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tv   Asia Business Report  BBC News  February 1, 2018 1:30am-1:46am GMT

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where she's expected to sign around $13 billion worth of trade deals. mrs may says she has won assurances that china will allow more access to its markets. the chinese government has forecast a golden era in trade relations. the former bbc china editor, carrie gracie, has told a committee of british mps that she was left feeling distraught when she learned how much more her male colleagues wer being paid. she resigned over the issue. bbc management says it is committed to equal pay. and this video is trending on bbc.com. three lunar events have happened at the same time, giving people in some parts of the world a rare view of a supersized moon going through an eclipse. it's the first time it's happened for more than 30 years. and it happened during a blue moon, the second full moon in a calendar month. and the top story here in the uk: members of parliament have voted to leave the palace of westminster while a proposed multibillion—0pound refurbishment of the historic
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building takes place. now on bbc news all the latest business news live from singapore. now on bbc news, all the latest business news live from singapore. facebook beats earnings estimates but investors steer clear of the like button over concerns about changes ahead. and india's budget goes before parliament. we find out how it might affect the country's economy. good morning, asia. hello, world. it is thursday. glad you could join us. i am rico hizon. we kickoff the programme with facebook and its latest earnings numbers which beat expectations. advertising
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revenue up which beat expectations. advertising revenue up 47% compared to the last quarter of 2016. a5 revenue up 47% compared to the last quarter of 2016. 11.3 billion us dollars profitability. not all good news. the stock slumped after mark zuckerberg warned engagement could ta ke zuckerberg warned engagement could take a hit as facebook evolves and users were spending 50 million fewer hours per day on the social media service. why is facebook changing? with the changes in the facebook algorithm, they are looking at meaningful social interactions. they are looking at friend to friend engagement, less brand engagement. looking for comments as well. the longer the comment, the higher the likelihood that post will go to the
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top of the newsfeed. this is surely impacts advertising growth?‘ top of the newsfeed. this is surely impacts advertising growth? a court of the world's population is on it. they can increase the costs. are you also reducing your time spent on facebook? not quite. i use facebook a lot not just facebook? not quite. i use facebook a lot notjust the facebook? not quite. i use facebook a lot not just the friends facebook? not quite. i use facebook a lot notjust the friends but facebook? not quite. i use facebook a lot not just the friends but the publishing information is what my newsfeed looks like in a few months, we will see. do you like the overhaul? i think they had to? the type of interactions and engagements they were receiving went to the type that mark zuckerberg feels is important to society. what do you make of this latest move, try to suppress the news a little bit more? will china reconsider facebook going forward as they make these changes? that is a good question. we might
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see facebook in china soon. maybe they are looking to appease the chinese government. but that don't what chinese citizens to see it. that will be interesting to watch. what other changes will facebook be making going forward? in order to appease the chinese. the chinese government only want citizens to see content they want them to see. we will see a high usage of instagram in certain markets which will be interesting. how important is instagram to facebook? we see higher reach on instagram. more advertisers are seeing instagram as a platform to communicate. charles tidswell. india's finance minister is due to
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present the annual budget to parliament in a few hours. will the government stay on course for a deficit or throw caution to the wind with spending priorities? the prime minister will be looking to attract rural vote rs minister will be looking to attract rural voters and small visitors ahead of the next general election. joining us outside parliament is the bbc‘s davina gupta. what are some of the features of this budget?m bbc‘s davina gupta. what are some of the features of this budget? it is a chilly morning here. the finance minister will be presenting the ruling party's budget injust a minister will be presenting the ruling party's budget in just a few hours. it comes with the backdrop of agricultural distress, unemployment stress expectations of social scheme announcements to help entrepreneurs as well is setting aside a fund for that and not only this, the first
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budget after uniform taxation policy was rolled out across the country, with some teething problems. there are expectations businesses could get a boost and there could be some news for the middle—class as well. as you pointed out, there are election considerations around the corner so election considerations around the corner so that could be some tax relief. this budget is key for the government to obtain its growth target of seven or 7.5%. absolutely, and it comes with concerns as well. a survey released ahead of the budget, there was supposed to be 6.75% growth and there are concerns over high could oil prices, growing protectionism which could hurt exports and that will be factored in. all eyes on the fine details of
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this india budget. a key so much the joining us, devina gupta. theresa may is in the middle of her china visit and she is travelling with representatives of british businesses trade between the two countries tops $80 billion. british exports to china jumped 25% in the last year. chinese businesses have been investing more in the uk. earlier i asked how much bargaining power theresa may has. her position is very weak, her personal position is very weak, her personal position is weak in her own party and the uk's position is weak. china realises there is an imbalance in terms of the negotiating position of the two countries. if you are saying that the prime minister has a week
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bargaining position, why is she in china in the first place? maybe it is too hot to be in london because of politics. donald trump, justin trudeau and others were there, you don't want to be conspicuous by your absence. you need to participate. maybe it will help some of these businesses get a deal in china on the micro level. but it is hard to see what the big picture benefits are. they need to exit before they conceal any trade deals. she claims that she is in china. intensifying this so—called golden era of relations. what era is that? it seems to be a fantasy. china's point of view, disappointing the great
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chinese foreign policy initiative of building infrastructure across asia and south asia as well, she is not backing that. they are also going to be viewing it quite negatively. japan's fuji film is taking over xerox in a $6.1 billion deal. xerox has been struggling for eight say ——8 years with falling sales as offers go paperless. joining us now is leisha sa ntorelli. offers go paperless. joining us now is leisha santorelli. they expect cost savings of nearly $2 billion. this came around because of a joint venture called fuji xerox but
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fujifilm has announced they will be restructuring and laying off 10,000 workers, 20% of the workforce. let's talk about the joint—venture. in asia, xerox is owned by fujifilm. this joint—ventu re asia, xerox is owned by fujifilm. this joint—venture makes asia, xerox is owned by fujifilm. this joint—ventu re makes about asia, xerox is owned by fujifilm. this joint—venture makes about $10 billion in annual sales. investors in america, most notably with —— most notably this man. as advised to be terminated altogether. analysts are questioning the deal. xerox is to bea are questioning the deal. xerox is to be a very iconic name in the business world. times have changed. the invention of email as well as portable printers have dealt it a ha rd portable printers have dealt it a hard bloke. this is a trend we are seeing globally. people are questioning the merits of this merger. i still need my papers,
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don't phase out the photocopiers. thank you so much for the update. leisha santorelli. thank you so much for the update. leisha sa ntorelli. the thank you so much for the update. leisha santorelli. the asian stock markets are all in positive territory. wall street stocks finished modestly higher. 0ffbeat economic —— up peak —— upbeat economic —— up peak —— upbeat economic data was offset by concerns about us monetary policy. have a great birthday, goodbye for now. britain's theresa may is in china to forge new partnerships ahead of britain's exit from the european union. the fbi says it has "grave concerns" about a report thought to outline alleged surveillance of the trump presidential campaign
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team. a public inquiry into the deaths of five children at hospitals in northern ireland between 1996 and 2003, has found that four of them were avoidable. chris page reports. claire roberts was nine when she died 22 years ago. her family were told at the time her death was caused by a virus. since then claire's parents, jennifer and alan, have been trying to find out what really happened. the grief is still overwhelming. even standing at the sink looking out at the back garden come summertime, you can still see her on her slide and her swing. she was at school on the monday and we essentially had lost claire by the tuesday evening, the early hours of wednesday morning. so they have robbed me of everything. the public inquiry heard claire was given a fatal overdose of drugs and fluids. she is one of five children whose deaths were investigated. the oldest was conor mitchell
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who was 15, raychel ferguson was nine, adam strain died aged four and the youngest was lucy crawford who was 17 months. today the inquiry chairman made devastating criticisms that doctors and their managers had been negligent and dishonest. it is time that the medical profession and health service managers stopped putting their own reputations and interests first and put the public interest first. and this was what he said about the death of claire roberts. in effect there was a cover—up by the consultant who mr and mrs roberts spoke to on the 23rd of 0ctober1996 when she died. herfamily are now hoping people will be held to account as a result of the inquiry. it has identified a cover—up and deceit, so far us really this is the start.
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the 1a—year long enquiry has been held up by a police investigation and by legal delays. the final report runs to three volumes. the health authorities have apologised for the failings revealed in it. there were elements and statements in that report that made me feel ashamed. after a distressing campaign the relatives of these children feel they finally have answers. chris page, bbc news, belfast. if you are in the right part of the world, the best advice is to look at. that is it from me. get in touch on twitter. hello, this is sport today, live from the bbc sport centre.
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coming up on this programme... aubameyang is now an arsenal man — a club record fee of $80 million for the gabon striker. antonio conte's chelsea are shocked at stamford bridge — conceding three at home to bournemouth. and formula 1 announces that the grid girls are to be no more. hello and welcome along to sport today, wherever you are watching us. so the january transfer window in european football has now closed. and the headline act on the final day was the move of pierre emerick aubameyang from borrussia dortmund to arsenal. the gabon striker arrived in london on a deal worth close to $80 million. and this was his reaction. said the league and they have the

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