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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 2, 2018 6:00am-8:30am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. the number of men dying from prostate cancer overtakes the number of women killed by breast cancer for the first time. it's now the third biggest cancer killer in the uk. charities are calling for more screening and research into the disease. good morning. it's friday, the 2nd of february. also this morning: the prime minister says her trip to china is a sign of a "global britain" and insists that she is delivering what people want on brexit. i'm nota i'm not a quitter. i mean this because there is a job to be done here and that's delivering for the british people. an investigation into the mystery death of natalie wood more than 30 yea rs death of natalie wood more than 30 years ago says her husband is being
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treated as a person of interest. apple has recorded £14 million of profit for the last three months, but as sales of iphones fell shortly despite the launch of a new handset, i will have the details. —— £14 billion,. in sport, there's a rethink over funding for some 0lympic there's a rethink over funding for some 0lympic and paralympic sports as uk sport has a change of heart. traditional sports badminton and archery get £600,000, ahead of the tokyo games in 2020, while new sports including climbing will receive a share of over a million too. we'll find out how a bear‘s eye view can tell us about what the future holds for polar bears on ice. high pressure across as today, so things are largely dry and settled. but there will be a keen wind and a few showers in the west. but the cool theme continues into next week. more in 15 minutes. thank you. first, our main story. the number of men dying in the uk from prostate cancer has overtaken the number of women killed by breast cancer for the first time.
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the charity prostate cancer uk says advances in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer have paid off and similar benefits could be seen if more money was allocated to the fight against prostate cancer. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. prostate cancer does not discriminate. last year, keen runner tony callier discovered he had the disease while training for an ultramarathon. his diagnosis was late, and he knows cancer will eventually take his life, so tony is using the time he has left to warn other men about the dangers. i think it's really important that people are aware of what the symptoms are and i would actually urge men to talk to their doctors, if they have any urinary issues at all. my issue is that i didn't actually have any symptoms and they think i had the cancer for ten years beforehand. more men are living to an age where they have a greater chance of developing prostate cancer.
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so, in 2015, more than 11,800 men died of the disease, compared with just over 11,400 deaths in 2015 due to breast cancer. and while the proportion of people dying from prostate cancer, the mortality rate, has fallen in the past decade, down by 6%, the decline in deaths from breast cancer has been even greater, at more than 10%. it is time to get behind this and to realise that we need to get on top of it now because it willjust become more common, and it is actually going to kill more men, if we are not able to do that. tony has joined those calling for increased funding for research and the development of a reliable prostate screening programme, so the gains seen in the fight against breast cancer can be matched in the fight against the disease that he knows will eventually claim his life, too. in the next half an hour, we'll speak to a gp about the signs and symptoms of prostate cancer to look out for.
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that's at 6:40am. health leaders have written to thejustice secretary, urging him to reform the pay—out system for negligence claims against the nhs. they say the nhs would have to pay up they say the nhs would have to pay up to £65 billion before current claims were successful. the government is looking at measures to control costs in such cases. theresa may insists she's delivering what british people want on brexit, and setting out a clear vision to the rest of the world. downing street says billions of pounds‘ worth of deals have been signed during her three—day visit to china, which ends later. earlier, the prime minister spoke to the bbc. it is important that we deliver what people want, which is control of our money, orders and laws, which is what we are doing. what are showing in china is how we can ensure that we actually enhance our trade with the rest of the world as well. why do we want to do that? it was as good for people in britain and good
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forjobs in britain. 0ur correspondent robin brant joins us from shanghai. she is trying to be convincing that she is on top of the message he is trying to deliver. the trip is nearly finished. it is combative stuff in that interview and she and this trip to china as she began, saying, iam not this trip to china as she began, saying, i am not a quitter, and making clear that she wants to carry on until the next general election. 0n brexit it is just the on until the next general election. 0n brexit it isjust the beginning of the negotiation process with the eu and she says she has laid out her vision and she convinced that she is doing her best, in terms of delivering for the british people when it comes to brexit. 0n the china trip she promises in that interview that there will be more jobs in the uk and more british products will be sold in china as a result. i think she will be pretty pleased. she has had the cloud of wrecks it hanging over her and questions over her leadership. 0n the chinese side they have said, the premier, that despite brexit, whatever happens, there will be no
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change to the uk — china relationship and the reality is this is the beginning of strategic deepening. that's what both sides wa nt deepening. that's what both sides want and irrespective of whether theresa may says on the job or not this is a long—term prospect in terms of the uk and china and their trade relationship and beyond. thanks very much. police investigating the death of natalie wood more than three decades ago say her husband robert wagner is 110w ago say her husband robert wagner is now being treated as a person of interest. the actress was found dead after going missing from a yacht off the coast of california, 37 years ago. 0ur los angeles correspondent james cook has more details. natalie wood was a hollywood superstar with three 0scar nominations when she died suddenly in 1981 at the age ofjust 43. her body was found floating in the water off the coast of california. the yacht on which she was sailing with her husband robert wagner, a co—star
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and the boat's captain. initially the death was ruled an accident but the death was ruled an accident but the enquiry was reopened in 2011. lease now say to new witnesses have corroborated accounts of a fight between robert wagner and natalie wood on the night she disappeared. detectives say it appears she was the victim of an assault and they believe her husband was the last person to see her alive. police say robert wagner has refused to speak to them since the case was reopened. they've not declared the death of murder and no charges have been filed against the act. he is now 87 yea rs old filed against the act. he is now 87 years old and has not commented on the latest developments. the elder son of the late cuban leader fidel castro has died in havana at the age of 68. given state media reported that he took his own life after a battle with depression. he was a nuclear physicist and worked for cuba's honest government.
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the nspcc has accued the government of "dragging its feet" when it comes to protecting children online. the charity says ministers have failed to implement half of the recommendations made in a report, which was commissioned a decade ago. mps say they are planning a voluntary code as part of the internet safety strategy. sarah campbell reports. this is the online generation. 0ver the past decade the internet and its use has expanded rapidly. instagram, snapchat and whatsapp didn't even exist in 2008. back then this professor was asked by the then prime minister to look into children's‘ safety online, ten years on the nspcc seemed less than half of the recommendations have been put into place. uk councilfor child internet safety was established. video games now have to have an age rating, but the charity says there's been no improvement to parental controls for games consoles and no
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code of practice is yet in place for the online industry. the government has really dragged their feet in implementing recommendations from what was a landmark report ten years ago by the professor that was supposed to be a comprehensive package to keep children safe. those measures haven't been acted on and is clearly essential that now we do see the government take steps, in particular introducing a code of practice and an independent regulator to make social networks keep children safe. the government says it does intend to introduce a volu nta ry says it does intend to introduce a voluntary code of practice for social media networks and it says changes to the law will also be considered to compel companies to reduce the risks they are science pose the children. —— their science. prince harry and meghan markle presented awards at the second annual endeavour fund awards last night, celebrating the achievements of wounded, injured and sick servicemen and women. ms markle's experience in the spotlight came in handy as she helped out her co—presenter who struggled with the envelope containing the names
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of the nominees. always useful to have someone help you an envelope. always! good morning. iam you an envelope. always! good morning. i am talking funding and good news for some of the sports, new paralympic sports and stars of badminton for example, it seems money for medals. given what they've done a world champion level they could get funding. wasn't that always the way? it was cut for badminton. stars like shorter cocci has been world champion twice at bouldering, she can now get from the —— funding. that's like climbing. there's a rethink over funding and money for five new 0lympic and paralympic sports too.
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uk sport has had a change of heart. £600,000 is given to archery and badminton ahead of the tokyo games in 2020, while para—taekwondo, para—badminton, sport climbing, karate and bmx freestyle will receive a share of over £1 million too. more bad news for england women's manager phil neville. his first choice goalkeeper karen bardsley was badly injured in just the second minute of last night's match between her side manchester city and chelsea. the star of the australian open, kyle edmund, will miss great britain's davis cup tie against spain, which gets under way today. the british number one developed a hip injury during last week's aussie open semi—final defeat by marin cilic and wasn't able to recover in time. and find out at 6:30am why warrington skipper chris hill, here on the left, had to run to hospital midway through his side's loss to leeds, in the opening game
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of the super league season. a big match, opening day of the season, his team as well warrington have already made all of their replacements, so he leaves the field and leaves his side one man down. why does he go to hospital? a good reason, i would say! his teammates have forgiven him? so basically he got the call saying his wife was going into labour. fabulous! but some people say they would have stayed on the pitch for another ten minutes. i would have gone. but he did leave his team one man down. i think leeds would have won anyway, but what would you have done? you are not going to look back on that and say, i wish i played those extra ten minutes. it's a 1—off moment and you don't know how long labour will last or how quickly it will be over. this was last night? yeah. do we know if everything was ok?
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that's what i'm trying to find out. if you know anything, please get in touch! we need the end of the story. fingers crossed. we need all of the details. thanks. carol is dressed appropriately for the weather this morning because there are cold spells coming along. so you are all in blue, to match your map. that's right. lending with the sea as well. this morning it's a chilly start to the day. some of us have temperatures around freezing or below and for others it's not as cold as it was this time yesterday. many of us will have seen is like this. a beautiful weather watchers picture. the forecast today is sunny and chilly. the wind is not as strong as yesterday and we could see a little bit of frost first thing, but will be about it. we have a weather front sinking south and you
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can also see that we have showers coming in across eastern england and a keen wind. we've also got showers across northern ireland and scotland and wales and south—west england. especially in devon and cornwall. the high pressure is across us, so things are fairly settled. plenty of sunshine around today and in the light winds it will still be chilly, but not as cold as it has done of late. temperatures find in the north —— five in the north to about seven or eight further south. heading through this evening and overnight, a weather front which is already coming across the west with the cloud will introduce rain initially to northern ireland and we will see snow on higher ground. the same for western scotland. snow on higher ground. it will come into wales and south—west england. snow on higher ground in wales. a little bit of sleet mixed in. low temperatures could see ice on untreated surfaces. further south, three degrees in london. if you are stepping up first
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thing tomorrow it will feel chilly. this is a weather front and tomorrow it will move eastwards. just how far is still open to question, but this is still open to question, but this is what we think at the moment. as it moves east it will still produce no, even a modest hills across scotland. we see some snow largely on the heels of northern england, in the pennines for example, and as it moves through northern ireland. there could be sleet in some heavy showers as they move across from the west. ahead of it brighter skies. again, no heat wave. for in aberdeen, five in norwich, seven in plymouth. moving into sunday, again a lot of dry weather around. breezy. there will be a few showers. also some brighter spells at times out towards the west. the temperatures range, 4—6. in some of those showers, with the wind coming in from the east, a bitterly cold
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direction for us. we could have wintriness as well, a mixture of rain, sleet and possibly snow. maybe evenin rain, sleet and possibly snow. maybe even in the south—east. these are showers and not all of us will either. then as we head into monday it remains cold. some of us again even next week will have further spells of snow. and we are not out of winter just yet. not spells of snow. and we are not out of winterjust yet. not big news for you, naga, but possibly charlie. let's take a look at today's papers. good morning. how are you? it isn't a weird question, i am asking. it sometimes is from you. yeah. here we go. let's look at the papers. i am just saying hello! the front page, quite a few of the newspapers enjoying the pictures of meghan markle and prince harry attending their first markle and prince harry attending theirfirst evening markle and prince harry attending their first evening function together. a lot of interest in what
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she is wearing, of course the other papers as well, and the nhs stories, this is about pay—outs for blunders, the amounts of money being paid out through the health service, just be secretary there saying alarming amounts of money. they are pending 01’ amounts of money. they are pending or having been paid out in negligence. the front page of the mirror has another nhs story, the poll shows 73% would pay more to save the nhs. most of us would pay an extra pound a week. the pictures on the top of the paper here is a story we are covering, we understand that 37 years on, investigators looking into the death of natalie wood, the hollywood actress, she died 37 years ago, they have now named robert wagner her husband as a person of interest. the daily mail, more curiosity about who is designing the outfits for kate and meghan markle, the main story is the
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lead story about prostate cancer, a bigger killer than breast cancer for the first time. more on that throughout the program. another nhs story on the front page of the time, looking at the cost of moisturiser, saying the owner of the high street chemist boots charging £1500 for single pots of moisturiser but others says have sold for less than £2 and a bill was sent to the health service is specially made cream for patients with skin problems in 2016, this is according to payment records being seen and a picture there of course of robert wagner and natalie wood, talking about him being a person of interest. are you alright then? iam. clearly, iwas person of interest. are you alright then? i am. clearly, i was up late tonight but before last but looking at the tech results, it has been a really big day for an update on how they are faring, they don't make the papers because they were so late
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that apple reporting their biggest ever profit figure company in the world, they made 14 billion dollars in profit, around £11 billion, for the last three months of last year. it is extraordinary. were they the previous record holders vote? they have always been up there. the big race this year is to become the first trillion dollar valued company in the world and the races between amazon and apple. 0vernight turning toa amazon and apple. 0vernight turning to a good quarter profit of £2 billion, its revenue is up as well but interesting, netflix have the best of scrivener numbers are pretty sharply as well, hbo, particularly a us story but netflix around the world signing up 8.3 million customers in the last three months —— subscriber numbers. it was expected to be around 6.3 but clearly many more of us are signing up clearly many more of us are signing up to use their services. horses for
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courses, why up to use their services. horses for courses, why soon up to use their services. horses for courses, why soon fences at cheltenham and grand national could be neon yellow. white. even bright blue! why? what colour are they now? dark orange, dark red. green. ring predominantly. this is how it is. —— green. it isn't to jazz up the sport but because they have found that horses don't see orange and red very well. not how we do. so to make it more say for them, saying that the big fences coming up, they are experimenting to see if they paint the borders neon yellow, white, blue. if the logic is you are telling the horse about what is coming up, why isn't the colourblind at the top of the fence? it is where the board is to hold the bush in place if you like. i will, it looks like it is imprinted on... it the hedgein like it is imprinted on... it the hedge in place. that tends to be the colour but horses cannot see it,
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apparently, according to research, it is ongoing at exeter university. a quick scientific experiment, according to latest science daniel craig is the worst looking james bond, why? because of the way that you measure a face. there is the true perfection, you find the golden ratio, i will demonstrate this right now. charlie. if that's what you are brandishing a ruler? let me. help me. i'm not sure with this. we measure that we measure the wits, 0! —— width. the golden ratio... your face is as wide as the length of your golden ratio is nowhere near. that gets my hair in place in the rank length of the face divided by the wits of the face, the golden ratio is 1.16? the wits of the face, the golden ratio is1.16? 1.6. the wits of the face, the golden ratio is 1.16? 1.6. you were nowhere
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near it. you make me nervous holding that ruler. please come back sometime. 6:32 am. today is the final day of the may's visit to china. she has insisted she is delivering what the british people wa nt delivering what the british people want when it comes to brexit, despite persisting criticism from within her own party. speaking to the bbc, she insisted she is setting out a clear vision to the rest of the world. it is important that we deliver what people want which is control of our money, our borders and our laws and it is what we are doing but what i am showing in china is how we can ensure that we actually enhance our trade with the rest of the world as well. why do we want to do that? it is good for people in britain, jobs in britain. prime minister, can you stay on? people are asking you to be clear about your priorities. how long do use day on, do you believe? let's be clear, i set out what my
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vision is, i have setup and i have said two people at every stage when we can fill in the detail we will do so and that is exactly... how long can you stay on? the idea that we have to have—we are about to com plete have to have—we are about to complete the negotiation with the eu on ourfuture complete the negotiation with the eu on our future relationship complete the negotiation with the eu on ourfuture relationship is wrong, we are at the beginning of the process of negotiating with the european union so we will be out there in ensuring that the deal we get delivers on what the british people want. that is what this is about. i know that what they want is good job of themselves and their children and that is what it is important to me to be here in china where businesses have been signing deals, selling more uk products, great uk products, into china and ensuring there are more jobs to people in the uk. do you want to be the tory leader at the next general election? i have been asked this on a number of occasions and i said clearly that are my political career i have served my country and have served my party and i am not a quicker, i am in this because there
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isa quicker, i am in this because there is a job to be done here which is delivering the british people and doing it in a way that ensures the future prosperity of our country, global britain, global britain is a real visions of the united kingdom. i watch the british people to see a government which is delivering for them around the world and that is that the what we are doing. our view is the day after day the tory party fighting amongst themselves. how do you reassert authority? i am doing with the british people want which is delivering on brexit but also getting out around the world ensuring that we bring jobs but to britain. companies will be selling more great british products to china asa more great british products to china as a result of this trip, there will be more people injobs in the uk as a result of this trip. but global britain in action. prime minister, thank you very much. thank you. we have been discussing some of her comments throughout the morning. something now to make you smile. what do you get if you cross a polar bear and a gopro camera?
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0n the serious side, you get some brilliant research of how the animals are coping with the diminishing arctic ice. 0n the flip side, you get some brilliant pictures, like these ones in our science correspondent victoria gill's report. a poll of their‘s few of the arctic. —— polar bear. these pictures were taken from cameras inside tracking collars, scientists fitted them june 19 politesse. in a study carried out over three seasons in the arctic, the researchers set out to find out whether animals are getting enough to eat during the critical spring thaw. but a light studies have shown that arctic sea ice is decreasing at a rate of about 14% every decade. and the polar bears need that to hunt and eat, their main and most calorie rich prey, seals. that was well is fitting them with gps tracking, camera containing collars, the research is injected the polar bears to a metabolic resale. ——
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tracer. this revealed that wild pears have a higher metabolic rate than previously thought. and that most of them were unable to catch a food to meet their energy needs. the scientist say this new technology following their every move and that every meal reveals just how these predators‘s survival will be affected as the icy environment transforms around them. they are amazing pictures. just wonderful. lovely. it is 6:26 am. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alpa patel. 60 years since her murder, police are appealing for more information on the unsolved case of a hertfordshire teenager. the 17—year—old anne noblett was strangled and her body frozen solid in woodland near wheathampstead.
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police say they believe there's a good chance someone still alive knows the killer and are urging them to finally come forward with information. the board, people keep things and yes we would certainly hope that somebody may just yes we would certainly hope that somebody mayjust give us a little bit of information. they may not realise how it is to us, but anything at all can be of use to us. new analysis of two infamous letters said to be written by jack the ripper suggests that they are fakes. experts studied the notes supposedly penned by the east end murderer and sent to a news agency in 1888. similarities to other writing at the time suggests that they were, in fact, faked byjournalists to boost business. london's first bingo academy has been launched in camden. the company behind it hope to attract younger people to the game. the number of halls in london has dropped from over 50 in 2006 to just 19 today. intimidated or overwhelmed by the
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skill levels that they face in traditional bingo hall is what we are trying to do is give young people a chance to compete so that they know the rules, they going with more confidence, enjoy themselves more, go back again and hopefully over time bingo will grow. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, the overground is part suspended between wandsworth road and clapham junction, while a track fault is fixed. and on the northern line, there are severe delays between edgware and camden due to late—finishing engineering work. 0n the trains, delays are possible in and out of paddington because of emergency engineering works. 0n the roads, goldhawk road in shepherds bush remains closed between shepherds bush green and st stephen's avenue for water main repairs. in brixton, brixton water lane is closed between dulwich road and tulse hill also due to problems with a water main. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. a fairly decent day of weather on the way for us
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today. what is quite windchill as there was yesterday, the winds will fall there was yesterday, the winds will fa ll over there was yesterday, the winds will fall over little white and continued to ease as we had through the day. good spells of sunshine and it should stay dry. starting with temperatures above freezing between 2- temperatures above freezing between 2— four degrees at with more cloud around the further east you are. the winds slightly brisk and one or the early showers across parts of hertfordshire and a is otherwise a dry day with the best of the sunshine in the west. it will feel a little more like 6— eight celsius with slightly lighter northerly winds. as we had through this evening and overnight again it is set to stay dry, some cloud around the eastern areas, temperatures dropping low enough to get a widespread frost i think we apply the wind as we head into tomorrow morning. tomori said to be a cloudy day with a little drizzle out towards western areas, there be some brightness out in the east. i thunder we have some cold air moving through and we could see some wintry showers. actually weekend ahead. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. it's friday, february 2nd. coming up on breakfast today: there was mixed news for technology firm apple overnight, with profits increasing, but a fall in the number of iphones sold. ben will be here to tell us which companies are hot on its heels. how smart you in the office? just one in ten british workers puts a suit on to go into the office. we'll discuss whether the traditional business suit and tie has had its day. and we'll meet the man taking record breaking to a new level. john farnworth‘s aiming to set a record by doing "keepy—uppies" while trekking to everest‘s base camp. he'll be with us just after 8:30am. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. the number of men dying in the uk from prostate cancer has overtaken the number of women killed by breast cancer for the first time.
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the charity prostate cancer uk says advances in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer have paid off and similar benefits could be seen if more money was allocated to the fight against prostate cancer. it really is time to actually get behind this and to realise that we need to get on top of it now because it is just need to get on top of it now because it isjust going need to get on top of it now because it is just going to become need to get on top of it now because it isjust going to become more common and it will kill more meaningfully aren't able to do that. health leaders have written to thejustice secretary, urging him to reform the pay—out system for negligence claims against the nhs. they say the nhs would have to pay up to £65 billion if all current claims were successful. the government says it is looking at measures to control costs in such cases. theresa may insists she's delivering what british people want on brexit and setting out a clear vision to the rest of the world. downing street says billions of pounds‘ worth of deals have been signed during her three day visit to china, which ends later. earlier, the prime minister spoke to the bbc. imd win what the british people
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want, which is delivering on brexit, but also getting around the world, ensuring we bring jobs back to britain. companies will be selling more great british products to china asa more great british products to china as a result of this trip. there will be more people injobs in the uk as a result of the trip. that's global written in action. —— britain. a result of the trip. that's global written in action. -- britain. but go straight to our correspondent. this is a determined and up would looking theresa may, but the backdrop has been amongst a lot of criticism? well, she's come here for this three—day visit which ends today with two things. questions about leadership, some of it from people on her own side, and of course the uncertainty and instability for both her and the people in the chinese leadership over brexit and what the polls. but her view has been that this trip demonstrates, as she said, that written is more outward looking, is
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a global trading nation and she has come here with the intention of increasing trade. china is only the uk's eighth biggest export market. that's got to improve if the uk economy is going to grow sustainably. so deals have been done and she insists that those deals that have been done will bring as you heard morejobs to that have been done will bring as you heard more jobs to the that have been done will bring as you heard morejobs to the uk, more british products sold in this country. i think broadly speaking the chinese have reassured her that whatever happens with brexit the relationship between the china and uk won't change. this has been about deepening, both sides have used that word, this strategic relationship and whether theresa may survives that relationship or not is important for the uk and for china top white thanks for the moment. —— thanks for the moment. police investigating the death of hollywood star natalie wood 37 years ago say her husband robert wagner is now being treated as a person of interest.
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the actress was found dead after going missing from a yacht off the coast of california. the eldest son of the late cu ban leader fidel castro has died in havana aged 68. cuba's state media reported that fidel castro diaz—balart, widely known as fidelito, took his own life after a long battle with depression. he was a nuclear physicist and worked for cuba's communist government. the government is facing criticism for failing to implement adequate safeguards for children online. in 2008, the byron review, commissioned by gordon brown, put forward 38 recommendations on internet safety. the nspcc says fewer than half have been properly implemented. ministers say they are planning a voluntary code as part of their forthcoming internet safety strategy. health experts are calling on the government to fully fund ivf treatment to help cut the number of multiple pregnancies that are riskierfor mothers and babies. the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists says the health and financial burden these
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pregnancies pose on the nhs can't be overstated. prince harry and meghan markle presented awards at an event last night which celebrated the achievements of wounded, injured and sick servicemen and women. ms markle's experience in the spotlight came in handy as she helped out her co—presenter, who struggled with the envelope containing the names of the nominees. 0ver over to the sport and of course prince harry, all of those things, sport, are close to his heart. i'm sure he will be pleased with this news. remember when funding was withdrawn from sports like badminton ahead of the tokyo 0lympics withdrawn from sports like badminton ahead of the tokyo olympics and paralympics? now, for the likes of the adcocks, there has been a change of heart and a welcome u—turn for many. both sports will now receive funding of over £6,000 each, archery and badminton, and five new sports,
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including sports climbing and karate, will receive a share of over £1 million. last year the adcocks one blonde —— won bronze at the 0lympics. one blonde —— won bronze at the olympics. uk sport has recognised we have the potential. so to get backing from them is positive. good day at the office. we've worked really hard and to get that medal, all of our hard work rewarded, it's all of our hard work rewarded, it's a really positive step and we are really happy about that. things don't seem to be getting any easierfor phil neville, who's started his role as england women's manager. after the controversy over his appointment, he was at kingsmeadow last night to cast an eye over chelsea and manchester city's england players. and he wouldn't have wanted to see this. england goalkeeper karen bardsley was stretchered off after falling heavily on her shoulder in just the second minute of the match. look at the height. write down on
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top. the game was held up for nine minutes while she was treated on the pitch. the game ended 0—0. she has gone off to hospital to be checked. she's got a little bit of pain in herarm checked. she's got a little bit of pain in her arm and her shoulders, but she is talking and she seems, you know, 0k and in good spirits, so we will trust the medical team to carry on from there. the super league season got back under way last night. there were victories for hull fc and the champions leeds. it was certainly "labour intensive", though, for warrington skipper chris hill, seen here on the left. he had to leave midway through the 16—12 loss to leeds because his wife went into labour. so he missed a great try from england teammate ryan hall, although he had more important things to worry about last night. kyle edmund is set to miss great britain's davis cup tie against spain, which gets under way today. he developed a hip injury during last week's australian open
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semi—final defeat by marin cilic and wasn't able to get over it in time. he's in marbella to support his team—mates though and could be drafted into play should his injury situation improve. i'm out here because i want to be pa rt i'm out here because i want to be part of it. it's not like... trying to put davis cup second, i always try to be ready when i can. but in one way it was a good prong because i made a deep run into the australian open. so it was a quick turnaround. they had done so well i might have been ready for here. so disappointment for edmund, but opportunity knocks for liam broady and cameron norrie. but who are they? well, liam broady, who you can see in the pictures here getting ready for today's match, probably the biggest of his life, is ranked 165 in the world rankings. norrie is the world 114. so both face really tough tasks. broady takes on the 21st—ranked albert ramos—vinolas. there's no pressure on us and i'm
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just going to focus solely on myself and what i can bring to the court and what i can bring to the court and see if albert can handle what i have to offer. i think is going to have to offer. i think is going to have to offer. i think is going to have to bring his a game and play some pretty good tennis, because i'm not going to be going anywhere. it's a great opportunity for me to play away in spain on clay. i couldn't be more thankful for the opportunity and just want to show the world what ican do. liam broady will play in the first singles rubber. you can follow the action live on the red button and online from 9:45am this morning and there's also coverage on bbc two from 1pm. and, finally, think of elite nigerian sport and what comes to mind? the super eagles national football team with premier league stars alex iwobi, and wilfred ndidi. well, after next week, that could all change at the winter 0lympics. the country will make history by entering a female bobsleigh team for the games in south korea. they're the first nigerian athletes to qualify for the winter olympics,
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and they've had to raise their own money to get there. all three bobsledders were once track and field athletes, before switching to winter sports. that's why, because it's all about the sprinting. anything can happen and we are here to compete. we went through a lot of things, a lot of trials, to get here, so i think it's only right that we give our best effort and represent everyone, notjust nigeria, but africa as a continent as well and everyone supporting us. what a story that is. no snow in nigeria, but it's all about the sprinting. that's why they have been able to qualify. an interesting story coming up. there have been new numbers coming out about prostate cancer, showing more men are being diagnosed than women with breast cancer and it's all about whether or not people test. taps that's why we are seeing the rise. —— perhaps. i had checked last year. it was so
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easy. painless. ten minutes. a place near you to go. fine. luckily it was 0k. near you to go. fine. luckily it was ok. i will keep going back. it's so important. it is a good advertisement for people to know it's not that difficult. every day, 129 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer in the uk. now, for the first time, the number of men dying from the disease has overtaken the number of women who die from breast cancer every year. prostate cancer uk is calling for significant investment into research, and the introduction of a screening programme. we're joined now in the studio by gp dr fari ahmad. a very good morning to you. so, these statistics tell a story. this has overtaken breast cancer as the biggest killer. what do you make of it? it feels like it has crept up on us. i think part of it is the disease itself. the slow—growing disease itself. the slow—growing disease that attempts to affect men
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over 45. we have focused a lot on breast cancer and on women and it's almost been not looked at as much. i think some of that is because men tend to be active and involved in their health and they don't go to their health and they don't go to the gb as often. they don't engage with things as much as women. so there is some of that going on as well. but i'm not that surprised that it well. but i'm not that surprised thatitis well. but i'm not that surprised that it is creeping up. we are living longer, so the longer you live the more chances of developing this. mike used the word painless, it was ten minutes. there's a lot of reluctance. it does involve a rectal exam, which is not something many people would relish. they could fill in —— feel embarrassed, be worried about the discomfort. how easy is it now for men to potentially approach a gp? it's not what men of a certain age do. i do understand their reluctance, but it's ourjob. some
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people might find it an awkward thing to talk to the doctor about, but we are used to having these awkward conversations. not everyone will need a rectal examination, but sometimes if we catch it early that's great. what about the science? i was just going to ask about the indicators. they aren't specifically for prostate cancer. they tend to be symptoms with passing you are in, so people can struggle to go, feel like they aren't going completely. they get out more. they are suddenly having to go... sometimes people get light in the euro and all infections. then there are more symptoms as the disease spreads. but often those symptoms can just be about getting older and you prostate getting bigger. but it is important to go and speak to your gp if you have these symptoms and it is usually a discussion, they will find out more about you and what the symptoms. you
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might need a blood test, an examination sometimes. what are the screaming —— screaming parameters? women are told that a certain age you have breast cancer screenings. does the same apply for men? widowed have an official prostate screening. should there be, in your opinion? to prompt people? there a lots of issues and lots of debate about this. the psa, a blood test that shows you prostate levels, has been around for a while and initially there was some thought that that would be a good screening tool. but it's not been that obvious that it has helped save lives, so a lot of stuff still needs to happen. at the moment the best way to diagnose it is talk to your doctor, get a blood test and you might need to have an examination. but they are not painful. they are easy. thank you very much for your time this morning. we will be talking about it later as well this morning, just
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after 8a m later as well this morning, just after 8am up with an expert as someone who has been through the process. it's 6:45 and you're watching breakfast from bbc news. carol is very grateful to be inside the studio, you were in a mild breeze i understand. a mild breeze! it was freezing, not just in breeze i understand. a mild breeze! it was freezing, notjust in london, either. good morning. this morning will be pretty chilly, some frost around first thing in the west midlands and the west country but thatis midlands and the west country but that is it. for many of us, some showers. more especially in the north and east, coming in across parts of scotland and ireland, parts of wales and south—west england. as we go through the morning to showers persisting eastern parts of england, move to the west, it is cold but we have brighter skies. showers will be heavy and they will also have perhaps a bit of sleet and hail in them as we go through the day. the southern counties, dry weather, niki if you are stepping out, and then we running the show was in the
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south—west, especially across devon and cornwall. wales, some showers today but for many we will start off ona dry today but for many we will start off on a dry note. while the island, a few showers dotted around. the chilly start. some fun trying though. western showers —— western scotla nd though. western showers —— western scotland a few showers. in the north and the north—east, a lot of dry weather. as a go through the day, many of the showers will fade, some will become fewer and further between in the east with less of a wind, but it will feel more pleasant than yesterday in the sunshine but the wind will strengthen through the day across parts of the south. temperatures, five in the north, seven or eight in the south. then we have a band of rain, some cloud ahead of it, as it comes our way, it isa ahead of it, as it comes our way, it is a weather front and is to go through the evening and overnight it will bring rain across northern ireland with some hill snow, the same commendation across scotland but the snow here will fall to more modest levels, 250 metres, some hill
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snow across northern england and also in across parts of wales, mostly in the hills. the heaviest rain will be in the south—west as a dance towards the midlands, we will see some sleep before the end of the night. this is the weather front responsible. through saturday it will be moving eastward into being during the day it flips around and it starts to move back towards the west. the scenario the saturday is a cold start to the day, the risk of ice on services that are untreated, the mix of rain, sleet and snow, mostly killed in, moving from the west towards the east and it will brighten the showers ahead of it and it will drag back towards the western feel cold. topping on cold, sunday will be cold, a change of ms and a stiff easterly wind, the cold direction for us, coming in from the north sea, dragging in some cloud and also wintry showers in parts of the south, they are showers, but a lot of us will see them, the brighter skies will be in the north—west. good to see, carol,
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thank you. we will talk to ben now. a bit ofa thank you. we will talk to ben now. a bit of a milestone now which is a company, a bit of a milestone now which is a company, apple, that have made more money than any company that has ever made over three months before. it is easy to throw these figures around, £14 billion is how much apple made over the last three months. really, really impressive figures but then there are all sorts of questions about whether we have hit the top of the market because we know the sales of the iphone ‘s slowdown, and launched a very expensive one, so it is fantastic to see these sorts of figures but there are still some concerns about how much power the big organisations have, like these ones, apple last night reported its biggest quarterly profit of all time, despite a fall in how many phones actually sold, and remember it is just over the year. it really does go to show how big of a part these big technology firms have become. this year1 of these
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these big technology firms have become. this year 1 of these firms will become the world's biggest trillion dollar company, yes, trillion dollar company, yes, trillion dollar, and that is because they may be a big part of our lives already but they want to be a bigger part, everything from what we buy to what we want, how we stay in touch, how we get around and frankly everything in between. their next plans involve robots that we can speak to, self driving cars and shops that know what we want before we even know we want it. don't have to click on a mouse. let's talk about all of this. let's talk to matti littunen from enders analysis where's the come from? people will worry whether apple will be able to spend most —— sell enough of the most expensive phone so yes, obviously they have, they have increased the price of $100 to £560 which is impressive and it really how apple is the competitive company
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and able to capitalise on their role. a huge amount of money, hard to imagine £14 billion in three months. we sort the future point though where those sales are now starting to fall, does that suggest we have got the saturation, everyone has an iphone, who wants one already has an iphone, who wants one already has one? apple now has 1.3 billion devices in use so now the question is how are they going to be able to serve these customers better and better and increase the already skyhigh revenue they are getting from each of them every few years or so? let's talk about amazon because it is easy to get caught up in the apple thing but their figures were also impressive. they are interesting, because rather than sitting on a big pile of cash, they know exactly what to do with all of it so straightaway they invested into new growth areas, moving into races, retailers, whole foods, areas
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like healthcare, theyjust announced a partnership, so across all areas of consumer's life, amazon is there or trying to get there. is there a danger these firms are too big race to mark a lot of these have appeared practically overnight and have got the valuations which have taken centuries to build for a traditional firm. 0ur centuries to build for a traditional firm. our people worried they have too much control over all lights? absolutely. 0ne too much control over all lights? absolutely. one of the things to watch with these companies is political attention that they are getting with the scale of success on them, first in the eu with increasing in the us. you have concerned citizens and their competitors in all sorts of areas who are going to politicians and asking of these companies too big mr mark of the affecting us too much? do they have enough power? politicians have a hard job of figuring out what they need to be a economy, what they mean to the future, what should we as a society hope their role to be? these are the future, what should we as a society hope their role to gaming 5? are thei the next big things have planned?l
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one thing, - areas, .ee.ee sew... . .e...,. 2 see. new devices and interesting new devices and services, so what is going to happen with augmented reality for example, what is the next big consumer technology thing after smart phones, artificial intelligence is the third one, i would say, in our everyday lives, so often we use these services companies and we don't understand they are part of the four power would buy artificial intelligence already so they know what we want before we want it, we use google maps, each knows what to recommend based on where we are before we have even searched for anything. if we use amazon, they recommend better and better recommended products and things like that so the question is which one of these companies is the best observing us as consumers better with this technology? good to talk to you. thank you farouq ‘s plane in mt. more from me after seven am. in the uk, for every
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two statues of women, there are five for men. this may be about to change, starting with three inspirational women who spearheaded the suffragette movement. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has been to find out more. soon to be immortalised, three women who fought for all women to rise up and claimed their vote. perhaps the most famous among them, emmeline pankhurst. i wanted emily to be the courageous, dignified, determined activist. the fight began right here in manchester. this very room. here the suffragette movement was born and here, in december, she will return. suffragettes were on the streets, ringing bells, summoning people out of their homes, somebody grabbed a kitchen chair as a makeshift grabbed a kitchen chair as a
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ma keshift rostru m grabbed a kitchen chair as a makeshift rostrum and emmeline pankhurst climbed the top. enough is enough, you know, time for deeds, not words. this was the message that inspired women up and down the country, ordinary women like alice hawkins in leicester, a mother of six who worked in a shoe factory. that is what drove alice fulwood, she wanted equal pay and the vote was the route to getting that. everyone that went off one of these? five times her great—grandmother was jailed. they still have her hunger strike medal, her prison badge, the sash she wore on every protest. never before spending days baking in the kitchen, making sure herfamily would be fed if she were arrested. if they were going to protest that was a chance to be arrested, not only be arrested but imprisoned, and so they anticipated that by making sure the home could manage without them. that is amazing, isn't it? that is what she did. at women great? we sure our! so practical!
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alice knew her duty to women and family and on sunday, leicester will pay their respects as a statue is finally unveiled. she was one of many women who risked everything to fight for the right to shape what happened here are but 100 years on, women are still underrepresented, not just women are still underrepresented, notjust in women are still underrepresented, not just in parliament women are still underrepresented, notjust in parliament but in parliament square. all the statues here are a man. where are the women? i couldn't believe it. the campaign by caroline will finally pay off next year when a statue will honour tillerson faucets, the woman who set up tillerson faucets, the woman who set up the national union of women suffrage societies. it has been 100 yea rs on suffrage societies. it has been 100 years on the sixth of february since the first women won the right to vote and it is shocking, really, that it has taken 100 years for us to get a statue of one of the women who fought so hard for the right here in parliament square and i'm delighted that fawcett will be the
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first to join the rank of these auguste man and i hope she will be the first of many. this is what they fought for, millicent died a few days after the vote was extended to all women, anna—lena never lived to see the day, all is voted in eight general elections. hopefully seeing that statue it will encourage young people exercise their right to vote. i really do feel that. an incredible legacy which lives on. it really makes you think, doesn't it? time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alpa patel. 60 years since her murder, police are appealing for more information on the unsolved case of a hertfordshire teenager. 17—year—old anne noblett was strangled and her body frozen solid in woodland near wheathampstead. police say they believe there's a good chance someone still alive knows the killer and are urging them to finally come
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forward with information. people hoard, people keep things and yes, we would certainly hope that somebody mightjust give us that little bit of information. they may not realise how important it is to us, but anything at all can now be of use to us. new analysis of two infamous letters said to be written by jack the ripper suggests that they are fakes. experts studied the notes supposedly penned by the east end murderer and sent to a news agency in 1888. similarities to other writing at the time suggests that they were, in fact, faked byjournalists to boost business. london's first bingo academy has been launched in camden. the company behind it hope to attract younger people to the game. the number of halls in london has dropped from over 50 in 2006 to just 19 today. intimidated or overwhelmed by the skill levels that they face in traditional bingo halls, so what we are trying to do is give young people more of a chance to compete so that they know the rules, they go in a bit more confident, enjoy themselves more, go back again and hopefully over
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time, bingo will grow. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, the overground is part suspended between wandsworth road and clapham junction, while a track fault is fixed. and on the northern line, there are severe delays between edgware and camden due to late—finishing engineering work. 0n the trains, delays are possible in and out of paddington because of emergency engineering works. 0n the roads, goldhawk road in shepherds bush remains closed between shepherds bush green and st stephen's avenue for water main repairs. in brixton, brixton water lane is closed between dulwich road and tulse hill also due to problems with a water main. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. a fairly decent day of weather on the way for us today. there won't be quite as much wind chill as there was yesterday. the winds will fall a bit lighter. they'll continue to ease as we head through the day. some good spells of sunshine and it should stay dry. we're starting with temperatures above freezing, between 2—4 degrees, always more cloud
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around the further east you are today. there, the winds are slightly brisk and maybe one or two early showers across parts of hertfordshire and essex, but otherwise a dry day with the best of the sunshine in the west. it will feel a little more like 6—8 celsius with slightly lighter northerly winds. as we head through this evening and overnight again, it is set to stay dry. some cloud around the eastern areas, mostly. temperatures dropping low enough to get a widespread frost, i think, with lighters winds as we head into tomorrow morning. tomorrow is set to be a cloudy day with a little drizzle out towards western areas. maybe some brightness out in the east. by sunday, cold moving through and we could see some wintry showers. don't forget there is plenty more on our website, the addresses on your screen. and on bbc radio london. i am back in 30 minutes. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga
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munchetty. the number of men dying from prostate cancer overtakes the number of women killed by breast cancer for the first time. it's now the third biggest cancer killer in the uk. charities are calling for more screening and research into the disease. good morning. it's friday, the 2nd of february. also this morning: the prime minister says her trip to china is a sign of a "global britain" and insists that she is delivering what people want on brexit. do you want to be the tory leader at the next general election? i've been asked this question on a number of occasions. i said clearly throughout my political career i served my country and my party. i'm not a quitter. an investigation into the mystery death of hollywood star natalie wood more than 30 years ago
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says her husband robert wagner is being treated as a "person of interest". tech giant apple reports the biggest ever company profit of £14 billion for the last three months. but sales of its iphone are falling, after launching an expensive new handset. i'll have the details. in sport, a painful blow for england's women. goalkeeper karen bardlsey is stretchered off after a nasty fall onto her shoulder in only the second minute of the super league match. it means she could miss crucial world cup qualifiers. good morning from the home of worldwide scouting and this magnificent tree, at least 500 years old. it is written macro's entry in the european tree award. thank you. more of that later. —— britain's entry. today many of us will have a dry day, with lengthy
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sunny spells, but shah down east and west coasts and part of the north will become lighter through the morning. —— showers. wherever you are it will feel chilly and be called over the next few days, even in the next week. good morning. first, our main story. the number of men dying in the uk from prostate cancer has overtaken the number of women killed by breast cancer for the first time. the charity prostate cancer uk says advances in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer have paid off and similar benefits could be seen if more money was allocated to the fight against prostate cancer. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. prostate cancer does not discriminate. last year, keen runner tony callier discovered he had the disease while training for an ultramarathon. his diagnosis was late and he knows cancer will eventually take his life, so tony is using the time he has left to warn other men about the dangers. i think it's really important that people are aware of what the symptoms are and i would actually urge men to talk to their doctors,
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if they have any urinary issues at all. my issue is that i didn't actually have any symptoms and they think i'd had the cancer for ten years beforehand. more men are living to an age where they have a greater chance of developing prostate cancer. so, in 2015, more than 11,800 men died of the disease, compared with just over 11,400 deaths in 2015 due to breast cancer. and while the proportion of people dying from prostate cancer, the mortality rate, has fallen in the past decade, down by 6%, the decline in deaths from breast cancer has been even greater, at more than 10%. it really is time to get behind this and to realise that we need to get on top of it now because it's just going to become more common, and it's going to kill more men if we are not able to do that.
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tony has joined those calling for increased funding for research and the development of a reliable prostate screening programme, so the gains seen in the fight against breast cancer can be matched in the fight against the disease that he knows will eventually claim his life, too. health leaders have written to thejustice secretary, urging him to reform the pay—out system for negligence claims against the nhs. they say the nhs would have to pay up to £65 billion before current claims were successful. the government is looking at measures to control costs in these cases. theresa may insists she's delivering what british people want on brexit, and setting out a clear vision to the rest of the world. downing street says billions of pounds‘ worth of deals have been signed during her three—day visit to china, which ends later. earlier, the prime minister spoke to the bbc. we arejust at we are just at the beginning of the process of negotiating with the european union, so we will be out
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there enjoying the deal we get is delivering on what the british people want. that‘s what this is about and i know what the british people want as well is good jobs for themselves and their children and that‘s why it is important for me to be here in china, where businesses have been selling deals, selling more uk products, bringing more into china and ensuring there are more jobs for people in the uk. do you wa nt to jobs for people in the uk. do you want to be the tory leader at the next general election? i've been asked this question on a number of occasions. i‘ve said clearly throughout my political career had served my country and party. i‘m not a quitter. i mean this because there is a job that needs to be done here. 0ur political correspondent iain watson joins us from westminster. you‘ve been listening to that interview and she is not a quitter, with her that before, but she is very much making clear she is here to stay and fighting back against critics, isn‘t she? to stay and fighting back against critics, isn't she? she is fighting back against critics. she is saying, here is an image of global britain
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she is portraying in china, a confident britain as they get ready to leave the eu. billions of pounds of trade deals. but i‘m not sure that‘s enough to silence critics. she was asked off —— about whether she would try for the next election. i will be talking to notjust conservative mps but council candidates, some business people, and there is still a great deal of scepticism about the leadership. some people say she doesn‘t deliver in council elections then there will be renewed pressure for her to go. downing street believed that a lot of speculation about the future will simply disappear as she gets onto the front foot of trade talks with the front foot of trade talks with the eu, but she was asked about those trade talks by laura kuenssberg, did she want to be closer to the eu, and she again sidestep that and said she wanted
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tariff free trade deals. but if she does give details she will end up risking eliminating some people from foreign party. we will watch that tightrope she is walking very closely. thank you. and we‘ll hear more from that interview with theresa may later on in the programme. police investigating the death of natalie wood more than three decades ago say her husband robert wagner is now being treated as a person of interest. the actress was found dead after going missing from a yacht off the coast of california. 0ur los angeles correspondent james cook has more details. natalie wood was a hollywood superstar with three 0scar nominations when she died suddenly in 1981 at the age ofjust 43. her body was found floating in the water off the coast of california. near the yacht on which she was sailing with her husband robert wagner, co—star christopher walkin and the boat‘s captain.
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initially the death was ruled an accident, but the enquiry was reopened in 2011. police now say that two new witnesses have corroborated accounts of a fight between mr wagner and ms wood on the night she disappeared. detectives say it appears she was the victim of an assault and they believe her husband was the last person to see her alive. police say robert wagner has refused to speak to them since the case was reopened. they‘ve not declared the death a murder and no charges have been filed against the actor. he is now 87—years—old and has not commented on the latest developments. the eldest son of the late cuban leader fidel castro has died in havana aged 68. cuba‘s state media reported that fidel castro diaz—balart, widely known as fidelito, took his own life after a long battle with depression. he was a nuclear physicist and worked for cuba‘s communist government. health experts are calling on the government to fully fund ivf treatment to help cut the number of multiple pregnancies,
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that are riskierfor mothers and babies. the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists says the health and financial burden these pregnancies pose on the nhs can‘t be overstated. as we reported earlier in the week, france has experienced the heaviest rainfall in 50 years, leading to flooding in central paris and, although waters levels peaked on monday, some suburbs are still underwater. while the floods have caused misery for some, with dozens evacuated from their homes, but these wakeboarders took the opportunity to practise just outside their houses. this is one of the suburbs. it was six metres at its heighest. that‘s how you make the best out of a bad situation! mike will be here
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with the sport later and of course carol will have the weather forecast. children are spending more time online than ever before, but, according to the nspcc, the government still hasn‘t implemented half of the recommendations for safeguarding them that were made a decade ago. the government says it is working with industry, schools and parents to make sure there are robust protections in place, but the charity is calling for a code of practice to protect young people. we spoke to one family about how they stay safe online. 0nline safety is a concern. i think it‘s a concern for parents, yes. you put something on and it disappears ina minute, put something on and it disappears in a minute, is that right? yeah. ten seconds. you put it on your story and that takes a day to go? we make sure we know to pass codes to be able to get on the devices and we just have a look through and that what each of them are doing to make sure they haven‘t got any apps on
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there that they shouldn‘t have. we do have some parental locks that lock something is automatically. do have some parental locks that lock something is automaticallylj feel lock something is automatically.” feel safe using social media. i have a private accounts are no stranger can look at what i'm doing and i know the rules, not to share passwords, where a live, at school. they are private accounts, so they have to follow that person and the person has to follow them. in terms of a voluntary code, i think it would be better if we were to put something more permanent in law because i think you can‘t actually do enough for children‘s safety and for everyone‘s safety, so, yes, those things will be good. i understand why companies may not wish to have that, at a thinker would be good. tanya byron who made the original reccomendations in that report ten years ago joins us now from london. thank you for your time this morning. i'm just thank you for your time this morning. i'mjust trying thank you for your time this morning. i'm just trying to get a sense of scale over your criticism of the government at this point in
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time. because many people have said the government isn‘t doing enough. we‘ve heard that before. how great you see the problem? the problem is huge. i did my report in 2008, four children in the digital world, and i recommended there should be a volu nta ry recommended there should be a voluntary code of practice so that social media companies could self regulate, but they needed to work together. uk council for child internet safety was set up following my recommendation so they could work together. ten years later this hasn‘t happened and government now is saying, let‘s see if we can get a volu nta ry is saying, let‘s see if we can get a voluntary code of practice. it is now too late. we lost over —— got over 500 reports of sexual offences against children. that‘s 15 day in 2016 and 17 and last year when finally the law came in, the anti— grooming law, in six months we have 1300 offences against children. so it is enough now. the social media
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companies have been left to mark their own home work, they haven‘t done it. my recommendation was ten yea rs done it. my recommendation was ten years ago, it hasn‘t been done. it‘s not good enough now to give them another ten years to see if they can get a voluntary code of practice up and running. we need a mandatory code and a regulator so that there is transparency and we can see annual reports about child safety, child endangerment, how it is being managed and we specific rules, so the social media companies are held to account and find if they don‘t stick to those rules around child protection and child safety online. are you saying that the government‘s inertia on this has damaged or put at risk more young people?” inertia on this has damaged or put at risk more young people? i think we know for example in the last four yea rs we know for example in the last four years tragically to young people we know have lost their lives because of online grooming, which led to contact abuse and murder. we know of the 1300 grooming offences in the
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past six months, as we‘ve seen as the new law has come in. what is worrying with the internet safety strategy is that the green paper will come out at some stage and grooming will not be included in that paper. grooming is seen under the jurisdiction that paper. grooming is seen under thejurisdiction of that paper. grooming is seen under the jurisdiction of the home office. so already we are seeing that really important aspects are being left out and the point is this can be done. we know these big tech companies have bots and algorithms that can target advertising the people. in germany, they will find social media companies that don‘t remove extremist content. we also know, as we recently heard, that a whistleblower said there was a backlog of child engage in reports. —— endangerment. it is not being done properly. we are talking about child safety and social media companies have had ten years and they haven‘t done anything in a joined up way that the public understands. it‘s not enough now for
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the to give them more time and then say, maybe we will think about legislation. time is up. there are quotes from theresa may. she was speaking in davos. i suspect you followed this. the quote was, shareholders should pressure the burmese to take their responsibility towards protecting their users seriously. screen. and on bbc radio london. i am back in 30 minutes. towards protecting their users seriously. i think the responsibility lies with everybody andi responsibility lies with everybody and i think you have had a great piece prior to talking to me with fantastic parents who obviously really preparing their children to use the online space safely and are aware of how their children are using the online space. it is everyone‘s responsibility but this was a government review that i was asked to do 10 years ago the recommendations were made and most of them, some of them have been followed through but most haven‘t. the point is 10 years ago snapchat and instagram and twitter didn‘t
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exist, these platforms do now, technology moves on. of course shareholders, stakeholders, parents, educators, it is everyone‘s responsibility in terms of protecting children but fundamentally these are huge companies which makes billions in profit who have the technology to target information to users who have, we understand, a backlog of child endangerment reports, you have had 10 years to create the own code and make it transparent to the company and they haven‘t done it and i think the time is up for them to ta ke i think the time is up for them to take responsibility. my apologies to interrupting, i know you are a psychologist edwards expects that use anger isn‘t terribly useful emotion when trying to get something done but i am sending you are pretty angry about this. as a clinician i am angry, as a clinician i work with children with mental—health problems in clinical settings. so we see now, imean, i in clinical settings. so we see now, i mean, i have been doing myjob for
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many years and over the last 10 yea rs particularly many years and over the last 10 years particularly we are seeing children come in who are having all sorts of horrendous experiences online. as i said before, there are many people who are responsible for us to help children understand, we need to look at education, things are changing, the digital economy act for example, looking at online pornography, there will be age verification and these are good things but the point is we are talking about child protection and child safety, we are talking about two children who died in the last four years, 1300 children being groomed online in six months, and these are the figures we know. i think anybody should feel angry when there is the long period of time and we are saying to the big companies who said yes, will look at a volu nta ry who said yes, will look at a voluntary code 10 years, the 10 yea rs voluntary code 10 years, the 10 years is up. i haven‘t done it. we now need a mandatory code, a regulator, and find because child protection is too important to us to wait any longer. very much appreciate your time. thank you so
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much, a clinical psychologist they‘re talking about the report that she brought out 10 years it‘s 7:18 and you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. let‘s talk to carol about the weather. it is getting colder? for many there will be more sunshine and the wind isn‘t a strong bracketing through the next few days into the weekend, it will still cold and there is no weather forecast. today what we have is a bit of sunshine around, the high—pressure across us, also from showers, both show was draped in the east coast of england, some of those heavy, with this and hail and sleep coming out as well but there are showers so not all of us will see them. inland with the drier conditions, fair amount of cloud but some clear skies and a nippy start if you are stepping out. across south—west england and wales, some showers. these are mostly rain showers. again, not all of us see them. only three degrees in cardiff
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at atm. some bright skies or indeed one or two showers dotted in here. the western, northern and north—eastern scotland some showers, a wintry element in some of them in the grampians but a lot of dry weather and a fair bit of sunshine. many of us today it is the story, dry weather and their lot of sunshine. the show was in the north and west tending to peter out to go through the course of the day. showers in the east will tend to fade a touch lose some of their intensity as we go through the day. as soon as this —— there is a keen wind down the coast, the wind picking up in the south but for most, more pleasant feel than yesterday. this evening and overnight a weather front comes in introducing a band of rain. hill snow across northern ireland, north wales and also north england. hill snow across scotland but more modest levels. we will be heaviest in south—west england and at the push through the midlands we could see some sleep coming through. there is
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the risk of life on untreated surfaces in the night. tomorrow, the weather front stressed to the east and through the day it turned around and through the day it turned around and starts to go back towards the west. the translator, we are off to a bright start in the east, a chilly one, the band of rain, sleet and snow comes along and behind in northern ireland some showers but some sunshine and then through the day it starts to pull back towards the west to where it has been more dull with the cloud it start to brighten later on but once again it will feel cold. but as cold as it will feel cold. but as cold as it will feel cold. but as cold as it will feel on sunday because a change ofair will feel on sunday because a change of air mass comes in from the north sea, italy cold easterly wind, you will most certainly noticed this! it will most certainly noticed this! it will drag in will most certainly noticed this! it willdrag ina will most certainly noticed this! it will drag in a fair bit of cloud and some wintry showers in the south—east, the rain, sleet, possibly hill snow, the brightest conditions will be in the north—west and then into the new week as mentioned remaining cold with some further snow, we think, on monday and thursday but of course we will
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keep you updated on that. carol, thank you. may i say you look very smart this friday. thank you! so do you! cannot see me does the us saying that anyway. i am getting away with nothing! vu later! —— see you later. sometimes we get to be boggled by the numbers in business and we need to be braced to this one, don‘t we, because you have some very big numbers? mind boggling. these are from apple because they have reported overnight telling us about their 3—month profit, good morning. there are a big part of our daily lives of course, big business, and apple have given us the information about their iphones last year. that didn‘t stop the tech giant posting a record profit of over £14 billion. that‘s the largest profit ever made by a company in three months. all of that down to its new iphone x that costs you nearly a thousand pounds. 0nline retail giant amazon saw sales
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jump by a third last year — that made them over a £120 billion in sales and boost profits by over 30%. they had a great christmas, but subscribers to their prime and cloud services gave them a big boost. and film and tv firm netflix signed up an impressive 8.3m new subscribers to their streaming service at the end of last year, despite upping their prices. and finally, you might wonder why i‘m dressed like this? well, it‘s the new normal, apparently. and notjust on dress—down friday. just one in ten british workers now wears a suit to work with most office workers, and their bosses, preferring a more casual dresscode. in half an hour, i‘ll look at whether time‘s up for the shirt and tie. i have to say it feels really weird
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to be in the studio dressed like this. it looks as though you are ready for a pe lesson. you have your plimsolls on. someone told me i look like i was going to play some tennis. thanks, ben! 7:23 am. today‘s the final day of theresa may‘s visit to china and in an interview with the bbc, she‘s insisted she‘s delivering what the british people want on brexit, despite persistent criticism from within her own party. speaking to the bbc‘s political editor laura kuenssberg, theresa may insisted she‘s setting out a clear vision to the rest of the world. it is important that we deliver what people want, which is control of our money, our borders and our laws. it‘s exactly what we are doing. what i am showing in china is how we can ensure that we actually enhance our trade with the rest of the world as well. why do we want to do that? it is good for people in britain,
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it‘s good forjobs in britain. prime minister, can you stay on? because people are asking you again and again to be clearer about your priorities. how long can you stay on, do you believe? well, let‘s be very clear about this — i‘ve set out what my vision is. i have set out and i have said to people that at every stage where we can fill in the detail, we will do so, and that is exactly... but how long can you stay on? the idea that we have to have — that we are about to complete the negotiation with the european union on ourfuture relationship is wrong. we are just at the beginning of the process of negotiating with the european union. so we will be out there ensuring that the deal we get delivers on what the british people want. that‘s what this is about. and i know that what the british people want as well is good jobs for themselves and their children, and that is why it is important for me to be here in china where businesses have been signing deals, selling more uk products, great uk products, into china, ensuring there are more jobs for people in the uk. do you want to be the tory leader at the next general election?
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well, i have been asked this on a number of occasions. i‘ve said very clearly throughout my political career i have served my country and i have served my party. i am not a quitter. i am in this because there is a job to be done here, and that‘s delivering the british people and doing that in a way that ensures the future prosperity of our country. global britain, global britain is a real vision for the united kingdom. i want the british people to see a government that is delivering for them around the world, and that is exactly what we are doing. 0ur viewers see day after day the tory party fighting amongst themselves. how do you reassert your authority? i am doing with the british people want, which is delivering on brexit but also getting out around the world ensuring that we bring jobs back to britain. companies will be selling more great british products to china as a result of this trip. there will be more people injobs in the uk as a result of this trip. that‘s global britain in action. prime minister, thank you very much. thank you. theresa may there. reflecting on
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some of the thoughts the rapid programme this morning. lots else we‘re not quite talking eurovision this morning, but we are searching for the european tree of the year. brea kfast‘s john maguire‘s with the uk‘s entry. he is in gilwell park. good morning. good morning, hope you are well. the home of international scouting, it has been here the 99 years and this tree has been here for around 500 years, something like that. it is a magnificent oak tree. imagine the history it has seen beneath its branches and bowels. as baden powell and his successors have trained. lots of international scouts here, they will say good morning in their native tongues. good morning, folks. this is the entrance, the british entrance of the european tree of the
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year awards. join us later, we will tell you lots about it. all about four after the news, sport and weather. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m alpa patel. 60 years since her murder, police are appealing for more information on the unsolved case of a teenager from hertfordshire. 17—year—old anne noblett was strangled and found in woodland near wheathampstead. police say they believe there‘s a good chance someone still alive knows the killer and are urging them to come forward. people hoard, people keep things and yes, we would certainly hope that somebody mightjust give us that little bit of information. they may not realise how important it is to us, but anything at all can now be of use to us. detectives have released cctv images of a man they are looking for in relation to an armed bank robbery in hounslow. the suspect entered the bank on the high street and suggested he had a bomb. he was also armed with a kitchen knife. police say he subjected staff and customers to a traumatic
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experience where they feared for their lives. london‘s first bingo academy has been launched in camden. the company behind it hopes to attract younger people to the game. the number of halls in london has dropped from over 50 over a decade ago tojust 19. more young people are playing bingo between they go down there they get a bit intimidated or overwhelmed by the skill levels that they face in traditional bingo halls, so what we are trying to do is give young people more of a chance to compete so that they know the rules, they go in a bit more confident, enjoy themselves more, go back again and hopefully over time, bingo will grow. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, the overground is part suspended between wandsworth road and clapham junction, while a track fault is fixed. and bond street station is interchange—only for the moment,
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due to a lack of staff. 0n the trains — there is disruption in and out of paddington — due to urgent repairs to the track. that‘s affecting lines towards reading. the a1m is down to one lane — towards london — betweenjunction 7 for stevenage and junction 6 welwyn due to a broken down lorry. lets have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini hello, good morning. a fairly decent day of weather on the way for us today. there won‘t be quite as much wind chill as there was yesterday. the winds will fall a little bit lighter. they‘ll continue to ease as we head through the day. some good spells of sunshine and it should stay dry. so we‘re starting off with temperatures above freezing, between 2—4 degrees. always more cloud around the further east you are today. here, the winds are slightly brisk and maybe one or two early showers across parts of hertfordshire and essex, but otherwise a dry day with the best of the sunshine in the west. it will feel a little more like 6—8
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celsius with slightly lighter northerly winds. as we head through this evening and overnight again, it is set to stay dry. there will be some cloud around again towards eastern areas, mostly. temperatures dropping low enough to get a fairly widespread frost, i think, with lighter winds as we head into tomorrow morning. now, tomorrow is set to be quite a cloudy day. there will be bit of little drizzle out towards western areas, i suspect. maybe some brightness out in the east. by sunday, we‘ve got some very cold moving through. we could see some wintry showers. up upa up a warm if you are heading out. i‘m back in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. here‘s a summary of this morning‘s main stories from bbc news. the number of men dying in the uk from prostate cancer has overtaken the number of women killed by breast cancer for the first time. the charity prostate cancer uk says advances in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer have paid off and similar benefits could be seen if more money was allocated to the fight against prostate cancer. it really is time to actually get behind this and to realise that we need to get
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on top of it now because it‘sjust going to become more common and it will kill more men if we aren‘t able to do that. health leaders have written to thejustice secretary, urging him to reform the pay—out system for negligence claims against the nhs. they say the nhs would have to pay up to £65 billion if all current claims were successful. more than double the amount three yea rs more than double the amount three years ago. the government says it is looking at measures to control costs in such cases. theresa may insists she‘s delivering what british people want on brexit and setting out a clear vision to the rest of the world. downing street says billions of pounds worth of deals have been signed during her three—day visit to china, which ends later. earlier, the prime minister told the bbc says the deals are good for britishjobs. we arejust at we are just at the very beginning of the process of negotiating with the european union, so we will be out there ensuring that the deal we get delivers on what the british people
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want, that‘s what this is about. i know that what the british people wa nt know that what the british people want as well is good jobs for themselves and their children and that‘s why it is important for me to be here in china, where businesses have been signing deals, selling more uk products and bringing them into china and making sure there are morejobs for people into china and making sure there are more jobs for people in the uk. do you want to be the tory leader at the next general election? i've been asked this question on a number of occasions and i‘ve said clearly throughout my political career i‘ve served my country my party. i‘m not a quitter. i mean this because there isa a quitter. i mean this because there is a job to be done here. —— i am in this. police investigating the death of hollywood star natalie wood 37 years ago say her husband robert wagner is now being treated as a person of interest. the actress was found dead after going missing from a yacht off the coast of california. the government is facing criticism for failing to implement adequate safeguards for children online. in 2008, the byron review, commissioned by gordon brown, put forward 38 recommendations on internet safety. the nspcc says fewer than half have
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been properly implemented. ministers say they are planning a voluntary code as part of their forthcoming internet safety strategy. health experts are calling on the government to fully fund ivf treatment to help cut the number of multiple pregnancies that are riskierfor mothers and babies. the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists says the health and financial burden these pregnancies pose on the nhs can‘t be overstated. prince harry and meghan markle presented awards at an event last night which celebrated the achievements of wounded, injured and sick servicemen and women. ms markle‘s experience in the spotlight came in handy as she helped out her co—presenter, who struggled with the envelope containing the names of the nominees. and we know from major evens that getting the wrong envelope and opening it can be really
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embarrassing. especially if you are nervous. it was the oscars, wasn‘t it? they opened the wrong one. ouch! the last thing you want to see when you are taking over as england manager, when you see one of your stars badly injured. we are still waiting for news on the england goalkeeper and we wish her a speedy recovery. phil neville was there to see it last night, his first week in charge doesn‘t get any easier. the world cup qualifiers are coming up and it is the last thing he would have wa nted is the last thing he would have wanted to see. karen bardsley, the england goalkeeper, falling heavy. she topples right over, falling onto her shoulder. injust the she topples right over, falling onto her shoulder. in just the second minute of the match as well. the game was held up for nine minutes while she was treated on the pitch and she was taken to hospital. the game ended goalless. she has gone off to hospital to be checked. she‘s got a little bit of pain
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in her arm and her shoulders, but she is talking and she seems, you know, ok and in good spirits, so we will trust the medical team to carry on from there. there is a bit of a silver lining. it meantjust one week after this 18—year—old signed a professional contract she got her chance and she pulled off some great saves, keeping a clean sheet. these are the pictures she tweeted upon signing that contract. well done to her for stepping into the breach. the super league season got back under way last night. there were victories for hull fc and the champions leeds. it was certainly "labour intensive", though, for warrington skipper chris hill, seen here on the left. he had to leave midway through the 16—12 loss to leeds because his wife went into labour. so he missed a great try from england teammate ryan hall, although he had more important things to worry about last night. we are still waiting to hear any news about how the labour is going or went. hopefully we have good news
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soon. kyle edmund is set to miss great britain‘s davis cup tie against spain, which gets under way today. he developed a hip injury during last week‘s australian open semi—final defeat by marin cilic and wasn‘t able to get over it in time. he‘s in marbella to support his team—mates though and could be drafted into play should his injury situation improve. i‘m out here because i want to be part of it. it‘s not like, you know, i‘m trying to put the davis cup second, it‘s not like that. i always try and be ready when i can. but in one way it was a good prong because i made a deep run into the australian open, so it was a quick turnaround. if i hadn‘t done so well i probably would have spent two weeks on the clay and been ready for here. liam broady will play in the first singles rubber. you can follow the action live on the red button and online from 9:45am this morning and there‘s also coverage on bbc two from 1pm. a great weekend of sport ahead with
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the start of the six nations and it is also the weekend of the super bowl. the sunday evening the philadelphia eagles and the new england patriots, for the right to be 2018‘s american football champions and you‘ll be able to watch it live on the bbc including the famous super bowl half—time show. last year lady gaga wowed the audience in houston in front of a television audience of more than 170 million in the united states alone. justin timberlake has the half—time show honour in minnesota. he was asked what inspired him to take on the challenge. what was my inspiration? i got this phone call, write? and they were like, would you come into do the half—time show and i was like, "yeah". that was it. i‘m just excited. my band are kids with
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potential and they are my special guests and i‘m excited to rock the stage. i wonder if he will be hanging from the ceiling. all wearing silver hot hands. you never know. the stage is almostjust as anticipated as the star himself. and there‘s coverage of the super bowl between the new england patriots and the philadelphia eagles live on bbc one and on the red button from 11:15pm on sunday night. you will love this. it‘s been described as british bull dog on roller skates, and the 2018 roller derby world cup, is under way in manchester. it is very physical. a lot of full contact challenges. you do have lockers trying to stop you. england won the match against korea. 38 countries are competing and it is live on the bbc website and various
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tvs as well. what are you not allowed to do by way of confrontation? you will find out tomorrow. ijoined the indian team in training and i got a few bruises! pretty much anything goes. you where a lot of padding, so it isn‘t as dangerous as it looks. you are pretty much say. this is a little tease. we have something special coming up. this is a very special ball as it belongs to a very special ball as it belongs to a freestyle footballer called john farnworth. he is going to try to keep the ball up all the way up mount everest and he isjoining us here and he will be coming into the studio while doing keepy uppies. in 2011 we are doing a preview of the london marathon and they kicked his ball into the river thames by mistake. i fished it out. what did you do that for? i didn‘t
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mean to! ijust what did you do that for? i didn‘t mean to! i just wasn‘t very good at keepy uppies. you get used to the certain ball you train with. and he has special waterproof trainers. you would need them for everest. a technical question. if you head it, is that still part of it? you can use your shoulders, anything, obviously not your hands. i thought i had set some kind of record using my hand, but that‘s blown it. thank you very much. see you later. all of the weather coming up in a few minutes as well. the nhs will be bankrupt unless victims of negligence are paid less in compensation. health service leaders have written to thejustice secretary calling for the payments to be cut. according to the letter, the nhs in england spent £1.7 billion on clinical negligence claims last year. niall dickson, chief executive of the nhs confederation, joins us from our london studio and is among those calling for a cap. thank you very much forjoining us
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this morning. tell us why you are calling for a cat. the reality from the prime minister downwards is that eve ryo ne the prime minister downwards is that everyone accepts that the health service is under enormous pressure, which means our members are making decisions on a daily basis about what they can provide and what they can‘t. we‘ve got to a situation where criminal negligence claims have become really neither fair nor affordable. as you said, £1.7 billion last year. the pipeline of claims, things coming towards the health service, is £65 billion and perhaps even more serious than this huge numbers, it is rising and in the last five years it has risen 11.596 the last five years it has risen 11.5% every year. that simply unsustainable. we can‘t go on like that. we need to find a fairer system, a better way of calculating and a better way of legally managing this issue. i will tell you a couple of things that spring to mind and please do respond to them. the first
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is, why are there so many claims? what is going wrong in the nhs that people feel, and it‘s a big step to ta ke people feel, and it‘s a big step to take on that they need to make a claim? the second is that if there a cap then certain solicitors will say, it‘s not worth my while taking on these cases, the innocent people who have been wronged won‘t have the protection to say, hold on, you need to fix this. obviously it needs to bea to fix this. obviously it needs to be a balance between what society can be a balance between what society ca n afford be a balance between what society can afford and recognising the people who have been harmed should be compensated. the issue of why more people are claiming, i think pa rt more people are claiming, i think part of it is the health service has got more open culture, which is right, and it is more transparent about when things go wrong and that makes ina about when things go wrong and that makes in a way people are told what has gone wrong more and they are therefore more likely to make claims. the health service has to understand what drives people to make claims and i‘m sure there are improvements that we can make in the way that we handle and support families through that process. there
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is certainly a lot of smaller claims coming through, so there could be a cultural thing at work here as well, which encourages people to make claims. so i think again that a complex issue. it is not cause healthcare that doctors are practising less safely, although there is a problem that more claims need more health professionals are frightened of being sued and the more likely we go backwards to a closed culture. on your second point about lawyers and so forth, again it‘s a question of finding a balance. but at the moment, for example, there are claims where more money goes to the law you that the client and that can‘t be right either. there are cases where the claimants and their lawyer is take the health service to the door of the health service to the door of the court and then realised the health service really is going to defend this and then they disappear and say,... the health service is still left with the cost. we need to
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find a fairway which absolutely does compensate people, recognise that we have a free national health service, so in have a free national health service, soina have a free national health service, so in a way we shouldn‘t really be compensating with private care for people who should be able to access free healthcare going forward, but that they do get their compensation. there has been a government response. the ministry ofjustice says, to help ensure this happens, fair compensation, it has set out proposals for a fairer way, setting the personal discount rate, and asking the city ofjustice council to look at ways of adjusting cost —— civil justice council. on to look at ways of adjusting cost —— civiljustice council. on a practical level how will this work? politicians, trying to get them to look at anything other than brexit is difficult, but the civil liability bill, the government could put some of the stuff into it, it will not be a major reform they could reverse this change to the rate which is a self—inflicted wound by the government, a couple of years
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ago by a previous lord chancellor, which is adding, in their estimates, an extra £1.2 billion in claims against the public sector. so i think there are limited things they could do now but would also like a more fundamental reform, although we accept that trying to get legislation at the moment is extremely difficult. chief executive of the nhs federation, thank you for speaking to us and explaining that. 7:45 p.m.. 2.5 minutes of weather coming up with carol. is that all? it is exactly that! i had better get cracking! but as cold as yesterday and we will have some sunshine, showers to bring the east and west, many of them will feature through the course of the day but through the course of the day but through the east, some sleet and hill mixed in but the showers, not all of us will see them. some dry weather in
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between and some sunshine. that is the case across northern ireland we re the case across northern ireland were the cloud will build from the west. that will herald the arrival ofa west. that will herald the arrival of a new weatherfront. scotland is dry with plenty of sunshine, a little cold, some showers across the north—east. the north—west england, you will have a fine day with a lot of sunshine but still some of the showers coming in with a keen wind across the eastern parts of england. through the afternoon it will start to lose intensity and some will fade away. east anglia, kent, london, the midlands, the south—west, dry weather, some sunshine, a few showers remaining across south—west england but most of them will clear and the same for wales, look at all the sunshine. through the afternoon you will find the win strengthening in the south side temperatures will feel with them this. some five, six, seven ‘s in there. it will feel pleasa nt to seven ‘s in there. it will feel pleasant to the time of year. the weather front comes in across northern ireland heading in the
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western scotland, western england and wales, pushing towards the midlands. snow on the hills, modest levels across scotland, down to about 250 metres. the heaviest rain is in south—west england, it pushes into the midlands and here we should be some fleet before the end of the night. a cold night as well with the iphone and treated surfaces. the culprit is this weather front. during saturday it will move from the west towards the east them through the day it comes back towards the west. we start off in eastern areas under bright skies, a dry note, then the band of rain, sleet and hill snow moves from the west towards the east and behind it it brightens with some sunshine and showers in northern ireland, rizk wind, and then it moves back so we will see some late afternoon sunshine in the far east but still, it‘s cold. heading into sunday, a bitterly cold day. a bitterly cold wind driving in a lot of cloud, some
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snow showers in the south—east, it is the west, the north—west, but also the lion ‘s share of the sunshine. the theme continues into next week and we are looking at further snow for some on monday and thursday at this stage. very good. i know you to be charming, knowledgeable and above all honest so... what are you talking about? if i show you the picture of ben. hello, carol! i don't know if we can look down a little bit. he is, a little change this morning. scruffy! what do you think was the mark and a lwa ys what do you think was the mark and always looks gorgeous but i think he is not dressed for work. see, that is not dressed for work. see, that isafair is not dressed for work. see, that is a fair point. good observation, i am with you. don‘t see how he was allowed in the studio in that state! i agree with carol, this is the weirdest thing being here dressed like this. a suit is a certain kind of bit of, you know? when i am in a suit i am in work mode like this
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could be going out. i think we have just seen carol, you were still in vision, ripping your microphone off! did you notice, carol, even when she was doing it it was still smart, composed, elegant... ben, sorry. it depends on yourjob because that kind of attire would be suitable for somejobs. and when kind of attire would be suitable for some jobs. and when we are out on location in factories and farms i wear all sorts of different things so it is just the setting that you feel like you should wear a suit. there is a reason i will be talking about this. it‘s notjust dress—down friday, i‘m making a point, because according to a poll, only one in ten british workers wears a suit to work — including you, and usually me, charlie. most prefer to be a bit more casual and half think this is also more affordable. let‘s speak to maria who knows about this, she is principal r fashion business. good morning. i have taken
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it to the extreme, i probably couldn‘t get away with wearing this in most offices because it is a polo shirt but the point being more and more of us are dressing down of this it is the end of the suit and tie? for certain industries, the places you would still be expected to dress in the wave to the legal profession for example, you would need to have a very sharp suit. but in usual offices now, particularly mainstream fashion, it has been casual dress. when i first came into the industry in the 805, everyone dressed sharp, it was the era of the power was sued for men and women and we introduced d re55 for men and women and we introduced dre55 down friday which was amusing because the man didn‘t know what to wear they turned up in their golf outfits because they really didn‘t know what ca5ual outfits because they really didn‘t know what casual or smart ca5ual boss. that is the thing, there is safety, a suit and tie especially for men, you know what he will wear, it is for men, you know what he will wear, it i5a for men, you know what he will wear, it is a suit and you don‘t need to make any decisions and it is a little like a school uniform. you know what you‘re everyday. also
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ensure the hierarchy in the office but now, don‘t have little individual officers, we are all open plan and even structures within busine55e5 plan and even structures within businesses have flattened the people are not so concerned with hierarchy, they are more concerned with working asa they are more concerned with working a5 a team to get things done and who the boss is isn‘t that obvious or important. if a lot of this driven by the technology firms? they are notorious, especially in the us, jeans, jumpers, polo shirts, do we ta ke jeans, jumpers, polo shirts, do we take influence from them?‘ jeans, jumpers, polo shirts, do we take influence from them? a little bit at the creative industries as well, in our industry you could see tho5e business report business and who taught de5ign, different people and dressed differently, but it is identity, really. when it comes to the clothes we do wear, what tell us about your status? you speak about the lack of hierarchy but the idea that you dress because it identifies you as a certain person within the business. a certain person but not hierarchy so it is difficult to go into an organisation now and pick
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out to the boss is because he or she could be dressed as casually a5 eve ryo ne could be dressed as casually a5 everyone else and it isn‘t unlikely to go into an industry and the people in trainers were once it would have been a really sharp suit and a good pair of brogues. would have been a really sharp suit and a good pair of broguesm would have been a really sharp suit and a good pair of brogues. it is so interesting, isn‘t it? it is really good to see you, maria. a bit of an extreme example this morning but it proves the point you guys think i would do myjob le55 proves the point you guys think i would do myjob less well if i dress like this? forget that i think, this presence is mentally you would do a betterjob than not to be so concerned with how you look. others we re concerned with how you look. others were worried he didn‘t use an iron your polo shirt. it is in this light. it is ironed! 8750 two am. i have not heard of the european tree of the year before but it exists. this is our entry now, the gilwell oak, which has a brilliant story behind it. brea kfast‘s john maguire‘s there in essex for us this morning. smartly dressed unsure behind the
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tree! i hope so! a couple leave you haven‘t heard of the european tree of the year awards, we talked about this in march! this is the gilwell oak, the home of worldwide scouting in the park, this tree is 500 years old and this place is 99 years old, its centenary is next year, and this is its centenary is next year, and this i5a group its centenary is next year, and this is a group of 5couts. its centenary is next year, and this is a group of scouts. good morning. i'm from germany. my name is patricia, i'm from mexico. i'm from south africa. howdy, i'm from the states. good morning, my name is sarah, i states. good morning, my name is sarah, lam states. good morning, my name is sarah, i am from germany. my name is lera, i‘m from mexico. sarah, i am from germany. my name is lera, i'm from mexico. good morning, it is me, john from bbc breakfast. let‘5 it is me, john from bbc breakfast. let‘s show you caroline from the 5couts. why is this place important and why is history important? the oak has been standing over gilwell
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and it has seen so much over 99 yea rs, and it has seen so much over 99 years, the scouts came here to participate in a training course to learn the skills that they would be able to pass on to young people to support them in their lives. this is a photo from the 19205 when baden powell may have been alive? he would have sat here under the oak and passed on his wisdom and created the movement that so massively globally successful today. exactly and quickly those courses became international, baden powell was the chief scout of the world and by 1920 leaders came from france, america, india. they took back the learning that they learned here, they then passedit that they learned here, they then passed it on to young people. this is why this tree is britain‘s entry because of the relationship with people, history, the world. because of the relationship with people, history, the worldm because of the relationship with people, history, the world. it is, and the oak tree is deeply symbolic in scouting, baden powell used the analogy oak tree growing from the acorn from the 20 boys who took to the island on the experimental camp in 1907. they became the oak tree of
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scouting that cover the world. caroline, thank you indeed. the european tree of the year award. voting is open now, go online and vote for it. let‘s say goodbye or maybe see you later or something in all about different linkages. have a good one folks! there we are. what an international program we are! john, to get the scouts badge for correcting the surface sitting present awards this morning. for me not remembering. i would never normally do that, charlie. he is correct to do it. i remember that peace in march. very clearly! still to come this morning, we‘ll meetjohn farnworth who‘s ta ken record—breaking to a new level. he‘s hoping to do ‘keepy—uppies‘ continuously for two weeks while trekking to everest base camp. that sounds tough enough.
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he‘s just outside our building now and he‘ll be making his way on to our sofa, with his football, just after 8:30. can you teach him a thing or two, charlie do you think? not in relation to that, no! time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m alpa patel. 60 years since her murder, police are appealing for more information on the unsolved case of a teenager from hertfordshire. 17—year—old anne noblett was strangled and found in woodland near wheathampstead. police say they believe there‘s a good chance someone still alive knows the killer and are urging them to come forward. people hoard, people keep things and yes, we would certainly hope that somebody mightjust give us that little bit of information. they may not realise how
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important it is to us, but anything at all can now be of use to us. london‘s first bingo academy has been launched in camden. —— new analysis of two infamous letters said to be written by jack the ripper suggests that they are fakes. experts studied the notes, which were sent to a news agency in 1888. but similarities to other writings at the time suggest they were faked byjournalists to boost business. london‘s first bingo academy has been launched in camden. the company behind it hopes to attract younger people to the game. the number of halls in london has dropped from over 50 over a decade ago tojust19. more young people are playing bingo but i think a lot of the time they go down there, they get a bit intimidated or overwhelmed by the skill levels that they face in traditional bingo halls, so what we are trying to do is give young people more of a chance to compete so that they know the rules, they go in a bit more confident, enjoy themselves more, go back again and hopefully over time, bingo will grow.
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let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. on the tube, the overground is part suspended between wandsworth road and clapham junction, while a track fault is fixed. and bond street station is interchange—only for the moment due to a lack of staff. on the trains, there is disruption in and out of paddington due to urgent repairs to the track. that‘s affecting lines towards reading. on the roads, the mm is down to one lane towards london, between junction 7 for stevenage and junction 6 for welwyn, due to a broken—down lorry. let‘s have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. a fairly decent day of weather on the way for us today. there won‘t be quite as much wind chill as there was yesterday. the winds will fall a little bit lighter. they‘ll continue to ease as we head through the day. some good spells of sunshine and it should stay dry. so we‘re starting off with temperatures above freezing, between 2—4 degrees. always more cloud around the further east you are today. here, the winds are slightly brisk and maybe one or two early showers
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across parts of hertfordshire and essex, but otherwise a dry day with the best of the sunshine in the west. it will feel a little more like 6—8 celsius with slightly lighter northerly winds. as we head through this evening and overnight again, it is set to stay dry. there will be some cloud around again towards eastern areas, mostly. temperatures dropping low enough to get a fairly widespread frost, i think, with lighter winds as we head into tomorrow morning. now, tomorrow is set to be quite a cloudy day. there will be bit of little drizzle out towards western areas, i suspect. maybe some brightness out in the east. by sunday, we‘ve got some very cold moving through. we could see some wintry showers. plenty more on our website, the address on your screen there, and on bbc radio london. now though it‘s back to charlie and naga. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. the number of men dying from prostate cancer overtakes the number of women killed by breast cancer for the first time. it‘s now the third biggest cancer killer in the uk.
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charities are calling for more screening and research into the disease. good morning. it‘s friday, the 2nd of february. also this morning. the prime minister says her trip to china is a sign of a "global britain" and insists that she is delivering what people want on brexit. do you want to be the tory leader at the next general election? i have been asked this question on a number of occasions and i have said very clearly throughout my political career i have served my country and i have served my party. i am not a quitter. an investigation into the mystery death of hollywood star natalie wood more than 30 years ago says her husband robert wagner is being treated as a "person of interest." tech giant apple reports the biggest ever company profit of £14 billion
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for the last three months. but sales of its iphone are down. in sport. a painful blow for england‘s women. goalkeeper karen bardsley is stretchered off after a nasty fall onto her shoulder very early in the chelsea and man city game and could miss crucial world cup qualifiers. good morning, the home of international scouting here and is home to this oak tree, our entry into the european tree of the year awards. for many of us, dry and sunny. at the moment, we have showers but they will fade through the day, some will have sleet and hail in the east. it will feel cold, that continues right into next week, more in 15 minutes. good morning.
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first, our main story. the number of men dying in the uk from prostate cancer has overtaken against prostate cancer. prostate cancer does not discriminate. last year, keen runner tony callier discovered he had the disease while training for an ultramarathon. his diagnosis was late, and he knows cancer will eventually take his life, so tony is using the time he has left to warn other men about the dangers. i think it‘s really important that people are aware of what the symptoms are and i would actually urge men to talk to their doctors, if they have any urinary issues at all. my issue is that i didn‘t actually have any symptoms and they think i‘d had the cancer for ten years beforehand. more men are living to an age where they have a greater chance of developing prostate cancer.
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so, in 2015, more than 11,800 men died of the disease, compared with just over 11,400 deaths in 2015 due to breast cancer. and while the proportion of people dying from prostate cancer, the mortality rate, has fallen in the past decade, down by 6%, the decline in deaths from breast cancer has been even greater, at more than 10%. it is time to get behind this and to realise that we need to get on top of it now because it willjust become more common, and it is actually going to kill more men, if we are not able to do that. tony has joined those calling for increased funding for research and the development of a reliable prostate screening programme, so the gains seen in the fight against breast cancer can be matched in the fight against the disease that he knows will eventually claim his life, too. health leaders have written to thejustice secretary urging him to reform the pay—out system for negligence claims
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against the nhs. they say the nhs would have to pay up to £65 billion if all current claims were successful, more than double the amount three years ago. the government says it is looking at measures to control costs in such cases. speaking earlier on breakfast, the chief executive of the nhs confederation, niall dickson told us there has to be a cap on the claims. it is not because health care that doctors are practising less safely. there is a problem, the more claims there, the more our professionals are frightened of being sued and the more likely it is we go backwards and we go to closed culture. theresa may insists she‘s delivering what british people want on brexit, and setting out a clear vision to the rest of the world. downing street says billions of pounds‘ worth of deals have been signed during her three—day visit to china which ends later. earlier, the prime minister told the bbc says the deals are good for british jobs.
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we are at the beginning of the process of negotiating with the eu. we wa nt process of negotiating with the eu. we want to reassure the deal we get delivers on what the british people want. i know what the british people wa nt want. i know what the british people want is good jobs for themselves and their children and that is why it is important for me to be here in china where businesses have been signing deals, selling more uk products, ensuring there are more jobs for people in the uk. do you to be the tory leader at the next general election? i have been asked this on a number of occasions. i have said clearly throughout my political career i have served my country and my party. iam nota have served my country and my party. i am not a quitter, i am have served my country and my party. iam nota quitter, iam in have served my country and my party. i am not a quitter, i am in this because there is a job to be done here. our correspondent robin brant joins us from shanghai. in politics, it‘s notjust what you say but the way you say it and there
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has been scrutiny on theresa may in this trip. yes, a combative interview. she said she is not a quitter and she intends to stay and fight the general election in 2022 as prime minister and leader of the tory party. downing street will be frustrated by this uncertainty around brexit, and negotiations, and her leadership, coming from some on her own side. as this trip ends, they will be pleased they have £9 billion of trade deals ranging from bp, aston martin, two smaller medical companies. she has met xijinping, has had reassurance from her counterpart, that whatever happens with brexit, the relationship between china and the uk will not change. this is for the prime minister more jobs in the uk, selling more
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products, and china want a more strategic partnership. it has two improved from its a exporting partner. police investigating the death of hollywood star natalie wood 37 years ago say her husband robert wagner is now being treated as a "person of interest". the actress was found dead after going missing from a yacht off the coast of california. our los angeles correspondent james cook has more details. natalie wood was a hollywood superstar with three oscar nominations when she died suddenly in 1981 at the age ofjust 43. her body was found floating in the water off the coast of california near the yacht on which she was sailing with her husband robert wagner, co—star christopher walken and the boat‘s captain. initially the death was ruled an accident, but the inquiry was reopened in 2011. police now say that two new witnesses have corroborated accounts of a fight between mr wagner and ms wood on the night she disappeared.
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detectives say it appears she was the victim of an assault and they believe her husband was the last person to see her alive. police say robert wagner has refused to speak to them since the case was reopened. they‘ve not declared the death a murder and no charges have been filed against the actor. this is the online generation. ten years on, the nspcc
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says less than half of the recommendations have been put into place. the uk councilfor child internet safety was established. video games now have to have an age rating, but the charity says there‘s been no improvement to parental controls for games consoles and no code of practice is yet in place for the online industry. the government has really dragged theirfeet in implementing recommendations from what was a landmark report ten years ago by professor byron that was supposed to be a comprehensive package to keep children safe. those measures haven‘t been acted on and is clearly essential that now we do see the government take steps, in particular introducing a code of practice and an independent regulator to make social networks keep children safe. the government says it does intend to introduce a voluntary code of practice for social media networks and it says changes to the law will also be considered to compel companies
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to reduce the risks their science pose to children. health experts are calling on the government to fully fund ivf treatment to help cut the number of multiple pregnancies that are risky for mothers and babies. the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists says the health and financial burden these pregnancies pose on the nhs can‘t be overstated. prince harry and meghan markle presented awards at an event last night celebrating the achievements of service men and women. the appearance in the spotlight came in handy for meghan markle as she held out her co—presenter in a mix—up over envelopes. it happens, doesn‘t it! an important occasion. the number of men dying
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from prostate cancer every year has overtaken the number of women dying from breast cancer, according to a charity. more than 47,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year in the uk. that‘s 129 men every day. only men have a prostate gland. it is usually the size and shape of a walnut and sits underneath the bladder. most men with early prostate cancer don‘t have any signs or symptoms, but some men may experience urinary problems. prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. those aged over 50, particularly black men and those with a family history of the disease are most at risk. we‘re joined now by rob bristow, professor of cancer studies and chief academic officer at the christie. and also by errol mckellar, who was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2010. good morning to you. lovely to see
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you here. you are one of the success stories. take us through the sequence of events in 2010? my sequence of events in 2010? my journey with sequence of events in 2010? myjourney with prostate cancer started in 2010 when my wife sharon was complaining about my snoring. as you know with all women, once they start moaning about something stott now, now! isaid, make now, now! i said, make an appointment with the doctor and i will go. i said, make an appointment with the doctorand i will go. i i said, make an appointment with the doctor and i will go. i sat down in the reception room waiting for the doctor and picked up a leaflet from prostate cancer uk. i thought, let me make an appointment to come back. something you hadn‘t thought about before? ifi before? if i had thought about it, i don‘t remember. i went to reception and
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said, can! remember. i went to reception and said, can i make an appointment to come back and do this test? she said, you don‘t need to make an appointment, the blood test takes less tha n appointment, the blood test takes less than ten minutes. that tenants would change the rest of my life. i did that last —— the blood %
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