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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  February 1, 2018 9:00am-11:00am GMT

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hello. it's thursday, it's 9 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme. should eu citizens still be allowed to settle in britain during the two year transition period after brexit day next year? theresa may has insisted that they shouldn't have the same rights as those already living in the uk — but will the eu agree to that? let us know what your view is. we have access to a church where more than half the congregation are ex—violent gangsters. the police welcome their approach. how do they do it? before i became a gang member, i was stabbed on my way home from football. i am basically saying to everybody else that i am proof that you can make a change. that film is coming up at 9.15. and why are 16—year—olds in the north of england on average one gcse grade behind teenagers in the south? that's what a report today shows. here's what the man who used to be chancellor says. the real problem comes actually at secondary school, where performance does markedly underperform those of kids from very similar backgrounds
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in the south of england and its cities like london, and that's where the real focus of the effort needs to go. hello. welcome to the programme, we're live until 11 this morning. question — how do you handle being late? iam i am thoroughly ashamed at not being in my place, and therefore, i shall be offering my resignation to the prime minister. itjust seemed so disproportionate, offering to quit hisjob, or maybe not. the prime minister has refused his resignation. we hope to talk to lord bates on the programme today. what did you make of what he did? do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning — use the hashtag #victorialive
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and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. theresa may says she will fight eu proposals to give eu rights —— residency rise to eu citizens who moved to britain during the transition period. the prime minister said there should be a difference between people who arrive in britain before march 2019, when the uk is due to leave the eu, and those who arrived after that. norman is in westminster. why is the prime minister picking this issue to have a fight on when everything else in the transition period were pretty much look and feel like britain is still in the eu? because, i suppose, it is for many people are the key issue in the whole brexit saga. what was the issue which came up again and again in the referendum? very often, it tended to be immigration. so for many people, it is fundamental that if we are leaving the eu, then the current freedom of movement rules cannot just the eu, then the current freedom of movement rules cannotjust carry on. life can't continue as before. but the eu say, this transition period
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is pretty much a standstill moment. nothing is going to change, and that applies to freedom of movement. so as they say, during that transition period, eu citizens will still have the right to come here. more than that, there will have the right to bring their relatives. they will have the right to education, benefits and all the rights they currently have. mrs may is saying thatis currently have. mrs may is saying that is unacceptable. british voters just will not understand that. so we are heading for a major clash over what i suppose was perhaps the central issue of the whole brexit campaign. and bear in mind that mrs may is under huge pressure from many in her own party, particularly the brexiteers, who take the view that she has already caved in to much. they are unhappy that she has agreed a sizeable divorce bill of up to £39 billion. they are not happy that there is even a transition period, so there is even a transition period, so she is under pressure not to give
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more ground. and it seems she has chosen to make a stand on this issue of freedom of movement. what it suggests is that getting agreement on this transition period is going to be tougher than any of us thought. the calculation was that they want a transition period, so we should be able to agree it quickly. if there is going to be a major showdown over freedom of movement, that may be quite optimistic and we could be in for a rough ride if we are to get a deal on transition. but how will fight like this go down with people in her party and the wider electorate? depends how it pans out. if she emerges victorious, fine. if, however, we end up with a slightly soggy compromise, then it could be difficult. bear in mind that when mrs may sits down at the negotiating table, a lot of people would say actually, the eu have the
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whip hand, because whereas the eu to date have been remarkably united and they agreed their proposals for this transition period in two minutes flat. so they are pretty united, whereas on our side, we know there are huge divisions in government. there is a lack of clarity about what we are trying to achieve. and as they know, there is pressure on mrs may. so the eu negotiators may well think they can play hardball and push mrs may pretty hard on this. annita is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. as we've heard, theresa may is in china, and she's currently holding talks with the country's president xijinping. let's go live to beijing and our correspondent there, stephen mcdonell. tell us more about what the agenda is for these talks. i am standing
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outside the great hall of the people, china's parliament. the prime minister's motorcade hasjust raced through the street behind me on her way to her meeting with residents see jumping. —— on her way to her meeting with residents seejumping. —— president xi. she is focusing on trade talks. she is meeting one of the two most powerful people in the world, xi jinping, with hundreds of billions of dollars of trade talks on offer. and yet discussions are still being dominated by the talk of brexit and the rights of eu citizens in this window period. when she meets with xijinping today, it is window period. when she meets with xi jinping today, it is also possible that they will be discussing moves that the european security council to get tougher on north korea. there have also been talks for her to raise questions about hong kong, the former richest
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colony and the fact that people are seeing their freedoms disappearing. but all of this is ironically being swamped by brexit, and i think people are seeing this as a distraction when there are important economic matters to be discussed on this trip. the disgraced usa gymnastics doctor larry nassar abused more than 265 young athletes in his care — a judge has told a michigan court. last week nassar was sentenced to 175 years after pleading guilty to sexual abuse charges and is facing a third and final sentencing hearing. bill hayton reports. another day in court for larry nassar, the former gymnastics coach exposed as a prolific paedophile. now, time for some of his victims to break their years of silence. i lost all motivation as i was overwhelmed with the truth of your abuse, but that ends today. you are the most vile, disgusting creature i have ever met. scum of the earth is too
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high of a title for you. i hope you realise that you will never have any power over anybody for the rest of your life. nassar gave medical treatment to hundreds of young girls. there are now more than 265 victims. he's already been sentenced to 175 years injail. but first, he must sit and listen to the agony his actions caused. it is imperative that we as a society do not view this as an isolated incident. he was prolific because surrounding authorities allowed him to be, because the gymnastics world allowed him to be. because, still, women are not perceived to be credible. many are now suing nassar for damages and usa gymnastics and other institutions that they accuse of ignoring their earlier allegations, which they say allowed larry nassar to continue to abuse young girls for more than 20 years. bill hayton, bbc news. the proportion of people having strokes in their
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forties and fifties has risen sharply over the last decade. that's according to figures from public health england, which show 20% of stroke cases now occur in those aged between a0 and 59. 0besity, obesity, diabetes and seven tree lifestyles are thought to be factors behind the rise. the former chancellor george osborne says more must be done to tackle disparities in education between children in the north and south of england. children in the north are one gcse grade behind those in the south. 0ne quarter of secondary schools in the north are judged to be inadequate or in need of improvement by 0fsted. the liberal democrats have claimed that a key government target for treating people with severe mental health conditions in england isn't being met. the party says it's gathered evidence which shows people experiencing a first episode of psychosis aren't getting a quality care package. nhs england says more than three—quarters of patients
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are seen within two weeks — and that the research shows a partial and "dated" picture of the services provided. this would never be tolerated in cancer or any other physical healthcare, yet it happens routinely in mental health care. we have the evidence of what you need to do to have an impact, and yet across the country, it's not being funded. facebook says its users are spending less time on the site. users are spending one minute and a half less on the day. they made a change designed to prioritise posts from friends and family while reducing the prominence of content from businesses, media and other companies. hate crime againstjewish people in the uk is at a record. a new report says thejewish community was targeted at
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a rate of nearly four times a day last year. 0nline abuse is said to have fallen, but there has been a spike in reports of violent assault. mps have voted to move out of the palace of westminster, while billions of pounds of essential renovation work is carried out. the move will now need to be given the final go—ahead by the house of lords. it would be the first time mps have moved out of the commons since it was damaged by a bomb in the second world war. britain's biggest stars are expected to wear black on the red carpet at this month's bafta film awards, in support of victims of sexual harassment and assault. last month, many actors followed an all—black dress code at the golden globe awards in support of the time's up initiative, which was launched in the wake of the harvey weinstein scandal. a letter has circulated around the british film and tv industry, inviting those attending the baftas to take part. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30. at 9.15, we will bring you our film,
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from gangs to god. here are some of your message is already on this. sarah says, this is great for them, giving them a sense of purpose and belonging, but it's sad that the church is the biggest provider in this area. there need to be more youth community centres to cut to the root of these issues, which is often poverty. william on facebook says, religion is not the answer. another tweet says, i am proud to be pa rt another tweet says, i am proud to be part of this. it has transformed my life. my christian life is like nothing i have experienced before, and my business life is growing too. and they tweet from clement — there has never been a better time to be alive than now, to see young people turning away from gangs and drugs and crime and becoming a positive change in their community. our and crime and becoming a positive change in their community. 0urfilm is in about three minutes' time. let us is in about three minutes' time. let us know what you think of this church's approach. let's get some sport.
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hugh is here. it was a record—breaking transfer window as premier league clubs continue to spend massive amounts of money? they did. well, it's finally over — the rigmarole for clubs of chasing down players and getting deals done, for fans anxiously checking social media forjust the smallest rumour and for us, trying to keep you updated with all the movements — right down to last night's deadline day. and on the finance front, it was once again a record breaking window. danjones is here from accountancy firm deloitte. £430 million was spent by premier league clubs in january. interestingly, that is more than spain, germany, france and italy combined. are we an extreme spending mould, or are those other countries
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just not spending? it isjust in proportion to how well those leagues are doing financially. england is 110w are doing financially. england is now so are doing financially. england is now so far ahead of the rest of the world in terms of the scale of the premier league. there are big clubs in the other countries, but the strength and depth of the premier league is what stands out. so that spending on the premier league is in standing with their level as the leading league in football. premier league football seems to be an economic bubble. i can't think of anything other than bitcoin which seems to be consistently going up by so much. 10 million spent in 2007 in january, 150 million this january. why the huge jump? revenues have gone up why the huge jump? revenues have gone up across why the huge jump? revenues have gone up across the board. you talk about it being like bitcoin. maybe the pace of growth is not so quick, but it is consistent growth. there has never been a dip in the premier league. and we don't see that changing any time soon. the new tv deals are being negotiated at the
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moment. we are expecting more growth then as well. as long as there is growth in revenue at the top, that money will filter its way to players, wages and transfers, because that is what people pay to see. they want the best talent. and we particularly see the best talent at manchester city. they have a massive lead at the top of the table, so that money has turned into results. they expect more money —— they spent more money on their goalkeeping and defence than two country spent on the actual defence budgets. why has that club been able to sustain its spending? increasingly successful on the pitch as well, the more successful you are on the pitch, the more broadcast and match day revenue you get, and the more sponsors want to be associated with you. they are the real driving force going forward financially. last january it was about the bottom
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is expending to stay up. this time it has been the top six spending to try to get in the champions league for next year. thanks so much for coming into the bbc sports centre. a new tv deal as well for premier league clubs. all of the moves from the january transfer window you can find on the bbc sport website. we will be back with more sport shortly. welcome to the programme. we are pleased to have you with us. now, this sounds like an unlikely church congregation — former gang members. former violent gang members. but it's true. we've been given exclusive access to the salvation proclaimers anointed church in south london, where more than half the worshippers used to be in a gang. the church is on a mission to save troubled youths, providing a safe space where they can go and talk to someone, and their approach has been welcomed by the met police. it is the largest force in england and wales. 0ur reporter noel phillips has been to see how it works.
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this is how one church is using former gang members to tackle knife crime. before i actually became a gang member, i was actually stabbed on my way home back from the football. the lives of these young men may be the most remarkable. some were once notorious gangsters but now they have put their past behind them for one common goal, to prevent violence and save lives. if you don't let me walk... if you do not let me walk away... if you do not let me walk... i said give me that. ok, so these people have been caught shoplifting by the security guard and they are not trying to get caught. we've had times when people are coming to the altar and dropping their drugs on the altar. the pastor responsible for their transformation claims that successive governments have failed to get a grip on violent crime and it is now time for the church to take action. over 55% of the people in the church were ex—gang members, drug dealers.
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last year, 2017, we had over 1000 people, young people, came forward to renounce that life. # no, no, no....#. we are inside spac nation, known as salvation proclaimers anointed church, based in south london, where preachings are tailored to a different kind of congregation. former armed robbers, drug dealers and gang members. a far cry from the life they once lived. this is not a normal pentecostal church. it's a place where the word of god is being used to reform ex—criminals, like 26—year—old kevin, who was recently in prison
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for attempted murder. last year and this year is the first, is actually the first time that i haven't been into prison, so, do you see what i'm saying to you? so it's something that's working. do you, are you confident that this will work and you will stay out of prison, perhaps for the rest of your life? it's working, its working. i'm confident, it's working. the church has over 1,000 members and is led by this man. he is basically like our prophet. he is our teacher, who teaches us about the word, and we don't idolise him but we come to him because he knows more about it than we do. who you might feel is not worthy, actually, that is who god uses, because they've been there. they know how to go back to the prisons. back to the estates. so i want to know how this 37—year—old pastor has taken some of britain's toughest gang members off the streets and into the church. i understand that our approach is different
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from a traditional church. so i've got to look at them, i've got to connect. that's really out of my way, to be honest with you. i would never have dreamt of wearing ripped jeans as a pastor. i mean, that is quite extraordinary. i mean, you, yourjeans are ripped. you're not in a suit. you're very casual. for a lot of people, that would be quite difficult. that's not pastoral, is it? but no, the generations are changing. i've got to look like the people i'm trying to talk to and you do realise that i've got access and i speak to the worst of the worst, the people that have done the most despicable things. i sit down with them and we talk. the son of a preacher, pastor tobi moved to the uk from nigeria 12 years ago. since then, he has expanded his church, with over 15 other the former mp, now chief of staff to the prime minister,
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gavin barwell, met members last year and praised the church's approach to tackling knife crime. you can't rely on the government to change your life on its own. but labelled as a cult, people on social media have accused pastor tobi of attracting young men and women from troubled backgrounds to his church using materialistic things such as money and wealth. if a cult means helping young people and reducing the number of people that will be victims of knife crime or gun crime... a guy comes to church who is trying to go to harvard from stratford, you know, and he's not able to go and then we give them money to go, if that's what a cult is, then we've got to be a cult. this might look like a staged performance but it is how this church interacts with their members. the ministers and pastors you see here are all self—appointed. they don't come under the supervision of any
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religious or regulatory body. in a society that does not always offer second chances to people like these young men, they say they are living proof that former gang members like them can make a difference in communities struggling to cope with knife crime. among them is 22—year—old daniel, who at the age of 12 was part of a gang. do you remember the first time you carried a knife? i do, yes, aged 13. i took it to school but although i didn't do nothing with it, it was there for protection. it's like reckless abandonment. you don't care what can happen. you don't care about the consequences. you know, you live in a minute, so you get the knife, you put it in your pocket. you don't think about, "0h, there's police down the road", or, "what if i get into a problem that actually, i have to use this?" it's just there and whatever happens, happens, you know? have you ever been stabbed?
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erm, yes, i have. well, i was caught up in a rival gang area, actually around here, in brixton. and, erm, i was actually approached by four members of a rival gang. i tried to escape but i was caught and i was actually stabbed in my leg. this is now daniel's life. he now preaches peace in brixton, the very same neighbourhood where he was once known as a gang member. an elderly person who's never been on the streets of brixton can't then tell a gang leader or tell a group of young boys, "don't carry a knife", or give them real reasons as to why they shouldn't, you know, carry a knife. what they need to do is good partnerships with community leaders, who can, who have been in that position of carrying a knife, who has been gang members. before i came into the house of spac, i was known as a lot of things. erm, before i actually became a gang member, i was actually stabbed on my way home back from football. and the reason why i'm standing
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here today is not only because of, like, what... it's not only because of, like, myself, basically, it's like, i'm basically saying to everybody else, i'm living proof that you can actually make a change... a frightening testimony. 23—year—old stephen, who is now an evangelist, has lived a life of drugs and extreme violence. if it wasn't for the church, i wouldn't, there would be no change for me. basically, in other words, myjob is not only to target gangs but to, like, anyone else, like, in the streets that needs saving, that's living in darkness, to bring them to christ. that's myjob. there is no organisation apart from the church that can solve crime among young people. you can never solve knife crime by saying, "we are anti—knife". why do you think these young men, whose lives you have been able to transform, are listening to you and perhaps not listening to their parents or to the authorities? what are you saying to them? i've actually gone to prison doors on the day a person is released,
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taking them, driven them home and tell them, "you're now living with me", and the next day, we have bought them a suit and a jacket and say, "come with me". if they see a better life, that's one of the major secrets. if they see a better life, they will change. a vivid reminder of the consequences of knife crime. he was sadly taken away from us, erm, by another young man using a knife, and... it actually never gets any easier for us all the family. fico dougan was just 17 when he was stabbed through the heart in 2013. it was a random attack. but enough for him to be murdered in front of a toddler by another teenager with a knife. gangs have closely been linked to the increase in knife crime.
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means comes here often with fico's family, who are part of the church. what we are trying to achieve, more life, less funerals, you know? mums and dads shouldn't really be burying their children like what's happened here. we are trying to prevent this. we are trying to prevent young people in prisons, you know. we are so passionate about young people, young black men and women, you know, achieving their potential, because what we are heavy on is literally going out there on the street, wherever, wherever young people are. london has just had its worst yearfor knife crime. 80 people were stabbed to death last year. 26 of those were teenagers. if you know someone that is in jail, and you know they're coming out, you can... we are in croydon, south london, where these pastors are looking for gang members. show the brothers, you get what i'm saying? there's not a lot of opportunities.
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this is what we are trying to show you. what about you, my sister? just a general prayer? yeah, it's ok, yeah? all right, we're just going to pray for you. a former leader of dsn, don't say no more, one of croydon‘s largest criminal gangs, pastor david is on a mission to show young people a life away from crime. we've come to bring peace and also to offer these people help, so it is a dangerous thing, but like i said, because we're coming from the heart, we just know all is well. you can even see how bad the area is because there's a fight starting right over there. that's how bad the area is. over here, can you see? david, let's go. reuben, who is no stranger to scenes like this, tells me his role on the street is not easy when it comes to gang wars and violence. my dear, my dear. we'll deal with it, we'll deal with it. if they do not go... soft, soft. are you a security guard? yeah, a security guard. 0k. this is what i'm saying...!
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0k, 0k. so these people have been caught shoplifting by the security guard and they are not trying to get caught. that's basically what happened. they've shoplifted and they don't want to get caught, that's it. that's croydon, big man. that's croydon. dealing with problems before they get out of control is the essence of their role. back in the church, critics say it should not be targeting vulnerable young people in order to grow its followers but pastors say they are seeing results. pastor tobi... is asking members of the congregation to make their way to the front with any knives or weapons that they may have in their pockets. we've had times where people are coming to the altar and people are dropping their drugs on the altar. we are coming where people are dropping their knives on the altar. i mean, last week, a young boy that came, ajo, i was praying for him, i was holding him and he was crying. a 23—year—old man crying,
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because he doesn't want that lifestyle. the only reason he's doing that lifestyle is because that's all he knows. just two years ago, connor was facing a 12—year prison sentence for a string of violent crimes. he is one of 14 ex—offenders who now lives with pastor tobi at his home. they need shelter. that is not shelter from ex—gang people chasing them. the mind, the mind is the factory for everything and i've got to do that. again, i stumbled into this. it's not a plan. it is not something we sat down and said we were going to have. but i will deal with cases and ask myself, "where do i want him to go?" i know that when he is coming out fresh from jail, if i allow him to go back to the community, the system will not employ him anyway. is it the role of the church to be getting involved with gangs and trying to stop knife crime?
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isn't that down to the police and perhaps the authorities? over 55% of the people in the church are ex—gang members, drug dealers. last year, 2017, we had over 1,000 people, young men, came forward to renounce that life. the police and the authorities don't really know what to do right now. they, they look to me like they are confused. and so, call it a church, call it whatever we want to call it. it has to be the role of somebody. in response, the metropolitan police has told us they want churches like this to be seen as safe spaces for young people in order to help reduce knife crime. for many of the former gang members who walk through these doors, it was a choice between life and death. most gang members that you see lack love. and that's a problem.
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they do lack love inside and most of them might not want to own up to it but that's the thing, it's like a lack of love. but for those given a second chance, this is an opportunity to make a real difference and prevent others from making the same mistakes they did. you can read more you can read more on you can read more on that story on the bbc news website. and after ten, we'll meet two young men, both former gang members, who are now mentors and pastors and also the mp who chairs the all—party parliamentary group on knife crime. thank you for your messages. jamal says, this has changed the lives of many ex—criminals by offering membership and an alternative lifestyle as well as spiritual guidance. wow! abbey treated us to say, i have seen lives changed in a day. young people are coming to church and leaving wanting to
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achieve more with their lives and follow greatness. rachel says, this isn't about religion, it's about community and change. if they can do what others can't, let them do their job. walking the streets and speaking to gang members is not easy, but if it can change lives, we should not be quick to dismiss it. still to come: those who suffer from psychosis or psychotic episodes are not getting the early intervention they need — that's the findings of new research by the nhs and the liberal democrats — we'll be speaking to their health spokesperson norman lamb shortly. and a man who had his first psychotic incident when he was 19. the group set up to improve the north of england's economy says the problems run deep, as gcse students in the north are getting worse results than those in the south. we will ask why. annita is in the bbc newsroom with the bbc news headlines this morning. theresa may says she will fight eu
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proposals to give residency rights to european citizens who moved to the uk during the brexit transition period. the prime minister, who is ona period. the prime minister, who is on a three—day visit to china, said there should be a clear difference between people who arrive in britain before march 2019, when the uk is due to leave the eu, and those who arrived after that date. the disgraced usa gymnastics doctor larry nassar abused more than 200 and athletes in his care, a court has told a dead in michigan. last week, he was sentenced to 175 years in jail after 160 week, he was sentenced to 175 years injail after 160 women week, he was sentenced to 175 years in jail after 160 women testified that he sexually assaulted them. another 65 women are expected to testify in the last of three sentencing hearings. yesterday the us gymnastics governing body confirmed that all of its remaining directors have resigned over the scandal. the proportion of people having strokes in their 40s and 50s has risen in the last decade according to public health england, which says
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20% of stroke cases now occur in those aged between 40 and 59. 0besity, those aged between 40 and 59. obesity, diabetes and sedentary lifestyles are all thought to be factors behind the rise. former chancellor george osborne says the government must do more to tackle poor achievement by children in the north of england. a study by the business led northern powerhouse partnerships and found that pupils in the north are on average one gcse grade behind those in the south. it also revealed a quarter of secondary schools in the north are judged also revealed a quarter of secondary schools in the north arejudged by step to be inadequate or in need of improvement. a government target for treating people with severe mental health conditions in england isn't being met, according to the liberal democrats. the party says it has gathered evidence which shows that people experiencing a first episode of psychosis are not getting a quality care package. nhs england says more than three quarters of patients are seen within two weeks and that the research shows a partial and dated picture of the services provided. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. and here are some sport now. jose
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mourinho was left angered by what he called a ridiculous start to manchester united's 2—0 defeat to spurs in the premier league last night. midfielder christian eriksen opened the scoring afterjust 11 seconds at wembley. that is the third fastest goal in premier league history. chelsea boss antonio conte wasn't much happier. he admitted that he felt there was real danger that he felt there was real danger that his side may fail to reach next season's champions league after a shock 3—0 defeat to bournemouth at sta mford shock 3—0 defeat to bournemouth at stamford bridge. football's transfer window ended last night with a total of £430 million spent in the premier league during january, a new record. 150 million of it was outplayed yesterday alone. finally, england's natalie sciver has reached the final of the women's big bash league in australia. she hit 38 as her perth scorchers side came past sydney thunder by 27 runs in their semifinal in perth. more sport
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later. now, i know you have seen this story, but i want to ask you how you handle being late. is being late a resignation issue? 0ne minister in the house of lords thought it was. at the despatch box, lord bates stunned fellow peers by saying he intended to resign after the "discourtesy" of arriving late to a session. my lords, with the leave of the house, i wonder if you would permit me to offer my sincere apologies to baroness lister for my discourtesy in not being in my place to answer her question on a very important matter at the beginning of questions. during the five years in which it has been my privilege to answer questions from this dispatch box on behalf of the government, i've always believed that we should always rise to the highest possible standards of courtesy and respect in responding on behalf of the government to the legitimate questions of the legislature. i'm thoroughly ashamed at not being in my place and therefore, i shall be offering my resignation. benches: no, no! with immediate effect. the prime minister refused his
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resignation. a spokeswoman at number ten said it was unnecessary and lord bates has decided to continue in his role. apparently, a couple of years ago, he also resigned from the junior home office role because he was going on a 2000 mile long trek. anyway! we are going to talk next about psychosis. psychosis or a psychotic episode is when you think or interpret reality in a very different way from people around you. you might be said to lose touch with reality. new research by the liberal democrats and the nhs shows that early intervention with those who experience psychosis is not being properly delivered in parts of the country. when the lib dems were in government they introduced plans to make sure at least half of patients experiencing their first episode of psychosis received specialist treatment within two weeks of being referred. but they've found only a quarter of trusts are providing patients
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with the full care required. let's talk now to liberal democrat mp norman lamb, the former care minister who established the care standards during the coalition government. sophie mei lan experienced a psychotic episode whilst at home with her two—year—old daughter and says it made herfeel paranoid. robert westhead had his first psychotic episode when he was 19 years old and says early intervention is key. robert, that first—time you had a psychotic episode, described that for our audience. most people will have no idea what that means. absolutely. firstly, the word psychosis and psychotic is a nasty word. we associate it with mad axe men being psychotic in a film. what it means is an acute episode of severe mental illness. for me, i was 19 and travelling around the world ona gap 19 and travelling around the world on a gap year. suddenly, i was not
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having the best time in the world, but i noticed suddenly that my moods we re but i noticed suddenly that my moods were starting to significantly go down. and then after about ten days, they would go up again. i would be having the time of my life, and then my moods would go down again. so i was having a rapid cycling bipolar disorder. at the time, it was terrifying. i couldn't conceive of what it might be. i knew nothing about mental illness. i was wondering what had happened in my childhood that might have led to this. it was a baffling experience. it was only when i got really ill andi it was only when i got really ill and i got back home and was detained in hospital that i began to discover what it was and begin treatment. and you experienced strong delusions. explain about that. when you are on a manic high but not too ill, you are the life and soul of the party,
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full of energy, nonstop, constant talking. but at some point, you start to lose reality and things go really weird. that is the behaviour that people associate with madness, where people have delusions of grandeur. they might think they are the prime minister. what were your delusions? i thought i was top dog. very strangely for someone who is not religious, i had some religious delusions, thinking i was on some kind of mission. i had a sense of the presence of god, which was strange. if i have the rustle of leaves in a tree, somehow that became associated with the sense of a presence of god. very strange and ha rd to a presence of god. very strange and hard to come to terms with when those experiences are so alien to you. sophie, when you first experienced your psychotic episode, what were you experiencing? experienced your psychotic episode,
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what were you experiencing ?|j experienced your psychotic episode, what were you experiencing? i didn't realise it was a psychotic episode at first. for me, it was something that built up over a long period. i was rolling around the house thinking people were after the. i felt like i was in a computer game. ididn't felt like i was in a computer game. i didn't know what was happening. i was running out of the house. even going to the supermarket, i would be dodging people, thinking i was being shot at. it was my mental health nurse who noticed it was getting really bad. luckily, i had a routine psychotherapy appointment, and they pinpointed that i was going through a psychotic episode. norman lamb, your findings a psychotic episode. norman lamb, yourfindings using a psychotic episode. norman lamb, your findings using freedom a psychotic episode. norman lamb, yourfindings using freedom of information, what have you discovered? we have discovered that although treatment starts
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reassuringly on time for many people, in other words within the two—week standard, they then regularly didn't get the full evidence —based treatment package which is part of the government's standard. and the government keeps say it is meeting the standard, but they are not. as you said, only about 25% of the country is delivering the full evidence —based treatment package. you would never get that encounter. it is like saying to someone, we will give you some chemotherapy, but we will not give you the full treatment programme. and yet we know that for every pound spent, you save about £15 in the long run for the state because you are giving people the chance of rescuing them, the chance ofa chance of rescuing them, the chance of a good life, the life that the re st of of a good life, the life that the rest of us take for granted. why isn't it happening? i think it is the financial strain that the whole of the nhs is under. when i was minister, i found that it is always
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mental health that loses out the most. the really important principle i want to stress is that there should be equality here. equal access whether you have a mental or physical health problem. nhs england told us that "10,000 people each year are receiving treatment through the early intervention in psychosis programme, with over three—quarters of patients getting treatment within two weeks. your analysis inevitably gives only a partial and dated picture of progress in these services." that is a grossly misleading and disappointing statement. this is data from this year. it is a survey across the whole of the country. analysis by nhs england themselves shows the same picture. and in fact, their statement, which only focuses on starting treatment on time, is a partial statement because they are ignoring the fact that people are not then getting the full evidence —based treatment package. and that is what people are titled to. in the
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nhs, a publicly funded health service, the principle of equality of access to treatment for everyone is important to reinforce. robert, do you believe if you get early intervention and the full support and treatment available it is possible to live a fulfilled and happy life and manage the psychosis? there is no doubt about that. i was lucky in a sense that it was caught at the age of 19 and i started treatment. it is common for people to wait ten years before they get any treatment at all. people go even longer than that, decades. on that point, let me read a text message from a viewer. i recently had a mental health assessment after a 25 year wait of suffering with psychotic episodes. i am having to self medicated my episodes with diazepam, bought online, or cannabis. i have reached out to many organisations during the 25 years i have been suffering, but this is the first time i have received help. that is shocking? it is shocking. sophie, with effective treatment and
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intervention, do you believe you can live a happy and fulfilled life and manage the psychosis question oflj believe i can manage the psychosis, but i don't think i can fully thrive. if i give an example of today, i actually used to work in the bbc leeds office. when i was having delusions, i thought when i was driving that i was knocking people overcome and i had knocked people overcome and i had knocked people down. so, coming here today, i had to come in a taxi. i don't drive and there are other things that limit me. but i do believe if you get early intervention, recovery, to some extent, is possible. i use my blog and my vlog to do that and talk to other people going through it, because it is a very scary time and something that people don't talk enough about when it isa people don't talk enough about when it is a psychotic episode, we associated with psychos. people are spending less time
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on facebook after the social network made a complete overhaul of its news feed. with me is our reporter adina campbell. what is going on? we now know that officially many of us are not spending as much time on facebook. the latest results show that the hours were reduced by about 50 million hours every day. every day!? everyday, translating about two minutes per user, and there are 4.2 billion users worldwide. users dropped in places like the us and canada, and it led to a drop in shares overnight by about 4% in after—hours trading. it has picked up after—hours trading. it has picked upa bit after—hours trading. it has picked up a bit this morning. ok. i mean, mark zuckerberg, the founder, has decided this is the right way to go to actually safeguard facebook‘s
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future, because people are demanding more meaningful... what is the word? more meaningful interactions? we have known for some time that people are quite simply fed up with newsfeeds being dominated by adverts, viral videos, posts from political parties or media companies. visibly wants to find out what theirfamily companies. visibly wants to find out what their family and friends are doing. —— they simply want to find out what their family and friends are doing. mark zuckerberg has taken the feedback on board and made an announcement recently to overhaul the news feed. that means less adverts and making sure that posts from family and friends are higher up from family and friends are higher up on people's newsfeeds. as you say, he has used this word meaningful, he wants to make sure that people spend a meaningful amount of time on the social network. today's results are not all doom and gloom for facebook. it is still the world's larger social media network. as i said, 1.4 billion users. revenue soared last year by about 47%, to more than £28 billion. thank you very much. later in the programme we will talk
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to two former gang members. this is coming up after ten o'clock, ex—gang members, because they have been converted. they have been turned away from a life of crime by the pastors and congregation of a church in london. good morning. 16 year olds in the north of england are on average at least one gcse grade behind teenagers in london. that's according to the northern powerhouse partnership — a group which aims to increase the contribution of the north of england to the uk economy — who say it's crucial we try and close that gap. they suggest tech and digital businesses to build better links with local schools. george osborne chairs the partnership and has been telling radio 4 that schools should be following the london model. you know, when i was growing up in london, the schools in london, the state schools were among
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the worst performing in the country and they are now among the best. they were improved in some of the most challenging and difficult areas, where many different languages were spoken, where people came from real deprivation. and it was achieved, yes, through investment in education but above all through reform, starting in hackney, one now i am saying, you could do something similar with a similar effort, a similar national focus, a similar involvement of local authority leaders, particularly now we have elected mayors in the big cities, and a similarambition and that is what we need. we need an ambition to say, "we don't have to put up with this situation". we can speak now to justin blackhurst, founder and director of digitalnext, a digital agency in manchester which already work with schools and young people, patsy kane, executive headteacher of the education and leadership trust which runs three schools in manchester, and ben houcher — conservative mayor of tees valley. thank you so much for coming on the
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programme. first, let me start with you, as a head teacher, patsy. your reaction to the fact that 16—year—olds in the north of england are falling one gcse grade, on average, behind those in the south? well, we can't argue with the evidence. what we can do is use the evidence. what we can do is use the evidence of what did work in the london challenge and spread that around. aren't you shocked at that? are you letting pupils down? are we letting students down? i think as a society we have to really focus on growing young people. i think proposals in the report are excellent. it does start pre—school, helping families get screwed already, and then it does propose —— helping families get school ready. if we get that real engagement from businesses as well, there are some very positive things coming out of the report. nothing to do with teachers? we are struggling to recruit in teaching. it can be the
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most fantasticjob. recruit in teaching. it can be the most fantastic job. in recruit in teaching. it can be the most fantasticjob. in schools there has perhaps been difficulty in recruiting great head teachers who are passionate and ambitious for the children in their areas, whatever the starting point. justin, thanks for coming on the programme. why do you think this is happening? tell me about the work you do in schools?” started my business about eight years ago. i set it up with my brother, a family business to start with. i quickly realised that it was a massive skills gap, in that digital field. people in a massive skills gap, in that digitalfield. people in the industry interviewing forjobs did not get the situation. just be really specific, what sort of skills are you talking about? well, we manipulate search engines like google for businesses, to grow them online, and also get people exposure online, and also get people exposure on platforms like facebook to really push their business and grow their businesses. so, that generation of people get the technology and how to use it, how to manipulate it in the best way. maybe an older generation
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would get it, but they have not grown up would get it, but they have not grown up with it and they have not been... they are not as savvy. ok. so, the work you do in schools involves what? so, we go into schools, looking for apprentices, looking for young kids that really driven, motivated, interested in the internet, in working in teams. we don't look to employ people all the time, but we put ourselves out there so that young people come forward and want to come and work for us. i rememberone of my and want to come and work for us. i remember one of my first staff members, chris, who is on the senior management team now, he just hung around in the early days, he liked the vibe that we were creating, and he has been with us eight years now. another young lad i played cricket with in the early days, he now runs our office in melbourne. he has built a team over there of around 15
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people. so, young people have been great for digital next. ben, conservative mayor for tees valley, how do you react to the fact that 16—year—olds in the north of england are falling one gcse grade on average behind pupils in the south? it is massively disappointing for me. ithink it is massively disappointing for me. i think we've got to recognise there is a difference, there are some very good performing schools and very specific issues that face each region in the north. the fact that on average we are one gcse behind the rest of the country means there is a fundamental issue that needs to be addressed. how are you going to address it? the report, actually, set out some very good points. the £300 million to help with integration of health services in the voluntary sector, to get pupils ready at age five, we all know that the early years has a huge impact ona know that the early years has a huge impact on a student's ability and prospects going forward. i think the refinement of the pupil premium system, recommended in the report, thatis system, recommended in the report, that is important to make sure that
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more money goes to the most disadvantaged students. 0ne more money goes to the most disadvantaged students. one thing other guests just disadvantaged students. one thing other guestsjust said disadvantaged students. one thing other guests just said was disadvantaged students. one thing other guestsjust said was business engagement. the statistics are very clear, if a young person have at least three meaningful engagement with business, that can have transformational prospects for their future career and the future life chances. of these things being suggested, apart from the focus on a child's early years, which seems really obvious, potentially, when it comes to gcses, powder is getting businesses involved in schools helps body get higher gcse grades? sorry, i've just pressed siri! i think it is about inspiration and aspiration. my brother used to work at bae systems, and he had to go into schools as part of the graduate scheme into primaries to make sure they were aware of the opportunities in barrow to get into that company. we have ici, that had huge resources
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to bring people in and get them familiar with the careers. arming students with information so they know the breath of careers that are out there and also the impact education has on getting thatjob, thatis education has on getting thatjob, that is something that is not being done properly to make sure the students are aware of really what education means to them and how it can affect their life going into their205, can affect their life going into their 205, 305 can affect their life going into their205, 305 and can affect their life going into their 205, 305 and long—term career. patsy kane, do you get businesses coming into your three schools to talk to pupils? massive priority, right from year seven we have inspiring people coming in and talk about their life story. two of the schools are girls schools, and it is particularly important they hear about different routes and how women manage a family and a great career. we have a specific focus on women in science, technology and maths, we had engineers from the bbc coming m, had engineers from the bbc coming in, designers from the bbc, another huge it company, uk fast. we need a
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wide range of people, these are exciting opportunities, they are local, well paid, really interesting and this is how we got there. it makes a massive difference. final thought, what would you like at school? did you think it was right for you, or how did you view that?” thought all was great, it gave discipline, it has a bit of everything, 5port. discipline, it has a bit of everything, sport. i discipline, it has a bit of everything, 5port. ithink discipline, it has a bit of everything, sport. i think that is key, especially a lot of the staff members that i have hired from the pa5t members that i have hired from the past that have been good team players have come from 5porting backgrounds a5 players have come from 5porting backgrounds as well. so, i think 5chool give5 kid5 backgrounds as well. so, i think 5chool give5 kids a well rounded education and also gives them the social skills that they need to succeed, especially in a corporate environment. thank you very much. continued success with your business, thank you. patti kane, same to you, executive ed teacher at a trust that runs three schools in manchester. and ben howe check, the
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conservative mayor of tees valley. thank you about your messages about psychosis. 0ne viewer says i struggle with psychosis and have a major episode in 2015. since then i have had counselling and medication to the nhs and feel like, after 15 yea rs, to the nhs and feel like, after 15 years, i have got my life back. karen e—mailed to say, my 18—year—old first became sick in 2016 and we just got appointments to talk. my son is really bad again and nobody wants to help, other than talking. i have seven children and bipolar is very strong in my family, but nobody listens to any of us. they think every young person who has this is down to the fact that they smoke cannabis. the latest news and sport is on the way. before that, the weather. and simon we've had a rare glimpse of the super blue blood moon. did you see it? i was asleep by
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7.50, that is how i roll! did you see it? i was asleep by 7.50, that is how! roll! i did you see it? i was asleep by 7.50, that is how i roll! i was asleep as well, but i saw it this morning. loads of weather watchers catching the super blue moon, the blood part is associated with the lunar eclipse happening on the other side of the world. fantastic photos from the asia—pacific region. many of us got to see the big moon in the sky. this is one shot from london. as i said, we had loads of photos, really close—up images of the moon, like this one in essex. i am just selecting a few of them, some of my favourite ones that we had through last night and through this morning. a lovely clear sky to see it. this one looked a little bit orange because it is quite low in the horizon. the atmosphere making it turn a bit orange. if you were out last night, looking at that, you will notice how cold it was. today, cold wind coming all the way from the north. look at the blue on the
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map. all of us on the influence of this arctic air and a rather brisk northerly wind feeding in some wintry showers. further snow showers to come across scotland, settling snow across the higher ground, down to low levels, still a bit of sleet and wet snow at times across scotland, northern ireland, even across wales and parts of south—west england. elsewhere, it should be largely dry. a fair amount of cloud around. good of sunshine through today. it is going to feel quite chilly, though. factor in that northerly wind, these are the wind figures, one to four celsius this afternoon. through this evening and overnight we still have a rather brisk northerly wind. still continuing to bring showers across scotland. more so down the eastern side of england, east yorkshire, lincolnshire, norfolk and suffolk, some showers here. clear spells further west. we could see a touch of frost into friday morning. those are the temperatures in towns and cities. during friday, quite a strong wind across eastern areas,
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continuing to feed in showers. not very pleasant through the day. further west, lighter wind and a good deal of dry weather with some sunshine for friday. temperatures about six or eight celsius, feeling that little bit more pleasant further west compared to today. how about the weekend ? further west compared to today. how about the weekend? running through the weekend we have a weather front thatis the weekend we have a weather front that is moving in. then it is going to stall on the spine of the uk. it will weaken as we go through sunday. it means we will continue to have this wintry feel. 0n it means we will continue to have this wintry feel. on saturday, snow over scotland, northern england, perhaps low levels as well. lots of cloud, outbreaks of rain and temperatures four or six celsius. by sunday, a drier day. still a bit of cloud for england and wales. the best of the sunshine coming across scotla nd best of the sunshine coming across scotland and northern ireland. temperatures again in the mid—single figures. a real wintry feel as we go through the next few days. the buyer. hello. it's thursday. it's 10 o'clock. i'm victoria derbyshire.
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should eu citizens still be allowed to settle in britain during the two year transition period after brexit day next year? theresa may has insisted that they shouldn't have the same rights as those already living in the uk — but will brussels agree to that? robert says, we are behind you, mrs may. don't be bullied. let us know what your view is. from gangs to god — we have an exclusive report on the south london church where over half of the congregation are reformed gang members. a minister there tells us it's vital to relate to the young people they're trying to save. an elderly person who has never been on the streets of brixton can't tell young boys, don't carry a knife or give them real reasons as to why they shouldn't carry a knife. they need to build partnerships with community leaders who have been in that position of carrying a knife, who have been gang members. we'll hear from two former gang members who have now
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turned to god shortly, and speak to the labour mp sarah jones, the chair of the all—parliamentary group on knife crime. and all women in england will now have access to a highly effective breast cancer drug, which has been approved the drug — called perjeta — can prolong the lives of women with incurable breast cancer by nearly 16 months longer than existing treatments. annita is in the bbc newsroom with the bbc news headlines this morning. theresa may says she will fight eu proposals to give residency rights to european citizens who move to the uk during the brexit transition period. the prime minister, who is on a three—day visit to china, said there should be a clear difference between people who arrive in britain before march 2019, when the uk is due to leave the eu, and those who arrive after that date. the disgraced usa gymnastics doctor larry nassar abused more than 265
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young athletes in his care, a court has told a court in michigan. last week, nassar was sentenced to 175 years injail after 160 women testified that he sexually assaulted them. another 65 women are expected to testify in the last three sentencing hearings. yesterday, the us gymnastics governing body confirmed that all of its remaining directors had resigned over the scandal. a key government target for treating people with severe mental health conditions in england isn't being met, according to the liberal democrats. the party says it has gathered evidence which shows that people experiencing a first episode of psychosis are not getting a quality care package. nhs england says more than three quarters of patients are seen within two weeks and that the research shows a partial and dated picture of the services provided. earlier on this programme, liberal
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democrat health spokesman norman lamb said mental health is still not prioritised in the way serious physical health conditions. only about 25% of the country is delivering the full evidence —based treatment package. you would never get that encounter. it's like saying to someone, we will give you chemotherapy, but not the full treatment programme. and yet we know that for every pound spent, you save about £15 in the long—running ford estate because you are giving people the chance of rescuing them, the chance of a good life. the proportion of people having strokes in their forties and fifties has risen in the last decade according to public health england, which says 20% of stroke cases now occur in those aged between 40 and 59. obesity, diabetes and sedentary lifestyles are all thought to be factors behind the rise. former chancellor george osborne says the government must do more to tackle poor achievement by children in the north of england. a study by the business—led northern powerhouse
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partnership found that pupils in the north are on average one gcse grade behind those in the south. it also revealed a quarter of secondary schools in the north arejudged by 0fsted to be inadequate or in need of improvement. facebook says its users are spending significantly less time on the site following changes to its newsfeed content. the website's figures show that people are spending an average of a minute and a half less each day on the network. the changes were designed to prioritise posts from friends and family while reducing the prominence of content from businesses, media and other companies. britain's biggest stars are expected to wear black on the red carpet at this month's bafta film awards, in support of victims of sexual harassment and assault. last month, many actors followed an all—black dress code at the golden globe awards in support of the time's up initiative, which was launched in the wake of the harvey weinstein scandal. a letter has circulated around the british film and tv industry, inviting those attending the baftas to take part. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30.
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thank you for getting in touch today. i have got another e—mail for you, and this is about the fact that theresa may looks like she's going to have with brussels over freedom of movement, come brexit day mulches at the end of march next year. good morning, victoria, i rejoiced that at last, the pm is aware of the reason why most of us voted to leave the eu. the shortage of housing for british nationals born in the uk is resulting in many leaving for australia and the like. i hope mrs may retains the core value of our intentions and stands her ground on this issue. we will talk about that more in the next hour. your views are very welcome. time for the sport. a record—breaking january transfer window came to a close last night. a
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total of £430 million was spent by premier league clubs. that is more money than was spent in the top leagues of france, italy, spain and germany over the past month combined. earlier on the programme, we spoke to danjones from the accountancy firm deloitte and he told us why england was so far in front. it isjust in proportion to how well those leagues are doing financially. england is now so far ahead of the rest of the world in terms of the scale of the premier league. there are big clubs in those other countries, but the strength and depth of the premier league is what stands out. so that spending on the premier league is consistent with standing with their level as the leading league in football. there were seven games last night. a goal was scored inside 11 seconds by christian eriksen at wembley. manchester united are now 15 points
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behind manchester city, the leaders, who beat west brom 3—0. bournemouth manager eddie howe called their 3—0 win away at the defending champions chelsea their best win in the top flight. chelsea their best win in the top flight. chelsea dropped to fourth in the table, but the cherries are once again holding their own in the top flight again holding their own in the top flight in their third premier league season. they have moved into the top half now. it has to be the best result and the best performance. we we re result and the best performance. we were excellent today, very aggressive. we tried to take the game to chelsea and implement what we wa nted game to chelsea and implement what we wanted to do. everyone was magnificent. west ham united have apologised after a national newspaper reported that their director of player recruitment had admitted that they wanted to limit the number of african players at the club because "they have a bad attitude" and "cause mayhem when not selected". well, in a statement today, the club confirmed "that director of player recruitment tony henry has been suspended pending a full and thorough investigation. west ham united will not tolerate any type of discrimination and has, therefore, acted swiftly due to the serious nature of these claims."
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28 russian athletes who were banned from the olympics for life have had their suspensions overturned by the court of arbitration for sport. eight days ahead of the start of the winter olympics in south korea, 11 more athletes had their appeals against the international olympic committee ban partially upheld. they had been banned by the ioc for doping at the 2014 winter olympics. the ioc say it would consider its own appeal to the swiss federal tribunal. we're into the last stages of cricket's big bash in australia, and there'll be some english representation in the women's final. natalie sciver hit 38 as her perth scorchers side came past sydney thunder by 27 runs in the semi—final in perth. and the men's side are also looking to reach the final. former england bowler tim bresnan has been in the wickets for the perth scorchers. the hobart hurricanes are currently 114 for two. more updates later.
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the metropolitan police want churches to help it tackle knife crime. they want them to be safe spaces for young people, places where they can go and talk to someone. this programme's been given exclusive access to a church where more than half the congregation are former gang members. 0ur reporter noel phillips has been to see how it's helping young people. here is a short extract of his hill film before we have a conversation about this. we're in south london inside spac nation ministries, a church where religion is being used to reform ex—gang members like 26—year—old kevin, who was recently imprisoned for attempted murder. last year and this year is the first, is actually the first time that i haven't been into prison. so do you see what i'm saying to you? it is something that's working. gangsters, but now they have
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swapped the streets for the church. we have had times when people are coming to the altar and dropping their drugs on the altar. we're coming where people are dropping their knives on the altar. last week, a young boy that came out ofjail, i was praying for him, i was holding him and he was crying. just two years ago, connor, who is now a pastor, was facing a ten—year sentence for a string of violent crimes. i went to jail for some robberies, possession of a bladed article. i was charged with money laundering of £30,000. i feel like, if i had come to spac before i went to, like, i was involved in that kind of stuff, i would have been shown the right mentorship and guidance to not have to do those kind of things. a far cry from his past life, this 22—year—old joined a gang when he was just 12. do you remember the first time you carried a knife? i do, yes, aged 13. yeah, i took it to school but although i didn't
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do nothing with it, it was there for protection. it's like reckless abandonment. you don't care about what can happen. the consequences. you know, you live in the minute, so you get the knife, you put it in your pocket, you don't think about, "0h, there's police down the road", or, "what if i get into a problem that i actually have to use this?" pastor tobi adegboyega is the man responsible for transforming their lives. over 55% of the people in the church were ex—gang members, drug dealers. so the police and the authorities don't really know what to do right now. they look to me like they are confused. and so, call it a church, call it whatever we want to call it, it has to be the role of somebody. but people on social media have accused the 37—year—old pastor of running a cult—like ministry, something he denies. at his home, pastor tobi has 14 ex—offenders living with him from his church. they need shelter.
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that's not shelter from ex—gang people chasing them. the mind, the mind is the factory for everything, and i have got to do that. again, i stumbled into this. it's not a plan. it is not something we sat down and said we were going to have. but i will deal with cases and ask myself, "where do i want him to go?" the metropolitan police has welcomed pastor tobi's approach and say they want more churches like this to help reduce knife crime. let's meet two other young men who spac nation has also helped. enrique uwabiae — a former gang memberfrom brixton, south london, has been stabbed three times and is now spac nation's youngest pastor. samuel akokhia joined a gang at age 12, has been involved in stabbings and served four years in prison for robbery. he is now a mentor,
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businessman and pastor. and the labour mp sarahjones — she's chair of the all—party parliamentary group on knife crime — and has also visited spac nation, which is in her constituency. welcome, all of you. enrique, you're a former gang member yourself. you've been arrested for attempted murder, violent disorder, criminal damage and carrying a knife. you have been involved in many dangerous activities. you've been stabbed on three separate occasions. we can see a picture of you in a hospital bed. you nearly died. what was motivating you to pursue a life of violent crime? i would say it was poverty at first. it was about getting money? at first
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it started, getting money, not having enough. that is what pushed me to wanting to get more. of course, that age, you don't really think of getting a job, you think getting a job is not going to provide for your needs, so to speak. that kind of drove me and my friends to commit certain crimes in order to get money. that is how it started, the age of 14. alongside that he would produce in various rap videos, encouraging people to join gangs for the same purpose, because you do need to get a job, you could get more money if you rob this institution or this home? the music videos were not really to encourage people to live the life i was living. i think i wasjust doing music because it was my passion. i used to make music from when i was young. once you are in a gang, how difficult is it to get out? you joined aged 12? it can be quite difficult to get out of a gang, because it starts off with a group
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of friends. it is not necessarily people who decided, 0k, we're going to form a gallon. it is people that have grown up together, they have lived together, eaten together, most of their lives, for certain years of their life, so it can be difficult to turn around to say to your friends you don't want to live this life any more. how would you describe a teenage years? mine were very, very violent. very violent. it started withjust pure very, very violent. very violent. it started with just pure violence at the beginning, but then it evolved into crime as well. we started having hunger for money and for things to do with what we perceived as success at the time. you know, having a lot of money, having a lot of girls, having a lot of things that were glorified in our inner circles, you know? then by the age of 17 circles, you know? then by the age of17l circles, you know? then by the age of 17 i started getting involved in major robberies and things like that, that would be things that i
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would never expect myself to be involved in, you know? then by 18 i was in prison. by the time i came out of prison, i was no longer a teenager. i was what we would call a young adult. a few days after you left prison, four days after, you got introduced to pastor tobi? with pastor tobi, i actually came to spac nation in 2016. sorry to interrupt, you are in a gang, you have done the violent stuff, you had come out of prison and you don't want to go straight back into prison. a self appointed pastor comes up to you and says, come to our church. you are just not going to go, are you? it can't be as simple as that? you will
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go if you see an alternative. as a young man, iwas go if you see an alternative. as a young man, i was looking for money, i was looking for relevance, i was looking for love, certain things i was looking for. if somebody would come to me and offer me that lifestyle, without me getting involved in crime and having to risk my own life, i would go for it. that option and alternative was provided for me and that caused the change. someone saying, you can get a decent job and you can still... i don't know, still have a gucci watch and a designer pair of trainers?” know, still have a gucci watch and a designer pair of trainers? i don't think it is necessary that simple. that is what i am trying to get to. people are looking for something. if i use my own story as an example, when i came out of prison, i had plans to go back to drug dealing. did you? yes, i made those plans in prison. but an interaction with pastor tobi changed my perception of
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life completely. what did he say to you? first of all, it started with care, he said, what isn't? i had never been treated with such respect. the kind of society that we come from, it is almost like you do not have an opinion. you order somebody that his plans to go —— you just somebody that is supposed to go to lie. he says, what do you intend to lie. he says, what do you intend to do now? he showed me his life style. to do now? he showed me his lifestyle. i have lived in his house. i have seen the way he lives. that inspires me. from wanting to go back and do drugs, to living in this house, being inspired, seven years down the line i am a businessman, a mentor ina down the line i am a businessman, a mentor in a community in london. i am also an entrepreneur in many different ways, and being a pastor
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it isa different ways, and being a pastor it is a life i would never have dreamt of, but because i saw one man, the leader of spac nation, i am able to say this is the life that i wa nt able to say this is the life that i want to live and impact other lives. what you would then say is that i think people don't see an alternative, they see people that are passionate about something. that passion is what they have been looking to do or be passionate about. what do you think? i think it is amazing. i think what these men are doing is stepping up, and they are doing is stepping up, and they are saying we know what happened to us, we have that lived experience that means you can relate to other people in the same position. they are stepping up and saying, we care, we want everybody to have the same opportunities we have now got. for me, as an mp, i want to learn from that and i want us to go, as politicians, we need to step up as well. we are at a bit of a crossroads with this knife crime stuff. it has gone up massively over
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the last few years. we can either let it carry on going up and up, and give up on a whole generation of people that are desensitised to violence, or we can say, well, we need to do something. they are stepping up, so we should step up to. there is nothing more effective, i think, than young people who have been through an experience, to be able to... i have met so many young people that are coming out of what they have been through because they have got mentors, they have seen people that have given them a choice and they have given them another alternative to getting involved in crime. you were involved at 12, how do you know what you were doing at 12 years old? those choices you make there, it is not your fault that you got into that situation. you need somebody to get you out. you said that about half of your congregation used to be in a gang. how do you know they are not carrying out criminal activities right now? the
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reason why we do is because, again, church is usually idolised as an institution, but what we have is a very close family bond. we almost live each day with each other. of course, live each day with each other. of course , we live each day with each other. of course, we go to work, we do what we need to do, but then we all have meetings with friends. why we are confident is because each person has friends in which they can connect with and live life with. you are saying you were just know because you are so close to everybody? well, we can't vouch for everybody, that's the truth. but what we can know about, those that truly do go to spac nation, we know that they are seeing something better and they are willing to leave that i find totally. ok. lucy tweeting, huge admiration for the men on your programme today discussing gangs and violence. another, it is so good that more young people in london are
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finding a purposeful life. it breaks my heart to see youths lost to gangs. lee says this is great work andi gangs. lee says this is great work and i love it. you are the youngest ordained pastor in spac nation, and currently a second—year undergraduate, studying... international business management. how do you reflect on the completely opposite contrast in your life from how it was to now? tend to live my life very open. i used to make music, i was very well—known. people can clearly the lifestyle i used to live and who i am now. one thing i a lwa ys live and who i am now. one thing i always tell young people is that, i just literally let them know that if i could be a gang member, being stabbed at the age of 17, nearly dying and stuff like that, but now i am notjust dying and stuff like that, but now i am not just the dying and stuff like that, but now i am notjust the youngest pastor in
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spac nation, but a leader in that, if it is possible for me, it is possible for you. if mental —— if mentors are provided, you can get somewhere in spac nation. and you can meet other people in that lifestyle ? can meet other people in that lifestyle? they are able to relate with me. it is not that it comes from a distant person, they can go on you tube and see the life i live. —— youtube. that inspires them and give them hope to be able to live a different life. for me, personally, it is about being able to show results, life stories. notjust our own, but we have many we have seen from that feature, kevin was in prison maybe a couple of years ago for attempted murder. he comes out and now is an entrepreneur, a
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director, he has not been back to prison, he has not been involved in any dealings with the police since he has been introduced to entrepreneurship. using that as examples for young people as well, that helps us notjust kevin, but many young men that have come from croydon and now have offices in mayfair. there are a lot of things that we can now point to as practical results of young people that have changed their lives.” wa nt to that have changed their lives.” want to put this to all of you briefly. helen, wonderful to see young people choosing to change their lives. appalling, though, that it is being led by a religious organisation. how can a sophisticated western country rely ona sophisticated western country rely on a religious organisation to offer alternatives to a life of crime? what do you say to that? absolutely, these guys have just explained how they got into this situation, poverty. imagine if we, as politicians, and as wider society, took responsibility for poverty and did something about it. sorry, it
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wasn't. .. if i did something about it. sorry, it wasn't... if i have understood you correctly, it wasn't necessarily about poverty, it was about wanting to get more money and not necessarily doing it by conventional routes, is that fair? no. iwouldn't say so. i would say it is poverty and not being able to have the opportunities at a time, to get finances in a more good way. so, things like education, loads of kids now are increasingly being expelled from school. when you are excluded from school. when you are excluded from school, you can easily go down a path. these guys are picking up on some of them, but it is the government's responsibility, it is the school's response ability, it is the school's response ability, it is the hospital's response ability. we could fund youth workers in all a&es, so if you come in and have been stabbed, there is somebody there to say, hang on, let's see if we can change your life. we all need to step up to the plate. thank you very much. go on? i was going to
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say, i disagree with the fact that it shouldn't be led by a religious institution. the reason being, most of the young people that we see, giving myself as an example, we grew up giving myself as an example, we grew up in church. we grew up in church and we left the church because we we re and we left the church because we were looking for an alternative life style. were looking for an alternative lifestyle. so, ithink were looking for an alternative lifestyle. so, i think the church has to be part of the solution to provide alternative lifestyle for these young people. ok, thank you very much. the british people did not vote to leave the eu "for nothing to change". so said theresa may, as she insisted that eu citizens who move to the uk after brexit in march, 2019, could not have the same rights as those already here, even during the transition period. lets talk to norman smith. theresa
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may seems to be gearing up for a full on head—to—head showdown with the eu over one of the issues that was at the centre of the whole brexit referendum, namely freedom of movement, immigration, eu citizens coming to the uk. because the eu are saying that, during this transition period, this two year transition period, this two year transition period from next year, they want freedom of movement to continue absolutely as it is at the moment. what that means is notjust that eu citizens can still come here and live here, and work here, it also means they can stay here and they also have access to a whole load of other rights. for example, they have the right to education, the rights to bring in family members. she is saying, that is not on, it is a transition phase, we will have left the eu, so you can't expect freedom
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of movement to continue with no changes. it is shaping up to be a major bust up. as we know, immigration was a huge issue in the referendum. but more than that, her own brexiteers are on the warpath and are, in effect, saying, no more compromises, you have already agreed to pay a divorce bill, you cannot compromise any further over the issue of freedom of movement. we have just been hearing from the brexit secretary, david davis, being pressed about this in the commons. if you listen closely to what he says, you will see that he doesn't offer any reassurances about allowing eu migrants to continue to enjoy the same sorts of rights as they currently have. just have a listen. we'll be discussing in some detail with the european union the treatment of people after the actual departure from the union, and he must take it as read, as i've said several times, that they will be treated properly, that we will not do anything which will undermine our economy and we will do everything possible
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to ensure that the industries we've talked about are supported. so what is next? there is going to be an almighty tussle, and i suppose what is putting ministers on edges that we are not in the most harmonic position at the moment. the reason for that is that we are slightly at sixes and sevens. we haven't really forged a clear strategy about what we are trying to achieve with brexit. there is ongoing division amongst ministers, and at the same time there is the sniping about mrs may, and eu negotiators will be watching this and thinking, right, we can throw our weight around a bit, because mrs may is in a wobbly position. so when it comes to the negotiations, mrs may is having to look over her shoulder at the brexiteers who are breathing fire and brimstone at her, and then look across the table at the eu negotiators who are saying, bring it on. it's going to be tough, but she
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has decided to draw a line on this issue and says she will not give ground about allowing freedom of movementjust to continue unchanged. changing the subject, there is going to bea changing the subject, there is going to be a question in the commons about the big firm capital. this is hugely worrying for many people. it's a bit like carillion, the other big firm which does so many public sectorjobs. capita big firm which does so many public sector jobs. capita is big firm which does so many public sectorjobs. capita is like carillion with knobs on, because carillion with knobs on, because carillion employs around 19,000 people. capita employs 50,000 people. capita employs 50,000 people. it does everything from managing the london congestion charge to back—office administration in gp surgeries. i think it does some of the personal independence payment assessments. it does a vast range of public sectorjobs. yesterday, its share price went into a steep nosedive, down by about 40% following a profit warning from the bosses. of course, the series, here
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we go again. could capita be another carillion? that would be terrifying for the thousands of people who work for the thousands of people who work for them. the slight nervousness among politicians is that they don't wa nt to among politicians is that they don't want to ring alarm bells. they don't wa nt to want to ring alarm bells. they don't want to make capita's position even more precarious by saying, oh, my goodness, here we go again. so it will be interesting to see how the government response to this debate. when it came to carillion, they faced a loss of criticism for the fact that they were still handing out whopping contract to carillion when it got into difficulties, including hs2. so it is a delicate path they will have to tread. cheers, norman. still to come: the breast cancer treatment described as life—changing has been given the final go—ahead for routine nhs use in england. and following the success of the time's up campaign at the golden globe awards, some of britain's stars are expected to wear black at this yea r‘s bafta awards, in protest against
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sexual harassment. time for the latest news. here's annita. theresa may says she will fight eu proposals to give residency rights to european citizens who move to the uk during the brexit transition period. the prime minister, who is on a three—day visit to china, said there should be a clear difference between people who arrive in britain before march 2019, when the uk is due to leave the eu, and those who arrive after that date. the disgraced usa gymnastics doctor larry nassar abused more than 265 young athletes in his care, a court has told young athletes in his care, a judge has told a court in michigan. last week, nassar was sentenced to 175 years injail after 160 women testified that he sexually assaulted them. another 65 women are expected to testify in the last three sentencing hearings. yesterday, the us gymnastics governing body confirmed that all of its remaining directors had resigned over the scandal. a key government target for treating
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people with severe mental health conditions in england isn't being met, according to the liberal democrats. the party says it has gathered evidence which shows that people experiencing a first episode of psychosis are not getting a quality care package. nhs england says more than three quarters of patients are seen within two weeks and that the research shows a partial and dated picture of the services provided. the proportion of people having strokes in their forties and fifties has risen in the last decade according to public health england, which says 20% of stroke cases now occur in those aged between 40 and 59. obesity, diabetes and sedentary lifestyles are all thought to be factors behind the rise. facebook says its users are spending significantly less time on the site following changes to its newsfeed content. the website's figures show that people are spending an average of a minute and a half less each day on the network.
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the changes were designed to prioritise posts from friends and family while reducing the prominence of content from businesses, media and other companies. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. a murder investigation has been launched following the death of an inmate at wormwood scrubs jail in shepherd's bush in london. police we re shepherd's bush in london. police were called last night following reports of a stabbing. an inmate was pronounced dead at the scene and four men, all prisoners at wormwood scrubs jail, have been arrested on suspicion of murder. here's some sport now with hugh. jose mourinho was left angered by what he called a ridiculous start to manchester united's 2—0 defeat to spurs in the premier league last night. midfielder christian eriksen opened the scoring afterjust 11 seconds at wembley — the third—fastest goal in premier league history. chelsea boss antonio conte admitted he felt there was real danger his side may fail to reach next season's champions league
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after a shock 3—0 defeat to bournemouth at stamford bridge. theirformer player their former player nathan acquis scored at bournemouth as well. football's transfer window ended last night with a total of £430 million spent in the premier league during january — 150 million of which was outlaid yesterday. 28 russian athletes who were banned from the olympics for life have had their suspensions overturned by the court of arbitration for sport. more on that after 11. it's time to bring you up to date in the trial of former football coach barry bennell. yesterday, the court in liverpool heard that the former celtic manager neil lennon walked in on a 13—year—old boy shortly after he had been sexually abused by barry bennell. the 64—year—old denies 48 counts of abuse. 0ur reporterjim reed has been following the case. yes, this is the trial of barry bennell, the former football coach
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who denies 48 counts of historical sexual abuse in this trial. yesterday, the court heard from one of the 11 alleged victims in this case. this man played for crewe alexandra as a schoolboy footballer in the 1980s. it is there that he alleges he was abused by mr bennell over a number of years. alleges he was abused by mr bennell overa number of years. he alleges he was abused by mr bennell over a number of years. he told the jury over a number of years. he told the jury about one time he said he was taken by mr bennell to an address near stoke or in stoke. it is there that he claimed he was sexually abused in a caravan outside his house. not long after that, abused in a caravan outside his house. not long afterthat, he abused in a caravan outside his house. not long after that, he says an older teenager walked into this caravan. he told the jury, that man i now know to be neil lennon. he was staying in those digs. neil lennon would have been a young player lock you alexandra at that time. he went on to play in northern ireland as an international and managed celtic. he is now the head coach at hibernian football clu b is now the head coach at hibernian football club in scotland. there is no suggestion that he may have been
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aware of what happened or that he was guilty of any wrongdoing himself here. it isjust was guilty of any wrongdoing himself here. it is just what was reported in court. and then the player was asked about a trip to the united states, wasn't he? yeah. this man said he was taken on a trip to florida by mr bennell. he alleges he was then taken to a motel room near 0rlando, where he says he was raped. mr bennell‘s qc, a woman called a loss, is defending mr bennell and she says that mr bennell accepts that he did sexually abused this point between the ages of 12 and 13, but he denies the more serious charges including rape. so under cross examination, she asked the alleged victim, have you been encouraged by anyone to exaggerate what happened to you? he replied no. mr bennell denies 48 counts of abuse in this case. the trial continues later today. thank you very much. and thank you for your messages
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about the interview with the former gang members who have turned their lives around and now go out to mentor other people in gangs. jackie says, a church with former gang members, well spoken black men making the change. i am very proud. that is the power of god. ruth says, massive respect for the church. if anyone wants to criticise them, they must be willing to provide an alternative. elisabeth seitz, anything that encourages people to give upa anything that encourages people to give up a life of crime, drugs and violence and is successful, has got to bea violence and is successful, has got to be a good thing for the whole population. we should definitely learn from it and encourage their good work. and another says is wonderful to see young men being given the chance to be someone new. may they know a lifetime of peace and hope in their lives be an example of god's goodness. thank you for those and you are welcome to get in touch. more than a thousand women now stand to benefit from a highly effective breast cancer drug, which has been approved for routine use on the nhs.
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perjeta can prolong the lives of women with incurable breast cancer by nearly 16 months longer than the existing treatments. up until now, it's only been available through the cancer drugs fund. now all women in england will have access to it. here now is bonnie fox, who was diagnosed with advanced breast cancer three years ago, when she was 37 and had just given birth to her son. she has been on perjeta ever since. and fiona hazel is from the charity breast cancer now. let me ask you both firstly for your reaction to the fact that the is approving this drug for routine use in the nhs in england? it is brilliant news that it has been approved. it is a drug that has meant so much to me and has enabled meant so much to me and has enabled me to do so much and enable me to live my life with normality, which
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is the most important thing. it has been to a half years since my diagnosis and at the diagnosis, i couldn't see further than that. now i have been able to live with normality, and that is so important. so it's brilliant news that people will be able to access it. there is definitely more work to do to make sure it is available across the uk and also available more flexibly to all patients. fiona hazell, how do you respond to this? as bonnie says, at breast cancer now, we think it's great news. for 3000 women in england, they will now be able to be confident that they can access this drug. this drug offers them a real extension of life, 16 months of extra time compared to the existing treatments. that is significant in itself. it is also significant
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because perjeta is a combination treatment. it is notoriously difficult to assess this type of drug in the system to make sure it reaches patients. it has taken a long time to get perjeta to this point. i guess what we are really adjusted in now is whether this is an exception to the rule or whether this is the start of a new way of looking at these drugs, because there are more drugs like perjeta coming to that offer significant clinical benefit to patients and are cost—effective, but even if they we re cost—effective, but even if they were given away for free, would not get through the process. so we want to understand whether this is the start of something new. my understanding is that we are at this point now with perjeta because the pharmaceutical company bennell came up pharmaceutical company bennell came up with an agreement on the cost. is it more than that? we don't know the details of the final bill that has been done, but they have reached a
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deal on cost. perjeta it essentially given in combination with chemotherapy and another drug called herceptin. it is then assessed by nice asa herceptin. it is then assessed by nice as a total cost and that causes a problem in the current system because it is not set up to deal with possessing drugs on a cost basis like that. and there are other drugs like that coming down the line. it is worth explaining which women with breast cancer that affects, because it is not all of them. no. it is basically relevant to women with incurable or secondary breast cancer who don't have a huge amount of treatment options. it is a specific type of breast cancer, so it is not right for all women, but it is not right for all women, but it is not right for all women, but it is irrelevant to around 1300 women in england each year —— it is releva nt women in england each year —— it is relevant for 1300 women. the other point is that we would hope that both in wales and northern ireland,
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they will follow nice's guidance so that northern ireland and wales will get access to this drug. we remain concerned about scotland, where the scottish medicines consortium have rejected perjeta three times already. i have a question from a woman on twitter or facebook, saying, camerawomen drive from scotla nd saying, camerawomen drive from scotland to england to get access to this? i have known women who have had to move from scotland to england to be able to access this drug. having incurable cancer is stressful enough without having to move to access the drug. it causes stress for patients. they hear that the drug has been approved, but when they look into the finer details, they look into the finer details, they find that they can't access it. it causes extra stress in an already stressful situation. the important thing is that nice and
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the manufacturer have proven a deal could be done, in spite of people saying it couldn't. so we need to get back on the table and find a deal that works for patients and taxpayers, because it can be done. it isa taxpayers, because it can be done. it is a great positive. you know, it is amazing that it has been approved and people can benefit in the same way that i have. it is deathly worth celebrating. there is still so much more to be done. we look the way that they have collaborated with nice and nhs england, that is definitely something that we want to work on. we need the drugs and we need them quickly, and we don't want to wait on a system that takes years to wait on a system that takes years to approve them. when we need them, we need them now, we need to be able to access trials and have a flexible at it. i think that is a really important point. how are you doing? really well, thank you. people might be surprised to hear you say that,
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when you say you have stage for breast cancer? before i was diagnosed i didn't have much of an understanding either. i probably couldn't, and that people could live with incurable cancer. i can see this far ahead, i couldn't see that... you know, iam back that... you know, i am back at work, enjoying holidays with my family, doing everything fairly normally, really. that wasn't something i could even begin to comprehend could happen. thanks to the drugs that i am on, i don't feel like i have cancer. i don't look like i have cancer. i don't look like i have cancer. if i don't want to tell people i have cancer, i don't have to. i think that is so important. if you ask a stage for cancer patient, they obviously want to stay alive, but they also want to live as normally as they can. that is so crucial, and that is what the drugs allowed. they allow you to carry on with fairly minimal side effects. allowed. they allow you to carry on with fairly minimal side effectsm is just worth explaining, i think with fairly minimal side effectsm isjust worth explaining, i think i did in the introduction, the reason you are able to be on it for the last few years is because it was paid for through the cancer drugs
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fund, which is coming to an end? yes, many of the drugs that have been on that have been through a reappraisal process, they have put them intoa reappraisal process, they have put them into a team that are commissioning them for the nhs. it has only been available on the cancer drugs fund, so it has only been available in england. that is why you have stories of women in scotland coming across the border, and also in wales. it is really welcome news today. it makes it a much more consistent decision. you know, a routine decision for doctors to prescribe it to patients. that is really welcome and we hope that wales and northern ireland will follow suit and we look forward to hearing from the scottish medicines consortium and the scottish government, about what they intend to do in scotland to ensure there is not a lottery around perjeta. thank you both. kinnego i have another e—mail about what is going on at the church in south london in terms of its work to turn the lives around of
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former gang members. sean says it is wonderful to see the church being so driven and focused on changing table's lives. having taken time to view the spac nation website, i am concerned it only seems to cater for young black people. i am not sure thatis young black people. i am not sure that is true. while i applaud their work, i would that is true. while i applaud their work, iwould rather see that is true. while i applaud their work, i would rather see this on more open cultural footing. i work, i would rather see this on more open culturalfooting. i can't imagine they turn anybody away, but do check. 16 year olds in the north of england are on average at least one gcse grade behind teenagers in london. that's according to the northern powerhouse partnership — a group which aims to increase the contribution of the north of england to the uk economy — who say it's crucial we try and close that gap. earlier, i wasjoined byjustin blackhurst, founder and director of digitalnext, a digital agency in manchester which already work with schools and young people, conservative mayor of tees valley ben houcher, and patsy kane, who's the executive headteacher of the education
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and leadership trust which runs three schools in manchester. i think as a society we have two really focus on growing young people. i think the proposals in the report are excellent. it does start pre—school, helping families get school ready. does propose we work with businesses. i think together, if we get that real engagement from businesses as well, there are some very positive possibilities coming out of this report. nothing to do with teachers? i think we are struggling to recruit in teaching at the moment. it can be the most fantasticjob. in schools, there has perhaps been difficulty in recruiting great head teachers, who are passionate and ambitious, for the children in their areas, whatever their starting point. justin, thanks for coming on the
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programme. why is this happening, and tell me about the kind of work you do in schools? i started my business about eight years ago. i set it off with my brother, it was a family business to start with. i quickly realised there was a massive skills gap in the digital field. people in the industry that were interviewing forjobs did not get the situation. just to be really specific, what sort of skills are you talking about? well, we manipulate search engines like google for businesses to grow them online. we also get people exposure online. we also get people exposure on platforms like facebook, to really push their business and grow their businesses. so, that generation of people get the technology and how to use it, how to manipulate it in the best way. maybe an older generation would get it, but they have not grown up with it and they are not as savvy. so, the work that you do in schools involves
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what? we go into schools, looking for apprentices, young kids that are really driven, motivated, interested in the internet, interested in working in teams. we don't look to employ people all the time, but we put ourselves out there so that young people come forward and they wa nt to young people come forward and they want to come and work for us. i remember one of my first staff members, chris, actually on the senior management team, he hung around in the early days. he liked to see these vibes we were creating. a young lad that i played cricket with now runs our offices in melbourne, running a team of about 15 people. young people have been great for us. the conservative mayor of tees valley, thanks for talking to us. how do you react to the fact
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that pupils in the ireland are falling one gcse behind on average? it is very disappointing to me. there are issues that face each region in the north, but on average we are one gcse behind the rest of the country and that means there is a fundamental issue that needs to be addressed. department for education told us that once all pupils to benefit from world—class education, no matter what they live or their background. he says they have already raised £2.5 billion to raise the attainment of pupils through the pupil premium. a comedian is trying to raise awareness for a condition that baffled doctors. she has written a, the show about to —— a comedy show about her condition.
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2015, the year my vagina tried to kill me. i started thinking about it like a double act i could do. that is where that name came from. it wasn't until i was 22 that i was diagnosed. i have symptoms starting when i was 12. that is really common foran when i was 12. that is really common for an dimitrios condition like this. i started to feel ill when i first started my periods. as i got older, more symptoms started. really bad bowel problems. when i started having sex, it was really painful
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andi having sex, it was really painful and i would bleed afterwards. in terms of relationships, with the sexual side of things, that wasn't very nice for me and is kind of made things difficult sometimes. also, i didn't understand why. i kind of thought maybe this is how everybody feels, but nobody says. i really just thought i was overdramatic, which i am. but it is nice to know that there is a reason for it. yes, it just opens the that there is a reason for it. yes, itjust opens the conversation, and i think that a lot of women are quite relieved when they hear somebody making jokes about it. my my first appointment today. sounds like their bear grills. women do not
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feel pottable talking about it, because they don't know if they can, if they will be judged or if it will create a weird atmosphere. we need to not have that atmosphere around discussing subjects like that. in terms of comedy, i think a lot of people think, she isjust terms of comedy, i think a lot of people think, she is just telling jokes about periods. well, i am, and iam0k jokes about periods. well, i am, and i am ok with that. we are going to talk to lizo mzimba about the baftas? what people are going to wear? a letter has been circulating amongst those that are going to be attending later this month. if you are under the golden globes, the powerful image, everybody wearing black on the red carpet in support of the initiative tied into battling sexual harassment, not just tied into battling sexual harassment, notjust in hollywood but across all industries. this letter, which has been going around
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various people within the industry, just saying, of course, the movement in the us was incredibly successful, it's time to continue on this side of the atlantic, with the baftas being the first major award ceremony in europe this year. we feel it is important to make a statement to show global solidarity. they are inviting people to wear black for the award ceremony, to follow suit with our sisters but attended the golden globes. men and women? yes, they are inviting them to wear a special buttonhole to support this. people supporting this include emma watson, emma thompson, carrie mulligan, felicityjones. some very well—known names both in front of and behind the camera. when the baftas co m es and behind the camera. when the baftas comes along, we do expect it
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to bea baftas comes along, we do expect it to be a big feature, sexual harassment in hollywood and beyond being such a major issue in this awards season. the power is that it isa awards season. the power is that it is a very simple, dignified way to bring attention to the issue, and to get people talking about it as well as the films at the awards ceremonies. very successful at the golden globes, they are expecting it to be equally successful at the baftas. thank you for your many messages about the film, from gangsta god. if you missed that, you can go to the programme page and you can watch that there. effectively, a church turning gang members away from their life of crime. —— from mines to god. basically helping them to become decent people. stephen says the very human need for a sense of meaning,
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to love and to you loved in return, it remains at the heart of our shared humanity. sarah says it was life changing stuff on your programme today. anthony says that hope goes a long way. thanks for your company today. have a wonderful day. good morning. it is pretty cold out there at the moment. we have a strong northerly wind. for many it is dry and bright, some beautiful weather watcher photos this morning. luck of the snowdrops with blue skies behind that. for many it will stay dry and right into the afternoon, but we will have further wintry showers into scotland, northern ireland, into wales, perhaps south—west england as well. snow on higher ground, down to low levels. a bit of snow and sleet. it will feel cold. if you factor in the
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wind chill it will feel like one to four celsius. a strong northerly wind will blow in showers across yorkshire, lincolnshire, towards east anglia. elsewhere, clear spells, a dry night to come and those temperatures close to freezing in the countryside. more showers across eastern areas. it will not feel that great. further west, across eastern areas. it will not feel that great. furtherwest, like the wind. if you showers from pembrokeshire, towards cornwall. for many it will be dry with some sunshine and light wind. perhaps feeling quite as cold for many of us tomorrow. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11. theresa may meets president xi
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jinping for talks on the second day she down she - down demands by the eu to give its citizens who come to the uk residency rights during the brexit transition. claims children in the north are not getting the education they need. facebook says its recent changes to how people see content has led to users spending less time on the site. lifetime bans for doping handed to dozens of russian 0lympic athletes are overturned. also in the next hour, concerns about the accuracy of gender pay gap figures. information provided by some firms under new government rules has been

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