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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  February 2, 2018 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm ben brown. today at 2pm. darren osborne is sentenced to life in prison, with a minimum term of 43 years, for the van attack near finsbury park mosque in london last year.// our father, like the victims of most terrorism, was entirely innocent which makes his death all the more hurtful. theresa may has refused to give details about what she's seeking in brexit negotiations with the eu. but she's insisting she will deliver the deal that the british people want. authorities in the french port of calais call for extra security measures after clashes erupted between crowds of migrants. during which five people were shot. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — hugh. and the opening weekend of the six nations is upon us. yes, we do, the women's competition
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begins this evening and the men tomorrow, where england will be hoping to become the first side to win three consecutive six nations titles out right. eddiejones has named his team for the game against italy and we have all the details coming up. lucy has the weather forecast. some cold weather on the way as we move through the next few days, it is also a groundhog day and i will have more on that. also coming up — the celebrity photographer that's selling his work for teenage cancer — we'll be speaking to him live shortly. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. darren osborne has been sentenced to life in prison
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with a minimum term of 43 years, for attacking a crowd of muslims near finsbury park mosque in london last year. he was found guilty yesterday of murder and attempted murder, after driving a van into worshippers injune, killing one man and injuring several others. angus crawford is at woolwich crown court. we've heard a lot more before sentencing about darren osborne and his common past, over 30 years he had had more than 30 court appearances —— criminal past. over 100 criminal charges including burglary theft and assault, we also heard about his victim, makram ali, a grandfather and father of six children, described as warm and sincere. his daughter spoke shortly after the hearing. the last few months have been very
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hard for our family as we have tried to adjust to life without our father. it was especially hard for us father. it was especially hard for us to have to sit in court and listen to darren osborne denied he had done anything wrong. we are very pleased with the guilty verdict. we would first like to thank our barristers, the detectives and the police for all the work they have done to secure the verdict. we would also like our liaison also like to thank our liaison office rs also like to thank our liaison officers who have - by our side officers who have been by our side throughout. before our father left the house that night, he had spent the house that night, he had spent the evening with his family. he was here, it was here where he felt most comfortable, he was such a peaceful and simple man. he had no bad thoughts for anyone. our father, like the victims of most terrorism,
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was entirely innocent, which makes his death in this violent way all the more hurtful. we cannot imagine the more hurtful. we cannot imagine the trauma he failed in his last few minutes. —— he felt. it but we choose to remember our father with happy thoughts and he will never be forgotten. he will always stay in oui’ forgotten. he will always stay in our hearts, is laughter will go the walls of our home and his smile will be reflected in our eyes and his memory will be alive in our conversations. we would also like to thank the witnesses who have helped the case and the family and friends who attended court and the support we received from the community. we would like to thank the press for respecting our privacy and would ask them to continue to do so so we can try and move on with our lives as best as we can. thank you.
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in sentencing, thejudge in sentencing, the judge mrsjustice cheema—grubb described him as a belligerent and five and character who had allowed his mind to be poisoned —— violent character. she said he still posed a significant risk to the public, possible to the rest of his life, and then she gave him a life sentence and said he must serve at least 43 years, he then then forward and said, god bless you, thank you. amber rudd has said the government will continue to be unwavering in their resolve to combat all forms of terrorism at whatever the underlying motivation. angus, many thanks. theresa may is coming under increasing pressure to spell out what she hopes to achieve
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from the brexit negotiations — including whether britain should remain part of a customs union after it leaves the eu. some leave—supporting conservative mps have urged the prime minister to be more specific about her priorities for future trade deals. downing street says mrs may has an "open mind" to the kind of customs arrangement the uk should pursue. speaking to our political editor laura kuenssberg, theresa may said her visit to china will help boost british trade prospects. this trip is an example of global britain. it's about britain getting out around the world, and, yes, enhancing our trade links. and crucially what happened here is that we have seen the businesses i have brought with me on this trip signing deal which means more jobs for people back in britain. that's good news for britain, it's global britain in action and that's what we are seeing here. on top of doing business around the world, your party, the public, business, they want to know, do you favour a really close relationship with
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the european union once we're out or a more dramatic break? what i favour is a deal, an arrangement for trading with the eu which is going be good for trade between the uk and the european union and good forjobs in britain. it's a fundamental choice here, isn't there? your chancellor has said he believes the changes might be very modest and one of your former brexit ministers who is on your side has said the government is yet to make clear choices and you are risking ending up with something which looks like meaningless waffle. my choice is very simple, we take back control of our money, take back control of our borders, take back control of our laws. you know very well that decision time is fast approaching. which is more important to you, less disruption to the economy or more control for parliament and politicians? because the eu, many people in business, many members of the public, people in your party believe you simply can't have both.
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i don't believe those are alternatives. what the british people voted for is for us to take back control of our money, borders and laws. and that's exactly what we're going to do. we also want to ensure that we can trade across borders. we're at the start of the negotiation. at the end of that negotiation, a deal will be presented to parliament, and parliament will have a meaningful vote. do you want to be the tory leader at the next general election? of occasions and i said very clearly drop my political career i've served my country and i've served my party. i'm not a quitter, i'm in this because there's a job to be done here. and that is delivering for the british people and doing that in a way that ensures the future prosperity of our country. our viewers see day after day the tory party fighting amongst themselves.
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how do you reassert your authority? i am doing what the british people want, delivering on brexit also getting out around the world ensuring that we bring jobs back to britain. companies will be selling the great british projects to china as a result of this trip, more people injobs in the uk as a result of this trip — that's global britain in action. our political correspondent eleanor garnier is in westminster. global britain in action is the mantra from the prime minister, but her critics will say they are not sure what global britain it will actually be. that is the phrase she will be keen to say which gets back to the uk and she will be keen to emphasise the success of her trip, coming back with billions of pounds of business deals signed, she sees this as putting out a message that there is a confident uk as it leaves there is a confident uk as it leaves the eu but as theresa may comes back to the uk is not a conservative party brimming with confidence that she will come back to. there is the infighting and the splits in the party, but i think the big problem
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for theresa may is the concern that some in her party have over her leadership, talk of disillusionment and despondency and some are questioning her decisiveness and even some of those in her party who have been supporters of her are becoming more wobbly in their confidence in her leadership. there are others who say, we need to be more radical when it comes to change and domestic policies. she comes back to britain under pressure, certainly. part of her problem is that she is presiding over what is essentially a coalition of people with differing ideas of what brexit should mean an differing visions —— and. she's trying to keep the coalition together. unity is the keyword but the row we are seeing at the top of the party but also down through the party ranks, that is a i’ow through the party ranks, that is a row which goes to the heart of the brexit debate across the country and around about the eu as a whole when
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it comes to the conservative party —— and a row. this is a split which has been theirfor —— and a row. this is a split which has been their for decades and one former minister has said that whoever was the leader at this time during the brexit negotiations would have faced the same issues and the same difficulties that theresa may is facing. some conservative mps who do support her say she is the right person to be in the job do support her say she is the right person to be in thejob now but do support her say she is the right person to be in the job now but they point to the local elections in may with a warning, saying if the conservatives are given a bad set of results, that could spell disaster for theresa may's future in number ten. downing street will say, getting theresa may on with the job and for her to be seen out and about around the country and around the world, that will help her to regain control of the party, but as we have seen over control of the party, but as we have seen over the last few days the toils and tribulations of the tory party could well be a distraction for theresa may as she tries to
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solve this really difficult question over which kind of brexit the government will choose to take in those negotiations with brussels. thanks forjoining us. the authorities in the french port of calais have called for extra security measures, after clashes erupted between crowds of migrants. four eritreans are reported to be in a critical condition in hospital, after they were shot during fights between afghan and african migrants. the french authorities say a series of fights broke out between migrants yesterday, it is not clear what sparked the clashes but clearly tensions have boiled over, amongst the hundreds to have gathered in calais in an attempt to cross the channel into the uk. france's interior minister has visited the scene and there are food distribution centres and he said the area had never seen such violence and urged migrants not to come to the area. translation: we see that
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we have reached a new level of islands tonight, an escalation of violence that is becoming completely unbearable for the people of calais and for the migrants, and we can't allow a sense of this to continue so we would do things every way we can. extra riot police have been sent and officers are searching for an afghan in his 30s who is suspected of shooting some of the injured. a local hostel worker says migrants are living in terrible conditions. translation: it is a disaster, there are tensions related to it being winter, the winter hostel is not open and there is police pressure to stop campsites being set up, and then there is the work of the smugglers who try to do their trafficking. many migrants in the area are feeling increasingly desperate as the french government does its best to make calais as unattractive as possible in an attempt to stop another large—scale
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camp re—emerging. a man has pleaded not guilty to the murder of two schoolgirls in sussex more than 30 years ago. karen hadaway and nicola fellows were both nine years old when they were found dead in woods near the moulescoomb estate, on the outskirts of brighton, in october 1986. russell bishop, who's 51, was remanded in custody and will stand trial at the old bailey in october. five people have been killed after two army helicopters in france crashed near the southern resort town of st tropez. both helicopters belonged to a military flying school, which trains pilots. local officials say all those on board died when the helicopters collided, but what caused the accident is still not clear. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. darren osborne is sentenced to life
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in prison, with a minimum term of 43 years, for the van attack near finsbury park mosque in london last year. theresa may refuses to give details about what she's seeking in brexit negotiations with the eu. but she insists she will deliver the deal that the british people want. authorities in the french port of calais call for extra security measures after clashes erupted between crowds of migrants during which five people were shot. in a moment, as the number of men dying from prostate cancer overtakes the number of women dying from breast cancer, we'll be speaking to a clinical oncologist about the uk‘s third biggest cancer killer. and in sport great britain have lost their first match in the davis cup. england have selected ben teo'o for
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their six nations against italy —— six nations fixture. and peter willey was in great form for england in theirfirst t20 willey was in great form for england in their first t20 victory over a prime minister ‘s 11. for the first time, the number of men dying from prostate cancer has overtaken the number of women dying from breast cancer. it makes prostate cancer the third biggest cancer killer in the uk. the charity, prostate cancer uk, says advances in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer have paid off and argues similar benefits could be seen if more money was allocated to the fight against prostate cancer. our health correspondent dominic hughes reports. prostate cancer does not discriminate. last year, keen runner tony collier discovered he had the disease while training for an ultra marathon. his diagnosis was late,
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and he knows cancer will eventually take his life. so tony is using the time he has left to warn other men about the dangers. i think it's really important that people are aware of what their symptoms are and i would actually urge men to talk to their doctors if they have any urinary issues at all. my issue is that i didn't actually have any symptoms and they think i had the cancer for ten years beforehand. more men are living to an age where they have a greater chance of developing prostate cancer, so in 2015, more than 11,800 men died from the disease. that compares with just over 11,400 deaths in 2015 due to breast cancer. and while the proportion of people dying from prostate cancer, the mortality rate, has fallen over the past decade, down by 6%, the decline in deaths from breast cancer has been even greater, more than 10%. prostate cancer hasn't had as much investment and has therefore tended to lag behind and it's now time —
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realising it's the third biggest cancer killer, it is the most common cancer in men, it really is time to actually get behind this and to realise that we need to get on top of it now because it's just going to become more common and it's actually going to kill more men if we aren't able to do that. cancers of the lung and bowel remain the biggest killers but even here there has been significant progress. improved treatments and years of research are now showing results. the really exciting things that are going on in the cancer research field at the moment is personalised medicines — so we're getting to know tumours inside and out, the genes that make them tick and the faulty molecules that also are fuelling the tumour‘s growth. and the more that we know about individual cancers the more personalised we can make treatments and that's where we think we can make real progress in developing new treatments and helping more people survive. meanwhile, tony has joined those calling for increased funding for prostate research and the development of a reliable screening programme. so the gains seen in the fight against other cancers can be matched
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when combating the disease that he knows will eventually claim his life, too. dominic hughes, bbc news. we will be discussing that very shortly with a clinical oncologist from birmingham. we can now go to our correspondent in ireland. two ulster rugby players are charged with raping a woman in june 2016. alongside those men are a couple of others, one charge with exposure and rory harrison charged with perverting the course of justice and all four men deny all of the charges against them for the. the alleged victim has been giving
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evidence for three days, she was in a nightclub at belfast and went into the vip area where some ulster rugby players when she went back to paddy jackson's has with three other women and she said she was raped by paddy jackson in a upstairs bedroom but the day after the attack stuart olding sent an explicit message to friends boasting about the events of the night. the victim has been cross—examined today and yesterday and she brings the said she did not follow rugby, and this morning the barrister showed a text message to the alleged victim and it said, just pretend you don't know they are from by. pretend you don't know they are from rugby. the defence lawyer suggested from the woman that she had watered down her knowledge of rugby and the people who play it. the alleged victim denied this. the trial is
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expected to last for another four weeks. chris page, there. police in the united states say the actor robert wagner is now being treated as a person of interest in an investigation into the death of his wife, the film star natalie wood. she was found drowned in 1981 during a california yachting trip with wagner, and her death was ruled to have been an accident. they were a hollywood golden couple at the time — natalie wood had been a child star, in miracle on 34th street — and got her first oscar nomination while still a teenager for rebel without a cause. this report from david sillito. # i feel pretty and witty and gay... natalie wood, the star of west side story. she won an oscar for rebel without a cause. and then in 1981 she was found dead. she had been sailing with their husband, heart—to—heart star robert wagner. the ships captain, dennis davern. i remember people coming on the boat, saying
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that they had found natalie wood floating, just couldn't believe it. the verdict, accidental drowning. the actor christopher walken was also on board at the time but how it all happened was a mystery. and then 30 years later new information emerged about the couple that night. the captain now said he had heard arguing. i believe robert wagner was with her up until the moment she went into the water. in 2011, the case was reopened. evidence of bruising led to the cause of death being changed to drowning and other undetermined factors. recently, we have received information which we felt was substantial enough to make us take another look at this case. and now detectives say two more people have come forward saying they also heard raised voices on the night. and one said: she saw figures in the back of the splendour,
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male and female, whose voices they recognised as being robert wagner and natalie wood. arguing in the back of the boat. back in 2011, that family issued a statement saying it supported the police's efforts and the detectives at the time had this to say about robert wagner. any questions? is robert wagner a suspect? no. six years on? i think it's suspicious enough to make us think something happened. i don't think she got into the water herself, i don't think she fell into the water. as we've investigated the case over the last six years, i think he's more of a person of interest now. we know he was the last person to be with natalie before she disappeared. ladies and gentlemen, robert wagner. so, not a suspect, a person of interest. robert wagner has made no comment about these latest developments. but 37 years on, the story of this golden hollywood couple and the investigation into the death of natalie wood is still very much ongoing.
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david sillito, bbc news. person of interest, what does this mean? it doesn't necessarily mean suspect but the police think robert wagner could have information knowingly or on knowingly that could help them explore what happened in 1981 for the back then it was declared an accident but now they are looking at it again, we have had witnesses coming forward, and the captain of the boat that was involved changing his testimony, although he has said many things over the years and sold his story to the tabloids, so they will way that up. they have re—examined the autopsy and have said actually something they thought that was consistent with natalie wood falling into the water accidentally could actually be more consistent with some kind of physical altercation. and the constant pressure from
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natalie wood's family and others to look at this again, and all these factors have made the county sheriff's office in los angeles said it is worth looking at this again, there are unanswered questions for there are unanswered questions for the robert wagner could help them a nswer the robert wagner could help them answer these. we should point out that consistently robert wagner has denied being involved in her death in any other way, apart from he was there when it happened. he is now 87 and he has not spoken publicly about this gridlock bespoke about this in his -- about this? he spoke about this in his memoirs, and he said he was there with this to a walking, and the first he was looking for her. he has denied knowing what happened for the deep police say his story has changed over the years and they wish to speak to him again ——
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they wish to speak to him again —— the police. with all these factors, there's more pressure on him to speak, to come forward. but it would bea speak, to come forward. but it would be a surprise if he says anything other than what he has consistently said over the years and years, that it was a terrible accident and he doesn't know anything more, but the police quite rightly, this is a person who died for whatever reason, and the police have said if there are unanswered questions it is their duty to do what they can to see if they can possibly answer some of them. 0k, they can possibly answer some of them. ok, thanks forjoining us. prince harry and meghan markle presented awards last night at a ceremony which awarded injured service men and women. ms markle's experience
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in the spotlight came in handy as she helped out her co—presenter who struggled with the envelope containing the names of the nominees. time for a look at the weather. pretty cold for the next few days? it certainly is, that is the theme for the next few days, you know what is behind me? groundhog day. another cold forecast, as well. groundhog day is a ceremony in north america, canada,it day is a ceremony in north america, canada, it is being held today, the groundhog comes out of his burrow and if he sees clear skies and has the same shadow they think that winter is going to last for an extra six weeks, but if he goes backdown they think there will be an early spring. it does look like we will
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see more in the way of winter. we don't need weather forecasters, we just need a groundhog. he has been accurate 39% of the time over the last 120 years. that is not great. you are 100%? of course. laughter it is another cold forecast. we have blue skies and if you are outside i think you would see your shadow and thatis think you would see your shadow and that is a sign of things to come, because we will see some cold temperatures, plenty of blue sky on the satellite picture. cloud starting to increase in the west and thatis starting to increase in the west and that is thanks to this weather front and that will bring increasing amounts of cloud and outbreaks of rain. do the afternoon, coastal showers but they will tend to fade away. —— through the afternoon. lots of bright weather. to the evening and overnight, clear skies,
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temperatures will fall away quite quickly, and then the cloud and rain will push in from the west, patches of ice not out of the question where it falls on freezing round, and maybe snow over high ground in the north. in the east a touch of frost to begin with, and there will be some early brightness bursting but the cloud and outbreaks of rain gradually spreading. the rain will fizzle out and become patchy, some brightness in the north and west, temperatures not feeling warm and a maximum of 6 degrees, and it will feel a touch cooler than that when you factor in the wind. into sunday, we still have the weather front, it will move back to the west across england and wales, and there is a very cold wind direction, you can see the cold air spreading firmly across the british isles, and so is across the british isles, and so is a cold day to come on sunday. but touch of frost to begin the day,
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especially in the north, some bright intervals and sunny spells and the best of those in the north. and a brisk wind across england and wales and the chance of a few wintry showers in the south—east. temperatures, maximum of seven. a few wintry showers in the south—west again, on monday, but also dry and bright weather. the next weather front waiting in the wings to come later on monday, into tuesday, and we conceive that on the pressure charts, as it comes it will bring moisture which will clash with the cold and so there is potential for snow, but uncertainty as to how far east the weather front will, and how much snow there will be but there is potential for disruption. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. darren osborne is sentenced to life in prison, for the van attack near finsbury park mosque in london
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last year, which killed one man and injured others. ourfather, like the our father, like the victims of most terrorism, was entirely innocent, which makes his death in this final way all the more hurtful. theresa may has attempted to brush off criticism of her leadership and approach to the brexit negotiations — insisting she will secure a deal with the eu that is acceptable to the british people. extra riot police are being sent to the french port of calais after clashes erupted between crowds of migrants during which five people were shot. calls for more funding and better screening for prostate cancer as new figures reveal the number of those killed by the disease overtook breast—cancer for the first time. also coming up — we meet the celebrity photographer who's selling some of his iconic snaps
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to raise money for cancer charities. sport now on afternoon live with hugh. we have got davis cup tennis. no andy murray is there in the davis cup, because of his hip surgery so how will team gb be getting on? very difficult for team gb. no andy murray. he had hip surgery. kyle edmund is out with a hip injury of his own. it is a bit like afternoon live without simon mccoy. it has left the brodie and cameron norrie flying the flag. it is a difficult time —— liam brodie. a defeat earlierfor liam time —— liam brodie. a defeat earlier for liam brodie time —— liam brodie. a defeat earlierfor liam brodie meant it has not started well. cameron norrie is
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taking on roberto bautista agut. he is playing very well indeed. he was a breakdown in the second set but he has fought back. he is two break point down again. a difficult match for him. we will see if he can do it. it can be followed on bbc two and also the red button. an ominous start for the davis cup. and rugby six nations action this weekend. yes, eddiejones six nations action this weekend. yes, eddie jones has six nations action this weekend. yes, eddiejones has named his team. it could be an interesting six nations. they could be the first tea m nations. they could be the first team to win the six nations title outright three is in a row. they will start their defence against italy in rome on sunday. there was a surprise selection. ben te'o is named at outside centre. ahead of jonathanjoseph. named at outside centre. ahead of jonathan joseph. he has named at outside centre. ahead of jonathanjoseph. he has not played since october. jones has been talking about his selection to the
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media today. there are two things will do in the backs, either get more sides get quicker and more skilful. we are working on both. we need to have a competitive edge in the backline. we don't have the naturally biggest guys in the world so we are naturally biggest guys in the world so we are working very hard on the speed, working very hard on their skill, but at the same time, if we find good big guys who can fit our game plan, then they will get an opportunity and ben is one of those. soa opportunity and ben is one of those. so a big amount to a great man needed for a big weekend. —— a big man needed for a big weekend. england's game with italy is on sunday at three o'clock. it is promising to be an exciting weekend ahead. we will preview all the action on six nations sportsday. that is at 6:30pm on bbc news. in football, arsene wenger admitted he did not get everything he wanted
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in the january transfer window but he is content with what he did receive. he broke the transfer record for the club for the second time within six months. he brought in pierre emerick. he is a good player and he has a good work as well. and he is a team player. we lost some goals because we lost sanchez giroud and walcott who are out goal—scorers so sanchez giroud and walcott who are our goal—scorers so he will complement. england are cruising for 2020 win over prime ministers leavening camera. the makeshift opener hit 34
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runs. nathan ryan captained the home side. england comfortably won by eight wickets. willie made 79 from just 36 balls. their tri— series with australia begins on saturday. and that is all the sport for now. i will be back in the next hour. many thanks. we can get more on the figures showing the number of those killed by prostate cancer has overtaken breast cancer for the first time. joining us now is daniel ford a clinical oncologist. a lot of people may be surprised by these findings. is this showing a lack of investment in prostate cancer research and screening? i think there are a
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number of factors here. one of the things is the number of patients being diagnosed with prostate cancer is increasing. if you look at the breast—cancer side, they are doing a very good job. i think what is important is there are a number of treatments in prostate cancer which are developing and things are progressing. clearly, we have still got a long way to go. there is still got a long way to go. there is still a gap between funding for prostate cancer research and breast—cancer research, but that gap is reducing. we are getting to a point where hopefully we will catch up point where hopefully we will catch up with the breast—cancer team. point where hopefully we will catch up with the breast-cancer team. this is partly the ageing population, is that right, and the number of men dying from the disease is rising because of the ageing population? that is partly it. it is age dependent. also, more and more people are being picked up with
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prostate cancer, not through specific screening programmes, but people are becoming more aware of the condition and are being treated accordingly. just talk about that awareness. i know traditionally it has been a problem with men to get them aware of what the symptoms are and when they need to talk to a doctor. just talk us through what you should know about this. so really, gentlemen who are developing any urinary symptoms, so increased frequency, getting up in the night, any urgency and also things such as passing blood are areas that should be looked at and investigated. the other thing to say is the number of people with prostate cancer, when it is atan people with prostate cancer, when it is at an early stage are asymptomatic. it is developing systems where we can screen those individuals and pick up these cancers earlier because clearly if you do marriage to get them earlier,
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you do marriage to get them earlier, you will be in a better place with treatments and options available. often hear that cancer survival rates are often hear that cancer survival rates a re better often hear that cancer survival rates are better in other european countries. what are the statistics on that with prostate cancer, would you say? i think with regards to the uk, if you look at the prostate cancer community and where we are, some of the world leading research and investigations and trials into prostate cancer are coming from the uk. i think certainly there is an issue with regard to picking these patients up earlier. but with regard to the treatment available and the investigations and the trials we are running, certainly, ithink investigations and the trials we are running, certainly, i think if you are diagnosed in the uk you have an excellent opportunity to be treated ina number of excellent opportunity to be treated in a number of world—class settings. good to talk to you. thank you for your time good to talk to you. thank you for yourtime and your good to talk to you. thank you for your time and your advice. daniel ford, clinical oncologist from queen
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elizabeth hospital in birmingham. photographer to the stars, dave hogan, has spent his career shooting some of the most iconic names in the entertainment industry. his portfolio includes freddie mercury, david bowie and madonna. with over 40 years of experience, he has established himself as one of the world's leading celebrity photographers. now dave is selling his work for charity, to raise money for the teenage cancer trust, the haven and cancer research uk. his photos will be on display at an exhibition and have been commissioned from getty images. i'm delighted to say he is here with us now. i'm delighted to say he is here with us now. some amazing pictures of rock stars down the years. are you going to talk us through a few of them? you are so privileged to have been on stage with some of these styles. this is madonna before she was famous. this was back in the
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80s. was famous. this was back in the 805. i was famous. this was back in the 80s. i was working with boy george at the time. he said, come and photograph this person, she will be big. how right was he. this was a little club in new york. she has changed. haven't we all! it was somebody like boy george who was so massive in the 80s and said you will wa nt to massive in the 80s and said you will want to come with me. we are still photographing her today. michael jackson, i know you took his photograph a lot in his extraordinary career. this was him in london. he is on top of the £300,000 daimler, in the days when stars went round london like that. the driver said, what am i going to tell my boss? i have had michael jackson moonwalking on the roof of the car. did he trash the roof of the car. did he trash the roof of the car? there were enough scuff marks on it that he had to explain it. see the policemen on the horse.
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his sister—in—law called up from canada and said, i have to buy this picture. it isjust canada and said, i have to buy this picture. it is just going worldwide. he has a great moustache. that was 40 odd years ago. i wonder what he looks like now. you have an extraordinary picture of the gallagher brothers from oasis, noel and liam. the reason why i think this is unique is it is the only known picture of the two of them smiling together. we were backstage at the royal albert hall. roger adultery was hosting. he is the governor. we were doing pictures of all the main stars. oasis were not the main purpose of the pictures. i photographed all the executives and people from the teenage cancer trust. roger adultery is the god. they stood next to him and they have the mean and moody not quite smiling. the scowl. the scowl. i said, iam smiling. the scowl. the scowl. i
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said, i am not going to do the picture unless you smile. they said, we do not smile. i said, you will smile today. they said you cheeky so—and—so. but i got the picture. it is about prating smiles and goodwill. teenage cancer trust is such a great charity to be involved with. now, tina turner and david bowie. we have got them together. you have so many great superstars. hasn't tina turner got some of your pictures in her house?” hasn't tina turner got some of your pictures in her house? i spoke to her pr, bernard. he got me into a lot of situations. we went to birmingham. nobody else knew that david bowie would come onstage apart from me and bernard. we go there and everyone puts their hands up. i said, put your hands down and smack i got this picture when they were doing this 12. she loved the picture. when he sadly died she said, can! picture. when he sadly died she said, can i tweaked it? it is on her
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grand piano. they were great, great friends —— she asked if she could twea ked friends —— she asked if she could tweaked it. this is a wacky one of paul mccartney. this was an exhibition of photographs of his wife, linda will stop i had been invited along and i bought her book. i never asked anybody for a celebrity autograph but i wanted linda to sign it. she signed it and i was very proud of it. he said, do you want me to sign it? i said, well, it is linda's book. but yes, he turned and did this face. no one recognises it is paul mccartney! lots of stars will be involved and it isa lots of stars will be involved and it is a unique moment which would not happen today. just talk to us about when you are backstage or even here on stage with a superstar, it
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must be the most privileged moment, because everybody wants to be at a concert, but you are actually onstage with the stars?|j concert, but you are actually onstage with the stars? i have sang onstage with the stars? i have sang onstage with the stars? i have sang onstage with every major star in the world, badly. iam onstage with every major star in the world, badly. i am there with my camera, dressed in black, trying to blend in. this was a moment at live eight in hyde park. with the audience we are trying to look at getting every single person in the picture to hashtag themselves to say i was there. we said how cool it would be if everyone tags themselves. he is the cat who has got the cream. he has won the audience over. i managed to be onside. must be such a buzz for you to be alongside these legends. onside. must be such a buzz for you to be alongside these legendslj onside. must be such a buzz for you to be alongside these legends. i am a kid from wales going, i am here! i
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am ina a kid from wales going, i am here! i am in a unique situation. it is a position i never abuse. this is not something like retiring, i have been asked by lady gaga if i will photograph her at wembley? of course i will. you respect the rules. it is amazing and i am very honoured to work with people. i am not their best friend but ijust help. and the rolling stones, finally, because you have been on tour with them... you cannot get any bigger band than them. you must get to know them well? there is a pecking order but when you're sitting backstage with them, they come to you and you are pa rt them, they come to you and you are part of the family. big bands that go on the road, they are on the road for a year. so there is a respect. such fantastic pictures. everybody would want to own some of these pictures and put them on their walls. why are you selling them off? basically, i have always wanted to
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give a year of my life to charity. ifi give a year of my life to charity. if i went away for a year they would say, dave who? so i am giving a month. i am say, dave who? so i am giving a month. iam basing myself in say, dave who? so i am giving a month. i am basing myself in a hotel, the trafalgar saint james. month. i am basing myself in a hotel, the trafalgar saintjames. we have a studio space. we are getting everybody to come in and do their portrait and we will do the biggest christmas charity book. dave hogan, thank you for coming in. celebrity photographer to the stars and the superstars. now let's take you to america. there have been dramatic scenes this afternoon during the sentencing of the former american gymnastics team doctor, larry nassar, who has been found guilty of molesting young women in his care. a father who had three daughters abused by him has lunged at him during the hearing. let's take you through what happened there this afternoon. and ex—survivor. ..
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and ex-survivor... i and ex-survivor. .. i would ask you to grant me five minutes in a locked room with this demon. that is not our... yes or no? would you give me one minute? you know that i cannot do that. that is not how our legal system works. let me have him! dramatic scenes. that was randall margrave is whose daughters were abused by nassar, lunging towards him at that final sentencing hearing in the united states. we will bring you more on that as it comes into us. the nspcc has accused the government of dragging its feet when it comes to protecting children online.
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the charity says around half the recommendations made in a government report commissioned a decade ago have still not been introduced. ministers say they are working to make the uk the safest place to be online. sarah campbell reports. this is the online generation. over the past decade the internet and its use has expanded rapidly. it can be hard to keep up. i think she's a bit behind with snapchat and stuff and my dad is as well. they get their names a bit confused. most of the time. but she knows about them and she knows how to use them, kind of. before the likes of whatsapp, snapchat and instagram even existed, just ten years ago, professor tanya byron, a clinical psychologist, was asked by the then government to look into children's safety online. a decade later the nspcc say fewer than half of her recommendations have been put into place. a uk council of child internet safety was established. video games now have
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to have an age rating. but the charity says there's been no improvement to parental controls for games consoles, and no code of practice is yet in place for the online industry. and even though the government says it does plan to introduce a voluntary code of practice, in 2018 professor byron argues any code now must be mandatory. we're talking about children at risk of sexual exploitation, of grooming, and those kinds of contacts. it has to happen now. there has been ten years for the voluntary code to be put together. it hasn't happened. so now we need a mandatory code. if you look at germany for example, they will fine social media companies that don't take down extremist content. the technology is there. rebecca lury is a headteacher and
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agrees social networks can't be left to voluntarily police themselves. it would be good to have something concrete and everybody has to abide by it and then we can learn from each other and make sure that happens. i understand why companies might not wish to do that but for children's safety it is important. in response to the nspcc‘s report the government says social media companies must go further and faster in reducing the risks their platforms prose, particularly to children, and we are considering all options to make this happen including changes to the law when necessary. ever evolving internet. sarah campbell, bbc news. in a moment, the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. darren osborne is sentenced to life in prison — with a minimum term of 43 years — for the van attack near finsbury park mosque in london last year. theresa may refuses to give details about what she's seeking in brexit negotiations with the eu. but she insists she will deliver the deal that the british people want. authorities in the french port of calais call for extra security
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measures after clashes erupted between crowds of migrants during which five people were shot. here's your business headlines on afternoon live: nearly 380 workers at carillion are being made redundant. the body in charge of liquidating the business said it had still managed to save 919jobs. the official said it had still managed to save 919 jobs. the official receiver said most of the people who have kept their posts are being transferred on existing or similar terms to new companies taking over carillion's contracts. progress in the construction sector is slowing. this comes from a survey by a group called markit/cips which uses an index to measure growth. anything above 50 means growth, below, means the industry is shrinking. the drop—off is quite sharp.
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injanuary the index fell to 50.2. it had been at 52.2 in december. the uk's energy regulator ofgem is to look into whether ovo energy has given inaccurate information to its customers over how much energy they used during the winter of 2016—17. incorrect consumption figures could lead to customers getting inaccurate bills. it is the day we found out in the united states how manyjobs were created? it is extraordinary how the american economy continues to generatejobs. it is american economy continues to generate jobs. it is 200,000 which isa generate jobs. it is 200,000 which is a good number by any standard. this is what donald trump has been trumpeting. that is right. the economy is growing but the dollar is not as strong and they think interest rates will go up. productivity, it is a little bit of
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a mystery why productivity there and here is not quite as good as people we re here is not quite as good as people were hoping. we will talk about that in the second. we have also got some other figures out. technology companies like apple. apple, amazon, google who's holding company is called alphabet. we are talking about huge numbers here. the big figures which we have had from alphabet which were something like six or £7 billion in the last three months of last year. amazon is the big performer. it is about one and a half billion pounds. it made a profit at the end of last year. that is really going fast. it is really gaining ground. it had a really good christmas. the new prime business is
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going well. we can go to yogita limaye in new york. amazon was the most impressive? that is right. amazon in a way has always focused on growth over profits. they are expanding. there are literally in every aspect of the american person's life these days. there was the announcement where they were tying up with the big companies here to get into health care as well. they have been diversifying very rapidly and still have been managing to quote record profits. the prophets have come from amazon prime subscriptions. in that sense that is being viewed as a good thing as well. as far as apple is concerned, that was also one that markets and people here were watching. there we re concerns about people here were watching. there were concerns about sluggish demand for the iphone ten. those do not seem for the iphone ten. those do not seem to be off the mark because they
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have reduced the sales forecast for the year ahead. essentially what is happening is they are now charging more. the money that they are making for every iphone that they sold, well, that is increasing. even though they might be selling fewer phones, they are still making profits. and the other big one that you are talking about, alphabet, google's parent company, despite the result it missed a forecast by a little bit and that is because of investments. the bosses of that company have realised they need to diversify so they are trying to push ina different diversify so they are trying to push in a different direction beyond the search engine. the results are pretty good, i know they were a little disappointing. there were 200,000 jobs created last month which is pretty impressive, we are expecting interest rates to go higher, the whole economy does seem to be going dambusters but the market when i last looked was not responding that well or has it
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changed? i asked exactly this question. over the past few days we have had the big high—tech companies with amazing results, job numbers which beat expectations, why isn't it reacting? they almost seem to factor this in, that this is what they expected in a sense and therefore you are not seeing the huge reaction right here. as far as jobs are concerned, the interesting numberl jobs are concerned, the interesting number i want to point out is actually the wage growth number. it is about 2.9%, that is the year—on—year number, and that rate is the highest since 2009. this is a number that the federal reserve looks at carefully. if you have wages rising and effectively inflation rising, that is what the federal reserve has been saying will happen this year. therefore, there does seem to be a pretty strong case for a rate rise when they next meet in march. thank you. going
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gangbusters, is that a from economics. the fast you go, the bigger you grow, the more you have got to grow, that is the problem. they demand more and more. indeed. let's see what the weather is doing. here is lucy. hello. this photo was sent in by a weather watcher. with clear skies we will see a touch of frost developing. the rain could fall of snow over higher ground. where we see the rain we will see a few patches of ice developing. a cold and frosty start to the day tomorrow. in the east it will be largely dry. the cloud and outbreaks of rain will spread its way woods through the day. the far east staying dry. seeing more in the way of brightness the northern ireland and scotland. temperatures, a
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maximum of six celsius. it will feel cooler than that. a cold and frosty start in the north. across england and wales, north—easterly breeze means it will not be feeling warm. there is the potential for means it will not be feeling warm. there is the potentialfor some means it will not be feeling warm. there is the potential for some snow showers in the east. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm ben brown. today at 3pm. darren osborne is sentenced to life in prison, with a minimum term of 43 years, for the van attack near finsbury park mosque in london last year. our father, like the victims of most terrorism, was entirely innocent which makes his death all the more hurtful. in brexit negotiations with the eu. but she's insisting she will deliver the deal that the british people want. authorities in the french port of calais call for extra security
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measures after clashes erupted between crowds of migrants. during which five people were shot. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — hugh. not a great start for great britain in the davis cup. yes, they are without kyle edmund and andy murray, and brody has been beaten in the opening match against spain. the second match looks like it is going the same way as well. lucy has the weather forecast. it is certainly feeling cold, despite the blue skies, and cold will be the theme over the weekend. and a sexual assault victim's father has lunged at the
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home secretary amber rudd said the government would be ‘unwavering' in combating ‘all forms of terrorism — whatever the motivation'. by our side throughout.
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before our father left the house that night, he had spent the evening with his family. he was here... it was here where he felt most comfortable, he was such a peaceful and simple man. he had no bad thoughts for anyone. our father, like the victims of most terrorism, was entirely innocent, which makes his death in this violent way all the more hurtful. we cannot imagine the trauma he felt in his last few minutes. but we choose to remember our father with happier thoughts and he will never be forgotten. he will always stay in our hearts, his laughter will echo the walls of our home and his smile will be reflected in our eyes.
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his memory will be alive in our conversations. we would also like to thank the witnesses who have helped the case and family and friends who attended court and the support we received from the community. we would like to thank the press for respecting our privacy and would ask them to continue to do so so we can try and move on with our lives as best as we can. thank you. in sentencing, thejudge mrs justice cheema—grubb described him as a belligerent and violent character who had allowed his mind to be poisoned. she said he still posed a significant risk to the public, possibly for the rest of his life, and then she gave him a life sentence and said he must serve at least 43 years.
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osborne then lent forward and said, god bless you, thank you. home secretary amber rudd has said the government will continue to be unwavering in their resolve to combat all forms of terrorism whatever the underlying motivation. and now to the united states where they have witnessed dramatic scenes at the latest sentencing of the disgraced us gymnastics doctor larry nassar. a case which has gripped notjust the united states, but the world.
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larry nassar has already been sentenced to up to 175 years in prison at an earlier hearing after pleading guilty to molesting young women under the guise of medical treatment the enraged father of three girls who were preyed on by the doctor, begged thejudge for time alone with larry nassar. and then the father lunged at him in the court room. i want to ask you as part of the sentencing to grant me five minutes alone with this demon. would you do that? yes or no? no, i can't do that. would you give me one minute? that is not how the legal system works. stay down. let me at him. stop. i want this bleep
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dramatic scenes in the court room, the father of three of larry nassar‘s victims. we've bleeped out some of the language but essentially as he was being handcuffed on the floor of the court room, you said i wa nt floor of the court room, you said i want that —— he said i want that son ofa... i want to ask you as part of the sentencing to grant me five minutes alone with this demon. would you do that? that is not how our... yes or no?
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no, i can't do that. would you give me one minute? that is not how the legal system works. stay down. let me have him. stop. i want this bleep the father of three victims of larry nassar, lunging at him in the court room, very emotional scenes in the court room. theresa may is coming under increasing pressure to spell out what she hopes to achieve from the brexit negotiations — including whether britain should remain part of a customs union after it leaves the eu. some leave—supporting conservative mps have urged the prime minister to be more specific about her priorities for future trade deals. downing street says mrs may has an "open mind" to the kind of customs arrangement the uk should pursue. speaking to our political
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editor laura kuenssberg, theresa may said her visit to china will help boost british trade prospects. this trip is an example of global britain. it's about britain getting out around the world, and, yes, enhancing our trade links. and crucially what happened here is that we have seen the businesses i have brought with me on this trip signing deal which means more jobs for people back in britain. that's good news for britain, it's global britain in action and that's what we are seeing here. on top of doing business around the world, your party, the public, business, they want to know, do you favour a really close relationship with the european union once we're out or a more dramatic break? what i favour is a deal, an arrangement for trading with the eu which is going to be good for trade between the uk and the european union and good forjobs in britain. there's a fundamental choice here, isn't there? your chancellor has said he believes the changes might be very modest. one of your former brexit ministers who is on your side has
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said the government is yet to make clear choices and you are risking ending up with something which looks like meaningless waffle. my choice is very simple — we take back control of our money, take back control of our borders, take back control of our laws. you know very well that decision time is fast approaching. which is more important to you, less disruption to the economy or more control for our parliament and politicians? because the eu, many people in business, many members of the public, many people in your party believe you simply can't have both. i don't believe those are alternatives. what the british people voted for is for us to take back control of our money, borders and laws. and that's exactly what we're going to do. we also want to ensure that we can trade across borders. we're at the start of a negotiation. at the end of that negotiation, a deal will be presented to parliament, and parliament will have a meaningful vote. do you want to be the tory leader
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at the next general election? i have been asked this question on a number of occasions and i've said very clearly during my political career i've served my country and i've served my party. i'm not a quitter, i'm in this because there's a job to be done here. and that is delivering for the british people and doing that in a way that ensures the future prosperity of our country. our viewers see, day after day, the tory party fighting amongst themselves. how do you reassert your authority? i'm doing what the british people want, delivering on brexit but also getting out around the world ensuring that we bring jobs back to britain. companies will be selling more great british products to china as a result of this trip, more people injobs in the uk as a result of this trip — that's global britain in action. the prime minister speaking earlier. and our political correspondent, eleanor garnier, says ‘global britain in action' is a mantra that will be pushed by theresa may when she returns to the uk. she will be keen to emphasise
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the success of her trip, coming back with billions of pounds of business deals signed. that phrase, sees this as putting out a message that there is a confident uk as it leaves the eu. but as theresa may comes back to the uk it's not a conservative party brimming with confidence that she will come back to. there is the infighting and the splits in the party, but i think the big problem for theresa may is the concern that some in her party have over her leadership. talk of disillusionment and despondency and some are questioning her decisiveness and even some of those in her party who have been supporters of her are becoming more wobbly in their confidence in her leadership. there are others who say, we need to be more radical when it comes to change and domestic policies. she comes back to britain under pressure, certainly. i suppose part of her problem
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is that she is presiding over what is essentially a coalition of people with differing ideas of what brexit should mean and differing visions. she's trying to keep the coalition together. unity is the keyword but the row we are seeing at the top of the party but also down through the party ranks, that is a row which goes to the heart of the brexit debate across the country. and a row about the eu as a whole when it comes to the conservative party. this is a split which has been there for decades and one former minister has said that whoever was the leader at this time during the brexit negotiations would have faced the same issues and the same difficulties that theresa may is facing. some conservative mps who do support her say she is the right person to be in thejob now but they point to the local elections in may with a warning,
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saying if the conservatives are given a bad set of results, that could spell disaster for theresa may's future in no 10. downing street will say, getting theresa may on with the job and for her to be seen out and about around the country and around the world, that will help her to regain control of the party. but as we have seen over the last few days, the toils and tribulations of the tory party could well be a distraction for theresa may as she tries to solve this really difficult question over which kind of brexit the government will choose to take in those negotiations with brussels. the authorities in the french port of calais have called for extra security measures, after clashes erupted between crowds of migrants. four eritreans are reported to be in a critical condition in hospital, after they were shot during fights between afghan and african migrants. our reporter gavin lee is in calais.
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a very different level of violence, what happened ? a very different level of violence, what happened? we spoke many times when it was at full scope, the so—called jungle camp which is in the distance behind me. this is one of the business parks off the side of the business parks off the side of it, i know we have pastors of small camps with different nationalities —— plasters. yesterday, given the jungle nationalities —— plasters. yesterday, given thejungle is no morecambe and the french president emmanuel macron said it will be no more, this is now the status quo —— given that the jungle is no more, this is now the status quo —— given that thejungle is no more, and the french president emmanuel macron said. we have had migrants playing football there, but yesterday we saw the worst scale of violence since the jungle camp was opened, there were gunshots and four
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people injured. one of them is in a critical condition in hospital and the other three in a serious conditions, more than 20 people with minor injuries including a couple of police officers, and it started as a fight over food, 100 police officers, and it started as a fight overfood, 100 eritreans in a queue with 30 afghans, and police are looking for a 37—year—old afghan man. it is a different atmosphere here. i will bring in clare from a charity based in. —— based here. the french interior minister was here this morning saying it appears to be gun smugglers that were involved... sorry, people smugglers that were firing the guns, but people will wonder what the atmosphere is like in calais and why has it reached a point where so many people were injured yesterday. the conditions here are always very difficult, the living conditions are always, you
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can see that people are sleeping outside. the tension is always high because people have no hope. it is very difficult living here. as he said, it is the people smugglers are everyone knows there are people smugglers in calais and that is a serious level of crime. not the people you want to be dealing with. the guys here are mostly young kids and they are playing football over here. they have all heard about it and they are scared, not as many people here as normally because they are frightened. the people we have seen are frightened. the people we have seen from video footage, many young eritreans seen from video footage, many young eritrea ns meant, seen from video footage, many young eritreans meant, —— eritreans, was there a trigger moment? i heard 200 migrants and refugees have arrived in the past few weeks. the problem is, the people who have no hope, and
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when they heard there was a chance that some people might get to the uk... they don't know the politics of the situation, but they would jump of the situation, but they would jump at any kind of hope on that tiny bit of hope is enough for them to cling onto —— and that tiny bit of hope is enough for them. this has made the french authorities panicked and they will come down even more, so and they will come down even more, so people will not go from calais and that upsets people even more. when people are living under these kind of pressures, it is easy for things, for anything to trigger a bad temperand when things, for anything to trigger a bad temper and when people are frightened they grouped together. mostly we see a lot of scared young boys. thank you. one point clare made, many of the refugees and migrants will talk to me but not on camera, a number of people saying they witnessed somebody holding a gun and run away, and another person
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said they heard the noise and they saw people with bats but they weren't involved. it is also worth saying, many people say they won't claim asylum in france because of the so—called dublin agreement, when they arrive from elsewhere, from africa, the first country where they arrive, where they get their fingerprints taken, and that means the french authorities can send them back, back to italy and greece, but these refugees say for that reason they still tried to come to the uk, but the numbers we think, from about 7000 at its height in the jungle camp, but about 700, 800, 7000 at its height in the jungle camp, butabout 700, 800, at 7000 at its height in the jungle camp, but about 700, 800, at the moment. gavin, thanks forjoining us. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. darren osborne is sentenced to life in prison, with a minimum term of 43 years, for the van attack near finsbury park mosque
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in london last year. theresa may refuses to give details about what she's seeking in brexit negotiations with the eu. but she insists she will deliver the deal that the british people want. authorities in the french port of calais call for extra security measures after clashes erupted between crowds of migrants during which five people were shot. in a moment, police in california say the actor robert wagner is now a person of interest in the investigation into the death of his wife, the film star natalie wood. and in sport: great britain have lost the opening singles rubber in their davis cup tie with spain in marbella. cameron norrie now trails roberto bautista agut by two sets in the second match in marbella. england head coach eddiejones has selected ben te'o to jonathan joseph at outside centre, despite not playing since october due to an ankle injury. and david willey narrowly missed out
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on becoming the first england batsman to hit six sixes in a single over. he hit five sixes and a four in england's t20 win over a prime minister's xi in canberra. i'll be back with more on those stores at 330. hours before he's expected to sanction the release of a controversial memo, president trump has accused the fbi and the us justice department of being biased in favour of democrats. the memo, which was drafted by republicans, is expected to make similar claims. the fbi says it believes the memo is inaccurate. let's speak to our correspondent in washington, jane o'brien. this is complex but this is essentially another showdown between donald trump and the fbi. it is complex but very extraordinary, the president of the united states is
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taking on his own people, rosenstein, the deputy attorney general and christian array, the director of the fbi, were both appointed by the president —— chris wray. when wray said he had grave concerns about this, do not released his memo, it is amazing that the president tweets against him, accusing him of politicising the sacred democratic process and accusing the fbi of coming out in favour of democrats, said this is unprecedented. the memo itself is unprecedented. the memo itself is unprecedented and now the attacks by the president on his own people. what exactly does the memo saying when are we likely to see it? —— and when are we likely to see it? —— and when we likely to see it. we haven't seen when we likely to see it. we haven't seen the memo but there has been
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enough reported about it and it is expected be highly critical of the fbi, accusing them of misusing their powers to spy on an american citizen. this is an aid of donald trump's campaign, we don't let the specific details and we don't know how the memo will be released or when. president trump is expected to clear its release and then it could happen fairly quickly. but because this whole process has never been done before, we are really in uncharted territory. all this against a backdrop of donald trump's approval ratings being pretty low at the moment, is there anything in this for him politically in terms of boosting those ratings? this whole thing is political, it is all about the republicans in this specific committee trying to put out a memo that they feel will show the white
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house and donald trump in a better light. that is why donald trump wa nts to light. that is why donald trump wants to see it released. there will bea wants to see it released. there will be a rebuttal by the democrats and they want to put their side of events because as i have explained the fbi feels it is inaccurate and it doesn't give the whole picture. but it is very hard to know at the moment who will come out of this better politically because at the causes are issues of trust. —— at the core of this. the fbi in trust the committee with sensor —— sensitive and classified information but now you have the president going after his own people and it's very difficult to see who going to come out of this better if anybody at all. thanks forjoining us. a man has pleaded not guilty
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to the murder of two schoolgirls in sussex more than 30 years ago. karen hadaway and nicola fellows were both nine years old when they were found dead in woods near the moulescoomb estate, on the outskirts of brighton, in october 1986. russell bishop, who's 51, was remanded in custody and will stand trial at the old bailey in october. around 90 migrants are feared to have drowned off the coast of libya after a boat capsized. the un's migrant agency said the vessel had been heading for italy. only three people are known to have survived. most of the people on board are believed to be from pakistan. the bodies of ten people have been recovered so far, eight of them were pakistanis and two from libya. earlier the international organization for migration gave some more details about the boat. we think as many as 90 pakistani migrants trying to reach a better life ended up through the criminal
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act of smugglers, drowning, and we don't know the full scope of it and we dodo the details. —— we don't know the details for the buck bodies have been washing up for the last couple of hours. there are a couple of survivors and they have told us that they think there were 90 pakistani ‘s on—board. police in the united states say the actor robert wagner is now being treated as a person of interest in an investigation into the death of his wife, the film star natalie wood. she was found drowned in 1981 during a california yachting trip with wagner, and her death was ruled to have been an accident. they were a hollywood golden couple at the time — natalie wood had been a child star, in miracle on 34th street — and got her first oscar nomination while still a teenager for rebel without a cause. # i feel pretty and witty and gay... natalie wood, the star of west side story.
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she won an oscar for rebel without a cause. and then in 1981 she was found dead. she had been sailing with her husband, hart—to—hart star robert wagner. the ships captain, dennis davern. i remember people coming on the boat, saying that they had found natalie wood floating, just couldn't believe it. the verdict, accidental drowning. the actor christopher walken was also on board at the time but how it all happened was a mystery. and then 30 years later new information emerged about the couple that night. the captain now said he'd heard arguing. i believe robert wagner was with her up until the moment she went into the water. in 2011, the case was reopened. evidence of bruising led to the cause of death being changed to drowning and other undetermined factors. recently, we have received information which we felt
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was substantial enough to make us take another look at this case. and now detectives say two more people have come forward saying they also heard raised voices on the night. and one said: she saw figures in the back of the splendour, a male and female, whose voices they recognised as being robert wagner and natalie wood. arguing in the back of the boat. back in 2011, the wagner family issued a statement saying it supported the police's efforts and the detectives at the time had this to say about robert wagner. any questions? is robert wagner a suspect? no. six years on? i think it's suspicious enough to make us think that something happened. i don't think she got into the water herself, i don't think she fell into the water. as we've investigated the case over the last six years, i think he's more of a person of interest now. we know he was the last person to be with natalie before she disappeared. ladies and gentlemen, robert wagner.
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so, not a suspect, a person of interest. robert wagner has made no comment about these latest developments. but 37 years on, the story of this golden hollywood couple and the investigation into the death of natalie wood is still very much ongoing. david sillito, bbc news. princess eugenie and jack brooksbank have confirmed the date for their wedding. it will take place on 12th october at st george's chapel in windsor castle. it will be the second royal wedding of the year, after prince harry and meghan markle who will tied the knot at the same venue on may 19th. time for a look at the weather. feeling cold as we move through the
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next few days. plenty of blue sky today, but with clear skies we have an early dip in temperature. the cloud will increase. the rain could fall as snow over high ground, and we might have a few patches of ice developing. these are the temperatures in the towns and cities and in the more rural areas it will be colder than that. fabrics of rain gradually spreading east —— outbreaks of the few far east staying dry, and single in the way of brightness. temperatures, maximum of brightness. temperatures, maximum of six but when you are in the win it will feel cooler. cold and frosty start in the north on sunday, largely dry with sunny spells, crossing and and wales, it won't be feeling warm and there's the potential for a few showers in the south—east. this is bbc news —
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our latest headlines. darren osborne is sentenced to life in prison, for the van attack near finsbury park mosque in london last year, which killed one man. our father, like the victims of most terrorism, was entirely innocent, which makes his death in this final way all the more hurtful. theresa may has attempted to brush off criticism of her leadership — and approach to the brexit negotiations, insisting she will secure a deal with the eu that is acceptable to the british people.
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extra riot police are being sent to the french port of calais after clashes erupted between crowds of migrants during which five people were shot. calls for more funding and better screening for prostate cancer — as new figures reveal that the number of people killed by the disease overtaken breast cancer for the first time. also coming up — we hear from celebrity photographer — dave hogan about why he's selling some of his famous works for charity. sport now on afternoon live with hugh. it is davis cup action in the tennis but no andy murray and no kyle edmund? no, but it seems like there are at least is one able deputy for them. cameron norrie hasjust taken them. cameron norrie hasjust taken the third set in his match against
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the third set in his match against the world number 23 roberto bautista agut. he did trail by two sets to love in that one but as you can see, the british fans are in much better mood now because he hasjust the british fans are in much better mood now because he has just reduced the arrears to de—1. earlier in the day it was not a great result for liam broady. he was beaten in straight sets by albert ramos—vinolas. it had looked ominous when norrie was trailing but he could be on the verge for a big comeback. you can see if he can do it live on the bbc red button. thank you. and football, arsene wenger the arsenal manager having another moan, not for the first time in his life, some might say. i could not possibly comment! it was a record-breaking january transfer window and arsene wenger broke his transfer record. £430 million was spent in england
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and he spent some of it. that is more spent in the top leagues of spain, france, italy and germany put together. but with clubs like manchester city having huge advantages in the european top flights, arsene wenger now thinks the huge sums of money are destroying the competitions. when you look at the five big leagues in europe, you could see that predictability, the unpredictability of the competition has gone down, because we are in december. we knew already the four champions of the five leagues. that means something is not right in our game. the huge power of some clubs is destroying basically the competition. england head coach eddie jones basically the competition. england head coach eddiejones has named his tea m head coach eddiejones has named his team for the first match of the six nations title defence against italy
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in rome on sunday. there is a surprise player. ben te'o is outside centre. eddiejones surprise player. ben te'o is outside centre. eddie jones has surprise player. ben te'o is outside centre. eddiejones has been speaking about why he selected him ahead ofjonathan joseph. speaking about why he selected him ahead of jonathan joseph. there are two things we have to do in the backs, either get more sides or get quicker and more skilful. we need to have a competitive edge in the backline and we do not have the naturally biggest guys in the world so naturally biggest guys in the world so working very hard on their speed and skill. at the same time, if we find good big guys they fit our game plan, then they will get an opportunity and then is one of those. the winning's super league gets underway this evening with wales taking on scotland. warren gatland has hit his tenth anniversary in his job. i have had that period in new
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zealand and with the lions, which was a great experience, and now the whole focus is on 2019 and then it will be finished. i did not expect it would be ten years here and 100 games. it has been brilliant. a big weekend ahead. wales kick of the championship against scotland tomorrow before ireland host france in paris. england's game against italy kicks off at three o'clock on sunday. we will review all of the action this evening with six nations sportsday and the wales legend martin williams. that is from 6:30pm on bbc news. now some fantastic hitting from england batsman david willey. he nearly hit six overs —— six sixes in an over. he hit 34 runs
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off an over which was bowled by nathan nayan who was captaining the side. david willey hit the first five balls for six —— made then the lion. england comfortably winning with seven overs in hand. david willey making 79 from 36 balls as the team took the tri— series which will be co—hosted by australia and new zealand and begins on saturday. that is all the sport for now. we will have more in the next hour. have a good break, go and make a cup of tea and put your feet up. you deserve it. photographer to the stars, dave hogan, has spent his career shooting some of the most iconic names in the entertainment industry. his portfolio includes freddie mercury, david bowie and madonna. with over 40 years of experience, he has established himself as one of the world's leading celebrity photographers. now dave is selling his work
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for charity, to raise money for the teenage cancer trust, the haven and london & cancer research uk. his photos will be on display at an exhibition and have been commissioned from getty images. earlier i spoke to dave hogan and he told me some of the stories behind the photos. amazing pictures of rock stars down the years. are you going to talk us through a few of them? you are so privileged to have been on stage with some of the stars. this is madonna before she was even famous? this was back in the 80s. i was working with boy george at the time. he said, come and vote to this person, she will be big. how right he was. this was a little club in new york. she has changed. haven't
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we all?! it was somebody like boy george who was so massive in the 80s and he said you will want to photograph her. you listened to people like that and that is why we are still photographing her today. michaeljackson, i know you took his picture a lot. this is him in london. is he on top of a daimler? he is on top of the £300,000 daimler. the driver said, what am i going to tell my boss? i have had michaeljackson moonwalking on the roof of my car. did he trash the roof of my car. did he trash the roof of my car. did he trash the roof of the car? there were enough scuff marks on it that he probably had to explain it at that see the policemen on the horse? his sister called up from somewhere in america or canada and said, i have to buy this picture. it is going worldwide will stop he has a great moustache. i wonder if he looks like that now, that was 40 odd years ago. you have
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an extraordinary picture of the gallagher brothers, oasis, noeland liam. the reason why i think this is unique is it is the only known picture of the two of them smiling together. we were backstage at the royal albert hall. roger dockery was hosting. he is the governor. we were doing pictures of the main stars —— roger daltrey. i photographed or the executives and all of the people from the teenage cancer trust. roger adultery is the god. they stood next to him and they had the mean and moody look —— roger i said you are going to smile. they said we do not smile. i said you will today and they said, you cheeky so—and—so! we got the picture. it is all about promoting smiles and goodwill. the
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teenage cancer trust is such a good charity to be involved with. tina turner and david bowie, we have got them together. you have semi—great superstars together. hasn't tina turner got some of your pictures in her house? i spoke to her pr, bernard. we went up to birmingham. nobody else knew that david bowie would go on stage apart from me and bernard. he came on stage and eve ryo ne bernard. he came on stage and everyone put their hands up. i said, put your hands down! i got this moment when they danced. she loved the picture. sadly, when he died, she said, can i tweet it? it is on her grand piano. they were great friends. paul mccartney. this is a bit of a wacky one of paul mccartney. tell us how this came about. this was an exhibition of
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photographs of his wife linda at a gallery in london. i had been invited along and i bought her book. i never asked anybody for a celebrity autograph but i wanted linda to sign it. cylinder signs the book, i have still got it. paul said, do you want me to sign it? i said, do you want me to sign it? i said, well, it is linda's book, but he signed it. then he turned and did this face. nearly really recognises him as paul mccartney! hopefully he is going to sign this. there are lots of stars. they are all committed to be involved with it. there is a unique moment that would not happen today. we have robbie williams on stage as well. just talk to us about when you are either backstage or even here on stage with a superstar. it must be the most privileged moment. everybody wants to be ata privileged moment. everybody wants to be at a concert that you are on stage with the stars. i have sang onstage with every major star in the world. badly! iam
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onstage with every major star in the world. badly! i am there with my camera, dressed in black, trying to blend in. this was a moment at live eight in hyde park. what we were trying to do with this was to get every single person to hashtag themselves in this picture to say, i was there. it is like woodstock and live aid. we thought how cool it would be if everyone tags themselves. but to stand on the side of the stage, look at him, he is the cat who has got the cream. he has won that audience over. it must be such a buzz to you to be alongside these legends onstage?” such a buzz to you to be alongside these legends onstage? i am a kid from wales smiling saying, i am here. it is a unique position. i never abuse it. this is not something that i am retiring. i have just been asked by lady gaga's people if they were —— if i will photograph her at wembley. of course i will. you respect the rules. i am
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very honoured to work with these people. i am very honoured to work with these people. iam not very honoured to work with these people. i am not their best friend but i just help. people. i am not their best friend but ijust help. but the rolling stones finally, you have been on tour with them around the world. you cannot get any bigger band. you must get to know them well. there is a pecking order. when you sit backstage, they come to you and they are part of family. big bands who go on the road, they are on the road for a year. there is a respect. such fantastic pictures. everybody would wa nt to fantastic pictures. everybody would want to own some of these pictures and put them on the walls. why are you selling them off now? basically, i have always wanted to do something, to give a year of my life for charity. if i went away for a year they would say, dave who? so i am giving myself a month. i'm basing myself in
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a hotel. it is the trafalgar st james. we have a studio space and we are getting everybody like simon cowell and david walliams to come in and have their portrait taken. then we will do a big book for christmas. dave hogan speaking to me earlier. for the first time, the number of men dying from prostate cancer has overtaken the number of women dying from breast cancer. it makes prostate cancer the third biggest cancer killer in the uk. the charity, prostate cancer uk, says advances in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer have paid off and argues similar benefits could be seen if more money was allocated to the fight against prostate cancer. our health correspondent dominic hughes reports. prostate cancer does not discriminate. last year, keen runner tony collier discovered he had the disease while training for an ultra marathon. his diagnosis was late, and he knows cancer will eventually take his life. so tony is using the time he has left to warn other men about the dangers. i think it's really important that people are aware of what their symptoms are and i would actually urge men to talk to their doctors
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if they have any urinary issues at all. my issue is that i didn't actually have any symptoms and they think i had the cancer for ten years beforehand. more men are living to an age where they have a greater chance of developing prostate cancer, so in 2015, more than 11,800 men died from the disease. that compares with just over 11,400 deaths in 2015 due to breast cancer. and while the proportion of people dying from prostate cancer, the mortality rate, has fallen over the past decade, down by 6%, the decline in deaths from breast cancer has been even greater, more than 10%. prostate cancer hasn't had as much investment and has therefore tended to lag behind and it's now time — realising it's the third biggest cancer killer, it is the most common cancer in men, it really is time to actually get behind this and to realise that we need to get on top of it now because it's just going to become more common and it's actually going to kill more men if we aren't able to do that.
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cancers of the lung and bowel remain the biggest killers but even here there has been significant progress. improved treatments and years of research are now showing results. the really exciting things that are going on in the cancer research field at the moment is personalised medicines — so we're getting to know tumours inside and out, the genes that make them tick and the faulty molecules that also are fuelling the tumour‘s growth. and the more that we know about individual cancers the more personalised we can make treatments and that's where we think we can make real progress in developing new treatments and helping more people survive. meanwhile, tony has joined those calling for increased funding for prostate research and the development of a reliable screening programme. so the gains seen in the fight against other cancers can be matched when combating the disease that he knows will eventually claim his life, too. dominic hughes, bbc news. in a moment, the business news with jamie robertson. first, a look at the headlines
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on afternoon live. darren osborne is sentenced to life in prison — with a minimum term of 43 years — for the van attack near finsbury park mosque in london last year. theresa may refuses to give details about what she's seeking in brexit negotiations with the eu. but she insists she will deliver the deal that the british people want. authorities in the french port of calais call for extra security measures after clashes erupted between crowds of migrants during which five people were shot. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. nearly 380 workers at carillion, which collapsed two weeks ago, are being made redundant. the body in charge of liquidating the business said it had still managed to save 919 jobs. the official receiver said most of the people who have kept their posts are being transferred on existing or similar terms to new companies
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that are taking over carillion's contracts. growth in the country's construction sector is slowing. this comes from a survey by a group called markit/cips which uses an index to measure growth. anything above 50 means growth, below, means the industry is shrinking. the drop—off is quite sharp. injanuary the index fell to 50.2. it had been at 52.2 in december. and digital currency bitcoin has fallen 30% this week, leaving it on track for its worst week since april 2013. and so bitcoin was worth 20,000?m is now worth about eight. you're not worried about this, are you?” is now worth about eight. you're not worried about this, are you? i only just know what bitcoin is. maybe thatis just know what bitcoin is. maybe that is part of the problem. a lot of people have not invested, not knowing quite what it is. it is
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basically an algorithm that you obtain, or you originally obtained by working it out on a supercomputer. which in itself leaves most people fairly baffled. however, the value of these things, it is not just however, the value of these things, it is notjust bitcoin, there are a number of other crypto currencies as they call them. they have all come down. they have tried to value what the total value of all these crypto currencies have been. in the last... since january, it has halved. a number of people say this is just a natural fluctuation in the number of people say this is just a naturalfluctuation in the price number of people say this is just a natural fluctuation in the price and they are fairly extreme. some people including a famous economist who predicted the 2007/8 crash, he said it is going down to zero. right, you
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heard it here first! on the subject of things which go up and down, mainly up, property prices. we have got a report about property prices, not just got a report about property prices, notjust in themselves, but in relation to income? you're looking at the most expensive property in the country, it is obviously in london. but if you are looking at the most expensive property in relation to average earnings, that is where the big gap is. the average house price is about seven times average earnings. four or five years ago it wasjust average earnings. four or five years ago it was just 5.5 times average earnings. we will talk to paul sweeney who is head of research and policy. paul, this is an extraordinary figure. it is because average earnings have been lagging behind while asset prices have been going through the roof? it is mix of earnings not moving very much but increased demand for houses which
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has pushed up prices. that is partly because we are not building enough houses, particularly in the south of england. you could save his people's wages not going up fast enough? england. you could save his people's wages not going up fast enough7m course, wages wages not going up fast enough7m course , wages have wages not going up fast enough7m course, wages have something to do with it but we are seeing population growing, particularly in cities in the greater south—east which is what this report points to. that means there is an increase in house prices asa there is an increase in house prices as a result. this not increasing to match the demand. if we had increases in supply, the incomes would not match so much. affordability would not really change. the worst oxford. is there something which makes it such a difficult place to buy a house because average earnings are so far apart house prices? oxford has a very successful economy in the same with cambridge and london do as well, two other expensive places. but we have not been building enough
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houses in and around oxford to keep up houses in and around oxford to keep up with this pace of demand. if you wa nt up with this pace of demand. if you want to continue to see places like london, oxford and cambridge making a contribution to the national economy, we have to make sure we're not rising people out of the city and we have to make sure we can create new jobs and we have to make sure we can create newjobs and get people into those jobs. this survey is very much about city houses. let's look at the other end of the scale. where is the best place to buy a house in terms of average earnings versus average prices? you tend to find a lot of cities are in the north of england and this report picks out sterling in scotland as a place which is very affordable. obviously, that is good news for the people who live there. but it tells us something about the performance of these places in that there are not a great deal ofjobs there are not a great deal ofjobs there and not many highly paid skilled jobs. that has big implications on the job
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opportunities that people have, the drugs they can get access to, the wages they will be paid and the money they have in their pocket. i think the indicator means in terms of more struggling economies in the southis of more struggling economies in the south is not a good thing. thank you. just a quick look at the markets. oh, they are down. the pound is a bit weaker against the euro. it went up a bit yesterday. now it has popped back down again. apple, that is because of worries about sales of the iphone, even though figures were pretty good. about sales of the iphone, even though figures were pretty goodm is not the bestselling —— is it not the bestselling product of all time, the bestselling product of all time, the iphone? yes, but there is a question about whether we have reached saturation. everybody has got as many iphones as they need. i'm sure apple does not agree. bt
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had some sale figures out which were a bit disappointing. and they were worried about a pension deficit. the word was bt group were the worst performer on the ftse. a lot of companies are worried about pension deficits. thank you. that is the business, let's check out the weather prospects. hello. cold is the theme of our weather. a weather front approaching from the west will bring in increasing amounts of cloud and outbreaks of rain. the rain could fall as snow over high ground and hills in the north. an early dip in temperatures for central and eastern parts this evening. rain pushing in from the west. cloud increasing and it could
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fall as snow over the hills. we have the potential to see a few patches of ice. we start the day tomorrow without weather front sitting across western parts of the country. it will gradually edged its way eastwards. i think the far east may hold onto the dry weather for longer. one or two showers. temperatures tomorrow at a maximum of six celsius. once you add in the wind the cloud will not be feeling particularly warm at all. the weather front will start to edge its way backwards on saturday. we do have a north—easterly breeze across england and wales. that is a cold direction for the wind so a cold day to come on sunday. the potential to see some snow showers in the south—east of england. there will be
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a lot of dry weather around. light winds in the north. temperatures at a maximum of seven celsius. as we move into monday, another cold start the day with a touch of frost. you could see a few snow showers in the south—east. the showers tending to fizzle out. a lot of dry and bright weather in the north. we can see our next weather front waiting in the wings to push in later tomorrow and tuesday. the moist air will collide with cold air. that brings the potential to see some snow. there is some uncertainty about how much and exactly where it will be sitting. it could cause some disruption. temperatures on tuesday. feeling cold over the next few days, the potential for some snow by tuesday. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm ben brown. today at 4pm. darren osborne is sentenced to life in prison, with a minimum term of 43 years, for the van attack
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near finsbury park mosque in london last year. our father, like the victims of most terrorism, was entirely innocent which makes his death all the more hurtful. theresa may has refused to give details about what she's seeking in brexit negotiations with the eu. but she's insisting she will deliver the deal that the british people want. authorities in the french port of calais call for extra security measures after clashes erupted between crowds of migrants. during which five people were shot. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. davis cup action? great britain's davis cup action? great britain's davis cup action? great britain's davis cup tie against spain has had a mini revival, we will bring you the latest on that, plus an angry
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arsene wenger. what is not to love about that? lucy has the weather forecast. i cold weekend to come, i will have to forecast, fairly cloudy and damp at times and even some snow. —— a cold weekend. sentencing hearing. with a minimum term of 43 yeasf
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near finsbury park mosque in london last year. he was found guilty yesterday of murder and attempted murder, after driving a van into worshippers injune, killing one man and injuring several others. our correspondent daniel sandford was in court. today was all about how long darren osborne was going to serve in prison and mrs justice cheema—grubb addressed the rather unusual defence he had used, a man called dave who had been driving the van at the time of the attack. she said you had been convicted on overwhelming evidence byajury convicted on overwhelming evidence by a jury who saw through your pathetic last—ditch attempt to deceive them, you van towards a group of muslims intending to kill them as many —— you accelerated your
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van. she said darren osborne had rapidly being radicalised over the internet and have allowed his mind to be poisoned by people who claims to be poisoned by people who claims to be poisoned by people who claims to be leaders but who were determined to inspire hatred. she talked about how this was a terrorist attack because it was a murder done for the purposes of advancing a religious or racial or political cause and she said she had seen no political cause and she said she had seen no evidence that darren osborne, the danger he had presented had lessened in any way, the very opposite, in fact, from how he had conducted himself in trial, so mrs justice cheema—grubb said he would have a life sentence and the minimum term he would serve in prison was 43 yea rs. afterwards, term he would serve in prison was 43 years. afterwards, makram ali's family, the man who was killed by darren osborne, in the form of his daughter, gave this reaction to the verdict. the last few months have been very hard for our family as we have
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tried to adjust to life without our father. it was especially hard for us to have to sit in court and listen to darren osborne deny he had done anything wrong. we are very pleased with the guilty verdict. we would first like to thank our barristers, the detectives and the police, for all the work they have done to secure the verdict. we would also like to thank our liaison officers who have been by our side throughout. before our father left the house that night, he had spent the evening with his family. he was here... it was here where he felt most comfortable. he was such a peaceful and simple man. he had no bad thoughts for anyone. our father, like the victims of most terrorism, was entirely innocent, which makes his death in this
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violent way all the more hurtful. we cannot imagine the trauma he felt in his last few minutes. but we choose to remember our father with happier thoughts and he will never be forgotten. he will always stay in our hearts, his laughter will echo the walls of our home and his smile will be reflected in our eyes. his memory will be alive in our conversations. we would also like to thank the witnesses who have helped the case and family and friends who attended court and the support we received from the community. we would like to thank the press for respecting our privacy and would ask them to continue to do so so we can try and move on with our lives as best as we can. thank you.
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this case has raised the growing problem of far right terrorism in britain with the killing ofjo cox and now this, there have been two people in 12 months convicted of murderfor people in 12 months convicted of murder for terrorist reasons who have come from the far right end of the political spectrum. the home secretary amber rudd in response to the verdict said:... mrs justice cheema—grubb mrsjustice cheema—grubb have the option of giving darren osborne a whole life tariff as part of his life sentence which would have meant
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he would never be released but she chose not to do that, but the 43 year minimum term means as he was 47 at the time of his arrest, it is impossible for him to be released until he is 90. thanks forjoining us. during the trial the court heard that osborne wanted to kill senior labour figures including party leaderjeremy corbyn and the london mayor sadiq khan. mr corbyn — whose constituency includes finsbury park — has been speaking about the case and said that someone like mr osborne could not succeed in dividing the community. well, it tells us that darren osborne was an extremely racist person and very dangerous who drove into a crowd of people who were leaving the muslim welfare house after late—night prayers during ramadan. it is in my constituency and in my own community and the response of the local community was that we all came together, every
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community, every fight, we came together and we went to the mosque and muslim welfare house —— every faithful. the answer to dario osborne, —— darren osborne is, you will not divide us, and you will not frighten us either. theresa may is coming under increasing pressure to spell out what she hopes to achieve from the brexit negotiations — including whether britain should remain part of a customs union after it leaves the eu. some leave—supporting conservative mps have urged the prime minister to be more specific about her priorities for future trade deals. downing street says mrs may has an "open mind" to the kind of customs arrangement the uk should pursue. speaking to our political editor laura kuenssberg, theresa may said her visit to china will help boost british trade prospects. this trip is an example of global britain. it's about britain getting out around the world, and, yes, enhancing our trade links.
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and crucially what happened here is that we have seen the businesses i have brought with me on this trip signing deal which means more jobs for people back in britain. that's good news for britain, it's global britain in action and that's what we are seeing here. on top of doing business around the world, your party, the public, business, they want to know, do you favour a really close relationship with the european union once we're out or a more dramatic break? what i favour is a deal, an arrangement for trading with the eu which is going to be good for trade between the uk and the european union and good forjobs in britain. there's a fundamental choice here, isn't there? your chancellor has said he believes the changes might be very modest. one of your former brexit ministers who is on your side has said the government is yet to make clear choices and you are risking ending up with something which looks like meaningless waffle. my choice is very simple — we take back control of our money, take back control of our borders, take back control of our laws. you know very well that decision
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time is fast approaching. which is more important to you, less disruption to the economy or more control for our parliament and politicians? because the eu, many people in business, many members of the public, many people in your party believe you simply can't have both. i don't believe those are alternatives. what the british people voted for is for us to take back control of our money, borders and laws. and that's exactly what we're going to do. we also want to ensure that we can trade across borders. we're at the start of a negotiation. at the end of that negotiation, a deal will be presented to parliament, and parliament will have a meaningful vote. do you want to be the tory leader at the next general election? i have been asked this question on a number of occasions. i've said very clearly during my political career i've served my country and i've served my party. i'm not a quitter — i'm in this because there's
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a job to be done here. and that is delivering for the british people and doing that in a way that ensures the future prosperity of our country. our viewers see, day after day, the tory party fighting amongst themselves. how do you reassert your authority? i'm doing what the british people want, delivering on brexit but also getting out around the world ensuring that we bring jobs back to britain. companies will be selling more great british products to china as a result of this trip, more people injobs in the uk as a result of this trip — that's global britain in action. and our political correspondent, eleanor garnier, is with us now. ‘global britain in action' is a mantra that will be pushed now. but what exactly is global britain? after brexit. it is a phrase that she will be wanting to push on her
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return to the uk from china because she is coming back with billions of pounds of business deals signed and she wants to talk about the positives of that trip. she wants to portray a message that uk is strong and stable as it leaves the eu and that it and stable as it leaves the eu and thatitis and stable as it leaves the eu and that it is a confident country, but it is not a conservative party brimming with confidence that she comes back to. one of the problems, there are concerns being raised by some in her own party about her leadership, and yes there is also the infighting and the splits in the cabinet, but her own leadership has now been called into question. we hear some talk of her being unable to make those really important decisions and some saying there isn't enough inspirational talk going on about the message that the conservative party should be able to ta ke conservative party should be able to take out to the rest of the country. some who have supported her in the past are becoming more wobbly about their confidence in her leadership.
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some supporters point to the may elections, the local elections that are coming up, saying if the conservatives come back with a bad set of results in those elections, it could spell a crisis for theresa may's future in number ten. downing street will point out that having theresa may out and about, notjust around the country but around the world, shows that she can get a grip on things and they will hope that this trip and the success they say it has brought will enable her to get a it has brought will enable her to geta grip it has brought will enable her to get a grip on things. but you can't get a grip on things. but you can't get away from the fact, they respect elation about her future role, —— there is speculation about her future in number ten and she is under pressure to redefine how she's going to take that talk to the country, take that message to the country, take that message to the country, not just country, take that message to the country, notjust on brexit but domestic issues, as well. it has been a difficult trip for the prime minister, she is in china banging
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the drum for british trade, doing deals worth billions of pounds, but quite a lot of sniping about her leadership while she has been a back at home. the toils and tribulations of the conservative party and his divisions have followed her across the world to china. —— its divisions for the she needs to get a grip on the unity of the party, but the debate going on in the conservative party about what direction the government should take these brexit talks, should the government end up with a position where the uk remains very close to the eu after brexit? philip hammond said the other day issued only move very modestly apart from the eu after brexit —— said the other day that the uk should only move other day that the uk should only m ove very other day that the uk should only move very modestly for the. or should she be moving towards a
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harder brexit, and it is those different views which are causing tensions, and until theresa may makes her opinion clear, i think we will see these splits and fights spill out into the public. thanks for joining spill out into the public. thanks forjoining us. the first stage of a legal challenge against the parole board's decision to release the serial sex attacker john worboys will take place next wednesday. last week, a judge ordered that the release of worboys, who's changed his name tojohn radford, be halted at least until next week's hearing is over. it will consider whether to allow the mayor of london and two unnamed victims to apply forjudicial review. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. darren osborne is sentenced to life in prison, with a minimum term of 43 years, for the van attack near finsbury park mosque in london last year. theresa may refuses to give details about what she's seeking in brexit negotiations with the eu. but she insists she will deliver the deal that the british people want. authorities in the french port of calais call for extra security
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measures after clashes erupted between crowds of migrants during which five people were shot. and in sport: great britain have lost the opening singles rubber in their davis cup tie with spain in marbella. but cameron norrie is staging a fightback in the second rubber. he's won the third set to trail roberto bautista agut 2—1 in marbella. england head coach eddiejones has selected ben te'o ahead ofjonathan joseph at outside centre, despite not playing since october due to an ankle injury. tee'o has just completed a brilliant recovery from an ankle injury by paying for his own rehabilitation in australia. and david willey narrowly missed out on becoming the first england batsman to hit six sixes in a single over. he hit five sixes and a four in england's t20 win over a prime minister's xi in canberra.
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i'll be back with more on those stores at 430. that must be so annoying, to get five sixes in one over, and hejust needed one more. don't forget — you can let us know what you think. tweet us using the hashtag afternoonlive. all the ways to contact us on screen right now. there have been chaotic scenes at a court in michigan during the sentencing of the former usa gymnastic‘s team doctor, a case which has gripped not just the united states, but the world. larry nassar has already been sentenced to up to 175 years in prison at an earlier hearing after pleading guilty to molesting young women under the guise of medical treatment. he has been convicted of abusing more than 200 young women. the enraged father of three girls who were preyed on by the doctor, begged the judge for time alone
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with larry nassar. thejudge said that the judge said that couldn't happen. this is what happened. i want to ask you as part of the sentencing to grant me five minutes in a locked room with this demon. would you do that? that is not how our... yes or no? no, i can't do that. would you give me one minute? that is not how the legal system works. well i'm going... stay down! let me have him! stop! i want this bleep! that was randall margrave, his three
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daughters were abused by larry nassar and two of them gave evidence in the trial. he was tackled by three sheriffs deputies as he tried to throw himself at larry nassar. as he was being handcuffed he said he wa nted he was being handcuffed he said he wanted that son of a pitch and he said to the people handcuffing, what if this happened to you. i want to ask you as part of the sentencing to grant me five minutes in a locked room with this demon. would you do that? that is not how our... yes or no? no, i can't do that. would you give me one minute? you know that i can't do that. that is not how the legal system works. stay down!
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let me have him! stop! put your hands behind your back. i want this bleep! the french interior minister is to deploy extra riot police in calais, following clashes on thursday between eritrean and afghan migrants. four eritreans are in a critical condition after being shot, and 18 other people were injured. our reporter gavin lee is in calais. and has explained exactly what happens. we spoke many times when it was at full scope, the so—called jungle camp which is in the distance behind me. the heaps of rubbish behind me.
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this is one of the business parks off the side of it. i know we have clusters of small camps with different nationalities. maybe 700, 800 people. yesterday, given thejungle is no more, and the french president emmanuel macron said it will be no more, this is now the status quo. we have had migrants playing football there, but yesterday we saw the worst scale of violence since the jungle camp was opened, there were gunshots and four people injured. one of them is in a critical condition in hospital and the other three in a serious conditions, more than 20 people with minor injuries including a couple of police officers. it started as a fight
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over food, 100 eritrea ns in a queue with 30 afghans. police are looking for a 37—year—old afghan man. it is a different atmosphere here. i will bring in clare from care for calais. the french interior minister was here this morning saying it appears to be gun smugglers that were involved... sorry, people smugglers that were firing the guns, but people will wonder what the atmosphere is like in calais and why has it reached a point where so many people were injured yesterday. the conditions here are always very difficult, the living conditions are awful, you can see that people are sleeping outside today. tension is always high because people have no hope. it's very difficult living here. as he said, it is the people smugglers —
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everyone knows there are people smugglers in calais and that is a serious level of crime. not the people you want to be dealing with. the guys here are mostly young kids and they are playing football over here. they have all heard about it and they are scared, not as many people here as normally because they are frightened. the people we have seen from video footage, many young eritrean men with iron bars and sticks. was there a trigger moment? i heard 200 migrants and refugees have arrived in the past few weeks or so. the problem is, the people here have no hope, and when they heard there was a chance that some people might get to the uk... they don't know the politics of the situation, they will jump at any kind of hope.
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and that tiny bit of hope is enough for them to cling onto. this has made the french authorities panic and they will clamp down even more, so people will not go from calais and that upsets people even more. when people are living under these kind of pressures, it is easy for things, for anything to trigger a bad temper and when people are frightened they group together. mostly we see a lot of scared young boys. thank you. one point clare made, many of the refugees and migrants here will talk to me but not on camera. a number of people saying they witnessed somebody holding a gun and run away. another person said they heard the noise and they saw people with bats but they weren't involved. it is also worth saying, many people say they won't claim asylum here in france, they keep going.
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because of the so—called dublin agreement, when they arrive from elsewhere, from africa, the first country where they arrive, where they get their fingerprints taken, and that means the french authorities can send them back, back to italy and greece, but these refugees say for that reason they still try to come to the uk, but the numbers we think, from about 7000 at its height in the jungle camp, but about 700, 800, at the moment. gavin lee, there. around 90 migrants are feared to have drowned off the coast of libya after a boat capsized. the un's migrant agency said the vessel had been heading for italy. only three people are known to have survived. most of the people on board are believed to be from pakistan. the bodies of ten people have been recovered so far, eight of them were pakistanis and two from libya. what has caused the accident is not clear. for the first time, the number
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of men dying from prostate cancer has overtaken the number of women dying from breast cancer. it makes prostate cancer the third biggest cancer killer in the uk. the charity, prostate cancer uk, says advances in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer have paid off and argues similar benefits could be seen if more money was allocated to the fight against prostate cancer. our health correspondent dominic hughes reports. we will hear from him we will hearfrom him later on we will hear from him later on with more details, in fact. princess eugenie and jack brooksbank have confirmed the date for their wedding. it will take place on 12th october at st george's chapel in windsor castle. it will be the second royal wedding of the year, after prince harry and meghan markle who will tie the knot at the same venue on may 19th. not invited to either and i'm not sure lucy will be either. but she has the weather forecast. and it is groundhog day. certainly is, and thatis groundhog day. certainly is, and that is a picture of a run hog. it
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isa that is a picture of a run hog. it is a tradition in north america and parts of canada, the groundhog predicts whether spring will come early or winter will continue, and sometimes his predictions are not quite accurate. what is the percentage hit right? 39% over the past 129 years. that's not good. that said, it does not like it will be cold in north america, cold arctic air, hence the brightness and he will have seen his shadow and then gone back into the burrow. it will be cold. i could have told you that, north america injanuary, it will be cold. yes, but, what can i say! what about the forecasted? also cold, but we did have some blue skies, these were some of the
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pictures revisited. —— we received. the cloud is starting to increase from northern ireland and that is thanks to the weather front coming from the west and overnight and that will bring plenty of cloud and outbreaks of rain and also snow over the hills on the high ground. to begin with with clear skies, the temperatures will fall away, early frosts. that will fall as snow on the hills, the chance of seeing a feud patches of ice where the rain moves in, these are the temperatures in towns and cities but in rural areas it will be colder. a bit of early brightness in the east first thing, the chance of some frost, the weather front sitting across western parts of scotland, wales and south—west england, that will move in east through the day, bringing patchy outbreaks of rain and drizzle, visiting out so the brain becomes increasingly like an patchy, —— fizzling out so the rain becomes
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increasingly light and patchy. across the board it will be a cold day, with highs of six. as we move into sunday, we still have the weather front and it will start to move back west. for england and wales a brisk and cold north easterly wind, so across the british isles on sunday, firmly in the cold air. frosty start to the day for many, dry and bright weather in the north, from northern ireland and north west scotland, england and wales have got the brisk strengthening north easterly wind and some brightness at times but also the risk of a few snow showers in the south and east. the showers could be wintry again first thing on monday but the north easterly wind will start to ease off, but the weather front is waiting in the wings that will bring some rain and maybe snow as we move through late on monday into tuesday, this weather front, edging its way south east,
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bringing moisture and that is colliding with cold air so the potential to see snow by the time you get to tuesday. it could cause disruption but there is uncertainty as to how far over the weather front will be and where the snow will be and how much snow. we will keep you up—to—date. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. darren osborne, who carried out the van attack near finsbury park mosque in london last year, is handed a life sentence with a minimum of 43 years injail. our father, like the victims of most terrorism, was entirely innocent, which makes his death in this violent way all the more hurtful. theresa may is under pressure to clarify what she hopes to achieve from the brexit negotiations. the prime minister insists she will deliver the deal that the british people want. the french authorities are deploying extra riot police in calais, following clashes between eritrean
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and afghan migrants. four eritreans are in a critical condition after being shot yesterday. for the first time, the number of men dying from prostate cancer has overtaken the number of women killed by breast cancer — prompting calls for more funding and better screening. and coming up, we will hear about a six—year—old girl from brighton who is travelling to israel for surgery after she was born with one leg longer than the other. before that we will get all the sport on afternoon live. how are the davis cup team getting on?l sport on afternoon live. how are the davis cup team getting on? a fight is going on. they were 1—0 down
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against spain after losing the opening rubber. but cameron norrie, he looks like rambo, he is taking on the world number 23 roberto bautista agut. he lost the first two sets but he has clawed his way back. he won the third set 6—3. he has a double break in the fourth set. he will be serving to win the fourth set and make it all to play for in the fifth set in this second rubber. bautista agut picked up a mystery injury before. he had a breather on the he is back fighting. this one is definitely going to a fifth. he is ranked 140 in the world, cameron norrie. he is more than pulling his weight here. let's talk about football. arsene wenger the arsenal manager splashed the cash in the tra nsfer manager splashed the cash in the transfer window. he has peter—macro
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and mesut ozil. but he is not happy? —— pierre—emerick aubameyang. arsene wengerjust broke the club's tra nsfer wengerjust broke the club's transfer record to bring in pierre—emerick aubameyang to the emirates. he's says he is only spending big to keep up with the huge spenders. who are they? he referred to specific example is in france, germany, italy and spain. in france, germany, italy and spain. in france, paris saint—germain are 11 points clear and they bought kilian backpay, the world record scorer —— kilian backpay. in spain barcelona have an 11 point lead over atletico madrid. they bought philip —— philippe coutinho recently. two days after tra nsfer philippe coutinho recently. two days after transfer spending in the premier league reached record
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levels, arsene wenger said the mystery of picking the winner in these competitions is being destroyed. when you look at the five big leagues in europe, you could see the predictability, the unpredictability of the competition has gone down, because we are in december. we knew already the four champions of the five leagues so that means something is not right in our game. that means something is not right in ourgame. and that means something is not right in our game. and the huge power, the huge financial power of some clubs is destructing the competition. david moyes says he is shocked by alleged racist comments by one of the club's officials and has since been suspended. a report claims the director of play centre in e—mail saying he did not want to sign african players. david moyes said he was actually trying to sign two african players. the comments are
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wrong. we were signing two players from africa on deadline day. so i can only say they are wrong. you have no policy here? you can see the players we have signed and we have signed dave the years. we signed good quality players, the best players we can get who are available to us. it does not matter where they are from. and the english rugby union coach eddie jones are from. and the english rugby union coach eddiejones has named the team for the first six nations title defence match in rome on sunday with the surprise selection of worcester‘s ben te'o at outside centre. there are two things were going to do in the backs, get more signings and get quicker and more skilful. we need to have a competitive edge in the backline. we don't have the naturally biggest guysin don't have the naturally biggest guys in the world so we are working very ha rd guys in the world so we are working very hard on their speed, working
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very hard on their speed, working very ha rd very hard on their speed, working very hard on their speed, working very hard on their speed, working very hard on their skill but at the same time, if we find good big guys, they can fit our game plan, then they can fit our game plan, then they will get an opportunity. ben is one of those. wales kick-off tomorrow before ireland host france in paris. england's game against italy will be on sunday. we will be previewing all the action this evening in 6—nation sportsday from 6:30pm on the channel. join us for that. you can follow the davis cup tie between great britain and spain right now on the red button and on sport website. —— and on the bbc sport website. —— and on the bbc sport website. now on afternoon live — let's go nationwide — and see what's happening around the country, in our daily visit
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to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. in tunbridge wells is juliette parkin with the story of kyra warrell, a six—year—old girl from brighton who was born with proximal focal femoral deficiency — or pffd, which affects fewer than one in 50,000 children in the world. it means that her left leg is much shorter than her right. the only option offered on the nhs is amputation, so her family has raised thousands of pounds to start treatment with an american surgeon in israel. we will talk about that in just a moment. and from salford, rogerjohnson is here with news of the fix the fells project in the lake district which has now been going on for 10 years. they have a team out today working on repairing pathways damaged by storm desmond. juliette first of all, thank you for
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being with us. tell us why kyra warrell need this operation and what is involved in her operation? well, kyra was born with a rare condition which means she has a deformed hip, a shortened left thigh and her ankle and knee are both very weak. kyra has had to wear a prison that it is that since she could walk. she is older and it has become bigger —— she has had to wear a prosthetic foot. in her condition her condition is so difficult to treat that the nhs have suggested that the only option for her is to have her leg amputated above the knee and wear a permanent perspective. kyra's pa rents a re permanent perspective. kyra's
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parents are keen to save the leg. they have spent six years researching and speaking to different surgeons. they have found the leading surgeon is based in florida. he is in israel at the conference. they will fly her out to israel to meet him and repairfor an operation which will lengthen her leg and realign her pelvis and align her ankle so it can be prepared for the lengthening process. i spoke to kyra as she was getting ready in brighton and she told them what it is like to live with this condition. fine macro i need to wear a prosthetic to help me walk otherwise i will be limping on this leg. she isa i will be limping on this leg. she is a very brave little girl. let's hope the operation will go well. do we know how difficult the operation will be? the surgeon looking after kyra is confident that the whole process of operations can be very
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successful, and says by the time she is 16 she should be walking on two feet and have all the mobility that a 16—year—old would expect. but of course, the lengthening process is incredibly complex. next summer, it is hoped that kyra will go to florida and start the lengthening process. it involves breaking the bone and spending four months of physiotherapy, effectively stretching the ligaments and tendons around the bone and growing new bone. each block of treatment they hope to stretch the bone by about five centimetres each time. after a series of operations it is hoped they will grow the limb by 21 centimetres over a period of ten yea rs. centimetres over a period of ten years. but of course, all of this comes at a cost. the family have already fund raised over £80,000 to send kyra out to israel for this initial operation. next year, the
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operation in florida will cost around £95,000. it does come at a cost but cost aside, it is hoped this process will eventually become successful. the family say it is up to kyra ultimately to go ahead with it. she tells me she wants to be a gymnast. let's hope that goes well. thank you, juliette parkin in tunbridge wells. let's go to roger now and the fix the fells project. storm desmond caused problems. who are the people who are trying to fix the fells? this was a project set up ten yea rs the fells? this was a project set up ten years ago and it was conglomerate between the lake district national park, the national trust and natural england. it is mainly volunteers, more than 100 of them who give 12 days each year to go them who give 12 days each year to 9° up them who give 12 days each year to go up into the next to fix the footpath. partly it is caused by
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erosion from the weather and also partly the sheer numbers of people who walk and enjoy the lake district every day of the year. they are getting into their busy time now. ten yea rs getting into their busy time now. ten years they have been going. they work between february and november. the volunteers are called lengths men. that is a medieval term who we re men. that is a medieval term who were the people who walked the length of the parish to fix the roads and footpath. it cost thousands of pounds every year to do what they do. the simple fixes might cost less than £100 to patch up a bit of footpath. they spend £40,000 a year on helicopters. while they try and use mostly stuff which is their stones which are ready to put in place and help repair the footpath, sometimes in a really inaccessible areas, they have to use helicopters to put big bags of stones in. it can be very expensive.
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today we filmed with them. it is near grasmere in the lake district. there is a beautiful walk to get to the town and if you are brave you can deliver the top into the langdale valley on other side. it is a beautiful part of the world. langdale valley on other side. it is a beautiful part of the worldm langdale valley on other side. it is a beautiful part of the world. it is so a beautiful part of the world. it is so stunning. we were looking at some pictures which i think were filmed in the summer with the blue skies. how busy is it that, roger? in the summer with the blue skies. how busy is it that, roger7m in the summer with the blue skies. how busy is it that, roger? it is busy. the shadow of brexit casts itself in many different ways across many different things. the lake district, many visitors will tell you that at the moment the number of overseas visitors are up. that is because the pound has come down and it makes it cheaper for overseas people to come here. the lake district visitors are reaping the benefits with the number of visitors they have seen and in the last quarter of 2017. having said that, a
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lot of the people who work in the la ke lot of the people who work in the lake district and from the eu and they have said it is more difficult now to attract and recruit people to come and work in those places. it is busy. as you said, it is a beautiful pa rt busy. as you said, it is a beautiful part of the world. some of those pictures were filmed today. there are cloudless skies. it is a beautiful day for anyone who has been walking in the lake district or the peak district or anywhere else. roger, thank you, good to talk to you. police in the united states say the actor robert wagner is now being treated as a person of interest in an investigation into the death of his wife, the film star natalie wood. she was found drowned in 1981 during a california yachting trip with wagner, and her death was ruled to have been an accident. they were a hollywood golden couple at the time — natalie wood had been a child star, in miracle on 34th street — and got her first oscar nomination while still a teenager for rebel without a cause. this report from david sillito. # i feel pretty and witty and gay...
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natalie wood, the star of west side story. she was nominated for an oscar for rebel without a cause. and then in 1981 she was found dead. she had been sailing with her husband, hart—to—hart star robert wagner. the ships captain, dennis davern. i remember people coming on the boat, saying that they had found natalie wood floating, just couldn't believe it. the verdict, accidental drowning. the actor christopher walken was also on board at the time but how it all happened was a mystery. and then 30 years later new information emerged about the couple that night. the captain now said he'd heard arguing. i believe robert wagner was with her up until the moment she went into the water. in 2011, the case was reopened. evidence of bruising led to the cause of death being changed to drowning and other undetermined factors. recently, we have received
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information which we felt was substantial enough to make us take another look at this case. and now detectives say two more people have come forward saying they also heard raised voices on the night. and one said: she saw figures in the back of the splendour, a male and female, whose voices they recognised as being robert wagner and natalie wood. arguing in the back of the boat. back in 2011, the wagner family issued a statement saying it supported the police's efforts and the detectives at the time had this to say about robert wagner. any questions? is robert wagner a suspect? no. six years on? i think it's suspicious enough to make us think that something happened. i don't think she got into the water herself, i don't think she fell into the water. as we've investigated the case over the last six years, i think he's more of a person of interest now. we know he was the last person to be with natalie before she disappeared. ladies and gentlemen, robert wagner.
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so, not a suspect, a person of interest. robert wagner has made no comment about these latest developments. but 37 years on, the story of this golden hollywood couple and the investigation into the death of natalie wood is still very much ongoing. david sillito, bbc news. in a moment the business news with jamie. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. darren osborne is sentenced to life in prison — with a minimum term of 43 years — for the van attack near finsbury park mosque in london last year. theresa may refuses to give details about what she's seeking in brexit negotiations with the eu. but she insists she will deliver the deal that the british people want. authorities in the french port of calais call for extra security measures after clashes erupted
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between crowds of migrants during which five people were shot. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. nearly 380 workers at carillion, which collapsed two weeks ago, the body in charge of liquidating the business, the official receiver, said it had still managed to save 919jobs. it said most of the people who have kept their posts are being transferred on existing or similar terms to new companies that are taking over carillion's contracts. growth in the country's construction sector is slowing. this comes from a survey by a group called markit/cips which uses an index to measure growth. anything above 50 means growth, below, means the industry is shrinking. the drop—off is quite sharp. injanuary the index fell to 50.2. it had been at 52.2 in december. and digital currency bitcoin has fallen 30% this week, leaving it on track for its worst
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week since april 2013. let's talk about bt, taking a tumble on the stock market today. the worst performer on the ftse100. there are worries about the number of tv customers it has got. so much of its money now is coming from premier league sales, and they have lost something like 5000 customers, which isa something like 5000 customers, which is a bit ofa something like 5000 customers, which is a bit of a problem, a bit of a worry. also second and third quarter reve nu es worry. also second and third quarter revenues are down by about 3%. they say it is not a problem because they are investing a lot of money at the moment but the other problem we have in the background as pension deficit. people are worried about
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how they will sort that out and they may have to put money into that. and we have some numbers from the big tech titans. the interesting one in a way, we have apple, amazon and alphabet which owns google. amazon did particularly well. shares are up about 6% in the states. it is largely because of the success of amazon prime. it is getting a lot of people to sign on to that and is expanding into places like australia and brazil. it is also heavily investing in the cloud. people are seeing that this is a company which has a huge amount of intentional. also in america, the economy there is creating more jobs which also in america, the economy there is creating morejobs which is music to the ears of donald trump. absolutely. the economy is going gang is. what does that mean? very well i think you would say in this
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country! —— the economy is going gang but —— busters. country! —— the economy is going gang but -- busters. it is certainly doing well. it shows the continued growth you have seen over the last few years is continuing. there are a few years is continuing. there are a few concerns. one problem is the pace of hourly earnings. they were up pace of hourly earnings. they were "/ pace of hourly earnings. they were up 3% on the year but now people are worried that some inflationary pressures are starting to emerge in the us and that will change interest rate rises. us equity prices are at an all—time high and there is a concern that if interest rates go up, maybe investors will see that as being more attractive. so the us federal reserve has a tough call, how fast it can raise interest rates without starting investors in that
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market. how about bt, the pension deficit is a problem? this is a problem for quite a few companies. and carillion as well. it is certainly an issue. it is something the company will have to deal with. the defined benefit scheme would always be an issue. more broadly with bt. it is an issue they have been focused so much on the television side and that has been incredibly costly. there is a decline in consumers but maybe if they make a move back to good old—fashioned telecom stuff, fibre—optic stuff, that kind of thing, maybe that is where the sign of growth will come back to bt. and the big tech companies in the states, apple, amazon and alphabet i have mentioned, it is amazon which is the star of the show but it is not the biggest? there are two things. prime has been a great
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advantage but also this tax reform has taken place in the us. with a more advantageous tax rate, investors like that. but amazon is ina investors like that. but amazon is in a heavy investment mode. they will continue investing. thank you. let's have a look at the markets. everything is down. we haven't got amazon which was up 6%. there is a slight fall in the price of oil. the pound against the euro is looking a bit weak. earlier we saw the pound bowing up bit weak. earlier we saw the pound popping up against the euro but it has sunk back down again. the ftse is down by half of 1%. the ftse has had a bad week. when we look back over the last few months, this is the worst week we have had for quite awhile. many thanks. let's bring you
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some breaking news coming in from washington. we were talking earlier at that the controversial republican memo on the fbi. president trump, we are hearing, this is according to various us media, has authorised the release, the declassification of the controversial republican memo which was from the republican lawmaker which purports to show that the justice department and the fbi in the united states are deeply politicised. this is trump giving the green light to the republican memo which accuses the fbi and justice department of abusive to carry out surveillance against a member of the trump campaign team. we had a quite from donald trump early on basically attacking the top leadership of the fbi sent: the top
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leadership of the fbi sent: the top leadership and investigators of the justice department have politicised the sacred investigative process. also hearing now from the american senatorjohn mccain saying that the latest attacks on the fbi and the justice department serve no american interests. and only putin's. so that is the latest from the united states, as expected, because this is something that donald trump has been indicating that he would do and his people have been indicating he would do. he has approved the declassification of that controversial republican party memorandum from the chairman of the house intelligence committee which purportedly shows the justice department and the fbi are deeply exercised. we will bring you more details on that story. that is it from your afternoon neither team today. the next news is that 5pm.
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before that, a weather forecast from lucy. hello, cold is the theme of our weather for the next few days. a weather for the next few days. a weather front approaching from the west will bring increased amounts of cloud, some outbreaks of rain and that rain could fall of snow over high ground. as we go through tonight, and early dip in temperatures for central and eastern parts. showers tending to fizzle out. the frost forming and cloud increasing from the west. where we do have the rain, the potential to see a few patches of ice. we start the day tomorrow with that weather front sitting across western parts of the country. it will gradually aged suede eastwards as we go through the day. i think the far eastwards holding on to the dry weather for longer. start into the brightness feeding in for northern ireland and north—west scotland.
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some showers and a freshening wind. temperatures tomorrow at a maximum of six celsius. the cloud will not be feeling particularly warm in the winter. on sunday the weather front still sitting across the country. there will not be much rain on it at this point. we do have a north—easterly breeze for england and wales. a cold day to come on sunday. with that, the potential to see some snow showers in the south—east of england. there will be a lot of dry weather around. lighter winds in the north and the best of the brightness for scotland and northern england. as we move into monday, another cold start to the day with a touch of frost. we could see some snow showers in the south—east. a lot of dry and bright weather in the north that ice to the west. we can see our next weather front waiting in the wings to push through later from monday into
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tuesday. i stare will collide with cold airand tuesday. i stare will collide with cold air and that brings the potential to see some snow by the time we get to tuesday. some uncertainty about exactly where it will be sitting but it could cause some disruption. temperatures on tuesday not up to match. feeling cold over the next few days with the potential for some snow by tuesday. today at five: darren osborne, the man who drove a van into a crowd of muslim worshippers, is jailed for a minimum of 43 years. thejudge said osborne had been
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on a suicide mission, when he killed one man and seriously injured many more. the family of the man who died have spoken of their loss: his laughter will echo the walls of our home, his smile will be reflected in our eyes and his memory will be alive in our conversations. i'll be talking to the imam praised by thejudge, for stopping the crowd from attacking osborne. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. the prime minister heads home from china amid pressure to spell out what she hopes to achieve from the brexit negotiations. the father of three of the victims of sex abuser larry nassar,
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