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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  February 2, 2018 5:00pm-5:46pm GMT

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today at five: darren osborne, the man who drove a van into a crowd of muslim worshippers, is jailed for a minimum of 43 years. thejudge said osborne had been on a suicide mission, when he killed one man and seriously injured many more. the family of the man who died have spoken of their loss: his laughter will echo the walls of our home, his smile will be reflected in our eyes and his memory will be alive in our conversations. i'll be talking to the imam praised by thejudge, for stopping the crowd from attacking osborne. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. the prime minister heads home from china amid pressure to spell out what she hopes to achieve from the brexit negotiations. the father of three of the victims of sex abuser larry nassar, lunges at the former us gymnastics doctor in court. for the first time, the number of men dying from prostate cancer
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has overtaken the number of women dying from breast cancer. a bear‘s eye view. how polar bears are struggling in the wild because of melting ice in the arctic. sterne brings a whiskey. and it's into the trenches in the world war one drama "journey's end". mark kermode is here to review that, and the rest of this week's top releases, in the film review. it's five o'clock. our main story: a man who drove his van into a crowd of muslim worshippers in north london,
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killing one person and injuring 12, has been jailed for life. darren osborne, has been sentenced to a minimum term of 43 years, for the attack near finsbury park mosque in london last year. thejudge said he had been on a suicide mission terror attack and had wanted to ‘sow long—lasting terror among the muslim population". jess parker reports. asummer a summer night lastjune, darren osborne mows down worshippers outside a mosque in finsbury park. several were injured, one man died. 51—year—old makram ali was crushed by the van. today, outside woolwich crown court, his family described how they will remember him. you will a lwa ys how they will remember him. you will always stay in our hearts. his laughable echo the walls of our home. his smile will be reflected in
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oui’ home. his smile will be reflected in our eyes. today, in handing darren osborne a life sentence, the judge, mrs justice cheema—grubb osborne a life sentence, the judge, mrsjustice cheema—grubb described how he had been rapidly radicalised over the internet. developing a hatred of muslim that was —— muslins that was irrational and perverted. ina that was irrational and perverted. in a statement to the home secretary, peacock . the court heard that he abused alcohol, and has dozens of criminal convictions. as he was arrested, he waved as he was taken away. in his defence, he claimed an accomplice called dave had been the driver. the judge described it as a pathetic last ditch attempt to deceive the jury, and today there was a defiant message from the leader of the
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labour party. the answer to darren osborne is, you will not divide us, you're not divide our wonderful multicultural community infantry park or anywhere else, and you do not frighten us, either. wright centres the date to a minimum time of 43 years behind bars, darren osborne will not be released until after his 90th birthday at the very earliest. wright jessica after his 90th birthday at the very earliest. wrightjessica parker, bbc news. pied at woolwich crown court. now that we have had sentencing, daniel, give us a sense of what the judge had to say here. what has direction been? well, the judge had to say here. what has direction been? well, thejudge picked up on one of the things that many of us following this case had noticed very, very quickly. that was the
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speed with which darren osborne had been radicalised by the material that he was reading on the internet. she highlighted the fact that he was radicalised by people who claimed to be leaders, but actually which is determined to spread the hatred of muslims. it is worth emphasising that darren osborne started getting angry about the race and religious issues in may last year. that was a bout a month before he carried out the attack in finsbury park. two weeks later, he went on to twitter, and that is when his use of social media started. he was searching out some of the leaders of britain first, as tommy robinson ——, robinson, one of the founders of the english defence league. he acquired enough beans and language, that when he wrote the note in the pub the night before, when he was talking to police after the attack, when he
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gave evidence in court, he was able to spell out very specific themes which reflected what he had read online. things about a particular scott hanson —— councillor in rochdale. about the profit mohammed, very specific things that he had learned in those two weeks of searching online. things that he saw asa searching online. things that he saw as a justification to try and kill inafit as a justification to try and kill in a fit of hatred. wright thank you, daniel. some of the elements that he was talking about, there, we will be talking about after half—past with a member of the home affairs select committee, but also, for now, we will talk a little bit more about the local imam, because asi more about the local imam, because as i mentioned, thejudge, the cheekily praised mohammed mahmoud, the imam of the muslim welfare has in finsbury park for his reaction on the night. i will be talking to them injusta
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the night. i will be talking to them injust a moment, the night. i will be talking to them injusta moment, but the night. i will be talking to them injust a moment, but i think it is not just telling you injust a moment, but i think it is notjust telling you a couple of the comments that the judge particularly made in court, today. thejudge made the point that darren osborne was in some dangerfrom the point that darren osborne was in some danger from an angry cloud of about 100 people, back in some danger from an angry cloud of about100 people, back injune, but the imam told them to leave him alone, to not seek vengeance, and to allow the law to take its course, which it has now done. and, the judge described this in court today, asa judge described this in court today, as a demonstration of true leadership, and i'm very pleased to say that the imam, so highly commended in court, today, is with me in the studio, today. very warm welcome to you. thank you for being with us. it is said striking to read those comments. those who once who we re those comments. those who once who were not there can only imagine what was going on that night. a warm summer night, and yet, you told people, i just watched summer night, and yet, you told people, ijust watched a man drive over people deliberately in a van to leave that man alone, to let the law ta ke leave that man alone, to let the law take its course. was thatjust your
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natural instinct? what was going through your mind at that moment? natural instinct? what was going through your mind at that moment7m was a natural instinct. in these situations, where one is never prepared, never trained, situations, where one is never prepared, nevertrained, one results to the condition response, and mine just happens to be to calm down tensions, and to de—escalated the situation, and thankfully, people responded positively to that. wright had yaxley witnessed him driving down the street, had you seen the impact, at what point you had you beenin impact, at what point you had you been in the area? allen—mac i —— i arrived about three to four minutes after the attack. wright and when people told you about it, you must have felt angry? people's and was justified. funny, iwas not have felt angry? people's and was
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justified. funny, i was not angry. the parity at the time was to take stock of what was injured, and to call the emergency services. and then, when i saw darren osborne was facing some potential harm, i intervened immediately, and then was helped by some other members of the mosque, who also surrounded him, and pushing people back. and now that, today, justice has been done, he has been given a life sentence, what are your thoughts for your self, feel family, for the community in that pa rt family, for the community in that part of north london, that he deliberately targeted? well, the community have moved on, quite a long way since the attack. they have shown that tamoaieta resilience, and strength, despite the —— they have shown their resilience and strength, despite being targeted specifically for their religion. one cannot help
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but notice that he targeted finsbury park, also, specifically. may be due to its reputation that it built over 15 years ago, and has been unable to shake off despite the two mosques in the areas best efforts? you mean a negative connotation as he would've seen it? yes, of course. but, people have strong resilience, and they have strong resilience, and they have moved forward. i am sure that they can now put this chapter behind them, and move on. as for the victims, of the attack, they have been left with scars that either do not heal, or may take time to heal, and wounds that are still fresh. they have been sentenced with life sentences themselves, where one family have been denied their
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father, and a loving member of their family, and other victims have sustained life changing injuries, and still suffer from them until today. yes, and the judge and still suffer from them until today. yes, and thejudge made and still suffer from them until today. yes, and the judge made that very clear, that some people have very clear, that some people have very serious injuries, indeed. as much as you can generalise, from what people say to you, whether they are worshippers or not, do people feel safe? do people feel that, god forbid, something could happen again like this, that they would be protected by the authorities, that people would rally round? i take your point that you say that people are very resilient, but what do people say to you, given the hatred that steam judge made so very clear, darren osborne felt? well, that attack was a realisation of their fears. it meant that people's fears,
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prior to the attack were not irrational, that these were justifiable worries that they had, that they would suffer i'm just reprisals. so, people do realise that they may be targets of right—wing extremists, or other groups, but thankfully, people don't live in fear. that is something that is noteworthy, and praiseworthy about the community in finsbury park, and their trust in the police and the emergency services was confirmed on that evening, and these show of strength from the entire community, that came out, those of faith and those of nun, who rallied around the mosque to show their
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support, their solidarity, to disown his actions, although they do not have to disown his actions, because he doesn't represent british values. he doesn't represent what it means to be british, or english, or christian. so, despite his actions, and his attempt to fracture the community, the community actually came out a bit stronger, and the relationship cemented and strengthened, so that is one positive that has come out of a tragedy. and, people may feel... i can't speak for every single person, their people who may feel fear, who may worry, people who have been subject to a islamic folk —— islamophobic attacks, women who have had their headscarves torn off, for
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the mere fact that they choose to cover their heads, these are some of the attacks that have risen statistically over the last year, and even these islamophobic attacks, the majority of them are not reported, so if they were to be reported, so if they were to be reported, then the statistics might actually show even more shocking results than what we know so far. well, thank you very much for your time. mohammed mahmoud, thank you very much, indeed. i will be talking more about this after half past. it is 40 minutes past five. —— 14 minutes past five. theresa may is coming under increasing pressure to spell out what she hopes to achieve from the brexit negotiations — including whether britain should remain part of a customs union after it leaves the eu. some leave—supporting conservative mps have urged the prime minister to be more specific about her priorities for future trade deals. downing street says mrs may has an "open mind" to the kind
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of customs arrangement the uk should pursue. speaking to our political editor laura kuenssberg, theresa may said her visit to china will help boost british trade prospects: that is good news for britain. it is global britain in action. that is what we are seeing here. wright but intent of doing business around the world, people want to know do you favour a really close relationship with the european union was out, or a break? whati with the european union was out, or a break? what i favour is a deal thatis a break? what i favour is a deal that is going to be good for trade between the uk and the european union, and good forjobs in britain. so, there is a fundamental... one of
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yourformer brexit so, there is a fundamental... one of your former brexit ministers who is on your side has said that the government is yet to make clear choices, and you're risking and linked up with someone that looks like meaningless waffle. my choice is very simple. we take back control of our money, our borders, our laws. you know very well then, that the decision time is fast approaching, which is more important to you, less disruption to the economy, or more control for our parliament and our politicians, because the u, many people in business, many people in your party believe that we can't have both. i do not believe that those can be alternatives. what british people voted to do is to ta ke british people voted to do is to take back control of our money, our borders and our laws. we are at the start of the negotiation. at the end of that negotiation, a deal will be
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negotiated to parliament. they will have a vote. our political correspondent eleanor garnier is in westminster. there is no doubt that the trip was important in terms of trade. what is the sense where you are, the extent to which it was overshadowed by brexit and leadershiplj to which it was overshadowed by brexit and leadership i am sure that theresa may will want to come back from china, emphasising the success of her trip, there. billions of pounds of business deals signed. she says that great britain is in a important position. she is not good to find a conservative party that is brimming with confidence. she comes back to disunity and concerns raised
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about her leadership. some talk about her leadership. some talk about disillusionment. some who have supported her in the past are now more wobbly about her ability to lead the party. yes, she has got to come back and dispel that disunity. she is under pressure when it comes to britain's trade arrangements after exit, but also under pressure to secure her own leadership. otherwise, some conservatives... that that could spell significant difficulty for theresa may. number ten will say that as she gets out of the country, out of the world, she is showing that she was getting on with the job of being prime minister. i think the issue is, the trials and tribulations going on inside the conservative party could prove a significant distraction just
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as theresa may is getting into the next stage of brexit negotiations, which many believe will be far more difficult than those that have gone before. all right, thanks for that. the fbi has dismissed the claims, here is what donald trump had to say about it all when asked what he thought about the contents of this memo? i think it a disgrace, what is going on in this country. i think it isa going on in this country. i think it is a disgrace. the memo was sent to congress, it was these classified, congress, it was these classified, congress will do what ever they are going to do. but, i think it is a disgrace what is happening in our country, and when you look at that, and fully see that, and so many other things, what is going on, a lot of people should be ashamed of
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themselves, and much worse than that. so, isent themselves, and much worse than that. so, i sent it over to congress, and they are going to do what they are going to do, what ever they are going to do. it is declassified, and that see what happens. a lot of people should be ashamed, thank you very much. well, let's try and find out what is going on, here. some of that might require a little bit of translation, parts for a british audience, but can you explain what this memo is, what it seemed to tie in with that whole hates his —— that whole history that... in broad terms, the memo accuses the fbi of abusing its powers in obtaining a warrant to carry out surveillance on a former champ campaign —— tomasz kedziora —— trump campaign adviser. knowing its
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political origins, so that is where this accusation of political bias comes from. we are still waiting for the memo to be released in its entirety, but what it is done, by releasing a spammer, the white house has deepened this extraordinary rift between the fbi and the department ofjustice. that between the fbi and the department of justice. that has between the fbi and the department ofjustice. that has made more a story, because the people now heading the fbi, that is the director, and the deputy attorney general, were hand—picked by donald trump. so, they are republican appointees, but entreat this morning, he went after them, and accused them of having this extraordinary political bias in favour of democrats, and against the republicans. it is an extraordinary rift, it is quite unprecedented. yes. and, we talk to you that bought, jane what that memo has been
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released. in dramatic scenes in a us court, the father of three of the victims of the disgraced us gymnastics doctor, larry nassar, has brought proceedings to a halt by lunging at him across the courtroom. nassar has already been sentenced to up to 175 years in prison for multiple counts of sexual abuse. i want to ask you as part of the sentencing to grant me five minutes in a locked room with this demon. would you do that? that is not how our... yes or no? no, i can't do that. would you give me one minute? you know that i can't do that. that is not how the legal system works. well i'm going... stay down! let me have him! stop! put your hands behind your back.
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i want this bleep! those were very emotional scenes. he has three daughters who were all attacked and abused by larry nassar, the man who admitted multiple counts of sexual abuse, and he abused many john girls, teenagers who he was meant to be looking after. that father then attacked him, and tried to attack him in court. you saw him being bundled to the ground. he has since apologised to the court, and said that he lost control, and he will not be charged with contempt of court. extra riot police have been deployed in calais, following violent clashes between eritrean and afghan migrants. four eritreans are in a critical condition in hospital after being shot, and 18 people
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were injured in separate incidents. jane frances kelly reports. the french authorities say a series of clashes broke out yesterday. it is not clear what sparked the clashes, but clearly tensions have boiled over, amongst the hundreds who have gathered in calais in an attempt to cross the channel into the uk. france's interior minister has visited the scene near a food distribution centre. he said the area has never seen such violence, and urged people not to come to the area. translation: we see that we have reached a new level of violence, tonight. the escalation of violence, tonight. the escalation of violence that has become completely unbearable of the people of calais. we cannot allow a sense of the
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survival of the fittest in our country, and yes, we will do things every way we can. extra riot police have been said, and officers are searching for an afghan in his 30s who is suspected of shooting some of the injuries. a local hospital worker says that my —— migrants are living in terrible conditions. worker says that my —— migrants are living in terrible conditionsm worker says that my —— migrants are living in terrible conditions. it is a disaster. the winter hostel is not open. there is police pressure to stop campsite is being set up, and then there is the work of the smugglers, who tried to do their trafficking. many maggots of the area are feeling increasingly desperate as the french government —— many migrants in the area feel increasingly desperate as the french government to do as much as they can to stop the violence. a man has pleaded not guilty to the murder of two schoolgirls in sussex more than 30 years ago. karen hadaway and nicola fellows were both nine years old when they were found dead in woods near the moulescoomb estate, on the outskirts of brighton, in october 1986. russell bishop, who's 51,
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was remanded in custody and will stand trial at the old bailey in october. some of the other stories making bbc news at five: at least 90 people are feared to have drowned when a migrant boat capsized off the coast of libya. only three people are known to have survived. the bodies of ten people have been recovered so far. a 33—year—old woman has been arrested in connection with a fire at nottingham station last month. she was arrested in derby on suspicion of arson. the fire is believed to have started in a toilet block and caused major disruption to rail passengers. the wedding of princess eugenie and her fiance jack brooksbank will take place on the 12th of october. the ceremony will take place st george's chapel at windsor castle — the same venue as prince harry and meghan markle's wedding in may. for the first time, the number
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of men dying from prostate cancer has overtaken the number of women dying from breast cancer. it makes prostate cancer the third biggest cancer killer in the uk. the charity, prostate cancer uk, says advances in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer have paid off — and argues similar benefits could be seen if more money was allocated to the fight against prostate cancer. our health correspondent dominic hughes reports. prostate cancer does not discriminate. last year, keen runner tony callier discovered he had the disease while training for an ultramarathon. his diagnosis was late, and he knows cancer will eventually take his life, so tony is using the time he has left to warn other men about the dangers. i think it's really important that people are aware of what the symptoms are and i would actually urge men to talk to their doctors, if they have any urinary issues at all. my issue is that i didn't
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actually have any symptoms and they think i'd had the cancer for ten years beforehand. more men are living to an age where they have a greater chance of developing prostate cancer. so, in 2015, more than 11,800 men died of the disease, compared with just over 11,400 deaths in 2015 due to breast cancer. and while the proportion of people dying from prostate cancer, the mortality rate, has fallen in the past decade, down by 6%, the decline in deaths from breast cancer has been even greater, at more than 10%. it is time to get behind this and to realise that we need to get on top of it now because it willjust become more common, and it is actually going to kill more men, if we are not able to do that. tony has joined those calling for increased funding for research cancers of the lung and bowel remain
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the biggest killers, but even here, there has been significant progress. really exciting things in the cancer research at the moment, is personalised medicine. the genes that make tumours tech, and the fa u lty that make tumours tech, and the faulty molecules that are fuelling their growth. the more that we know about individual cancers, he more personalised we can make treatments, and that is where we think that we can make real progress, and develop new treatments and help more people survive. tony has joined those calling for increased funding for research and the development of a reliable prostate screening programme, so the gains seen in the fight against breast cancer can be matched in the fight against the disease that he knows will eventually claim his life, too. time for a look at the weather. good evening. staying cold as we move into this weekend. we will
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start to see an early dip in the temperatures where we have the clear skies to begin with. the cloud will increase from the west, with outbreaks of rain pushing in. that could fall as snow on the hills in the north. temperatures in towns and cities feeling cold, but it will be a touch cooler than that in rural areas. we start tomorrow that weather front in the west, moving eastwards as we know through the day, the rain becoming light and patchy. the far east, perhaps, staying dry asked for longest. temperatures struggling, a maximum of six, perhaps 7 degrees. sunday is a cold and frosty start for many of us, there will be brighter intervals at times, the best in the west, but there will be a north—easterly breeze across england and wales, meaning it will not feel particularly warm at all, and also the potential of some wintry showers
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in the south—east. this is bbc news — the headlines: darren osborne, who carried out the van attack near finsbury park mosque in london last year, is handed a life sentence with a minimum of 43 years injail. the family of the man who died have spoken of their loss. our father, like the victims of most terrorism, was entirely innocent, which makes his death in this violent way all the more hurtful. president trump has approved the release of a controversial memo thought to detail bias on the part of the fbi, in its handling of the inquiry into alleged russian meddling in the us election. theresa may is under pressure to clarify what she hopes to achieve from the brexit negotiations. the prime minister insists she will deliver the deal that the british people want. we will talk more in the next few
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minutes about the aftermath of that attack at finsbury park mosque, right now, although they's sports news. we have just witnessed cameron norrie, a remarkable comeback to level britain's davis group —— davis cup group tie. there is no andy murray or kyle edmund, britain's top two are not available. liam brodie lost the first match of the day, but cameron norrie was two sets down in the second robber, he rallied to win the second robber, he rallied to win the next three sets and square the tie against a man ranked behind him in the world. it was a record—breaking winter tra nsfer
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it was a record—breaking winter transfer window, £430 million was spent in england alone, but arsene wenger says that is not a good thing. he says the problem is getting worse across europe, and claims that while clubs like manchester city are included —— enjoying big leads, huge expenditure is destroying the competition. when you do get the five big leagues in europe, you could see that predicts —— unpredictability of the competition has gone down, because we are in december. we knew already we are in december. we knew already we had four champions over five leagues, so that means something is not right in our game. and the huge financial power of some clubs has, is destroying basically the competition. david moyes says he is shocked by alleged racist comments made by one of the club's officials, the fa are investigating after reports that the director of player recruitment sent an e—mail saying that west ham did
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not want to sign african players. david moyes says the comments have not affected morale at club. the comments are wrong. we were signing two players from africa on deadline day, so i can only say they are wrong. you can see the players at the club's —— club signed over the yea rs, club's —— club signed over the yea rs , we club's —— club signed over the years, we signed good quality players, the best players we can get who are available to us, it doesn't matter to me where they are from at all. women's rugby union six nations get underway tonight, and tomorrow it is the turn of the men at two 15p in the turn of the men at two 15p in the principality ‘s —— principality stadium. warren gotland despot warren gatland is in his tenth year as the coach. —— warren gatland. you had that period with the lions, which was a great experience, and
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fiow which was a great experience, and now the whole focus is on 2019, and then we will be finished. but i didn't expect i was going to be ten years here, and 100 games anyway. it's been brilliant. soa it's been brilliant. so a big weekend ahead, with wales kicking off the men's championship against scotland tomorrow, before france host ireland and paris. italy against england is 3pm on sunday. we will be previewing all the action this evening in six nations sports day, with wales legend martin williams, from 6:30pm. some extraordinary hitting from david willey, who nearly became the first england player to hit six sixes in an over. england cruised to a win against the prime minister's xi, but look at this. nathan line
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was captaining xi, but look at this. nathan line was ca ptaining the xi, but look at this. nathan line was captaining the home side. david willey could only manage a four from the last ball, england won co mforta bly the last ball, england won comfortably by eight wickets. 137 with seven overs in hand. the tri— series begins on saturday. you can find out more on all those stories on our website. we will buy —— we will have more for you at half past six. we are going to talk more about oui’ six. we are going to talk more about our main story, a man given two life sentences with a minimum 43 years for attacking a crowd of muslim people near finsbury park mosque in london lastjune. darren osborne was found guilty yesterday of murder and attempted murder, after driving a van into worshippers, killing one
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man and seriously injuring a number of others. let's talk about the implications of this, particularly some of thejudge's implications of this, particularly some of the judge's comments about radicalisation in this case. rehman chishti mp is a conservative member of the home affairs select committee, and is in our westminster studio for us now. you may know that the judge particularly talked about the speed with which darren osborne was radicalised, he went online, he saw videos and films that made him angry, almost within the space of a month, thejudge said, what angry, almost within the space of a month, the judge said, what does that tell us about how we tried to tackle extremism of any type? firstly, my thoughts are with the family of the man who was killed. to have lost his life in this cowardly attack, my thoughts are with him and his family, and also with the imam at the finsbury park mosque, and the dignified way he dealt with the situation. the point you raise in
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relation to the comments by the judge ‘s what does one do to deal with internet radicalisation? we had over 800 individuals from our country travelling to syria to fight with bias, and some were inspired by the internet. we have to do everything we can to address the issue head on in relation to the internet. what the government has done since 2010, it has taken down 300,000 pieces of extremist material from online, but are you saying to me more can be done by the social media companies? the answer to that is yes, but i would say, well we are moving in the right direction, —— we are moving in the right direction, earlier this year the home secretary travel to the united states to try and get the international community
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working together on a global forum with all the social media companies, to ensure that extremist material is taken that quickly, speedily, before individuals are sucked in by this extremist material. because the heads of some of these companies you mention have been up in front of your committee even in the last month. did you get a sense from them then that they take responsibility here, that they want to try and help? what did you push them on when you say they could do more? beck in —— we had google, youtube, twitter, twitter has 95% of illegal material being taken down. these companies are working hard to ta ke these companies are working hard to take their material, there is no doubt. do i think they need to do more to take down this material quickly? germany has put forward legislation to say, these social media companies have to take the material within 24 hours, or they will have financial sanctions to make sure they do it quickly and are
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accountable. these companies are working very ha rd to these companies are working very hard to take down this material, and we wa nt hard to take down this material, and we want them to do it within two hours, because the point you made earlier, the point from the individual first earlier, the point from the individualfirst singer earlier, the point from the individual first singer material to being sucked in carrying out a terrorist attempt is a very short time. —— seeing the material. like i say, from 2010 until now, 300,000 pieces of material have been taken down. we are making sure through a globalforum, that down. we are making sure through a global forum, that all these organisations come together to take down this material. because whether it is far right extremism or islamist extremism, we have to do with it swiftly, and today's sentence has made it clear that all forms of extremism out there will be dealt with by the firm force of law. and we know from everything we heard through this trial but darren osborne was particularly following tom robinson, he was inspired by him as he would see it. —— tommy robinson. do you feel the edl should
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be banned? i would say the government had previously prescribed national action. in terms of the international —— individuals you have identified, my view is that their actions are despicable and contrary to our british values, in relation to the issue of prescribing, a set of criteria has to be implemented. —— proscribing. the duke and duchess of cambridge have spent their second day in the norwegian capital oslo as part of their tour of scandinavia. they met students at a secondary school — and the duchess said the sub—zero temperatures reminded of her university days in scotland. our royal correspondent nick witchell reports. this contains some flash
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photography. the duke and duchess we re photography. the duke and duchess were hosted to dinner by the king of norway. king harald of norway was not afraid to raise the issue of britain's future in europe. i hope we will be able to maintain oui’ i hope we will be able to maintain our close an extensive cooperation with the united kingdom withdraws from the u —— eu. but william stopped short of acknowledging brexit, opting instead for safe generalities. norway has been, and will continue to be, enormously important to britain both as a friend and partner. norway, of course, is the country cited by some as an example britain should follow. i'd said the eu, but inside the single market. its 5 million people have done well. nowhere is one of the richest nations per capita in the world. —— norway. the royal speech writers clearly believe any reference to that sort of thing, or to the
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reality of brexit, would, to use the analogy of this ski school, be the slippery slope to the royals being criticised for being political. some norwegians are used to taking a giant leap without knowing exactly where it will take them. and william ann—kathrin kept to the safe ground —— the duke and duchess kept the safe ground outside oslo. and then tojoin safe ground outside oslo. and then to join the children at the kindergarten campfire. time to go, said an official. i'd rather stay, said the duchess. it is all very much the soft end of interstate relations, but the importance of royal visits like this should not be underestimated. the norwegians, and before them the swedish, have valued the visits, which have reemphasised britain's strong links with her scandinavian friends. and at the moment that matters. a little earlier we were talking to
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oui’ a little earlier we were talking to our washington correspondent about that memo that is emerging in washington, dc tonight. just a few details are starting to come through about the contents of that memo, we saw a strong reaction from president trump came ——, saying people referenced in it should be "ashamed". it is quite complicated, and it is coming through piecemeal. but some of this can —— concerns a british agent, christopher steele, this republican memo, the details of which arejust coming this republican memo, the details of which are just coming out, for example he said in september 2016, he told a seniorjustice department official that he was desperate that donald trump not get elected. this isa man, donald trump not get elected. this is a man, christopher steele, he wrote some allegations about president trump's behaviour before he was elected president, and it would seem that a republican
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committee has used information from what he had to say, to carry out surveillance on a trump campaign aide. there is an awful lot of detail coming through, it described confused and complicated, so there is an awful lot still to emerge, we can is an awful lot still to emerge, we ca n safely is an awful lot still to emerge, we can safely say for tonight, and we are endeavouring to talk again to our washington correspondent because this is turning into an issue of enormous debate. we know donald trump himself is currently very angry about all of this, and democrats saying tonight, according to the reuters agency, that the release of this republican memo is shameful —— a shameful effort to discredit the department ofjustice. there is a lot more to emerge from that, we will try to talk to our correspondent in washington a little bit later, as more

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