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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  February 1, 2018 11:00am-1:00pm GMT

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11. theresa may meets president xi jinping for talks on the second day she down she - down demands by the eu to give its citizens who come to the uk residency rights during the brexit transition. claims children in the north are not getting the education they need. facebook says its recent changes to how people see content has led to users spending less time on the site. lifetime bans for doping handed to dozens of russian olympic athletes are overturned. also in the next hour, concerns about the accuracy of gender pay gap figures. information provided by some firms under new government rules has been called into question, as a charity calls for a clamp—down on so—called fake data. and a campaign group says thousands pledged to avoid animal—derived
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products last month with more people asking questions about where their food comes from. good morning. theresa may hazmat president xijinping in beijing during the high point of her three—day mission to china. she said britain and china were enjoying a golden era in their relationship and that she wanted to take further forward the global strategic partnership that we have established. let us get more on this
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with steven mcdonnell who is in beijing. a golden era, is that mutual and what phone work has been done? it has been a warm welcome for the prime minister in the chinese capital. i will come to her meeting with president xijinping in capital. i will come to her meeting with president xi jinping in a moment but first, she has this nickname she has been given here which is auntie may. she was told this today. she was quite pleased by that. some young wags have been having a laugh at her present to president xijinping. she gave having a laugh at her present to president xi jinping. she gave a having a laugh at her present to president xijinping. she gave a box set of the blue planet series a p pa re ntly set of the blue planet series apparently with a personal message from david attenborough in it. young people in china, not many of them have dvd players any more and they are saying, what are those silver
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things and what are you supposed to do with them? you will probably hear more of what was said behind closed doors because she will be flying to shanghai tonight and that is when reporters who are on the flight will get some sort of a briefing about what has gone on and have they spoken about human rights? at this book about the economy, access for british companies, greater access to this enormous market here in china? all of that is going on but to what extent is brexit dominating what is happening there in china? for those who wanted this to be all about trade, there is hundreds of billions of pounds worth of trade and investment being spoken of here and yet brexit has been dominating. that is partly because the prime minister raised this matter of the rights for
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eu citizens during that window prior to brexit in britain. we are not sure what rights they might have. she said they shouldn't have the same full rights as european citizens have right now in britain. once you say that come up with the travelling press, that will dominate things and so it has swamped the message for her. there are 50 business leaders here trying to cut through one education, on tourism, on services and trying to promote these things go britain prior to their being a free—trade agreement with china at some point in the future after the divorce from europe. and yet brexit again looming large here. thank you very much. theresa may has said she will fight a demand that eu citizens who moved
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to the uk during the transition period after brexit be given for residency rights. the promised said ina26 —— residency rights. the promised said in a 26 -- 2016 residency rights. the promised said in a 26 —— 2016 referendum, the british people hadn't voted for nothing to change. her comments are likely to be well received by conservative brexiteers but have drawn criticism from the eu. joining us now from westminster is our assistant political editor norman smith... theresa may wants to be seen to be tough but this is going to be a really tricky thing to marriage —— managing the discussions going forward will stop is suggest the negotiations over the transition deal which people thought would be straightforward will be much more bruising and problematic with mrs may signalling she wants to make a stand over the issue of freedom of movement and it should continue com pletely movement and it should continue completely unchanged in this transition period. eu citizens would be able to remain here indefinitely
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should they wish and be able to bring in their relatives if they wish, they will be able to get access to benefits, education. mrs may is saying after we leave next year, things have to change. freedom of movement cannot continue as it currently exists. the brexit secretary, david davis, was axed about that in the commons. we will be discussing in detail the treatment of people after the departure from the union. he must ta ke departure from the union. he must take it as read that they will be treated properly, we will not do anything which will undermine our economy and do everything possible to ensure the industry talks about that supported. i am joined by david jones and from your perspective, must this be a breadline? it must be. quite clearly we will be leaving the european
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union and we must have control of oui’ union and we must have control of our borders and whilst eu citizens will be coming in, they will have to be subject to a registration screen. there should been no question of them having the right to stay here in definitely. the course of this negotiation has seen compromises so farand many negotiation has seen compromises so far and many will say there will be a compromise on this. what happens if there is a fudge? it is a question of compromise. we are entering into a negotiation. the eu have to stand —— understand at this stage that the british government will adopt this position. the people of this country will be concerned if they thought there was going to be an unlimited right of people who came in during the transition period to here. they will approve very strongly of what the prime minister has said. mrs may is under pressure to make a stand. what if she buckles on this issue? i don't anticipate she will. she has been clear about
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this issue today. i was pleased to see she made it clear that she was not talking about a three—year transition period. it must be two yea rs transition period. it must be two years 01’ transition period. it must be two yea rs or less. transition period. it must be two years or less. again, an indefinite transition period would not be acceptable. it is good to see she is developing a clear position on implementation. would you like mrs made to reject the transition period because we have seen some of your collea g u es because we have seen some of your colleagues described the proposals set out as an eu ultimatum? we know the european union would accept a calendar style deal which is an off—the—shelf deal available to us immediately. that would need a transition and i think the calendar style is something increasingly looking attractive. we know there are considerable unhappiness over the big vision. how vulnerable is she? the party will support mrs may
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in these negotiations. everybody realises we have a mandate from the company did take britain out of the european union and it is good to see her articulating such a positive position today. it will win a lot of support from colleagues in the parliamentary party. issue bombproof during the negotiations?” parliamentary party. issue bombproof during the negotiations? i would wa nt to during the negotiations? i would want to put it that way. she will get a tremendous amount of support from what she has said to us —— said today that is what we want to see come from her. they want to get that transition deal signed and delivered next month. it is a tight timetable indeed which some will argue gives the eu an advantage. they can play long known in britain is desperate to move onto trade talks. norman, thank you very much. joining us now from brussels is our reporter adam fleming. bring us up—to—date with what the
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reaction has been to these latest comments from theresa may and the rights of eu citizens. good morning from the european parliament. this afternoon there was going to be a public hearing with meps, senior members of the european parliament and representatives from the campaign groups representing eu nationals living in the uk and british national party and the rest of the eu. this is a live issue in this building today. we will have to wait and see what people say about it but i expect we will hear a restate m e nt it but i expect we will hear a restatement of the eu's position. they call the transition period the full monty minors. mine is because the uk would be in the european commission, the european council or the european parliament and the full monty because they are signing up during that transition period to all eu law in every respect, which includes the free movement of
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people. that is what this argument will be about. if you look back at the agreement that was signed between theresa may and michel barnier and the rest of the eu at christmas which allowed the brexit talks to move from phrase want to phase two, there is a bit of tension there. —— phase one. on brexit day, there. —— phase one. on brexit day, the transition changes that was agreed by both sides both sides agreed by both sides both sides agreed that it could change as a result of the negotiations about the transition period or the implementation phase. the eu site words to that paragraph to say that is what you have to sign up to. the other paragraph says, hang on, we agreed brexit day was brexit day. that is whether disagreement is. thank you very much for bringing us up thank you very much for bringing us up to date on that. the economic gap between the north and south of england will continue to grow, unless the government prioritises education and skills.
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that's the warning this morning from the northern powerhouse partnership — a body that is chaired by the former chancellor of the exchequer george osborne and champions his policy of boosting the regional economy. today's report says disadvantaged children are being let down, and that a lack of funding and aspiration are holding back economic growth in the region. nina warhurst reports. if your child's born in the north—east, the latest league tables suggest there is a one in five chance he or she will go to an underperforming school. born in london, the chances arejusti in15. today's report says the key to closing the north—south divide includes £300 million of new money for early—years development, making the north a world leader in apprenticeships, and all northern businesses mentoring young people. how are you finding the communications? barclay‘s is one of the businesses behind today's report. they have more than 500 northern apprentices. i think it was an opportunity that
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i was quite surprised to find that i didn't have to move away for, because i think my preconception was you would probably have to move to have a really good career but now my view has completely changed on that now that i found the degree program because you can do it from anywhere. is the government now stepping up after being accused of neglecting the northern powerhouse post—george osborne? one of the real unsung bits about our northern powerhouse is the £70 million we put into our northern powerhouse schools strategy which goes all the way from early—years provision and making sure that is as good as it can be, to the maths and english hubs we have setup. the authors of today's report say if it's followed, there could be 850,000 newjobs and £100 billion of new money in the northern economy. they claim that children from all backgrounds and postcodes will be given a fairer start. nina warhurst, bbc news, middlesborough. let's speak now to marc doyle — he is the principal of a university
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technical college in lincolnshire. first of all, tell us more about what you do there. the first thing i would like to see is without doubt everybody deserves a good education regardless of where they come from, whatever their background is. the focus for me is around the report that says employers need to work really closely with schools to bridge the skills gap. utc's schools for 14 to i9—year—olds, we have many schools and we are already doing that. meaningful work experience, business mentors, we backed by employees and 15 universities. our focus is on real—life projects and building those skills gaps. you are
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blending of secondary education with technical skills effectively? absolutely. we are having an incredibly positive impact. one in three of our students will go and find employment with the employer that they have been working with through the school time. 25% of our stu d e nts through the school time. 25% of our students going to apprenticeships against 5% nationally. we are finding the real success in everything that we are doing around this. another point is that the accountability system in the education system is very much towards aptitude. young people have got skills in many different areas. we need to focus on notjust on that aptitudes and are of year tests but their skills and abilities and we need to work closely on their employability skills. its students and parents are looking for a way into the world of work, utc's are great place to be. are you saying
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that children in the north are on average grade below their southern cou nterpa rts average grade below their southern counterparts in gcse subjects? are you saying you are not so worried about that measurement?” you saying you are not so worried about that measurement? i am more worried about the fact that there is a skills shortage across the country and it will affect the economy as a result of that huge focus on aptitude rather than employability skills and students being able to see the relevance and the career path they can follow to achieve success. we're going to have a problem. success is measured in lots of different ways and if anyone is interested injoining a utc, come to the colleges and see all the amazing work we are doing. that will end up ina work we are doing. that will end up in a place where you have a real good opportunity to get a job. do you accept that in the region, the
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issue of an attainment gap needs to be addressed more brightly with the schools, perhaps not like yours which are offering this secondary education but in other schools? that this needs to be addressed? as we said that the start, we can't nor the fact that students across the country deserve the best education they can get. where they are not receive no good education, we have to work as hard as we can to make it better. funding would help and it is important to note that there is so much amazing stuff going on in schools at the moment and we often focus too much on the bad side and not look up the good side. very good to have you with us. thank you. thank you. the headlines on bbc newsroom live... theresa may meets china's president of the talks on the second day of
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her visit to the country. during her trip, she says she will fight eu plans to give its citizens who come to the uk residency rights during the brexit transition. ministers are urged to take action on the quality of education in the north of england. in sport, the international olympic committee save the court of arbitration for sport ‘s decision to overturn the olympic life spans of 28 russian athletes may have a serious impact on the future fight against doping. the ioc are considering an appeal to the swiss federal tribunal. baptist united boss jose mourinho federal tribunal. baptist united bossjose mourinho has slammed his players ridiculous start of the game as they were beaten 2—0 at spurs at wembley last night. christine ericsson's al —— open at 11 seconds, the third fastest in premier league history. transfer window ended last night with a record total of £430 million spent in the premier league
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during january. 150 million of which was yesterday. i will be back with more on those stories just after 11:30am. facebook says its users are spending significantly less time on the site following changes to its news feed content. the website's figures show that people are spending an average of a minute—and—a—half less each day on the network. the changes were designed to prioritise posts from friends and family while reducing the prominence of content from businesses, media and other companies. with me now is our business presenter. good morning. is this in line with what facebook was expecting? it didn't know what the repercussions would be. this has come out as part of its quarterly results and overall the numbers are very impressive. mind—boggling because facebook made $30 billion in
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the fourth quarter alone. up 47% on the fourth quarter alone. up 47% on the same period last year. the chief executive has said that they changed the algorithm earlier this year to focus the news feed more on friends and family. this was partly in response to criticism that facebook was blown in spreading fake news. it made these changes but the amount of time spent by users on facebook overall has been reduced by 50 million hours every day. it is too early to say whether this is affecting its profits because this has just been introduced. affecting its profits because this hasjust been introduced. they got to look at the scale of facebook. there is still huge reach and growth as well. it has 2.13 billion users around the world who login at least once a month. that is up i4% in a year. that is over a quarter of the world's entire population. its reach is huge. mind-boggling statistics.
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cutting down on those minutes a day does add up. the real problem is it is failing to attract younger users. they are more likely to use snatch after insta gram which facebook own but they are not going cross—platform. its competitor in china has lots of other networks within that and users do migrate and area within that and users do migrate and are a lot more intergenerational. thank you. the proportion of people having strokes in their 40s and 50s has risen sharply over the last decade. that's according to figures from public health england, which show 20% of stroke cases now occur in those aged between 40 and 59. our health correspondent catherine burns reports. my dad had a stroke. i had a stroke. the older you are, the greater your chance of it happening to you but the average age of men having a first stroke has fallen from 71 to 68.
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for women, it's gone from 75 to 73. adrian jones was just 53 when he had one. when i woke up in the morning, i didn't feel too great straightaway and when i twisted and tried to stand up, i immediately fell over. and i couldn't feel, i had no sensation on my left side at all. figures from public health england break down at what age people had first strokes. almost 60% were 70 or over. but it's interesting to see the increase in middle—aged people being affected. in 2007, about 15% of first—time stroke patients were aged between 40 and 59. by 2016, it had gone up to 20%. we know that obesity is a real national problem and that certainly contributes towards stroke. diabetes is a very strong risk factor for stroke. and i think that there's issues around lifestyle as well. we all lead a much more sedentary life, perhaps, than we used to.
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early treatment can help reduce the risk of disability or death so a campaign has been launched to help people recognise the symptoms as quickly as possible. face — has it fallen on one side? 40—to74—year—olds in england are eligible for health checks to help spot the early signs of various conditions, including strokes. catherine burns, bbc news. joining me now isjuliet bouverie, chief executive at the stroke association. give us your take on why the average age of people having a stroke is falling. what is behind that? the message we want to get across is/ is not a condition that affects older people. what we are seeing is you have 38% of people aged between 40 and 69 who are now having is strokes. we believe it is something
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about the lifestyle messages and not getting across to that younger population and people not being aware of the risk factors and the signs of stroke and the fact they need to treat it as a medical emergency. risk factors, diet, exercise. 50% of emergency. risk factors, diet, exercise. 5096 of strokes are caused by high blood pressure. the thing that causes high blood pressure is not taking physical activity, having too much salt in your diet, not eating a healthy diet, smoking. we encourage people to take those risk factors seriously. let us talk about the signs people need to look up for. by head interview earlier today and the phrase thatjumped out at me was the interviewee saying this is the equivalent of a heart attack exceptin the equivalent of a heart attack except in the brain. if you saw someone except in the brain. if you saw someone having a heart attack, you wouldn't hesitate to call for an ambulance straightaway. do you find people hesitate with strokes because they are not sure whether someone is
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having one or not? people don't realise it is a brain attack. for every second somebody has a stroke, they argue losing 2 million neurons in the brain and it can result in lives being lost and severe disability. if you see anybody who is showing signs of their face drooping, who is not able to lift one or both of their arms, whose speech is being slurred, you do the fast test, face, arms, speech and then time. please call 999. every second counts. if people pick up the signs of stroke quickly, they can get into when emergencies/ unit and can get the world—class treatments. the life can be saved and their disability can be significantly reduced. if somebody is showing one of those symptoms, it applies. just
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mild state. somebody acting out of the norm. please don't hesitate to call 999. it is really important that an ambulance gets to that person and they go on an ambulance because they will know exactly which hospital can treat people at an acute stroke unit with the right conclusions and —— clinicians and speed is of the essence. thank you very much for explaining that. the end of january marks a milestone for those who have pledged to go the whole month without drinking alcohol. organisers of the dry january campaign say they have seen thousands of people signing up to take part. another campaign — veganuary — has also reported thousands pledging to avoid eating animal—derived products forjanuary — with more people asking where their food comes from and the ethics behind its production. danny savage has been to meet some of those taking part in leeds. a vegan cafe in leeds.
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there's no meat or dairy products in any of the food here and for the last month, non—vegans have been encouraged to give it a go and those behind the veganuary say it's a lot easier today than it was a few years ago. when i went vegan seven years ago, there was none of this chain restaurants doing vegan options. now nearly all of them have got vegan options on the menu or they've got a vegan menu itself. the supermarkets now, the range of products that are available to people going vegan is a lot better than it was six or seven years ago so it's moving in the right direction. what is the one thing you miss? cheese. that's your... ? yes, cheese. tabatha went vegan forjanuary. despite some cravings, she stuck to it and will continue. the thing that got me in the first place was the environmental impact of the veganism and vegetarianism. health, essex, so many reasons. you
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haven't struggles? no, i haven't. at a nearby bakery, ellie has looked at the business making vegan cakes. it is now becoming mainstream. the business making vegan cakes. it is now becoming mainstreamm the business making vegan cakes. it is now becoming mainstream. it has been crazy. lots of cafes want to accommodate everybody. they are wanting to offer a really good range and just the general public. you go toa and just the general public. you go to a market orjust the big vegan fares, there are bigger crowds. the growth in trade is reflected by a growing change in people's attitudes. it is a lifestyle choice and has boomed. for many people they are choosing a flexible approach, even part—time, reducing their meat inta ke to even part—time, reducing their meat intake to once or twice a week and eating more vegetables on the other
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days. veganuary is a brilliant introduction to test the waters. the organisers say 78,000 people tried going vegan in january organisers say 78,000 people tried going vegan injanuary and they think even more will have a go next year. it is time now for a look at the weather forecast. good it is time now for a look at the weatherforecast. good morning. we have further wintry showers working in today many for scotland, northern ireland and wales. a cold wind once again blowing across the uk. there will be a good deal of dry and bright weather with some sunshine. particularly across england and wales. we will see the wintry showers in the south—west. it will feel cold out there. add on the wind chill and that is what it will feel like. do this evening —— through this evening, we have some showers
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for the east. temperatures close to freezing in the countryside tonight and there will be some patchy frost to start on friday morning. for many western areas, it should be largely dry and bright. eastern areas, there will be a few showers moving into those eastern areas and temperatures around six celsius. this is bbc news, our latest headlines. fit theresa may is continuing her three day visit to china — if and has met the country's president, xijinping. nuclear weapons programme. theresa may has signalled that she'll fight a demand a by the european union, which wants full residency rights for eu citizens who move to the uk, during the transition period after brexit. the prime minister says the british people didn't vote in the eu referendum "for nothing to change". the former chancellor, george osborne, says the government must do more to tackle poor achievement by schoolchildren in the north of england. a report by the business—led northern powerhouse partnership has
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identified a major divide in education between north and south. the founder of facebook says changes to the social network's news feed have resulted in people spending less time on the site. mark zuckerberg took the step to try to stamp out fake news, malicious advertising and propaganda. now for sport with hugh. good morning. 28 russian athletes who were banned from the olympics for life, have today had their suspensions overturned by the court of arbitration for sport. eight days ahead of the start of the winter olympics in south korea 11 more athletes had their appeals against the international olympic committee ban partially upheld. our sports news correspondent alex capstick joins me. bring us up to date with all of this. this goes back to the sochi
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winter games in 2014, allegations that russia operated a widespread conspiracy that covered sheets, dirty samples swapping with clean ones inside the anti—doping laboratory at sochi in 2014. they looked at this last year and charged over 40 athletes with cheating. 39 of them were given lifetime bans and they went to the court of arbitration for sport last week to appeal the banker and as you said, 28 of them have had that upheld. in a statement it was said there wasn't enough evidence to prove they had cheated. so those 28 are cleared, they are allowed to compete, the results have been reinstated. the other 11 have at their lifetime ban reduced to the store brand and found
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guilty, but most of them will not be able to compete in the winter olympics. what will this mean for the big winter olympics starting next week? it's messy and chaotic. time is running out for the ioc to sort this out. in theory, those 20 athletes who have can apply for the neutral team, they'll be called olympic athlete from russia because the russian olympic committee banned from the olympics as it stands. but we don't have many will apply. the ioc said that disappointed with the decision, it doesn't mean they are innocent and it doesn't mean that they will necessarily be invited to be pyeongchang games. there was not long to sort this mess out. russia said in various statements from various officials that this is a statement the justice but they what the 20th athletes will do next.
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thank you. a record breaking january transfer window came to a close last night with a total of 430 million spent by premier league clubs. in fact it's more money than spent in the top leagues of france, italy, spain and germany over the past month combined. earlier on the programme we spoke to danjones from accountancy firm deloitte — who told us why england had such an advantage... it's just in it'sjust in proportion it's just in proportion to it'sjust in proportion to how it's just in proportion to how well those leagues are doing financially. england is now so far ahead of birth ofa england is now so far ahead of birth of a world in terms of the scale of the birmingham league and the depth of our ghostly, the big clubs in the other countries, but the strength and depth of the premier league stands out. that spending is consistent with their standing as the leading league in world football. plenty of transfers last night. it was a busy night on the field last night — with seven games in total. the third fastest goal in premier league history was scored by tottenham's christian eriksen at wembley. inside 11 seconds, it set up a 2—0
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win over manchester united, who are now 15 point behind manchester city, they beat west brom 3—0.. bournemouth manager eddie howe called their 3—0 win away away at defending champions chelsea their best win in the top flight. chelsea drop to fourth but the cherries are once again holding their own in their third premier league season. they move into the top half.. it has to be the best. the best result and the best performance getting the result. i think we were excellent today, we were very aggressive, we tried to take the game to chelsea and implement what we wa nted game to chelsea and implement what we wanted to do, and everyone was magnificent. west ham united have suspended their director of player
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recruitment after a national newspaper reported he had said that they wanted to limit the number of african players at the club because ‘they have a bad attitude' and ‘cause mayhem when not selected'. well in a statement today the club confirmed... that's all the sport for now, more in the next half hour. the fbi has "grave concerns" about the accuracy of a confidential memo that alleges the agency is biased against president trump. the white house is expected to publish the memo later — which accuses the fbi of abusing its surveillance powers during the election campaign. the democrats claim the document is an attempt to discredit the fbi's investigation into russian meddling in the us elections. our washington correspondent david willis has more. it is a good idea for this memo to be released, expressing grave
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the fbi, in a rare statement, has said it does not think it is a good idea for this memo to be released, expressing grave concerns over what it says are omissions which therefore render the document itself inaccurate. the democrats say the memo is selective and is aimed, by the republicans, at discrediting the investigation that has been undertaken into collusion, russian collusion in the 2016 election by the special counsel robert mueller. obviously the department ofjustice and the fbi feel that this is an extraordinarily reckless step to take because the information has not been vetted and we have not been able to do research on the sources and methods. while that analysis is supposed to go on, they say the president has not read the memo. he believes releasing that memo might be a pretext for donald trump to sack
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the special prosecutor robert mueller and the man who appointed him, the deputy attorney general, rod rosenstein. the danger for all of this, aside from the obvious dangers of politicising the intelligence process, is that it sends a message to the white house that they can fire rob rosenstein and they can fire robert mueller, and there are gop members that are so vested in his presidency that they will roll over. and that would cause a constitutional crisis. owing to the sensitive nature of the memo, the white house has to sign off on its release. there are reports it is looking to do so, possibly as early as later today, thursday. the head of ofsted is warning that schools in england are being used to ‘indoctrinate' pupils under the guise of religious education. in a speech today, amanda spielman will warn that the most
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‘conservative voices‘ of particular faith groups do not speak for everyone, and schools should not be afraid to call out practices they think will negatively impact younger people. the liberal democrats have claimed that a key government target, for treating people with severe mental health conditions in england, isn‘t being met. the party says it gathered evidence which shows people experiencing a first episode of psychosis aren‘t getting a quality care package. nhs england says more than three—quarters of patients are seen within two weeks — and that the research shows a partial and "dated" picture of the services provided. hate crime againstjewish people in the uk is at a record high. a new report from the "community security trust", which monitors anti—semitism, says thejewish community was targeted at a rate of nearly four—times—a—day last year. online abuse is said to have fallen, but there‘s been a spike in reports of violent assault. for the first time since world war
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ii, mps are left set to move out of westminster. the move will cost billions of pounds. our correspondent reports. it may be a palace but one that‘s in desperate need of repair. anyone who‘s had building work done on their home will know it can be stressful, but mps are now facing the prospect of moving out for several years while it is carried out. it will cost billions, with both the commons and the house of lords having to up sticks, most likely to another part of whitehall. many mps say it‘s the only option. the building‘s crumbling, it needs rewiring and it‘s just not safe. one even said conditions were even worse than down in the pit. there‘s some steel props holding the roof up. it looks like the workplace i used to work in before i came into this building, that was maltby colliery. other mps are reluctant to go, arguing the work should be done around them. there are also concerns
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about the cost. the lords still have to give their approval and with the proposed departure not until 2025, that is after the next general election, the next parliament may take a different view. simon jones, bbc news. happiness at school is more important than academic qualifications — and should even be factored into the curriculum. that‘s the conclusion of a major report by lord richard layard from the london school of economics, who used data from more than 100,000 people to conclude that wellbeing as a pupil is a great indicator of happiness in later life. tim muffett has been to a secondary school in dartford that has made weekly lessons in having a healthy mind — a number one priority. the pathway through childhood, adolescence and beyond. going into year 11, there‘ll be a lot of exam stress. take a step back and think about what you're going to do next. it can be paved with challenges, exams, friendships, social media, self—esteem. many people of our age,
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they deal with mental health issues and they‘re very scared to come out about them. who can tell me what catastrophising means? at the leigh academy in dartford in kent, the curriculum has been changed to try and help. can you think of all the different types of emotion that maybe you have within school or maybe in your home life? four years ago with 30 other schools it introduced a new subject, healthy minds. the students have one lesson per week and that's dedicated for one hour when they come to their healthy minds lesson, look at things like relationships, resilience, things like mental health. i think they're really important in building character and helping us develop as children. if you got a problem you been taught, like, how to solve it all what to do. it's all good going to maths, english, science lessons, they build your brain but i think healthy minds build characters. a huge study of mental health, well—being and happiness is about to be published. it‘s analysed data from 100,000
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people and it shows that schools and teachers can have almost as much impact on a child‘s happiness as they can on their academic performance, and that the impact lasts a long time. the best predictor of whether an adult will be happy is not what qualifications they get from their school but how happy they are while they‘re at school. some will say, though, that good academic qualifications will bring about happiness, will lead to a better job and a better life? happy children learn better, so there‘s no conflict between these objectives, they are complimentary to each other. don't be aggressive, don't be passive, just be assertive. professor layard want more schools to follow leigh academy‘s example and ensure mental health is a key part of the curriculum, even if that means less time studying traditional subjects like maths and science, which is what happens here. the healthy minds curriculum, yes, it takes a lesson away
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from the core curriculum but it's important because it makes the students have a greater well— being, stronger relationships. we've seen stronger reduction in bullying and higher numbers of older students supporting younger students as they gone through the course. benefits that should last long into adult life. tim muffet, bbc news. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first , the headlines on bbc newsroom live. theresa may says the uk and china are enjoying a golden era of their relationship as he meets the country‘s resident. during her trip, the prime minister says to fight eu plans to give citizens who came the rights. and england‘s chief schools inspector say school values are being undermined in faith schools.
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i‘m susannah streeter — in the business news. facebook has said users are spending less time on the site following changes to the way it prioritises content. the social network reported better than expected results despite the changes, which come amid increasing scrutiny of its ad business, role in political campaigns and broader social impact. chief executive mark zuckerberg said the tweaks would help royal dutch shell‘s profit more than doubled in 2017 — to 16 billion dollars. the anglo—dutch company benefited from stronger oil and gas prices. it also reported a sharp rise in cash flow as the effect of years of costs cuts and the integration of bg group filtered through. betting firms ladbrokes, william hill, and pt entertainment have agreed to change online games promotions after pressure from the regulator. the competition and markets authority said some promotions were unfair and trapped players money. it said punters must be able to cash out when they want, and not have to play more to release winnings.
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profits at oil giant royal dutch shell have more than doubled to 16 billion dollars. it has been helped by the surging cost of crude. the group has benefited as a barrel of brent crude has risen past 70 dollars, for the first time in more than three years. the price has been boosted by supply curbs from oil cartel opec, a record run of declines in us crude inventories and a weaker us dollar. the numbers come just one year after the oil major‘s lowest profits in more than a decade, joining us now is david hunter, director of market studies at schneider electric energy & sustainability services thanks forjoining us. is this mainly to do with the rising cost of crude oil or as much to do with its cost—cutting programme?” crude oil or as much to do with its cost-cutting programme? i think both factors a re cost-cutting programme? i think both factors are at play. clearly the oil prices have continued to rise in the last few months and that has boosted the average price that shell has been able to sell its product for the same time, after the oil price
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class, —— clash, tambe muck and other companies were ruthlessly and sometimes —— where profitable in cutting and lowering prices. and it acquired the regroup, that‘s a risky step been reaping the benefits? that was a big decision for shell to make, particularly as you mentioned, the market price for oil and gas was lower. i think shell and other companies see natural gas as an important part of their future strategy, as we look to decarbonise the natural gas that camp play a natural part in road transport. there can be a bridge to the future. bp firmly in the natural gas camp, it is giving a diversifying an interesting set of assets for future growth. share price has dipped partly due to be one—off tax charge
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due to the tax changes brought in by the us president donald trump. over the us president donald trump. over the longer term, the tax position looks more favourable: what is the one—off charge and why has it come about? it is due to donald trump's tax changes around corporation tax, that in the long term will lower taxation costs for companies doing business with subsidiaries in america but in the short time, an extra charge around camp repatriation of foreign profits. short—term pain, long—term game for shell and similar companies exxon mobil, one of the peers, announced they would significantly increase their investment plans in the coming yea rs their investment plans in the coming years as their investment plans in the coming yea rs as a their investment plans in the coming years as a result of the more attractive tax environment in the us. thanks forjoining us. the northern powerhouse was launched to redress the economic imbalance imbalance between the north and south of england. but four years on, a new report has found that children in the north
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are on average one gcse behind those in the south. our economics editor kamal ahmed met lord jim o‘neill, former treasury minister and architect of the northern powerhouse, to ask whether it is still a priority for the government. for the past couple of years, the north west part of the northern powerhouse has been outperforming the whole country. whether it‘s because of policies to do with northern powerhouse, i suspect some of it is, or other stuff, is obviously debatable. but i suspect it is. but it is really an encouraging basis for so many of the things to build on, to take us to this long—term holy grail of closing the productivity gap. which, importantly, in a national context, it is notjust important from those from the north and passionate about the north, it would change the game for the economy nationally. but how important is that for the general strength of the uk economy? london is a huge contributor, financially, to the rest of the country.
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it‘s not really, ultimately, that good for london or the rest of the country if we are dependent on hand—outs in london. if you have your own local engine that is economically as powerful as london, it is a game changerfor the nation. do you think that theresa may and theresa may‘s government has the same commitment to the northern powerhouse that george osborne, when you were treasury minister, had to the northern powerhouse? i don‘t think it can be as strong as when i was there with george osborne, because it was sort of like my baby. and it became a huge, top five priority for the government. is it still? it‘s not as big. what i would say, more encouragingly, is if you go right back to the prime minister‘s first speech on downing street‘s steps, it is very clear that she is sympathetic to the whole goal of doing something like the northern powerhouse. fuji film is hoping to boost its
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revenue to hire annually. ebay plans to drop its long—time partner paypal — instead hiring dutch company adyen for its payments business. ebay said the shift will result in lower payment processing costs for merchants. paypal shares plummeted by 10% after the news was announced. thusis thus is sales has climbed at ag barr despite the decision to cut sugar in its drinks including irn bru. it hopes to report sales up to 277 million pounds, up 7% on the previous year. check in with the
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market. royal dutch shell price is down partly because of that one—off tax charge mentioned earlier despite the rises, abbott capita is well on the rises, abbott capita is well on the board, its share price down 5%, on top of the 50% yesterday, it comes on top of the 50% yesterday, it co m es after on top of the 50% yesterday, it comes after it emerged british government officials met senior executives of the firm after issuing a large profit warning. one cabinet office minister has said in the last hour but capita is a different situation to carillion which collapsed in january. situation to carillion which collapsed injanuary. vodafone has fallen after revenue fell by 3.6%. in the third quarter. that was due toa in the third quarter. that was due to a stronger euro and the creation ofa to a stronger euro and the creation of a newjoint to a stronger euro and the creation of a new joint venture to a stronger euro and the creation of a newjoint venture in the netherlands —based taking their toll. that‘s all the business needs. 2017 was mexico‘s bloodiest year since records began. there were more than 25,000 murders in the country. but only around one in ten ever results in a successful prosecution,
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as the government struggles to contain the violence. now president enrique pena nieto has pledged to get the situation under control, using thousands of troops in problem areas, as andrew plant reports. another murder scene in mexico where police are fighting against record numbers of killings, more than 25,02017. --25,000 in 2017. homicide rates are measured per 100,000 people, in mexico that number is more than 20, one of the highest in the world. others are higher still. venezuela at 57. honduras with 42. el salvador at 61. mexico‘s government has vowed to crack down, pledging to get gang violence under control, and this is how, using more troops, aiming to round up known criminals and break up the cartels.
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drugs, they say, turf wars are fuelling the violence. translation: the different crime gangs have slow down their activities. people are happy that the soldiers are there now. there was a demand for a prompt response from the governed. i think we will have good results over time. the violence is not confined to gang members. in the tourist resort of cancun three days ago, people were killed in a bar. a tourist murdered in acapulco. 25 deaths in the course of a single weekend. a wave of murders that has terrified locals and is putting off tourists. as politicians and security forces here struggle to stay in control. coming up at the top of the hour, or more on the chinese visit from theresa may and we will talk about brexit and theresa may‘s comments on the rights of eu citizens during the
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transition period. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two — first we leave you with for a look at the weather... we‘ve got a fine and dry day from many parts of the uk, with some wintry showers moving into the far north. look at this lovely scene here, snowdrops in hampshire in the sunshine and from the satellite imagery can see lots of sunshine across england and wales. look at the speckled cloud here, further northern trust you go. these are showers feeding in. they are giving us some snow. many showers feeding in. they are giving us some snow. many of the higher ground but even down to lower levels we re ground but even down to lower levels were a bit of sleet and wet snow possible. all because of this cold northerly wind right across the uk, that means it‘s also feeling pretty cold out there as well. but have a look at the rest of the afternoon, we continue with sunny spells across many parts of england and wales, a
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few more showers though to the far west of wales, some snow across the high ground. wintry showers in northern scotland and northern ireland, temperatures on the thermometer about 5008 degrees but factor in that northerly wind. it feel colder, than that suggest. ——— 8 degrees. a few showers will come in in eastern parts of yorkshire, lincolnshire, norfolk and suffolk. this could also be tested little bit wintry. clear spells with temperatures down to 2—4 degrees. in the countryside, it will be close to freezing. friday morning, a frosty start but for many western errors are a few showers in pembrokeshire down to cornwall, and showers down the eastern areas of england, for many it will be a dry day was sunshine. temperature 6—8dc with lighter winds, it won‘t feel quite as cold as it will be today. through
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the weekend, we have a weather system moving in, it will stall over the spine of the uk, it will weaken in the second half of the weekend, said there would be too much rain. it will stay cloudy for many of us, still a wintry feel to conditions. on saturday, some snow of the high ground in northern england perhaps even down to low levels, lots of cloud generally speaking on saturday, killing of rain. sunday should be dropped —— sunday should be dry, and the temperatures 5—7d. sunshine across northern areas and that won‘t feel too bad. for many over the weekend, with the cloud, with the wintry mix of what rain and sleet and snow, not feeling particularly great, more on the website but that‘s all from me. goodbye. at this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at midday. theresa may meets china‘s president as she continues her visit to one of the world‘s biggest and fastest growing economies.
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during her trip, the prime minister slaps down demands by the eu to give its citizens who come to the uk residency rights during the brexit transition. stroke patients are getting younger and they are asking the public to look out for the symptoms. religious extremists are targeting schools to undermine british values warns england‘s chief schools inspector. facebook says its recent changes to how people see content has led to users spending less time on the site. also, lifetime bans for doping handed to dozens of russian olympic athletes are overturned. the ruling from the court of arbitration for sport also says the 28 athletes will have their 2014 sochi winter olympics results reinstated. and a campaign group says thousands pledged to avoid animal—derived products last month — with more people asking questions about where their food comes from.
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good afternoon. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the prime minister, theresa may, has met president xijinping in beijing during the diplomatic high—point of her three—day trade mission to china. mrs may said britain and china were enjoying a "golden era" in their relationship and that she wanted to "take further forward the global strategic partnership that we have established". it has been a warm welcome. i will
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come to her meeting with president xijinping ina come to her meeting with president xijinping in a moment. she has this nickname she has been given here which is on may and she was told this today. some young wags have been having a laugh at her present to president xijinping. she gave him a box set of the blue planet series apparently with a personal message from david attenborough in it. young people in china, not many of them have dvd players any more and they are jokingly saying, "what are those silver things and what are you supposed to do with them?" we will hear more of what was said behind closed doors because she will behind closed doors because she will be flying to shanghai tonight matters when reporters who are on
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the flight will get some briefing about what has gone on and have they spoken about human rights? have they spoken about human rights? have they spoken that the economy can access the british companies, greater access to this enormous market here in china. ——? to what extent is brexit dominating what is happening there in china? for those who wanted this to be all about trade, there is hundreds of billions of pounds worth of trade and investment being spoken of here and investment being spoken of here and yet brexit has been dominating and yet brexit has been dominating and that is partly because the prime minister raised this matter of the rights for eu citizens during that window prior to brexit in britain. we are not sure what rights they might or might not have. she wasn‘t specific other than saying they
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shouldn‘t have the same full rights as european citizens have right now in britain. once you see that, with the travelling press, that will dominate things and so it has a little bit swamped the message for her. there are 50 business leaders here trying to cut through on education, tourism, on services and trying to promote these things for britain prior to their being a free—trade with china. brexit again is looming large here. theresa may has signalled that she will fight a demand by the european union that eu citizens who move to the uk during the transition period after brexit be given full residency rights. the prime minister said that in the 2016 referendum, the british people hadn‘t voted for nothing to change. her comments are likely to be well received by conservative brexiteers — but have already drawn criticism from the eu. our assistant political editor norman smith is in westminster... we know someone has said citizens
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rights are not negotiable. cue a tough battle ahead. we're heading for a major showdown on what is one of the big issues around brexit, namely the whole issue of immigration and the access of eu citizens to the uk. the eu seem adamant that if we want to window all the benefits of the single market during this transition period, we will have to five —— abide by all the rules that means freedom of movement must continue unchanged during the transition phase eu citizens coming to britain during that two—year period roster have residency rights and still have the right to remain and live here indefinitely. they will still have the right to bring in family members, they were still have the right to benefits and education. mrs
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may‘s view is this is just not sellable to the british electorate because of movement was to continue unaltered and people would wonder what they had voted for. we are heading for a major showdown on the issue and the brexit secretary was asked about the issue in the last hour or so asked about the issue in the last hourorso in the asked about the issue in the last hour or so in the commons. we will be discussing in detail the treatment of people after the departure from the union. he must take it as read that they will be treated properly, we will not do anything which will undermine our economy and do everything possible to ensure the industry talks about that are supported. mrs may has been under pressure from tory brexiteers groaning about what they see as unacceptable compromises. they have applauded mrs may‘s decision to make a stand over freedom of movement with the former
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brexit minister, david jones this morning, saying it had to be redline issue. it isa it is a question of compromise. we are entering into a negotiation but the fact is that the eu have to understand at this stage, this is a position that the british government are going to adopt. the people of this country would be extremely concerned if they thought that there was going to be an unlimited right for people who came in during the transition period to live here. they will approve very strongly of what the prime minister has said. mrs may is under pressure to make a stand. what if she buckles on this issue?” don‘t anticipate she will. she has been clear about this issue today. i was pleased to see she made it clear she was not talking about a three—year transition period. it must be two years or maybe less than two years. an endeavour transition period would not be acceptable and it is good to see she is developing a much clearer position on
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implementation. some public support but it just yes implementation. some public support but itjust yes to the implementation. some public support but it just yes to the forthcoming negotiations over transition deal could be more bruising than many people thought likely and maybe could drag on beyond march. thank you very much. let us discuss this now and joining me is the labour mp for hove, peter kyle. do you think we are looking at pinch point which over what rights it systems would haveif over what rights it systems would have if they come to the uk during the transition period ? have if they come to the uk during the transition period? we are. this is one of very many pinch points. the issue of northern ireland is still an ongoing one and that has not been resolved. let me clarify one thing. this isn‘t about eu citizens come to reside in the uk. this is about british citizens also
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going to work in the eu. there is a flip side to this and the eu is watching. if we so we want people to come and live and work and contribute to our economy are not have any access to education, no access to health care, no access to the other safety nets we have in our society, making them second—class citizens, we are dooming criticisms toa citizens, we are dooming criticisms to a second—class citizenship all across the european union. it is profoundly un—british. across the european union. it is profoundly un-british. you think the eu has the upper hand in this? right now they have the moral upper hand and they have the economic upper hand. it is very difficult to see how theresa may, going off to china and stomping her feet on the ground to please 20 or 30 tory mps is going to please 20 or 30 tory mps is going to provide anything like the kind of dignity and human rights to british citizens who want to work abroad and
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also eu citizens who want to come here to work in our nhs for example. we need 20,000 nurses to come and work in our nhs. what are they thinking now? people making these decisions living across the eu looking at thejob decisions living across the eu looking at the job adverts that we are placing in their local newspapers to come and work in the nhs, whatare newspapers to come and work in the nhs, what are they going to think? they were work on an nhs but they will have no right to have the benefits of the nhs. it is absurd and inhuman and it is plain un—british. and inhuman and it is plain un-british. remind us what labour's position is on the rights of citizens in this transition phase. we wa nt citizens in this transition phase. we want to stay in the customer ‘s union and the trade market which will enable the free movement in that period. we have all our negotiating chips on the table throughout that period. i want the labour party to go further and i wa nt labour party to go further and i want is to remain permanently in the single market and customs union
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because that is the way we protect our economy through this. the prime minster has said she willjettison the british economy to satisfy 30 mps who want is out now and have no rights whatsoever and create a second—class citizenship for the hundreds of thousands of eu citizens who want to come and support our welfare services, our nhs, and our economy and pay taxes in this country. it just feels economy and pay taxes in this country. itjust feels the wrong way to go about this. on the china trip, number ten saying by the end of the trip, the three day trade mission, £9 billion of new contracts will have been secured. surely this demonstrates theresa may years getting trade links that the government has been saying it can be more free to establish after brexit. it is doing what it said it was going to do, isn‘t it? it is doing what it said it was going to do, isn't it? it is absolutely fantastic that theresa may and all of the british ministers
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are going out there and doing trade deals. i went on a delegation to china two years ago and saw the huge opportunities for china investing britain and britain investing in china. that needs to happen. bear this in mind. the government‘s document leaked this says that there is no benefit conceivable from additional trade deals that will outweigh britain not having access to the european labour market. the damage done by limiting labour come from europe to work, not traditionally, conditionally come to work in britain, will damage the economy far more than any benefit that can come from additional trade deals. we need more detail on that. we have seen far enough detail. all of the independent government advice is saying that is the case. all of the economic think tanks and the
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majority of opinion of experts in this country, but also british opinion is now the case that we need to protect our trading relationship with the european union, not damage it in the samet —— savage way it is at the moment. the idea that we can do £9 billion worth of trade with china and that will outweigh the fa ct we china and that will outweigh the fact we are leaving the trading block where we have traded 150,000 billion pounds worth of british product into that market since we have joined it. it product into that market since we havejoined it. it is product into that market since we have joined it. it is ludicrous that we can replace one with the other. peter kyle, thank you very much. the proportion of people having strokes in their 40s and 50s has risen sharply over the last decade. that‘s according to figures from public health england, which show 20% of stroke cases now occur in those aged between 40 and 59. our health correspondent catherine burns reports. my dad had a stroke. i had a stroke. the older you are, the greater your chance of it happening to you but the average age of men having a first stroke has fallen
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from 71 to 68. for women, it‘s gone from 75 to 73. adrian jones was just 53 when he had one. when i woke up in the morning, i didn‘t feel too great straightaway and when i twisted and tried to stand up, i immediately fell over. and i couldn‘t feel, i had no sensation on my left side at all. figures from public health england break down at what age people had first strokes. almost 60% were 70 or over. but it‘s interesting to see the increase in middle—aged people being affected. in 2007, about 15% of first—time stroke patients were aged between 40 and 59. by 2016, it had gone up to 20%. we know that obesity is a real national problem and that certainly contributes towards stroke. diabetes is a very strong risk factor for stroke. and i think that there‘s issues around lifestyle as well. we all lead a much more
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sedentary life, perhaps, than we used to. early treatment can help reduce the risk of disability or death so a campaign has been launched to help people recognise the symptoms as quickly as possible. face — has it fallen on one side? 40—to74—year—olds in england are eligible for health checks to help spot the early signs of various conditions, including strokes. catherine burns, bbc news. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: theresa may says the uk and china are enjoying a golden era of their relationship as she meets the country‘s president. she says she will fight eu plans to give citizens residency rights during the brexit transition. religious extremists targeting schools to undermine british mal use wands england‘s
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chief school inspector. —— british values. now to the sport newsroom. 28 russian athletes banned from the olympics the life have today have their suspensions overturned by the court of arbitration for sport stopped a days ahead of the winter olympics in south korea, 11 more athletes have their appeals against the international olympic committee‘s ban upheld. this goes back to the saatchi winter games and allegations containing reports that russia had a widespread conspiracy that covered up cheats, that dirty samples have been swapped with clean ones inside the anti—doping laboratory in 2014. the ioc took a look at this and they charged over 40 athletes with cheating. 39 of
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them were given lifetime bans and they went to the court of arbitration for sport to appeal that ban and 28 of them have had their appeal upheld. in a statement, they said there wasn‘t enough evidence provided by the ioc to prove they had cheated. those 28 now clear and allowed to compete. the results have been reinstated. the other 11, they have had their lifetime ban reduced or stopped they have been found guilty of committing a doping violation but most of them won‘t be able to compete in the winter olympics. jose mourinho has slammed a ridiculous start to their premier league defeat to spurs last night. they conceded the third fastest goal in premier league history scored by christian eriksson afterjust ii seconds. it helped set up a win over united who are 15 points behind
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manchester city. they beat west brom, 3—0. bournemouth manager eddie howe called their win away at chelsea the best when they have had in the top flight. chelsea move down to fourth but the cherries are holding their own during the third premier league campaign and move into the top half. the fa say they will investigate after west ham united suspended their direct of play recruitment. a national newspaper reporter tony henry has said he wanted the club to limit the number of african players because they have a bad aptitude and cause mayhem when they are not selected. —— attitude. tony henry has been suspended pending a full and thorough investigation. west ham united will not tolerate any type of discrimination and has therefore acted swiftly due to the serious nature of these claims. that is all the sport for now. we will have a
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full round—up ati:30pm. facebook says its users are spending significantly less time on the site following changes to its news feed content. the website‘s figures show that people are spending an average of a minute—and—a—half less each day on the network. the changes were designed to prioritise posts from friends and family while reducing the prominence of content from businesses, media and other companies. this has come out as part of its quarterly results and overall the numbers are very impressive. mind—boggling because facebook made $30 billion in the fourth quarter alone. up 47% on the same period last year. the chief executive has said that they changed the algorithm earlier this year to focus the news feed more on friends and family. this was partly in response to criticism that facebook was playing a part in spreading fake news. it made these changes but as a result, the amount of time spent by users on facebook
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overall has been reduced by 50 million hours every day. it‘s too early to say whether this is affecting its profits because this has just been introduced. absolutely and you‘ve also got to look at the scale of facebook. once a month. that is up i4% in a year. that is over a quarter of the world‘s entire population. its reach is huge. mind—boggling statistics. cutting down on those minutes a day does add up. the real problem is it is failing to attract younger users. they are more likely to use snapchat or instagram which facebook own but they are not going cross—platform. its competitor in china has lots of other networks within that and users do migrate and are a lot more intergenerational.
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the economic gap between the north and south of england will continue to grow, unless the government prioritises education and skills. that‘s the warning this morning from the northern powerhouse partnership — a body chaired by the former chancellor of the exchequer george osborne which champions his policy of boosting regional economies . today‘s report says disadvantaged children are being let down, and that a lack of funding and aspiration are holding back economic growth in the region. nina warhurst reports. if your child‘s born in the north—east, the latest league tables suggest there is a one in five chance he or she will go to an underperforming school. born in london, the chances arejusti in15. today‘s report says the key to closing the north—south divide includes £300 million of new money for early—years development, making the north a world
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leader in apprenticeships, and all northern businesses mentoring young people. how are you finding the communications? barclay‘s is one of the businesses behind today‘s report. they have more than 500 northern apprentices. i think it was an opportunity that i was quite surprised to find that i didn‘t have to move away for, because i think my preconception was you would probably have to move to have a really good career but now my view has completely changed on that now that i found the degree program because you can do it from anywhere. is the government now stepping up after being accused of neglecting the northern powerhouse post—george osborne? one of the real unsung bits about our northern powerhouse is the £70 million we put into our northern powerhouse schools strategy which goes all the way from early—years provision and making sure that is as good as it can be, to the maths and english hubs we have setup. the authors of today‘s report say if it‘s followed,
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there could be 850,000 newjobs and £100 billion of new money in the northern economy. they claim that children from all backgrounds and postcodes will be given a fairer start. nina warhurst, bbc news, middlesborough. let‘s look at some of today‘s other developing stories: the liberal democrats are claiming that a key government target, for treating people with severe mental health conditions in england, isn‘t being met. the party says it‘s gathered evidence showing people who experience a first episode of psychosis aren‘t getting a care package of sufficient quality. nhs england says more than three—quarters of patients are seen within two weeks — and that the research shows a partial and dated picture of the services provided. former health secretary, norman lamb, said mental health services lagged behind those for other illnesses. this would never be tolerated in cancer or any of other physical
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healthcare but it is tolerated here. we have the evidence you need to do to have an impact and get across the country, it‘s not being funded. hate crime againstjewish people in the uk is at a record high. a new report from the community security trust, which monitors anti—semitism, says thejewish community was targeted at a rate of nearly four—times—a—day last year. online abuse is said to have fallen, but there‘s been a spike in reports of violent assault. the head of ofsted is warning that schools in england are being used
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to ‘indoctrinate‘ pupils under the guise of religious education. in a speech today, amanda spielman will warn that the most ‘conservative voices‘ of particular faith groups do not speak for everyone, and schools should not be afraid to call out practices they think will negatively impact younger people. we are responsible for inspecting schools against equality law and the british values policy. it is government policy. one of those british values is tolerance and respect for all faiths and we are looking for signs that the value is breaking down and by being tolerant, you can end up importing intolerance
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and we have to make sure we find the balance in schools and we report where we find that balance is at for the first time since the second world war, mps look set to move out of the palace of westminster, while major renovation work is carried out. they voted in favour of the move last night. the repair programme will cost billions of pounds. simonjones reports. it may be a palace but one that‘s in desperate need of repair. anyone who‘s had building work done on their home will know it can be stressful, but mps are now facing the prospect of moving out for several years while it is carried out. it will cost billions, with both the commons and the house of lords having to up sticks, most likely to another part of whitehall. many mps say it‘s the only option. the building‘s crumbling, it needs rewiring and it‘s just not safe. conditions were even worse than down in the pit. there‘s some steel props holding the roof up. it looks like the workplace i used to work in before i came into this building, that was maltby colliery.
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other mps are reluctant to go, arguing the work should be done around them. there are also concerns about the cost. the lords still have to give their approval and with the proposed departure not until 2025, that is after the next general election, the next parliament may take a different view. simon jones, bbc news. for a full summary of the news you can go to our website where you‘ll be able to get more details on the day‘s stories. now let us go to the weather forecast. good afternoon. some crisp sunshine to look out for but we have showers and they have been driven end today by a north—westerly wind. most of them would be across north—western parts of the country. there are few down the eastern coast as well with temperatures between
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five and seven celsius. overnight tonight, there is the risk of a few icy patches particularly where we have seen this temperatures drop. temperatures tonight between two celsius and four celsius. the friday, we have the showers across the north sea coast to start the day and they will thin out as pressure builds and away from east coast, most of should have a fine and dry day. another exception will be western wales and cornwall where we will have a minor showers developing. temperatures around five and eight celsius. a little bit milder than it has been today but in the weekend, the risk of some rain and light snow for saturday. this is bbc newsroom live , our latest headlines.
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theresa may has met the chinese president, xijinping during her three day visit .their talks focused on global issues , including north korea‘s nuclear weapons programme. theresa may has signalled that she‘ll fight a demand by the european union, which wants full residency rights for eu citizens who move to the uk, during the transition period after brexit. the prime minister says the british people didn‘t vote in the eu referendum "for nothing to change". the proportion of middle—aged people having strokes has risen sharply over the past decade. figures from public health england show that 20% of stroke cases now occur in those aged between 40 and 59. the head of ofsted, amanda spielman, is warning that schools are being used by those who want to "actively pervert" education under the guise of religious belief. in a speech she called on head teachers to tackle those who undermine fundamental british values. the duke and duchess of cambridge have arrived in norway on the second leg of their nordic tour. later, the duke will meet norway‘s future entrepreneurs of tomorrow at an event in oslo.
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the royal couple have spent the past two days visiting the swedish capital, stockholm. let‘s get more on the report claiming ona let‘s get more on the report claiming on a skills gap in the north of england children are getting poll results and the rest of the country in the north. tom joins us the country in the north. tom joins us and leave. thanks forjoining us. tom forth is from the open data institute and he joins me from leeds. why do you think this attainment gap exists? in the report that comes out today, with long known about attainment gap between north and south, we‘ve struggled to understand why. one of the things that happened around a decade ago is london moved from being poorly performing in education to doing really well. it is kind of exceptional weather
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england now how while london does. pa rt england now how while london does. part of the reason for the gap is that the north and the north cities have not improved as quickly as london has. in terms of getting skills to young people and people of all ages, to get the jobs that would really help them and the economy.“ it not been simple to identify what has brought about changing the london area and replicate that model if you like, in the north? identifying the reasons is something that england is actually extremely good at. this if you look at the national people database, they have no institute, we love working with data and looking at data, the national people data base data and looking at data, the national people database that england has in the limerick is excellent. we have some good research is looking at these things, they have identified a few things that explain london‘s over
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performance. the always things to work out figure out, but the interventions london challenge and higherfunding interventions london challenge and higher funding for pupils interventions london challenge and higherfunding for pupils in london, did higherfunding for pupils in london, d id clearly higherfunding for pupils in london, did clearly lead higherfunding for pupils in london, d id clearly lead to higherfunding for pupils in london, did clearly lead to a performance that now everybody and i think what‘s great around skills and education is everybody agrees that more skills are fantastic for everybody, whether it‘s for a better job or a better life. we are looking at saying maybe we should be emulating those things that really worked in london, in northern cities and across the north. where does the responsibility for this light, for making the change? is it primarily with the education sector or the business community as well? we spoke to the principle of the engineering university technical college of northern lincolnshire, where they are blending a secondary education, are blending a secondary education, a traditional one, with technical skills as well. this was one of my favourite bits of the report that has come out. the reports by the
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north powerhouse partnership is led by business led organisation, one of the things it said, rather than complaining about skills gaps and shortage, it says business has two step up. business are still start reaching out to people that it wants to train encouraging them to understand the possibilities and understand the possibilities and understand the possibilities and understand the opportunities that are, and take that chance. it took a lot about apprenticeships and if the north of england can make apprenticeships a first—class citizen in terms of skills, that would do some fantastic things. you mentioned in north lincolnshire, in leave there are fantastic examples of technical education, building colleges, and greater manchester police also a real push, you look at andy burnham and his deputy for skills, which are working across parties. sean is a conservative politician, the mayhem isa--
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is a —— the mayor of manchester is labour. the upscaling of people is absolutely the way forward. i‘m glad business is being pushed in this report. to fix things rather than just business blaming other people. is there enough money around to bring about this sort of change? businesses, you could argue, that is something in it for them if they find these programmes themselves might get some fantastic find these programmes themselves might get some 1 grand c - behind going on into the grand ideas behind what this report is talking about? that is the important question. the report has for quite a lot of money, —— asks for quite a lot of funny, i‘m not sure it will be found. if we look at how education is run and how further education colleges especially are run, the funding
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