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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 2, 2018 7:00pm-7:46pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 7.00pm. president trump has approved the release of a memo, thought to reveal bias on the part of the fbi in its handling of the inquiry in to alleged russian meddling in the us election. the memo was sent to congress, it was declassified, congress will do what they are going to do. but i think it is a disgrace what is happening in our country. darren osborne — the man who drove a van in to a crowd of muslim worshippers in north london, is jailed for a minimum of 43 years — with the judge describing his actions as a suicide mission. on her way back from china, the prime minister is under pressure to set out where she stands on britain's trade agreements after brexit. northamptonshire county council says it's facing "severe financial challenges" and has banned all council expenditure. and dramatic scenes in the us courtroom where the trial of sex abuser larry nassar continues. he lunges at larry nassar in court.
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and more than 20 years after they first formed, be spice girls have confirmed they are getting back together. good evening and welcome to bbc news. a controversial republican memo has been released which accuses the fbi of bias in its investigation into possible collusion between president trump's election campaign and russia. democrats had opposed the document's publication, saying some of the allegations were untrue — and aimed at discrediting the inquiry led by special counsel robert mueller. but after approving its release,
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mr trump said the four—page memo told a disgraceful story, and a lot of people should be ashamed of what it revealed. i think it is a disgrace what is going on in this country. the memo was sent to congress who was declassified. congress will do whatever they are going to do, but i think it is a disgrace what is happening in our country. and when you look at that, and you see that, so you look at that, and you see that, so many other things what is going on. a lot of people should be ashamed of themselves, and much worse than that. i sent it over to congress. they will do what they are going to do. whatever they do is fine. it was declassified, and let's see what happens. but, in a lot of people should be ashamed. thank you very much. we'll be live in washington shortly — but first let's get some analysis from scott lucas — who's professor of american studies at the university of birmingham. thank you very much indeed for
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joining us. the people here in the uk who have not followed all the twists and turns of this very complex affair, just tell us exactly what is memo says, what have we learned from? well, put simply, there is a political attempts, through this memo to discredit the fbi, and to hold the trump russian investigation before it reaches donald trump, which could be quite soon. now, to do that, it's claimed the fbi was biased in getting surveillance of a tramp campaign adviser, a man named carter page, in 0ctober adviser, a man named carter page, in october 2000 adviser, a man named carter page, in 0ctober200016. the problem for the memo, and for the trump cab, is that it rests on a flawed assumption, it argues that the fbi can appealed to the top secret government courts to get the word, resting on a private intelligence dossier, and collected bya intelligence dossier, and collected
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by a former mi6 agent, christopher steele. that is not right, though. the fbi's case before the court did not draw from the steel dossier, and instead, the fbi had multiple sources of intelligence, because it had been washing carter page, this type adviser says 2013, because it was concerned that russia was trying to recruit him as an ancient. 0nce you strip away that flawed assumption, the document collapses. what this shows us is the grounds on which the fbi were spying on a member of the trump's team during election campaign. right. and remember, the fbi at the same time, got authorisation from this top—secret court to maintain surveillance on a number of russian officials, and russian banks, because they knew that russians had stolen information, including e—mails that could damage hillary clinton. they knew that russian banks might be putting money into the campaign, and indeed, what we
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have actually been, what has been revealed as the trump campaign officials indeed work meeting throughout as in 16 with russian officials. what they were talking about might not mean collusion, but there were contacts. it rests on a whole stream of information, and indeed, we are at the point now, when the special counsel is ready to have donald trump give oral testimony about whether he knew about those contacts, and whether he meant to obstruct justice. about those contacts, and whether he meant to obstructjustice. that is why the memo had to come out now, it isa why the memo had to come out now, it is a race against time to try and save trump before anyone gets to him. letjust mention here, the former fbi was sacked by donald trump, he says: he seems to be downplaying the
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significance of what we have learned in this memo. welcome he is not mincing his words, is he? he is saying that this is it a part of a political campaign, and it does not provide new information, and indeed be information it provides might be misleading. let's give a bit of wider context. because, james comey was in the middle of this. in january, he thought they were revealing information about russian contacts. in may of that year, he fired james comey. to try and hold the russian investigation. injune, the russian investigation. injune, the following month, he tried to
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find the special counsel. the effort has continued to be, if you can't get rid of the investigator, undermine the investigation. go after the fbi. that is why james comey is so angry. either trump went, or the fbi went. and, donald trump, we had him saying, this is a disgrace, it is disgraceful, but what you are saying, is that in fa ct, what you are saying, is that in fact, we take the entirety of this memo, it does not actuallyjustified his claims that the fbi were politically motivated, and should be discredited, and this investigation should stop. absolutely not. if the fbi was politically motivated, then this top—secret court, which is one of the most special court in the us, and gives out very few words to surveillance, they would not have granted theirs. they make the fbi to work for three months to get this
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warrant. let's look at the pattern, here. visit the fbi trying to underminejustice, or here. visit the fbi trying to undermine justice, or has here. visit the fbi trying to underminejustice, or has it been donald trump, who has criticised his own agencies, fired the fbi director, that threatened to fire the deputy director, threatened to fire the special prosecutor. who here is that she tried to change the court of justice? here is that she tried to change the court ofjustice? the fbi or donald trump? 0k, court ofjustice? the fbi or donald trump? ok, that is great, for now. we will bring you more on this as we get it. the man who drove his van into muslim worshippers outside a mosque in north london has been sentenced to life with a minimum of 43 years in prison. darren 0sborne killed makram ali, who was 51, and injured 12 other people in the attack in finsbury park lastjune. our home affairs correspondent has this report. darren 0sborne was seized at the
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scene of the finsbury park attack after ploughing his van into a group of muslims, trying to kill as many as possible. convicted of murder, and attempted murder yesterday, his 102 previous convictions for violence, dishonesty and drugs offences were outlined to the court, today. as was the devastation caused today. as was the devastation caused to the family of makram ali, the man he murdered. 0utside court, his daughter, with his tearful wife by her side spoke of the family's love for him. you will never be forgotten, he will always stay in oui’ forgotten, he will always stay in our hearts. his laughter will echo the walls of our home, his smile will be reflected in our eyes, and his memory will be alive in our conversations. darren osborne's absurd defence at a man called dave was driving during the attack was scorned by thejudge. addressing him directly, judge—mac said, "an
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intelligent british jury should sue so intelligent british jury should sue so through your pathetic attempt to deceive them. " so through your pathetic attempt to deceive them. he cannot be released until he is at least 90 yea rs released until he is at least 90 years old. today, thejudge also chose to praise the man who protected 0sborne after the attack. she said that he had the strength to do the right thing under pressure, to respond to evil with good. with me is vidhya ramalingam, founder of moonshot, a group that works to disrupt and ultimately end violent extremism. i'm also joined via webcam by matthew feldman founder of the centre for analysis of the far right who has testified in a number of radical right terrorism cases. let me talk to you first, thank you
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for joining let me talk to you first, thank you forjoining us. it is clear, that in this case, darren 0sborne was motivated, didst turn to violence in part, as a result of the extremist groups that he had encountered online. absolutely. individuals who are eyeing gauging with these sorts of ideologies in the online space, they often leave behind them a trail of clues, as to exactly what they are doing. who they are getting involved with, and what types of contacts during ageing with. this prison opportunity for those of us who try to prevent the sort of violent acts, and we need to get much better at making better use of that publicly available data, and by the individual sectors in advance, and intervening. i will come back to you ina and intervening. i will come back to you in a moment, but let's be to matthew feldman, i know that you work at a grassroots level to try and capture this sort of thing. does this case not show us that there is
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a huge amount more that needs to be done to stop these if she mist groups opt to buying and using social media? yes, and that has been something that has been an ongoing issue after the last couple of years. facebook, twitter, and other social media coupled have begun to be more active in ticking down extreme as content, but there is no doubt that there is a great more to doubt that there is a great more to do in that area. i think coming back to this very important point, you are right that socially there is a responsible as you on all of us to look at the breadcrumbs, but also, as we saw in this case, and in many other lone wolf, terrorist offences, there is an online situation where someone there is an online situation where someone will state that they are going to do this. i think people of good will need to take those sorts of statements fiercely, and report them to the relevant authorities. and, video, this was one particular man who had has played hand to
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violence, was clearly disturbed by what he had read. how serious is the threat from the far right, are we looking at just a threat from the far right, are we looking atjust a very small number of very extreme cases, like this. the threat of the far right in the uk has been around for a long time. we're not talking about a new phenomenon. going back to 2013, there was a terrorist who was trying to plot a string of attacks against masts. we have seen this before, it is not new. it is important to say that. in the last few years, the uk government has stepped up in a development that this is a problem. there are now three prescribed anti—terror groups in the uk, and now that is an president. so, we are ina new now that is an president. so, we are in a new context, but this problem is being taken more seriously, and it presents an opportunity to ensure that violence decreases. we have had suggestions that there is now a
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security review of the scale of this threat. what is your experience, that, in the north—east, where you are working. is it something that you have seen increasing in recent yea rs, particularly you have seen increasing in recent years, particularly in the light of some of the terror attacks as we have had? we have certainly seen a greater visibility. by that, think it is important to say, in the north—east, there has never been an elected councillor, member of the european parliament, anything in the north—east, there has been directed addition, politically by the far right. but, that has not stopped all sorts of demonstrations over the la st sorts of demonstrations over the last five or ten years, whether it is the union address —— whether it is the union address —— whether it is the union address —— whether it is the english defence league, or the infidels. ithink is the english defence league, or the infidels. i think we are seeing a greater visibility. that can have a greater visibility. that can have a knock—on effect, for people who are honourable, and inclined towards violence to dig it one step while at —— to take it one step further. it seems like darren osborne did not
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have ongoing links with radical right groups, which is unusual in someone right groups, which is unusual in someone who is radicalised towards violent extremism. what is your opinion about preventing these people? we have got to be realistic. have got to support people through diversionary programmes. but, let's remember, a sense of proportion is important, as well. you are still more likely to die in your bath tub then you are, in terrorist attack, so then you are, in terrorist attack, soi then you are, in terrorist attack, so i think you have got to keep a sense of proportion, but at the same time, recognising the statements of violence, and individuals broadcasting their intent, . .. violence, and individuals broadcasting their intent,... they might be in courage to report it. if they start hearing about somebody talking about killing innocent people, i think that sort of falls
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under the same category, as well. we had mentioned that of the preventive strategy, which has been quite controversial. is there a danger that that is aimed too much at tackling muslim extremism, and not is looking sufficiently at the threat from the far right. certainly, the saskia has gone under a number of reviews. the rise certainly mistakes made. there is a real focus on both the violent far right, and on jihad real focus on both the violent far right, and onjihad is extremism, that said, we have never do laugh. and the violent far right, is a particular moment when these goods are emboldened. they feel that they have an open space in the online space, to be expressing themselves. and whilst that can be a very scary thing, it makes the internet a scary place, it also makes it is bit of opportunity, because we can see everything they say. they are not necessarily going underground, and that presents an opportunity to find
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them and actively engage. that is where i think the prevent strategy needs to move much more strongly, into the online space. ticking proactive action to reach people before they commit any acts of terror. -- taking proactive action to reach people. thank you so much to reach people. thank you so much to both of you forjoining us. the headlines on bbc news: president trump has approved the release of a controversial memo thought to detail bias on the part of the fbi in its handling of the inquiry in to alleged russian meddling in the us election. darren osborne, the man who drove a van in to a crowd of muslim worshippers in north london, is jailed for a minimum of 43 years, with the judge describing his actions as a suicide mission. on her way back from china, the prime minister is under pressure to set out where she stands on britain's trade agreements after brexit. the prime minister is under increasing pressure to be specific
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about what she wants britain's future eu trade relationship to look like. theresa may is on her way back now from a trade visit to china and negotiations on brexit are due to resume with brussels on monday. mrs may said the uk should not face a choice between a free trade deal with the eu and striking deals with the rest of the world. she was speaking in shanghai to our political editor, laura kuenssberg. a few last glimpse is, then to china a final wave goodbye. the prime minister on her way home, business deals in her pocket, but she will return to a next round of... is she ready to decide? your party, the public, business,
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they want to know do you favour a christian nation ship with the european union once we are out, or do you want a break?|j european union once we are out, or do you want a break? i want a trade deal which would be good for... there is a fundamental choice, that. your chancellor has said he thinks the changes will be very modest. one of yourformer exit the changes will be very modest. one of your former exit ministers on your side has said that the government is yet to make clear choices, and you are risking ending up choices, and you are risking ending up with some in that looks like meaningless waffle? fact is that that deal was done. we got what we wanted, we ensured that we got what —— dealt with those issues that first phase. now we start negotiations in the second phase. there might not be much serenity when she is at home. the decision of whether to bind tightly to the eu after brexit, or pull further apart
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is the line right down the middle of her party. her supporters believe she is the only person who can hold it together, but she is agonisingly pulled by detractors on both sides. if you are latin to explain your priority, your choice for what you want, can you stay on? because people are asking you, again and again, to be clear about your priorities. how long can you stay on do you believe? let's be clear about this. i have set out my vision. i have said that at every stage when we can fill in the detail, we will do so, and that is exactly what i have been doing. do you want to be the tory leader at the next general election? well, i have been asking that —— asks that on a number of occasions. i am that —— asks that on a number of occasions. iam not that —— asks that on a number of occasions. i am not a quitter. i am in this, because there is a job to be done, here. and that is delivering for the british people, and doing that anyway that ensures the future prosperity of of our
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country. global britain is a real vision, for the united kingdom. i wa nt vision, for the united kingdom. i want the british people to see a government that is delivering from them around the world, and that is exactly what we are doing. if i may, the tory party is fighting amongst itself. how do you reassert authority? i am do what the british people want which is to deliver on brexit, but also getting at and around the world, to insure that we bring jobs back to britain. companies will be selling more great british products to china as a result of this trip. there will be more people injobs in the uk as a result of this trip. that is global britain in actions. number ten hits that it britain in actions. number ten hits thatitis britain in actions. number ten hits that it is by seeing and doing that the prime minister can re—establish control, but the set of decisions will follow her around the globe. we can speak now to catherine barnard, who's professor of eu law at cambridge university. she joins us on the line from cambridge. thank you very much for speaking to
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us. thank you very much for speaking to us. the prime minister, dad, pressed by our correspondence, seems to dismiss the idea that she has got to make a choice, pressing her on whether she'd be prime minister wa nts to whether she'd be prime minister wants to stay close to the eu, and accept a lot of the existing laws and regulations, or breakfree accept a lot of the existing laws and regulations, or break free and have greater freedom. is and regulations, or break free and have greaterfreedom. is it and regulations, or break free and have greater freedom. is it possible for her to get both? i think the a nswer for her to get both? i think the answer is no. for the u, there is a binary choice. the choice is either to stay close, in some corn, such as the eea agreement that norway has got, or on the other hand, to go further away, something like the canadian free trade agreement, and that would give much greater regulatory freedom to the uk, but as the studies... it will do economic harm. lots of people who voted leaf said that is what we are prepared for. we knew there would be an
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economic cost, but a lot of business say, actually, we want to stay close to the eu. it is still our close of trading partner, and whatever deal is struck, if the uk was to sell goodsin is struck, if the uk was to sell goods in the european union market, those goods must conform to european standards. some people say that it is better to comply to european standards for lager so that we stay close. the prime and there isn't a sting in the last day or so that she wa nts to sting in the last day or so that she wants to control immigration, but after the uk and leave the eu in march of next year, than the eu citizen world no longer have the same rights to come and live and work here, that they must apply and register for residency rights. can she do that during this transition deal, and still continue to trade as we are in the moment with the new? yes and no. actually, she has been doing it already. she has been asking the eu citizens to register.
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it is up and that the uk has never taken advantage of. the problem comes, if she says, that as of march 2019, citizens who arrived after that date have got to be subject to a different legal regime, this create all sorts of practical problems, not least because employers will be hiring these people, without actually knowing what the end point is, what will happen in two years' time, and the end of transition, and you'll end up with two groups of people, those who arrived before the cut—off, who gets the state is that they do at the moment, and those who arrived during transition, who have a separate and as yet unknown legal station, at —— legal status, and the third group will be those non—eu citizens subject to a very strict immigration controls. they will eventually say, we are not hiring these people, because we just don't know what their immigration status will be in a few months, two if you years'
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time. and we had the prime minister, that, very keen to talk about the billions of pounds of trade deals that have been done in her trip to china, should we see that every positive sign for the future, the possibilities of global trade, with countries such as china, who are the real economies parring global growth at the moment? sylla well, of course it is good news that she has entered into some of these agreements. but, remember she has done this without having a free—trade agreement with. tuesday ms on the basis of international trading new rules, and the fact that she is operating at the fact that she is operating at the moment under eu rules, the year doesn't have a big trade agreement with china. the uk can go ahead, and enter into these sorts of arrangements, but all done without a free—trade deal. it shows what can be done, even without the uk having a trade deal, but it also shows what can be done what we are still in the eu. 0k, thank you so much for
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joining us from cambridge. more on our top story — the us congress has released a highly controversial memo which accuses the fbi of abusing its powers to spy on donald trump's election campaign. our correspondentjane o'brien is in washington. jane, we are already seeing lots of reaction from all sides on the significance of this memo. just, for viewers here, you haven't followed all the twists and turns of the political battles over their alleged bashing involvement in president tom's campaign, what do we learn from this memo? well, we learn of the accusation made by the republicans that the fbi have abused their powers in trying to obtain a warrant to carry out surveillance on a former member of trump's campaign team. the accusation is that in order to obtain this warrant, they used information from a dossier that
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had been compiled by a former british spy, who is being paid by the democrats, and who also said he was passionately against mr trump from becoming presidents. the republicans and the white house claim that that shows that there we re claim that that shows that there were buyers on the very top level —— bias on the very top level of the fbi, and the department ofjustice, which has opened up this huge war, between donald trump, and the people that he appointed to oversee these departments. the democrats say that this memo is incomplete, and it is misleading. the fbi said that it had great concerns about, but the republicans are saying that it showed that there was buyers that should undermine the russia probe. jame, we are hearing to hear some tweets from the attorney general, who are saying that he has great confidence in the men and women of this department, and that he is
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determined that he will fully and fairly ascertain the truth. where does this memo leave that crucial investigation, robert ‘s investigation, robert ‘s investigation, and his hopes of interviewing president tom, to ask him about this crucial issue? this memo has no impact on the russian investigation in that it continues. it doesn't have any impact on whether the individual be able to talk to mrtrump, whether the individual be able to talk to mr trump, or not. this is about one small part of an ongoing investigation, and it forget that there are many investigations going on at the moment. but, this calls into question the process by which the fbi and the department of justice obtain evidence. that is what this is about. so, the actual russian investigation itself is not
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actually necessarily affected, and the white house goes on to say that the white house goes on to say that the main reason that they supported its release was because it raises serious questions about the integrity of decisions at the highest of the department of justice, and the fbi, to use the government's most intrusive surveillance tools against american citizens. in other words, should the fbi have this power to be able to spy fbi have this power to be able to spy on american citizens when there isn't any real oversight as to how they obtain it. jane, thank you so much. let's catch up with the weather, here at home. phil avery has all the details. showers along the eastern shores of england particularly but things are changing as we speak. towards the west, a weather front coming in from the atlantic pushing rain across northern ireland, into the western side of scotland and england and through the heart of wales. some of
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that falling onto frozen surfaces so watch other eyes first thing if you're on the move on saturday morning. saturday is one of those days, i'm afraid. that france is not moving very far. the eastern fringes of these anger, bright, western side of these anger, bright, western side of scotla nd of these anger, bright, western side of scotland and northern ireland late in the day, but look at those temperatures. three, four, five, 6 degrees only. as we move into sunday, the front is still there but weakening all the while. best of the sunshine in scotland and northern ireland, not much in the way of breeze here. look at the isobar is in the south. a cold winds. it will feel much colder than these temperatures. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: congress has released a controversial memo thought to detail bias on the part of the fbi in its handling of the inquiry in to alleged russian meddling in the us election. darren osborne, the man who drove a van into a crowd of muslim
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worshippers in north london, is sentenced to life in prison, with a minimum term of 43 years. theresa may is under pressure to clarify what she hopes to achieve from the brexit negotiations. threats is to deploy extra riot police in calais following fighting between migrants. the violence involved afg ha ns between migrants. the violence involved afghans and eritreans. for eritreans were shot on in a serious condition in hospital. 18 people we re condition in hospital. 18 people were injured. gavin lee has been in calais for us. this is one of the smaller migrant camps that have p°pped smaller migrant camps that have normed up smaller migrant camps that have popped up in calais in recent months. it is a food hand—outs going on at the moment and it was this time yesterday when the violence flared. another food hand—out time yesterday when the violence flared. anotherfood hand—out was going on clothes by here where we
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are told about 30 afghans and 100 eritreans were in a queue and what triggered it? the police and charity workers and migrants are still trying to get the bottom of it but we are told gunshots were fired, four people are in hospital in serious condition after being shot. one of them in a life—threatening condition. 20 others with minor injuries including two police officers. this morning the interior minister said there had not been violence since the day of the so—called jungle when there were 7000 people here and you can see the back of the old cab the distance but let's walk and show you around here. most of calais now, there are far fewer migrants, about seven or 800 in clusters of different areas. for example, this area we are told about 60 to 100 people. the police have a clear and move policy. if they see tents, they move the tenth straightaway but they are set up again very quickly. migrants are on the move. what we are told from
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talking to the people here, many do not want to talk on camera, but they say they felt things getting worse. a big part of this is that two weeks ago when emanuel mccrum came here, they thought the president might have something different to say. they thought there might be a different narrative, a deal with the uk over the situation but macron said there will be no new cab. he is working on a new policy, swifter returns of field asylum seekers, speeding up the immigration process but talking to migrants and charity workers here, they said there was a moment of despair. lots of people here are getting more desperate. the other thing to point out, there had been a deal with theresa may and macron talking about unaccompanied minors coming to the uk and that has led to 200 people arriving in the past two weeks thinking they would have a chance which has also added to the numbers given that food supplies are very short, just relying on charity. the government says they are stepping in and will start to hand out more food to try
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to manage the problem given that it still exists here. all that time since thejungle still exists here. all that time since the jungle camp was closed, but where do we stand tonight? a 37—year—old man is said to be on the run. police said he was a migrant smuggler, not believe to be amongst the migrants here but he is still missing tonight. extra police are on guys but as you can see around me, it is relatively calm, relatively peaceful. gavin lee. what is the mood in kent after today's events across the channel? peter whittlesey is in doverfor us tonight. across the channel? peter whittlesey is in dover for us tonight. whenever there is an incident in calais, the ripples are felt here. that is because every day thousands of trackers and tourists use the ferry and the eurotunnel. college groups are saying that they want guarantees from the french government that the brits around calais are safe, especially because last night firearms were involved. the mp for
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dover, who was until three months ago conservative until the party withdrew the whip, has also weighed in and he says the prime minister was naive to make an agreement with the french president to allow more child migrants to come to britain. he says since that agreement was made in san a fortnight ago, the numbers of migrants in calais have gone from 330 800. he says that has given strength to the magnet of the migrants migrate is calais. other people say it isjust coincidence that the number of migrants has increased since that announcement was made. meanwhile, today, i have also spoken to lorry drivers who have crossed over from the channel. they say in calais in recent weeks the situation has got worse and they are fearful to stay in calais. they believe that if they stay there, many people will try to break into their lorries. they also say that their lorries. they also say that the situation is better than it was
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about three years ago when up to 10,000 migrants were living in the camp known as the jungle. northamptonshire county council says it's facing "severe financial challenges" and has banned future council expenditure. it made the dramatic announcement this afternoon. only statutory services for vulnerable people won't be affected by the decision. the council says there's a real risk it will not be able to deliver a balanced budget by the end of the year. stuart radcliffe has more. this move is a real indication of the financial crisis that this council finds itself in. the financial crisis that this councilfinds itself in. to the financial crisis that this council finds itself in. to give some background to that, they have plans at £34 million worth of cuts for the next financial year and there is currently a government appointed inspector in the council overseeing their finances to look at allocations of financial mismanagement. he is doing a com plete mismanagement. he is doing a complete route to ground review of how this council has operated. to
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give you some context to this as well. according to the chartered institute of public buyouts, this the first time in 25 years but one of these section 114 notices has been issued to an english council. basically what it means is this council will not consider any new expenditures so if a member of staff leaves, they will not be replaced. if something breaks, it will not be replaced. no new projects will be entered into and the reason for this is clearly that the council simply does not think it can balance its books by the end of the financial year. books by the end of the financial yea r. staff books by the end of the financial year. staff here have already been asked to take a day's on paid leave in an attempt to balance the books but clearly that simply has not been enough. to be clear, it does not mean that services will simply close overnight. everything runs as normal and schools will operate as normal, libraries and staff will continue to be paid. in terms of new expenditure, the exception to the rule is the council says they will
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allow expenditure when it is for safeguarding vulnerable children and adults. the council have 21 days to discuss the implications of this notice and then discussed again at full council on the 22nd of february. more now the the increasing pressure on the prime minister to be specific about what she wants britain's future eu trade relationship to look like. theresa may is on her way back now from a trade visit to china and negotiations on brexit are due to resume with brussels on monday. joining me now from east sussex is dr peter holmes from the uk trade policy observatory at the university of sussex. thanks very much indeed for talking
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to us. theresa may has been talking to us. theresa may has been talking to our political editor and has been very keen to flag up these billions of pounds of trade gales that she has donejust in of pounds of trade gales that she has done just in the past few days. shouldn't we see that as a positive sign for the sort of global trade deals that britain could do in future? it is obviously positive but i think the recent government forecasts analysis confirm what everybody has said, that it would be absolutely impossible for trade deals which we are currently trying to negotiate to replace the loss of market access that we are going to haveif market access that we are going to have if we increase trade barriers with the eu. and of course, we run the risk of losing the free trade agreements that we have at the moment, so about 3% of exports... we stand a chance of losing quite a lot
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more than that from brexit, i'm afraid, so the prospect of increasing exports to china compensating just doesn't really add up compensating just doesn't really add up because it's going to be very difficult to get a strong deal with china and even if we did, the possibility for expansion is very limited. the prime minister has been talking about the deep and special relationship she hopes to have with the eu where we have left. she insists that she believes she can get something that keeps us close to these sorts of frictionless trades that we are experiencing at the moment. is she realistic to think that she can do that and do wider global trade steals?|j that she can do that and do wider global trade steals? i think not. one of the things you have to bear in mind isjust what is one of the things you have to bear in mind is just what is the implication of the northern ireland and republic border agreement. very
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few observers think that you can actually have a completely free border there without remaining in the customs union. we can't remain in the customs union if we left the eu but having a customs union with the eu, and if we do that, then we can't sign free—trade agreements with other countries at least as far as tariffs are concerned. one of the possible arguments is that we remain ina possible arguments is that we remain in a customs union relationship with the eu and hope to be able to sign agreements with countries like china or the united states and services. these services agreements are the ones which it is hardest to make. we keep hearing this distinction being made about, well, we can't have a customs union with the eu but we did have a customs union. is that realistic? can we have some sort of customs deal with the eu which is not quite what we have at the moment but achieves the same thing, in other words that goods can move
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freely across, for example, the border between northern ireland and the republic and also, of course, through other routes to the rest of the eu? you can't be in the eu customs union if you are not a member of the eu. you can have a customs union arrangement with eu such as turkey has, but the turkish border is not a very good example because customs delays there can be up because customs delays there can be up to 30 hours, so we would have to have something quite unique. we would have to have an arrangement which was not membership but which was like membership and actually nobody has been able to work out how thatis nobody has been able to work out how that is going to work because it is not just the collection that is going to work because it is notjust the collection of customs ta riffs notjust the collection of customs tariffs and if you have a free—trade agreement the monitoring of rules of origin, all sorts of health and safety checks have to take place at borders, vat, there is a lot that must be done at a border and the eu have spent a long time trying to create a single market to get rid of
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the borders and, you know, you can't replicate the frictionless border u nless replicate the frictionless border unless you are actually part of the eu. at least, that i would have to say is the majority view. there are people who believe, and david davies believes, that this situation across the canadian border could be replicated but very few other observers believe that is the case. thank you very much indeed for talking to us. two weeks ago, 16 syrians, including several children, died trying to travel across the mountains from syria into lebanon. they used a route taken by thousands before them, but they were caught in an icy blizzard. only a few survived. our middle east correspondent martin patience has been to meet one of them, a three—year—old girl. meet little sarah, just three years old. the black marks on her face are caused by frostbite. smugglers abandoned sarah during a blizzard as she was crossing the mountains from the war in syria tojoin her dad.
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she only survived because the man who dumped her was forced at gunpoint to go back and get her. but sarah's mum, big sister and granny all froze to death. now, in a lebanese hospital, sarah's dad watches over her day and night. translation: i do my best to be a mother and a father to sarah. i'll do everything i can to help her get over this. she's all i have now. 16 syrians died trying to reach safety that day. for the rescuers, it was the worst thing they'd ever seen. but there is some good news... a couple of days after first meeting sarah and her dad, we went to see them again. sarah's had an operation on herface. she's got her appetite back.
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her doctor says the surgery was a success. so you're hopeful there won't be too much scarring? yes, yes, i hope. that her face will be...? yes, will be normal, like a normal baby. fantastic, it will looked normal? yes. sarah's dad captured herfirst moment after the operation. she's got a long way to go, but she still smiling. martin patience, bbc news, lebanon. you're watching bbc news and if you are expecting news watch, you can see that

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