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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 4, 2018 6:00am-7:00am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with chris mason and tina daheley. the disgraced film producer harvey weinstein faces fresh claims of sexual assault. scotland yard says a total of nine women have now made allegations against him. the actress uma thurman has broken her silence, saying that harvey weinstein tried to force himself on her during the 19905 following the release of pulp fiction. good morning, it's sunday the 4th of february. also this morning: mps warn that cuts to the royal marines could seriously undermine uk security. a jihadist group in syria says it shot down a russian warplane yesterday using a shoulder—launched missile. we'll hear from the british medical team back home after bringing a deadly disease under control in the refugee camps of bangladesh. and in sport, there's a thumping win for wales against scotland
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and ireland pip the french in paris with the last kick of the match. it's a brilliant start to the 6 nations. and ben has the weather. good morning. it's shaping up to be a brighter day for most today, quite a brighter day for most today, quite a lot of sunshine around but some wintry showers too brought in on a cold north—easterly wind. all the weather details you need to know on the way. cheers, ben. talk to you later. good morning. first, our main story. scotland yard is looking into two more allegations of sexual assault against the hollywood film producer harvey wine—steen. it brings the total number of women who have reported him to british police to nine. the actress uma thurman has also alleged he assaulted her at a hotel in london in the 1990s. our correspondent simon jones has more. she starred in several films produced by the disgraced movie mogul.
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it was after the success of pulp fiction that uma thurman says she was targeted by harvey weinstein. now she's the latest woman to speak out in an interview with the new york times. uma thurman claims harvey weinstein pushed her down when she met him in his suite here at the savoy hotel in london. she says he tried to expose himself, he did all kinds of unpleasant things. but she said she managed to wriggle away like a lizard. the next day, she says, a bunch of flowers arrived. a spokeswoman for harvey weinstein said in a statement: it comes as scotland yard say they have received two further allegations of sexual assault, one from a woman who claims harvey weinstein assaulted her in westminster in 2011, and another from a woman
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who says she was targeted in the republic of ireland. that brings the total number of women who have reported the producer to british police to nine. officers in new york and los angeles have also begun investigations. he has denied all allegations of non—consensual sex. harvey weinstein was once one of the most powerful men in hollywood, credited with scores of oscar wins, but he has been thrown out of the organisation that runs the oscars and he's now in rehab, a huge fall from grace from which there is likely to be no return. simon jones, bbc news. there's a warning this morning from mps that cuts to the royal marines would significantly undermine uk security and must be stopped. the defence select committee says the government must cough up amid speculation of a funding squeeze on the elite fighting unit. daniella relph reports. the training, known for being tough
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and arduous. 6500 royal marines go through it to make them amongst britain's at elite fighting forces. known for their versatility and their ability to respond quickly to situations around the world. the royal marines also provide up to half the personnel for the uk special forces. the half the personnel for the uk specialforces. the defence select committee report warns that further cuts to the marines would damage their ability to be a high readiness unit, quickly deployable, often in difficult circumstances. it also criticises plans to end the use of hms albion as a ship from which beach assaults are made. if there are new and intensified threats you would think we'd be adding to our capabilities, not deleting one of oui’ capabilities, not deleting one of our world beating star capabilities. the committee praises the defence secretary, gavin williamson, for taking control of the defence review but again warned that he won't be able to prevent harsh cuts without
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extra funding from the treasury. the ministry of defence says that protecting the uk is its priority and stress that the royal marines play a vital role in defending the country. daniella relph, bbc news. a senior conservative mp has accused ministers of being vague and divided over brexit. bernard jenkin, who was on the board of the official leave campaign, said civil servants deserved an unambiguous and united direction from ministers, singling out the chancellor philip hammond for criticism. it comes ahead of key ministerial meetings this week on the uk—eu relationship. a russian militaryjet has been shot down in north—western syria, an area held by syrian rebels. the defence ministry in moscow said the pilot had managed to deploy a parachute, but was killed on the ground. sarah corker reports. the burning wreckage of what looks like a russian fighterjet, red stars clearly visible on the wing. this footage posted online appears
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to show the plane being hit and bursting into flames in a rebel—held area of north—west syria. jihadist group hayat tahrir al—sham, formally linked to al-qaeda, said it had shot the plane down with a surface—to—air missile. moscow said the pilot ejected and survived the crash but was killed by rebels on the ground. the sukhoi 25 fighter was shot down near the city of saraqeb, close to a major highway in idlib province. it was back in december when the syrian government, backed by russian air power, launched a major offensive against rebel groups in idlib, the last province under rebel control. but civilians are paying a heavy price. thousands have fled. on friday, rescuers said they pulled the bodies of at least seven civilians from cars hit by air strikes south of aleppo. this incident is a rare loss
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for the russian air force. opposition groups have in the past shot down syrian planes but rarely those of the russian army, and there are reports that moscow has responded by firing cruise missiles from navy vessels in the mediterranean. sarah corker, bbc news. italian police have arrested a gunman suspected of carrying out a drive—by shooting that targeted african immigrants. the suspect had an italian flag wrapped around his neck when he was detained. the victims are being treated in hospital, at least one of them is said to be in a serious condition. how airlines seat passengers will be investigated in a new review. it comes after accusations that flight operators are deliberately splitting up groups so they pay extra to sit together. the civil aviation authority says passengers are paying as much as £400 million each year to be reallocated, and one in ten didn't know they would incur an extra cost to sit with loved ones.
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an olympic ice hockey team with players from both north and south korea will compete for the first time later today. the all—women team will take on sweden in a friendly match before the start of the winter olympics next week. north korea's participation is being seen as a show of reconciliation with the south. it's the biggest night in american sport, but football fans heading to tonight's 52nd super bowl in minneapolis will be wrapping up warm. it's expected to be a bone—chilling minus —16 degrees when the action gets under way at 11:30pm uk time. the game will be played indoors, but the local authorities have set up a trauma centre near the stadium in case any fans find themselves caught out by the freezing conditions. as you can see in these pictures, i
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think you just saw them, the fans are making the most of it doing doughnuts. looks mighty chilly. if you get caught up in a long queue on the way in, even though you will be warm on the inside, the long queue on the way in might make you think. you need to make sure... it's all about the layers. —i6, i can't even imagine how cold that is! mighty chilly! let's return to our main story now. uma thurman, who starred in several films produced by the disgraced film mogul, harvey weinstein, has claimed that on two occasions he tried to sexually assault her. thurman broke her silence in an interview with the new york times after saying in october that she didn't want to say anything in anger. mr weinstein‘s lawyer said the allegations are false. entertainment journalist anita bennett can discuss this with us now from los angeles. thanks for sparing us some time, what do you make of these latest revelations? these latest revelations are just
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another bombshell in the continuing harvey weinstein case. i woke up this morning to multiple breaking news alerts. i knew urma suggested she had a story to tell but what a story! why did she take this long to decide to go public? she's not the only one, salma hayek came forward in december. as more women have come forward , in december. as more women have come forward, others have felt more empowered to speak out so i think that really had a lot to do with it. how much surprise is there in hollywood, in los angeles, as more information emerges? we saw the torrent of allegations made before christmas, now further allegations, what's been the reaction? the reaction here is dismay, shock. a lot of people are saying... industry insiders they say did know, seth
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macfarlane cracked a joke about rb weinstein on and various comedians alluded to the fact something was amiss —— about harvey weinstein. but the allegations are disturbing to say the least. uma thurman is alleging he threw her down on a bit ina alleging he threw her down on a bit in a hotel room in the uk. you had science, salma hayek come out in an op—edin science, salma hayek come out in an op—ed in the new york times in decemberand her op—ed in the new york times in december and her allegations were disturbing. it was when she was making bell and frieda and harvey weinstein produced that film, when she turned him down he became angry and threaten to shut down the production and pull the plug on the funding unless she did a full frontal nude scene in the film with another woman. uma thurman's career and harvey weinstein‘s career overlapped hugely, they worked together for overlapped hugely, they worked togetherfor a long time on overlapped hugely, they worked together for a long time on and overlapped hugely, they worked togetherfor a long time on and off? they really have. when mr
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weinstein's attorney released a statement today, they mention there are pictures of her through the years at various entertainment events posing alongside him and it raises the question, if she was so troubled, he made a pass at her, that was it, but if she is so troubled by him why did she continue to be friendly with him? that's a question though one can answer but uma thurman. that's very striking and you touched upon it there, the nature of his response to these allegations, he is digging in and defending himself. he really is. his attorney put out a statement, they didn't threaten to sue but the attorney said her allegations are being carefully examined and investigated and they will decide how to proceed. whether or not they will sue her, he would have, find the time because he's been hit with an avalanche of lawsuits since the allegations first appeared in october so he will be tied up in
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court for years to come. in a sentence, that's it, his career is over? i don't have a crystal ball but i think at this point he is kind of like kryptonite. you'd be hard—pressed to find someone willing to work with him in hollywood or the uk or europe or anywhere else. is his career over? probably, but never say never. thank you, we appreciate it. a metre bennett reporting for us live from los angeles. —— anita bennett. uma thurman making lots of the front pages this morning, let's look at the sunday times. her assault claims on the front page but also brexiteers, pot two installed dream tea m brexiteers, pot two installed dream team at numberio, brexiteers, pot two installed dream team at number 10, borisjohnson, michael gove and jacob rees—mogg as chancellor. —— plot to. that's the
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warning from tory mps last night. if headlines like that seem a little far—fetched, politics has had the capacity to surprise over the last few years. front page of the sunday mirror, talking about the big march in london yesterday involving lots of campaigners and doctors and nurses. they seem to have found a picture ofjeremy hunt, the health secretary, fast asleep at what they describe as a posh spa hotel. one of those unfortunate moments when you realise everyone has a camera and if you have a nap it could turn out to bea you have a nap it could turn out to be a cat embarrassing. a different story on the mail on sunday, fury of harry hero's widow, suicide soldier might still be alive today if useless mod had helped according to the family of a soldier who fought alongside prince harry who has accused defence chiefs of failing to provide him with the help that could have stopped him committing suicide. a quick look at the observer in its newish format as a tabloid, another
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brexit front—page. picking up on the discussions that have been going on for some time at westminster about whether or not the civil service is adequately impartial, some suggestions from the likes of jacob rees—mogg that that isn't the case. plenty of others arguing strongly that the civil service should not be undermined. let's find out what's happening with the weather, ben? is the buy today at the weekend. many of us will see some spells of sunshine. some wintry showers brought in on a cold north—easterly wind. the satellite picture shows the way the thick, rain bearing cloud has broken overnight and as it clears away, more than north—easterly wind bringing increasingly cold air in our direction and some wintry showers, particularly across parts of east
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anglia and the south—east. the further west you come, fewer showers and more in the way of sunshine per south—west england. a very chilly start. quite a widespread frost. the odd shower to the eastern side of scotland. western scotland, northern ireland getting off to a bright start and as we go on through the day, it's a continuation of that theme. a bit more cloud further east. when you factor that into the feel factor. the six nations match, we will see some sunshine. and, as these north—easterly winds feeding,
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we will see quite a few wintry showers. snow showers most likely across parts of east anglia into the south—east. we could see a few centimetres of snow. that again brings with it the rinks —— the risk of some ice tomorrow morning. travel plans across east anglia and the south—east, some places could see a covering of snow. one or two issues. elsewhere tomorrow, a decent day with some spells of sunshine. another cold day. another weather system moving in from the north—west. on what will be another cold feeling day. wherever you are across the country, there is a
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chance to see some smoke. —— see some snow. but now it's time for the film review with jane hill and mark kermode. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. so mark, what do we have this week? we had a new version ofjourney‘s end. helen mirren in winchester, the ghost story chiller. and an oscar—nominated denzel washington in romanj israel, esq. journey's end, is it a tough watch? i was very impressed by it, it is directed by a man whose previous film was about world war ii. this is set in the trenches of world war i, a terrific ensemble cast, tobyjones,
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paul bettany. .. and essentially what the film does is capture the sort of day—to—day squalor and struggle and comradeship of people in those trenches in the middle of that terrible war. my darling joan. when you read this, i don't imagine that for one moment you will feel bitter and resentful. but you will find comfort in the thought that i went down fighting for my country. but you will find comfort in the thought that i went down fighting for my country. you are too clear— headed for that, my darling. there is a job to be done. it ought never to have arisen, but that is not the point. i have had so very much out of life.
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and all these youngsters do not realise how unlucky they are. so new are they to their very existence. paul betta ny, capturing the understated power of the drama. this is a story that everyone knows, but i think they bring something new to it. there is a palpable sense of terror, the fact that we are waiting for a german attack, it hangs heavy over the drama. i think the director cranks up the tension, while all the time reminding us that this is to do with the characters, their day—to—day life, that strange mixture of on the one hand grinding boredom and on the other hand imminent terror, balanced very nicely. you get a raw sense of being there in that trench environment.
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i think what this film manages to do is take a classic text and make it com pletely releva nt, it is very cinematic. the performances are terrific, there are laughs as well, and there is real vibrancy in it. but i find it very moving, very powerful, very harrowing, and a very sort of potent reminder of just what was at stake in what was sacrificed. i thought it was really good, it was a really good adaptation. you are a horror film fan, aren't you? winchester is not going to scare you. this is inspired by the true story of sarah winchester, the widowed heiress of the winchester rifle fortune. some people said she was haunted by the spirits of the people killed by the firearms. is she crazy, is she haunted, is it all in her mind? this sounds like a great set up. no, all that ambiguity goes out in ten seconds. the house goes bang, there are lots ofjump scares,
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the movie shouts at you... ok, fine, it is an interesting setup, but once you are into it, it is like the most mechanical roller—coaster ride. none of it is scary. dame helen mirren does a brilliant job of keeping a straight face! why did she say yes to this? she said it is in the tradition of great japanese ghost stories, it is nothing like that! it is like twister. at no point, at any point, did i feel there was any ambiguity, any uncertainty, and it was not scary. you are completely safe with this. i can't see it! you have sold it. denzel washington, 30 years after his first oscar nomination, he plays a savant law attorney,
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very dedicated to civil rights causes, but is absolutely terrible with people. so for most of his career he has been the person in the backroom, who does the book work, then the partner he has been working with suddenly finds himself in hospital, and he has to step up and do the interaction, and he cannot do it. here's a clip. my client is interested in discussing a deal. i have a0 open cases. refresh me. a convenience store shooting, a man was killed. i have it. the shooter in this case was a fugitive. carter johnson.
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my client may know his whereabouts and might be willing to testify. he will deliver on that? that depends. if you waive all objections on appeal, and he is willing to cooperate, we will drop the assault and kidnapping, and reduce murder one to involuntary manslaughter, ten years. involuntary, 3—5. it is a good deal. it's an enema of sunshine. i'm sorry for taking a nanosecond off of your rubber—stamp assembly—line existence... we withdraw. hello?! so he can't do any of the interaction stuff, but he needs money. so he sells out. the beginning is him accusing himself of having sold out. it is an uneven drama, it tries to cram a huge character arc into a small period of time. but he is really watchable,
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you do believe in his transition between somebody who is very idealistic to somebody who is selling himself out, even if you don't quite believe the drama around him. it is quite often funny, sometimes the tone is uneven to the point of not working, and i have to say it really loses its way in the third act. and ultimately it does not hang together, but wouldn't you rather look at a movie which tries to do something interesting and doesn't quite pull it off, rather than something that is quite down the line? and he is so likeable, i so liked denzel washington, but i guess you want it to be better. was it created just as a vehicle for him? look, i think it is a film that is trying to do a very complicated character arc, in a very compressed period of time,
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and it doesn't quite hang together. but it has such a strong lightning rod performance at the end of it, that you can forgive it for the things that are wrong with it. phantom thread. this is the new paul thomas anderson. i think it is his best film since punch drunk love. daniel day—lewis is obsessed with rituals, everything in his life has to be one way... lesley manville is his sister, and suddenly his life falls apart. he falls in love with a woman. firstly it has a brilliant score byjonny greenwood, who has been oscar—nominated. the music is wonderful. i do think lesley manville is going to win for best supporting actress. i have now seen this four time, and every time i see it it looks like it is a different film. the more i watch it, the more it becomes a fairy tale, like a powell and pressburgerfilm.
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but it is also about a woman entering a world that is like bluebeard. the art ventures out into the forest, strange mushrooms that have extraordinary powers... it is odd! it is! but the more you scratch away... right, it is beautifully made. that is such a backhanded compliment! it means it didn't work. i loved the first half hour so much, and there is such attention to detail, with the music and the costumes, but the relationship between the two of them just got weirder and weirder. but it is a fairy tale, it is a mythical allegory. it is a horror! what it really is, it is a ghost
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story about him being obsessed with the ghost of his mother. if you want a ghost story, forget about winchester, go and see this. very quick thought about dvd, i'm curious as to whether, should blade runner even be watched on dvd, isn't it made for the big screen? i saw it first on a huge imax screen. here's the good news, it does stand up, because beyond the extraordinary visuals, it is a film that has substance. it is about something, it is about what artificial intelligence is and what it means to have a soul or not have a soul. it is a very different experience on home viewing, but even if you saw it in the cinema and loved it, it is going to work again on dvd or blu—ray. and though it is really divisive for some people, but i think it is great. mark, thank you very much.
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a quick reminder before we go that you'll find more film news and reviews from across the bbc online at bbc.co.uk/mark kermode. and you can find all our previous programmes on the bbc iplayer. i think it is the week to go and see phantom thread myself. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast, with chris mason and tina daheley. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: scotla nd scotland yard is looking into two more allegations of sexual assault into the hollywood film producer harvey weinstein, that brings the total number of women who reported him to british police to nine. the actress uma thurman was also alleged he assaulted her on two occasions. she broke her silence in an interview with the new york times. mr weinstein's team say the accusations are false. there's a warning this morning from mps that proposed cuts to the royal marines would significantly undermine uk security and must be stopped.
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the defence select committee says the government must cough up amid speculation of a funding squeeze. the proposals would see two thousand marines cut and and two specialist ships taken out of service early. the government says protecting the uk will always be its priority. a russian militaryjet has been shot down in northwestern syria, an area held by syrian rebels. the defence ministry in moscow said the pilot had managed to deploy a parachute, but was killed on the ground. italian police have arrested a gunman suspected of carrying out a drive—by shooting that targeted african immigrants. the suspect had an italian flag wrapped around his neck when he was detained. the victims are being treated in hospital, at least one of them is said to be in a serious condition. how airlines seat passengers will be investigated in a new review. it comes after accusations that flight operators are deliberately splitting up groups so they pay extra to sit together. the civil aviation authority says passengers are paying as much as £400 million each year to be reallocated, aaa aaa =a z—aaaa'aa-a ,. ,, . .
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bit fit ”um bit ”um w—cifl a bit stupid because scotland had such a good year last year but it didn't work out that way and this is the beauty of the six nations. everybody seems to raise their games. we are up and running in this year's championship, two very contrasting matches in cardiff and paris yesterday. ireland beat the french 15—13 with a monster of a drop—goal from jonny sexton right at the death, and scotland's rugby revival came a cropper
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at the hands of the welsh, beaten 34—7 at the principlaity stadium. hrre's our sports correspondentjoe wilson. six nations predictions, scotland had their best chance in decades. wales would struggle with so many injuries. by half—time in cardiff, rethink. interception, opportunity for wales and its gareth davies, can anyone catch the scrum—half? davies for the corner, harris can't get there and a try for wales. scotland had afair there and a try for wales. scotland had a fair bit of the ball early on but wales used it with composure and commonsense. leigh halfpenny scored his first try in five years and then he started the second half with another. no way back now for scotla nd another. no way back now for scotland and for their fourth try wales really turned it on. llanelli scarlets connections all over the pitch. west is best, as they say
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here. steph eva ns‘ pitch. west is best, as they say here. steph evans' sense of direction was perfect. 34—7, final score. we've trained really well in the last couple of weeks and i said to the players i think we'll batter them. we took what we've been doing on the training pitch and were clinical and we produced a really good performance. funny in six nations how emotions and optimism and pessimism can change after just and optimism and pessimism can change afterjust one match. in paris, everything changed it seemed in the space of a sprint. finally some french magic in the drizzle. ireland had seemed in control up until this, it meant france led by a point and still be led with the clock turned red. time was gone but ireland still had one last chance if they could get the ball tojonny sexton, if he could get his dropkick to make it. here it comes. . . get his dropkick to make it. here it comes... it looks good... he likes it! nigel owens' arm goes up!
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word. two memorable wins in two radically different ways. that's the first saturday done. joe wilson, bbc news. incredible celebrations at the end in paris, the french were distraught. that will go down in irish rugby folklore. let's look at that again. they had been through a0 phases to keep the ball alive. that again. they had been through a0 phases to keep the ball alivem you look at his face he can't believe it himself. he was aa metres out. and it's already being put up there as one of the great match—winning drop goals, gerry guscott for the lions, jonny wilkinson for england to win the world cup. this is not as important for the irish but looking at those moments at the final whistle, the final kick of the match, it felt so important. they won the match and they are up and running with a victory. just happy to get another chance to
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get the victory for the boys, we've worked so hard for the last two weeks and all our goals would have crumbled today if we'd lost and it's just great to be in the position we're in now after getting the way win. they'll be raising a few glasses to johnny sexton in dublin i'm sure! england start their championship in rome against italy at three o'clock. england's are also the defending champions in the woemn's 6 nations , the red roses play after the men at 5:30pm. the red roses play after the men at 5:30pm. ireland's women faced a tough opener against france in toulouse yesterday. the french side were relentless, scoring four tries in total, including two from jade le pesque. 2a—0 to them for a bonus point win. two premier league games this afternoon, strugglers newcastle against crystal palace and then what could be a cracker sat anfield liverpool taking on tottenham. there were goals everywhere yesterday, a first for alexis sanchez for his new club manchester united, they beat huddersfield, and arsenals new boy pierre emerick aubameyang made an impressive debut
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as they put five past everton. joe lynskey reports. new arrivals at the emirates face a special kind of pressure, but this january arsenal have gone all out to bring in the best. mkhitaryaan, in towards aubameyang, he chips the goalkeeper, it's a lovely finish. at £56 million, they'll hope it'sjust the start of the aubameyang dynasty, but on a day when arsenal put five past evidence, it was an old head who broke new ground. a first hat—trick for aaron ramsey in his nine years at the club. and fresh faces have brought fresh hope. nine years at the club. and fresh faces have brought fresh hopem looks like they have the quality to integrate with the game we want to play. they are quick, sharp movement, agile. want the ball. the tra nsfer movement, agile. want the ball. the transfer window puts the strain on
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football's relationships. february is time to show affection. alexis sanchez marked his old trafford welcome with a first united goal. he is the archetypal modern superstar ata is the archetypal modern superstar at a club with a poignant past. this was the day they marked 60 years since the munich disaster. tributes were paid too at the hawthorns on west brom's first chance to mark one of their own. the death of cyrille regis was felt ha rd est death of cyrille regis was felt hardest here. but the emotion couldn't inspire the team to victory. a crucial 3—2 win for southampton leaves albion cut adrift at the bottom. it was a shame because it was a special day in a lot of ways but obviously not a special result. as much as we sort of have to and puffed in the second half we couldn't find a way back into it. pa rd ew‘s into it. pardew‘s i've may look in hope towards bournemouth to see how quickly things can change. they came from behind to beat stoke and go seven clear of trouble. two wins in
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four days may have transformed the cherries' season. at the top manchester city show few signs of fading but they are at least showing their human. raheem sterling with surely the miss of the season. it's normally city's opponents wanting the ground to swallow them up but this time burnley look to make city pgy- this time burnley look to make city pay. this goals sealed a 1—1 drawer and a red taste of regret for the runaway leaders. they will surely still be future champions but this was the weekend football paid respects to its past. joe lynskey, bbc news. there was a rare defeat for celtic in the scottish premiership. they went down 1—0 at kilmarnock, only the second time that they've lost to scottish opposition under brendan rodgers youssouf mulumbu first goal in four years gave killie their first win over celtic for five years, the first in eight years at rugby park. aberdeen won yesterday to cut celtic‘s lead to eight points. rangers lost. you can find the other results
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on the bbc sport website. great britain are up against it in the davis cup, they have to win both of today's singles rubbers if they're to beat spain in their davis cup world group tie in marbella. jamie murray and dominic inglot were beaten in straight sets in the doubles by pablo carreno busta and feliciano lopez yesterday. cameron norrie and liam broady are due to play for gb in the singles but captain leon smith can select kyle edmund if he is fit. you can follow it all on bbc two from 10am this morning. if they win that it would be heroic. thanks, speak to you later. here's ben with a look at this morning's weather. how cold is it looking today? today, pretty cold, particularly in the south where you are exposed to a strong north—easterly wind. some areas will feel like no better than freezing but the big
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compensation today is some sunny spells, more sunshine than we had yesterday, albeit with some wintry showers. here's yesterday's cloud which brought patchy rain and hill snow, most of that has faded away overnight. we're starting to bring in this strong cold north—easterly wind and that speeding in some wintry showers into eastern areas and the potential for highs wintry showers into eastern areas and the potentialfor highs in parts of eastern england as well. the further west you come this morning, further west you come this morning, further showers, more dry weather, good spells of sunshine into the south—west and wales and north—west england, a frost into north—west england, a frost into north—west england and in north—east england and north—east scotland, a few wintry showers and a mixture of rain sleet and snow. in western scotland and northern ireland, a bright but cold start. through the day northern areas will have fairly light winds so where you get the sunshine it won't feel too bad but the winds that bit stronger further south, continuing to feed in wintry showers but through the afternoon the
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showers mostly falling as rain and sleet, not so much snow at this stage but with the cold wind, your thermometer might say five, six, seven, but it will feel more like freezing or maybe even below. meanwhile a relatively balmy ii in rome for the six nations, italy against england. some sunshine overhead. back home, though, temperatures are going to plunge overnight. a cold night to come. where we are still exposed to this north—easterly wind, quite a few wintry showers for east anglia and the south—east. most of these will be snow showers away from the immediate coast and they could give a few centimetres of snow into monday morning in some places, confirmation of a cold night where you are, these are towns and cities, colder in the countryside with fog patches. snow and ice could cause problems to the south—east tomorrow morning, a few centimetres of snow where we've had the showers overnight and then the wintry showers will drift further west through the day. the weather system
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into the north—west later on but in between a lot of sunshine to enjoy on monday but still with actually feel. as we move out of monday into tuesday, we bring this frontal system in from the west, outbreaks of rain but potentially snow as well as that pushes south—east. with a cold week to come, we'll see widespread frost and just about wherever you are there could be a bit of snow in the forecast. ben, for now, thank you very much. we will need to wrapped up warm. winter isn't finished with us yet! tinnitus may be perceived as a condition that only affects older people. but new research suggests the majority of uk parents are unaware children can also have it. now advice has been sent out to teachers as there may be one child in every classroom with the hearing condition according to the research. we're joined now by 10—year—old george, who has tinnitus, and his mum, niki. thanks for coming in this morning. let's start with you, when did you
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realise george had to notice? when he was in year a, last year. —— had to notice. he came home and said he was stressed and upset with a header ta ke was stressed and upset with a header takejo was stressed and upset with a header take jo headache. —— was stressed and upset with a header takejo headache. —— illiterates. we went to the doctors and they passed us on to find out what the a nswer passed us on to find out what the answer was. how was it for you, what we re answer was. how was it for you, what were you hearing? i was hearing a high—pitched buzzing noise in my head and it was really hurting me. what did it sounds like? it was really, really high—pitched. it was really, really high—pitched. it would be difficult not to only describe it to work out where it was coming from. scary? yes. it's normally associated with older people. it is not the case with children certainly. it must have
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been a big surprise. we went to see the audiologist. then she explained it. she gets anxious. the brain is like a superhero, isn't it? he didn't know how to stop that cycle. learning how to control it, really. now that you know what it is, what strategies do you use to make it more bearable? ijust, you know, breathe. i breathe all the time. i ta ke breathe. i breathe all the time. i take deep breaths when i'm about to do big things and just keep calm. how supportive as the school? when i do get headaches, they let me sit in the library to do my work. i normally feel a lot calmer after
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that. george connolly you brought some books. tell us about those. that. george connolly you brought some books. tell us about thoselj got given them by the audiologist. there was an activity book with drawing and stuff. let'sjust showed the viewers. here is george's book. you can draw on there as well. was speaking to audiologists. what advice they give in. she said it might be the case that he always has
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it. for him, it is learning how to deal with it, how to control it, how to keep calm. it's when he is more anxious, that's why we did breathing exercises. just chatting, having some quiet time. you use your headphones. it is really helpful for people who are watching at home. you are staying with us but now, thank you very much. we'll be back with the headlines at 7:00. but now it's time for click with spencer kelly. see you soon. welcome to dubai, the desert kingdom where there's no such thing as too much. this city has spent more than a decade making a name
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for itself for the outrageous buildings that it's created. but now it seems it wants to be known for technology too. a while ago, i paid it a visit during its drones for good challenge and met some of the local innovators who dubai hopes will contribute to its new tech power image. but drones are not the only thing is taking to the skies. this hover bike designed for the police force may one day be whizzing officers to the scene of a crime. copper chopper anyone? the officers can be using the hover bikes across the city to provide the service in the right spot and even a fast response. and these weren't the only high—tech additions to the force. back in may, the dubai police got some new recruits and these
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weren't your ordinary newcomers, these guys were made of the hard stuff, and kate russell went to meet them. like so much of dubai's over—the—top ambition, the police force wants to be seen to be using the latest crime prediction and surveillance technology to watch over the people. we have our cameras, our drones, our robots. we are going to live in a science—fiction movie. artificial intelligence—based predictive crime systems, autonomous patrol vehicles and unmanned police stations are just a few of their futuristic initiatives. robot: i am a humanoid service robot... planned to be built in all of dubai's neighbourhoods are the world's first smart police stations, which will be completely unstaffed. citizens can pop in for a safe driving lesson, a quick coffee or even to report crimes.
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they can also meet dubai's own robocop. i am the latest incorporation into dubai's police department. but unlike the movies... hello... ..he'll kill you with kindness. you have really pretty eyes. i think i'm getting hit on by a robot! do you think i'm beautiful? yes. i love talking with you. thank you. you are absolutely astoundingly gorgeous, but it's the least interesting thing about you. myer sensors detect the paparazzi among us. guess who it is? it's him. flirting aside, the head of artificial intelligence for dubai police sees the future with al and robotics very much at its heart. behind it is the artificial intelligence, so it can see you, it has a facial recognition so it can identify the person
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in front of them and send all the live feed to the command and control system. we have a project what we call the dubai eye where we have integrated all the cctv cameras across the city, and on top of that we're going to build smart system where it has a facial recognition. it's so difficult to monitor more than 10,000 cameras in the city, so we have an intelligence system that can analyse live feeds from those cameras and it can also predict also and identify all kinds of activities, especially the wanted people. although this unmanned facility currently still needs a human on conference call when it comes to reporting a crime. so i would like report a crime. there is a robot here and he's stolen my heart. he's stolen your card? my heart. your heart! we've recently seen chicago pd‘s crime—predicting algorithms and now
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dubai's police are turning their focus to preventing crimes before they even happen. this application analyses past crime and tries to predict where and when the next crime in that zone could happen in the future. another one of the smart services offered to citizens in dubai is the ability to register if you have a history of cardiovascular problems. you can see on the map there represented by hearts. now, this means that when an ambulance is called it will instantly know that it could be attending a heart attack victim, and they say that this has allowed them to reduce the number of fatalities by more than 50%. that's an impressive statistic, but is this widespread surveillance reminding anyone else of a certain sci—fi film? people are going to equate this to minority report, what kind of protocols do you have in place to make sure the data
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is used in ethical ways in the future? we don't predict who would commit a crime, we predict where it could happen and when it could happen, so we can prevent it and reduce the rate for the crimes. with one in three crimes being successfully predicted this time last year, the benefits of using artificial intelligence are, well, predictable. what's more surprising is that the drone team here in dubai would like to see it taken even further. they believe they can use drones to spot a potential criminal by analysing a person's vital signs. like so many of dubai's big plans, all this stuff seems to have one foot in ambitious reality and the other in well—intentioned fa ntasy.
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like so many of dubai's big plans, all this stuff seems to have one foot in ambitious reality and the other in well—intentioned fa ntasy. it's a place worth keeping an eye on, though, and you can be very sure they'll be keeping an eye on us. now, fashion week season is upon us. new york next week will kickstart the most important month in a fashionista's calendar, as i well know. but there is a group of people who do not see themselves reflected zero people with disabilities. london fashion week last year made some progress when two disabled
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models opened the show for one of the designers. now a new york fashion school is hoping to continue that, combining tech and fashion by designing bespoke clothes for people with disabilities. paul carter paid them a visit. buying clothes is something most people take the granted. you like the look of it, you try it on, you buy it. but what if your choices are much more limited because of an impairment or disability? i've come to a fashion lab here in new york who are using tech to make fashion more accessible. open style lab was is a non—proft organisation in new york established to make clothing for disabled people which is both functional and fashionable. operating in partnership with parsons school of design in manhattan, they pair student designers, engineers and occupational therapists with disabled people to tackle real—world clothing conundrums. our goal pretty much and our vision is to make style accessible
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to people of all abilities, whether it's disability or those who have injury, or those who are facing ageing, by 2025 through design and technology. a year ago i was looking for a coat i could put on without the use of my arms. seven years ago, my arms became paralysed and i needed a coat for the brutal new york city winters. a friend referred me to open style lab and i was actually one of the participants for a semester. i fell in love with open style lab and became a board member this year. the team has access to a wide range of tech, such as 3d printers and arduinos, to assist in the design process in the design process and the clothing they create. i went to meet some of the people on the receiving end of this fashion innovation. i'm an adult survivor of paediatric cancer and it used to be called a quartermain amputation, i think — they take part of your arm, take part of your shoulder, a bit of the collarbone.
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they're designing a bag that doesn't carry exactly like a backpack and doesn't destroy my shoulder. jason da silva has multiple sclerosis and has difficulties with speech. his design team were creating a shirt with integrated microphone and loudspeaker to amplify his voice. they're creating a sensor system so i can talk louder than i would normally. it's a speaker system for other people to use. an emerging area in fashion design being utilised by open style lab is conductive fabric. this is material that can be stitched into clothing to create working circuits within garments. this allows for switches to be contained inside clothing, which can in turn be used to operate inbuilt items such as lights, heaters and even electric motors. this one, i haven't looped it
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on but what it's doing is using a microcontroller chip and i've pretty much asked it to do the same bait switch, because it's got conductive fabric inside, so when you touch one of the pockets it will send a signal and i did it for the microcontroller to send a signal if its left or right, and these are some of the prototypes that were made for a woman with breast cancer to see her range of motion, so this is one of my first iterations of putting on the chip and using conductive thread to figure out how the circuit lives inside a garment. completed projects created by open style lab in the past include a waterproofjacket shaped to fit a wheelchair user and a seamless top for a young girl whose autism made her hypersensitive to stitching because of autism. that's it for the short cut
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of click for this week, the full—length version is up on iplayer for you to watch whenever you like. and don't forget, we live on throughout the week on facebook and on twitter @bbcclick. thanks for watching, we'll see you soon. hello, this is breakfast, with chris mason and tina daheley. the disgraced film producer harvey weinstein faces fresh claims of sexual assault. scotland yard says a total of nine women have now made allegations against him. the actress uma thuman has broken her silence, saying that harvey weinstein tried to force himself on her during the 19905 following the release of pulp fiction. good morning, it's sunday the ath of february. also this morning: mps warn that cuts to the royal marines could seriously undermine uk security.
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