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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 4, 2018 7:00am-8:01am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with chris mason and tina daheley. the disgraced film producer harvey weinstein faces fresh claims of sexual assault. scotland yard says a total of nine women have now made allegations against him. the actress uma thuman has broken her silence, saying that harvey weinstein tried to force himself on her during the 19905 following the release of pulp fiction. good morning, it's sunday the 4th of february. also this morning: mps warn that cuts to the royal marines could seriously undermine uk security. a jihadist group in syria says it shot down a russian warplane yesterday using a shoulder—launched missile. we'll hear from the british medical team back home after bringing a deadly disease under control in the refugee camps of bangladesh. and in sport, there's a thumping win for wales against scotland and ireland pip the french in paris with the last kick of the match. it's a brilliant start
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to the 6 nations. and ben has the weather. good morning. it's shaping up to be a brighter day for most today, quite a lot of sunshine around but some wintry showers too brought in on a cold north—easterly wind. all the weather details you need to know on the way. cheers, ben. talk to you later. good morning. first, our main story. scotland yard is looking into two more allegations of sexual assault against the hollywood film producer harvey wine—steen. it brings the total number of women who have reported him to british police to nine. the actress uma thuman has also alleged he assaulted her at a hotel in london in the 1990s. our correspondent simon jones has more. she starred in several films produced by the disgraced movie mogul. it was after the success of pulp fiction that uma thuman it was after the success
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of pulp fiction that uma thurman says she was targeted by harvey weinstein. now she's the latest woman to speak out in an interview with the new york times. uma thurman claims harvey weinstein pushed her down when she met him in his suite here at the savoy hotel in london. she says he tried to expose himself, he did all kinds of unpleasant things. but she said she managed to wriggle away like a lizard. the next day, she says, a bunch of flowers arrived. a spokeswoman for harvey weinstein said in a statement: it comes as scotland yard say they've received two further allegations of sexual assault, one from a woman who claims harvey weinstein assaulted her in westminster in 2011, and another from a woman who says she was targeted in the republic of ireland. that brings the total number of women who have reported
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the producer to british police to nine. officers in new york and los angeles have also begun investigations. he has denied all allegations of non—consensual sex. harvey weinstein was once one of the most powerful men in hollywood, credited with scores of oscar wins, but he has been thrown out of the organisation that runs the oscars and he's now in rehab, a huge fall from grace from which there is likely to be no return. simon jones, bbc news. there's a warning this morning from mps that cuts to the royal marines would significantly undermine uk security and must be stopped. the defence select committee says the government must cough up amid speculation of a funding squeeze on the elite fighting unit. daniella relph reports. the training, known for being tough and arduous. 6,500 royal marines go through it to make them amongst britain's elite fighting forces, known for their versatility
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and their ability to respond quickly to situations around the world. the royal marines also provide up to half the personnel for the uk special forces. the defence select committee report warns that further cuts to the marines would damage their ability to be a high—readiness unit, quickly deployable, often in difficult circumstances. it also criticises plans to end the use of hms albion as a ship from which beach assaults are made. if there are new and intensified threats you would think we'd be adding to our capabilities, not deleting one of our world—beating star capabilities. the committee praises the defence secretary, gavin williamson, for taking control of the defence review, but again warn that he won't be able to prevent harsh cuts without extra funding from the treasury. the ministry of defence says that protecting the uk is its priority and stress that the royal marines play a vital role in
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defending the country. daniella relph, bbc news. a senior conservative mp has accused ministers of being vague and divided over brexit. bernard jenkin, who was on the board of the official leave campaign, said civil servants deserved an unambiguous and united direction from ministers, singling out the chancellor philip hammond for criticism. it comes ahead of key ministerial meetings this week on the uk—eu relationship. a russian militaryjet has been shot down in north—western syria, an area held by syrian rebels. the defence ministry in moscow said the pilot had managed to deploy a parachute, but was killed on the ground. sarah corker reports. the burning wreckage of what looks like a russian fighterjet, red stars clearly visible on the wing. this footage posted online appears to show the plane being hit and bursting into flames in a rebel—held area of north—west syria. jihadist group hayat tahrir al—sham, formally linked to al-qaeda,
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said it had shot the plane down with a surface—to—air missile. moscow said the pilot ejected and survived the crash but was killed by rebels on the ground. the sukhoi 25 fighter was shot down near the city of saraqeb, close to a major highway in idlib province. it was back in december when the syrian government, backed by russian air power, launched a major offensive against rebel groups in idlib, the last province under rebel control. but civilians are paying a heavy price. thousands have fled. on friday, rescuers said they pulled the bodies of at least seven civilians from cars hit by air strikes south of aleppo. this incident is a rare loss for the russian air force.
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opposition groups have in the past shot down syrian planes but rarely those of the russian army, and there are reports that moscow has responded by firing cruise missiles from navy vessels in the mediterranean. sarah corker, bbc news. italian police have arrested a gunman suspected of carrying out a drive—by shooting that targeted african immigrants. the suspect had an italian flag wrapped around his neck when he was detained. the victims are being treated in hospital, at least one of them is said to be in a serious condition. how airlines seat passengers will be investigated in a new review. it comes after accusations that flight operators are deliberately splitting up groups so they pay extra to sit together. the civil aviation authority says passengers are paying as much as £400 million each year to be reallocated, and one in ten didn't know they would incur an extra cost to sit with loved ones. an olympic ice hockey team with players from both north
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and south korea will compete for the first time later today. the all—women team will take on sweden in a friendly match before the start of the winter olympics next week. north korea's participation is being seen as a show of reconciliation with the south. here's our macro soul correspondent laura bicker with more. this is the first time the public will get a chance to see the south korean inter— korean hockey team play. ‘s, that a lot of controversy here in south korea. there was a feeling certainly among a lot of young people that the south korean government had jeopardised this women's hockey team's chances at its own olympics and they were using these players as a political pawn to try to encourage north korea to take pa rt try to encourage north korea to take part in talks to reduce its nuclear weapons programme. so there was certainly a feeling that the south korean government had not consulted on this, had not spoken to the
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women's hockey players before deciding on a joint team. they were told that the team would work on a roster, that everyone would get their shot. there are 12 members from north korea and the unification ministry has issued pictures of the two sides, north and south, getting to know one another and even celebrating a birthday in a bid to calm the controversy. i think many eyes will be on the game today to see how the two sides have managed to match up and play together over the last week. meanwhile, other athletes, ten athletes from north korea, arrived in them athletes village in pyeongchang. the north korean flag is now flying in south korea, which is a very rare sight indeed, and indeed hoisting the north korean flag in south korea is usually a crime but an exception is being made in this case. meanwhile, north korea is continuing with its plans to hold a large military parade on the day before the opening
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ceremony of the olympics. they're saying certainly from pyongyang that no one has a right to interfere in its plans. it's the biggest night in american sport, but football fans heading to tonight's 52nd super bowl in minneapolis will be wrapping up warm. it's expected to be a bone—chilling minus —16 degrees when the action gets under way at 11:30pm uk time. the game will be played indoors, but the local authorities have set up a trauma centre near the stadium in case any fans find themselves caught out by the freezing conditions. plenty of scope for having fun on one of those doughnut things, whizzing down the hill. fans look like they're making the most of it. look at the tyres on that bike! extraordinary. i suppose you need them. -16 is seriously cold, isn't it? your beer or wine might freeze
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over! that is true! it's the world's fastest growing refugee crisis. since last august, more than 668,000 rohingya refugees have fled myanmar for camps over the bangladesh border. the congested refugee camps, with only limited clean water and toilets, are an obvious breeding ground for waterborne diseases and other infections. medics from the uk yesterday returned from bangladesh after fighting a diphtheria outbreak, which six weeks ago was on the verge of becoming an epidemic. joining us now from our london newsroom is jay matthews, who was part of the uk's emergency medical team sent out to help. good morning to you, jay. thank you for speaking to us the day after you came back from bangladesh. give us a sense of what it was like out there mac. hello, thanks for having me. uglyjetlag has kept me awake this morning! it was eight terribly
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amazing thing, that's my phrase for it -- amazing thing, that's my phrase for it —— luckily —— it was a terribly amazing thing. terrible to see people suffering but it's an amazing place to be and the people were fantastic. what did you do when you we re fantastic. what did you do when you were out there? we did a few things, were out there? we did a few things, we set up diphtheria treatment centres and we treated anyone who had diphtheria. basically we sorted out and develop all the dtcs and stocked them and set up triage pathways and administered the diphtheria antitoxin to children and adults alike. generally oversaw the treatment of diphtheria while we we re treatment of diphtheria while we were there. we've seen the terrible conditions in the refugee camps, so many people are affected by what's going on, basic sanitation, clean water i know is an issue, how challenging were those circumstances for you and your teams in helping to prevent a bigger outbreak of diphtheria? yeah, it's obviously challenging
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whenever you have a lack of resources , whenever you have a lack of resources, especially things like water and electricity, but it's amazing how quickly you can adapt. at first i remember when we got there and the electricity cuts out, it's a big, what do we do? but five weeks in its normal and you deal with it and luckily we've got a great team helping us prevent things like wearing gloves and visors and educating the people we were working with so they can continue that. you wouldn't say they were best memories but if you could talk to us about your worst memories and some of the better times from your trip? one of the things i miss is you hear the school kids singing each morning, i—ten or heads, shoulders, knees and toes, heartwarming to hear that. we had one little girl who was four yea rs old had one little girl who was four years old who came to us she presented signs of diphtheria. she
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was quite unwell. i treated her myself. she left not brilliant but better than she came. unfortunately she came back two days after with some serious cardiac effects of the disease. we transported her to another facility where shoot could receive a bit more care but u nfortu nately receive a bit more care but unfortunately there was nothing we could do for her —— where she. she passed away the next day. that was quite sad. but it highlighted how important the work we were doing was. all the other people we treated went on to carry on their lives, which was an amazing thing. you were there for six weeks, is the diphtheria outbreak under control now? it's definitely more under control than when we got there certainly. we left the people, the national doctors and nurses there with more skills and pathways to make sure they can keep on top of the situation and better deal with
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disease outbreaks in the future. you've been there for six weeks, you missed christmas and new year, why was it important for you to go out and help? i work iwork in i work in a caring profession where we help people and people deserve to be cured and treated for. if you can ta ke be cured and treated for. if you can take that from a situation like here we have wonderful care and want to be looked after, everybody deserves that care. that's why are signed up to this humanitarian response. creating a volunteer register. the international search and rescue. it's all funded by uk aid. we can't go out and help these people and give people a fair and decent life without the help of the public who give so generously through uk aid.
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you give your time so generously. we hope you get a rest. it'sjust you give your time so generously. we hope you get a rest. it's just going quarter past seven. scotland yard is looking into two more allegations of sexual assault against harvey weinstein. uk security could be undermined by the loss of 2000 royal marines according to a group of mps. also, the darkest hour is one of the biggest contenders for the oscars and the baftas but notjust for the actors, we meet the make—up artists who transformed tari oldman into winston churchill. let's take a look at the weather. cold weather will persist throughout today and much of the coming week. the some of this, there is going to be some snow in the forecast. but the compensation today is a fair
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amount of brightness and sunshine. some wintry showers. here is yesterday's cloud. some damp conditions and some hill snow. we are conditions and some hill snow. we a re left conditions and some hill snow. we are left with this strong, cold north—easterly wind particularly affecting southern and eastern areas and bringing some wintry showers. a mixture of rain, sleet and snow. large areas of cloud floating around. through south—west england and into wales, some decent spells of sunshine. widespread frost across north—west england. some wintry showers. that mix of rain, sleet and snow. western scotland and northern ireland started the day with some good spells of sunshine. a shower could crop up anywhere but broadly speaking, the further north or west you are, the more in the way of sunshine. showers continuing to push in through parts of the east, especially eastern england. your
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thermometer might lead 4— seven degrees across the country but in the south, with the strong wind, it will feel more like freezing. ii degrees with sunny skies overhead for the six nations rugby in rome this afternoon. but back home, as we go into the evening, temperatures are going to give away. some widespread frost. we are going to see more and more of these wintry showers speeding in. at this stage, most of the showers are falling snow. even a few centimetres of snow piling up in places. confirmation of a cold night wherever you are that it is the south—eastern corner because of a few centimetres of snow with some ice as well, that could cause some travel headaches. those wintry showers could migrate west. a weather system into the north—west later on but tomorrow, lots of
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sunshine. it won't help with the cold feel. the frontal system in the north—west will push the south and east as we get on into tuesday. at this stage, what much of what it brings will be snow. another cold feeling day. 3— five degrees. that feeling day. 3— five degrees. that feeling continues through the week ahead and there could be some further snow. snow in the uk is a lwa ys further snow. snow in the uk is always disruptive. not as cold as the super bowl, though. one of the main tenets of christianity is friendship to your neighbour. but new analysis seen by the bbc suggests the vast majority of people who describe themselves as church of england are opposed to immigration. 87% of anglicans think the number of immigrants coming to britain should be reduced according to university of bristol research. so is it possible to be a christian and opposed to immigration? brea kfast‘s graham satchell reports. sausages, bacon and a warm welcome.
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this is the anglican church of the martyrs investor. it is open to everyone. families, students, homeless people, migrants. jane has been helping out here for more than a decade. for me, it is part of my faith to serve and encourage people to help people. some people leave their own country not out of choice but because they have too. as a christian, it's about being welcoming to a stranger. anthony is one migrant who's been warmly welcomed, coming to britain from zimbabwe 16 years ago.|j welcomed, coming to britain from zimbabwe 16 years ago. i felt the same christian principles of loving your neighbour. it is what they hold dear. so it was easy for them to welcome me because of their christian faith. so surprising then that the vast majority of people who describes themselves as church of england are opposed to immigration. university of bristol research is analysed a series of surveys. they found 87% of anglicans think the
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number of immigrants coming to britain should be reduced, compared to 77% of people you say the same thing with no religion. church leaders say they have work to do. we don't have a great history in this country and the church of england of having welcomed immigrants, way back since the 50s and 60s, and we still have a long way to go in order to enable, to help, to educate congregations to be a will to express awful lot to those who both enter our churches and also come to our country. the study also found a difference between those who go to church every week and those who call themselves question and don't go to church. ctc —— 66% to regularly go to church of saint number should be reduced but it is 86% of those who are christian but rarely attend. the church of england, you go to some of
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them and it feels like a branch meeting of momentum. david kurten is the ukip member and a committed christian but stopped going to church after the eu referendum.” we re church after the eu referendum.” were shocked at one point because the vicar of the church was against brexit and he started using the pulpit to preach against brexit and for people like me you think, it's not so much that i've left the church but perhaps the churches that me. but aren't christians meant to love your neighbour as yourself? absolutely, but that doesn't mean you support rapid mass immigration. backin you support rapid mass immigration. back in leicester, breakfast is still going strong. so is it possible to be a christian and be opposed to immigration? richard waugh sold is the vicar here. intellectually, it is possible for people to make an argument that. whether i would accept that is another matter. there are complex arguments about cultural attitudes and christian teaching and politics and christian teaching and politics and the difference between economic migrants and refugees but the
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surveys a re migrants and refugees but the surveys are right, there remains a huge disconnect between the hierarchy of the church and a majority in its congregation. graham satchell, bbc news. the reverend sally hitchiner is here to tell us what's caught her eye. we must ask you about the report there. it is a tricky old balance there. it is a tricky old balance the people in your role, when the whole issue of politics and religion crossover. it is huge. we are careful not to use the pulpits for political ideology however i have to say that i don't know how you can be totally coldhearted to people coming over here needing help if you are reading the stories ofjesus every day, he was a refugee, lots of things like that which strike you from the gospels. there are a lot of people who maybe aren't going to church each week and answering the sermons on the gospels who can sometimes affiliate with the church
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of england and also for good reasons and they sometimes described their personal spirituality in a way that feels nice and safe in middle—class that aren't necessarily listening to the teachings. it's all about political ideology. loving your neighbour is vitally important. some of the stories you picked up. mentally ill is turning to priests to help. we were talking about loving your neighbour. more of us are experiencing mental health problems. to the point where we are considering having a mental health specialist chaplin, someone who is a qualified occupational therapist in mental health who is also qualified asa mental health who is also qualified as a chaplain because the numbers of people who are coming forward, what we term as minor, small—scale things and major things that have a dramatic impact on their lives.
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turning to all sorts of sources of support including spirituality. there is loads of help out there if you are looking for it. it's really important to consider all the options. it's an extra support if you are on a waiting list. waiting for treatment of mental health. the community is so important, beyond the medical specialists. having friends you can talk to, navigating the nhs. having a community around you which, many people come is the church and other support sources are important. the sunday mirror. you picked up this story, the incident in bristol and that hullabaloo involving the conservative politician jacob rees—mogg. involving the conservative politician jacob rees-mogg. i'm not a huge fan of whatjacob rees—mogg
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says but you should always be able to speak your political views without harassment. theresa may is bringing in new plans to say that there will be laws against intimidating in public life and what we are seeing is an increasing tolerance, particularly among younger people —— younger people for views that are offensive and we need to be able to hear those views respectfully without violence and intimidation. i certainly know from my time at westminster, many conservative mps are subject to a lot of abuse. in the case of derek cox. might partner was a councillor at the time and she was really concerned about her safety and we need to protect those in public office, whatever their views are, without risk to their physical safety. this is another story you
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picked out. women's refuges might get transgender staff.” picked out. women's refuges might get transgender staff. i was angry to see this on the front page of the times, that we have this sort of language used against burchett —— transgendered women who are more likely to be the victims of rape and violence of any other group of women in society. a charity called women's aid to run over 300 shelters, the largest providers of support for women who face abuse and they have now decided they are going to include on their staff, without discrimination against women who are also transgendered and while there may be concerns from people of other countries where lg bt may be concerns from people of other countries where lgbt rights are not as respected, what we need to do in this culture is alleviate those concerns and i this culture is alleviate those concerns and i run a this culture is alleviate those concerns and i run a charity which supports lg bt young concerns and i run a charity which supports lgbt young people of faith. many young people are coming out earlier and earlier as transgendered
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to the point where they could have been out as a transgendered person from their early teens and spent their whole lives being nose as the gender that they are. in their 20s and 30s, they may wish to help others who have been victims of violence and oppression. it is a real step forward that women's aid wa nt to real step forward that women's aid want to help with this issue. i'm not a happy with the times. for now, sally, thank you. on sunday morning, there is always a smidgen. andrew marr is on bbc one. i have the home secretary amber rudd. discussing all those brexit stories. i've got the retiring president of sinn fein, gerry adams, looking back over an
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extremely controversial and tumultuous life. sir vince cable, leader of the liberal democrats and the outgoing in leader of haringey council, claire cockburn, with big rumblings in london. we look forward to it. stay with us. headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast, with chris mason and tina daheley. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: there's a warning this morning from mps that proposed cuts to the royal marines would significantly undermine uk security and must be stopped. the defence select committee says the government must cough up amid speculation of a funding squeeze.
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the proposals would see 2,000 marines cut and and two specialist ships taken out of service early. the defence select committee says the government must cough up amid speculation of a funding squeeze. but the government says protecting the uk will always be its priority. scotland yard is looking into two more allegations of sexual assault into the hollywood film producer harvey weinstein, that brings the total number of women who reported him to british police to nine. the actress uma thurman was also alleged he assaulted her on two occasions. she broke her silence in an interview with the new york times. mr weinstein's team say the accusations are false. a russian militaryjet has been shot down in northwestern syria, an area held by syrian rebels. the defence ministry in moscow said the pilot had managed to deploy a parachute, but was killed on the ground. italian police have arrested a gunman suspected of carrying out a drive—by shooting that targeted african immigrants. the suspect had an italian flag wrapped around his neck when he was detained.
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the victims are being treated in hospital, at least one of them is said to be in a serious condition. how airlines seat passengers will be investigated in a new review. it comes after accusations that flight operators are deliberately splitting up groups so they pay extra to sit together. the civil aviation authority says passengers are paying as much as £400 million each year to be reallocated, and one in ten didn't know they would incur an extra cost to sit with loved ones. a senior conservative mp has accused ministers of being "vague" and "divided" over brexit. bernard jenkin, who was on the board of the official leave campaign, said civil servants deserved an unambiguous and united direction from ministers, singling out the chancellor philip hammond for criticism. it comes ahead of key ministerial meetings this week on the uk—eu relationship. an olympic ice hockey team
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with players from both north and south korea will compete for the first time later today. the all—women team will take on sweden in a friendly match before the start of the winter olympics next week. north korea's participation is being seen as a show of reconciliation with the south. it's the biggest night in american sport, but football fans heading to tonight's 52nd super bowl in minneapolis will be wrapping up warm. it's expected to be a bone—chilling minus —16 degrees when the action gets under way at 11:30pm uk time. the game will be played indoors, but the local authorities have set up a trauma centre near the stadium in case any fans find themselves caught out by the freezing conditions. but this is where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one. bye for now. time now for the sport. hello. we
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are talking rugby, the start of the six nations this weekend, talking about the nfl, indoors for the super bowl, it was indoors yesterday in cardiff, one of my favourite rugby stadiums. not quite as cold as -16. it was fresh but not as cold. it creates a cauldron with the roof closed? it was unbelievable and that was in the advantage of the welsh, 16 matches over the next six weeks, 16 matches over the next six weeks, 1 million fans through the gates. the highest average six nations than any other major event in the world. there is a stat for you! you can use that one! we are up and running in this year's championship, two very contrasting matches in cardiff and paris yesterday. ireland beat the french 15—13 with a monster of a drop—goal from jonny sexton right
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at the death, and scotland's rugby revival came a cropper at the hands of the welsh, beaten 34—7 at the principlaity stadium. hrre's our sports correspondentjoe wilson. six nations predictions — scotland had their best chance in decades, wales would struggle with so many injuries. by half—time in cardiff, rethink. commentator: interception, opportunity for wales and it's gareth davies, can anyone catch the scrum—half? davies for the corner, harris can't get there, a try for wales! scotland had a fair bit of the ball early on but wales used it with composure and commonsense. leigh halfpenny scored his first try in five years and then he started the second half with another. no way back now for scotland and for their fourth try wales really turned it on. llanelli scarlet connections all over the pitch. west is best, as they say there. steff evans' sense of direction was perfect. 34—7, final score. we've trained really well in the last two weeks and i said
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to the players, "i think we'll batter them." we took what we've been doing on the training pitch and being clinical and we went out there and produced a really good performance. it's funny, isn't it, in the six nations how emotions and optimism and pessimism can change afterjust one match. in paris, everything changed it seemed in the space of a teddy thomas sprint. finally some french magic in the drizzle. ireland had seemed in control up until this, it meant france led by a point and still they led with the clock turned red. time was gone but ireland still had one last chance if they could get the ball tojonny sexton, if he could get his dropkick to make it. commentator: here it comes... it looks good... he likes it! nigel owens' arm goes up! 15-13. two memorable wins in radically different ways. that's the first saturday done. joe wilson, bbc news. incredible celebrations
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at the end in paris, the french were distraught. let's look at that again. it will go down in irish rugby folklore. england havejonny wilkinson to win the world cup in 2003 and jerry guscott dropped a good one for the lions to beat south africa but my word, johnny sexton, 42, 44 metres depending on what you believe. he was absolutely mobbed, so important to get their championship up and running with a win. the work that went into keeping that all alive for five minutes to put him in that position and he knew it was all down to team work as well. here'sjohnny sexton with his thoughts afterwards. just happy to get another chance to get the victory for the boys, we've worked so hard for the last two weeks and all our goals would have crumbled today if we'd lost and it's just great to be in the position we're in now
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after getting the away win. we'll see what drama we get this afternoon in rome. england start their championship against italy at three o'clock. england's are also the defending champions in the women's 6 nations, the red roses play after the men at 5:30pm. ireland's women faced a tough opener against france in toulouse yesterday. the french side were relentless, scoring four tries in total, including two from jade le pesque. 24—0 to them for a bonus point win. two premier league games this afternoon, strugglers newcastle against crystal palace and then what could be a cracker sat anfield liverpool taking on tottenham. there were goals everywhere yesterday, a first for alexis sanchez for his new club manchester united, they beat huddersfield, and arsenal's new boy pierre emerick aubameyang made an impressive debut as they put five past everton. joe lynskey reports. new arrivals at the emirates face
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a special kind of pressure, but this january, arsenal have gone all out to bring in the best. commentator: mkhitaryaan, in towards aubameyang, he chips the goalkeeper, it's a lovely finish. at £56 million, they'll hope it's just the start of the aubameyang dynasty. but on a day when arsenal put five past evidence, but on a day when arsenal put five past everton, it was an old head who broke new ground. a first hat—trick for aaron ramsey in his nine years at the club. and fresh faces have brought fresh hope. it looks like they have the quality to integrate with the game we want to play. they are quick, sharp movement, agile and want the ball. the transfer window puts the strain on football's relationships. february is time to show affection. alexis sanchez marked his old trafford welcome with a first united goal. he is the archetypal modern superstar at a club with a poignant past. this was the day they marked 60 years since the munich disaster. tributes were paid too
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at the hawthorns on west brom's first chance to mark one of their own. the death of cyrille regis was felt hardest here. but the emotion couldn't inspire the team to victory. a crucial 3—2 win for southampton leaves albion cut adrift at the bottom. it was a shame because it was a special day in a lot of ways, but obviously not a special result. as much as we sort of have to and puffed in the second half we couldn't find a way to get back into it. pardew‘s side may look in hope towards bournemouth to see how quickly things can change. they came from behind to beat stoke and go seven clear of trouble. two wins in four days may have transformed the cherries' season. while at the top, manchester city showed few signs of fading but they are at least showing they‘ re human. commentator: raheem sterling with surely the miss of the season. it's usually city's opponents wanting the ground to swallow them up, but this time burnley
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looked to make city pay. this goal sealed a 1—1 draw and a rare taste of regret for the runaway leaders. they will surely still be future champions, but this was the weekend football paid its respects to its past. joe lynskey, bbc news. there was a rare defeat for celtic in the scottish premiership. they went down 1—0 at kilmarnock, only the second time that they've lost to scottish opposition under brendan rodgers. youssouf mulumbu first goal in four years gave killie their first win over celtic for five years, the first in eight years at rugby park. aberdeen won yesterday to cut celtic‘s lead to eight points. rangers also lost. you can find the other results on the bbc sport website. great britain are up against it in the davis cup, they have to win both of today's singles rubbers if they're to beat spain in their davis cup world group tie in marbella.
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jamie murray and dominic inglot were beaten in straight sets in the doubles by pablo carreno busta and feliciano lopez yesterday. cameron norrie and liam broady are due to play for gb in the singles but captain leon smith can select kyle edmund if he is fit. you can follow it all on bbc two from 10am this morning. that's all your sport, a tough one for the tennis players. speak to you later. now, are you sitting comfortably? well, at home you might be, but on a flight these days, you might also be feeling lonely, with your partner, friends or colleagues seated at the other end of the plane, because you've been split up by the airline. the civil aviation authority has just announced a review into airlines' seating policies, following a survey in which 18%
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of passengers said they'd been separated from their travelling companions. simon calder, the independent‘s travel editor, joins us now. good morning. this is a frustration for people. i guess the tricky thing is people can pay an airline to guarantee sitting next to friends or family ora guarantee sitting next to friends or family or a colleague so wild that exists but also there's the chance you might be able to do it without paying, there's going to be confusion —— so while. paying, there's going to be confusion -- so while. and confrontation. if you haven't been ona confrontation. if you haven't been on a plane since the 20th century you're probably wondering what we're talking about but around seven years ago i carbon debate it to, easyjet decided unlike other low—cost airlines they would do allocated seating —— carbon date it to. be used algorithms to assign people together but if you want to pay extra money to sit up front or for
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extra money to sit up front or for extra legroom you can do that. the other airlines saw what was going on and saw there was money to be made when basic airfares were sinking. —— be used algorithms. they did it as well. british airways, ryanair, other airlines are charging for a specific seek —— they algorithms. the caa want to see if they are transparent —— specific seek —— be used algorithms. could they be the king hal —— specific seat —— they used algorithms. i always wrongly assume that if you didn't pay and the seating was available you would automatically end up sitting next to the party you booked with? you will do in a lot of cases, personally i never pay a penny to sit in a specific seat and so far i've been mostly lucky. the
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one airline which is different from the others and in the survey the caa conducted they found one in three people flying on ryanair who hadn't paid in advance for a seat found they were not sitting next to their companion, that's about twice the average among the other airlines, ryanair has a different way of doing things. this started last may and what happened was i suddenly noticed that people who booked together mightfind that people who booked together might find themselves... chris is in 11b, tina is in macro booed to, the airline says nothing to do with us, they are just saying some people wa nt to they are just saying some people want to pay —— tina is in 27e. some people want window seats or i'll sits. we will give you a seat but we will give you one that people don't want. why don't they create a situation? may be the solution to this is an assumption that and less you this is an assumption that and less y°u pay this is an assumption that and less you pay extra you will not be sitting with whoever you're flying with —— may be.
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sitting with whoever you're flying with -- may be. i think that's a pretty safe assumption these days on some airlines. it does upset a number of people and it also is a concern on long haul flights when there's perhaps more urgency to want to sit together and also it's going to sit together and also it's going to cost you a lot more money. that's why the caa is getting involved to try to find out if it's being conducted in a fair and transparent way to make sure there's no funny business going on. it's worth stressing that this is nothing to do with family seating. if you're travelling with under 12s, it's an entirely different ball game, it's all to do with aviation safety rules that say no under 1212 can sit no more than one row from their parent and other airlines say we go better than that, they say a parent will a lwa ys than that, they say a parent will always be sat next to a younger child —— under 12. there's lots of people out there saying my travel agent said unless we pay extra the three—year—old will be stuck 17 rows
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back, that's absolutely not true. but as you suggest, once some people pay for their seats, if the cabin crew have to start shuffling people around then everyone gets upset at a time when we should all be trying to get on. simon, thanks very much! frank admission. there have been flights i've been on why have been quite glad. you can tell me that while ben gives an update on the weather. allocated seat or not, you will be looking to get away because of the cold possibly. things chilly throughout the rest of the weekend but today, starting to see a bit of brightness. it's going to be the sunny day of the week and the most. some wintry showers as well. on the
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satellite pictures, there is the cloud that brought the rain on the hill snow. now tending to dissipate. big clear gaps in the cloud, allowing a touch of frost. some wintry showers feeding in. a mixture of rain, sleet and snow and icy stretches. further west, few showers. into wales in north—west england as well, a bit more cloud into north—east england and scotland. the chance of some showers. starting the day on a bright note but actually won. as we go through the day, the best of the sunshine will, as a rule, be across western areas. some northern areas as well. the further east, more cloud. some wintry showers. a mixture of rain, sleet and snow. the strength of the wind will have a big impact on the guilt factor of the day. it will feel like it's freezing
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or even a touch below. 11 degrees in rome for the big six nations match this afternoon. sunny skies overhead. back home, many of us will enter the afternoon with some sunshine but the temperatures will drop away quickly. some fog patches as well. we will also see an intensification of the wintry showers across the south—east, most likely snow showers. a few centimetres possible. confirmation of those temperatures even in towns and cities down to freezing or below. if you do have travel plans in the south—east, there could be some snow lying on the ground, some ice around as well. some monday morning disruption. generally speaking, aside from these showers drifting westwards, quite a crisp feel to the weather. the wind is in a little bit. this frontal system will come into play as you move out
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of monday into tuesday as it slides its way across the country. possibly further snow in places. that is the message for the week ahead. i was just thinking, i am done with winter that winter is not done with us. it's funny but i'd always reckoned the the oil—rich abu dhabi, here in the uae, was never that interested in attracting tourists. unlike its flashy, noisy neighbour dubai, for example. but on this trip, i think i might have to revise that opinion. because abu dhabi seems to be upping its game, especially in the cultural stakes. on myjourney, i'm going to experience world—renowned architecture like the new louvre museum, and finding out how traditional local musical instruments
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are being revived. but i'll also be exploring both urban and desert landscapes, to get a sense of how this emirate is making the most of its unique environment. it's hard to believe abu dhabi was just a fishing village only a few decades ago. in 1971, the united arab emirates became a nation and its dominant stakeholder has always been abu dhabi, led by the al nahyan family, thanks largely to huge oil revenues. and when it opened in 2007, this impressive white marble edifice became a spiritual landmark. abu dhabi's grand mosque, grand in ambition, grand in scale,
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and grand in design. and when it was finished a decade ago, it became this emirate's calling card to the rest of the world. now, when they made this mosque, they were making a statement, weren't they, about abu dhabi? oh, yeah. absolutely. i think, you know, when people think about the united arab emirates or the middle east, the first city that comes to your mind is definitely dubai. but i think after we built this mosque and it was the vision of the late, his highness zayed bin sultan al nahyan, he knew that this was going to be the icon that will bing people to abu dhabi and will show the true message of the middle east. 10,000 visitors come here every day. inside, up to 40,000 worshippers can
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be accommodated on key days in the islamic calendar. just look at the details of every single part of the mosque. it is absolutely beautiful. the carpet is from iran. you have the chandeliers up above us. in fact, this is the largest handknotted carpet in the world, and this gold chandelier is one of the biggest in the world. islam is regarded here as a living, breathing faith, with verses from the koran the inspiration for all the design and architecture here. but i wanted to know from omar if the grand vision in abu dhabi really includes everyone who lives here, like the expat community and the migrants are
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work in relatively low paid jobs. after all, the emiratis are in the minority here. just look around you. you'll find a lot of people from all over the world and all different backgrounds, who come here and have made this place home. the us always used to sell the american dream. there is the emirati dream, believe it or not. the emirati dream is definitely living a great quality standard of life and, this is definitely the emirati dream. in the wake of the jewel in the crown have come other signature, large—scale construction projects. on saadiyat island, a cluster of magnificent galleries and museums include quite possibly the most prestigious art brand in the world, which has just recently opened its doors. for a decade now, the grand mosque has been abu dhabi's most popular tourist location — until this astonishing
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creation came along. the louvre abu dhabi houses artefacts on loan from paris, and others, bought and permanent. from ancient pieces, to african sculptures, facing european masterpieces from every era. while contemporary arabic art shares space with chinese sculpture. it's a universal museum, it's a museum that takes you through time and through different geographies. you'll be able to see different cultures and different civilisations in contact with one another. in a way, to me, walking to the galleries is walking through time and seeing what is happening in different parts of the world at
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the same moment. there is a medina, or arabic village feel, to the layout geometry and light. it's a dome symbolising islamic architecture, but as you can see, there is eight layers up there that allows the light to filter through and come down as you can see it, with what the architect calls the rain of light. so, this whole display of the museum is in a way representing who we are as emiratis, because we's always been in the middle of this region. the gulf has always been a connection of trade and different civilisations, so... going through this narrative allows you to capture the essence of who we are, the essence of
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who the uae is today. and the museum is yet to reveal its most publicised exhibit — a 500—year—old painting of christ, which recently achieved the highest auction price for any work of art, by the very same artist who created this, leonardo da vinci. so basically, the chances are that the world's most expensive painting is going to be in this room, possibly in this very spot. exactly who bought the salvator mundi for nearly half $1 billion has been shrouded in some mystery. reports claimed it was a saudi billionaire prince, the louvre people tell me it was the abu dhabi government. either way, it';,' be on display very soon. playing the cultural card here is notjust about splashing cash on famous international brands and collections. there are indigenous art forms that are being revived,
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like traditional arabic instruments. in this academy, 60 students of all ages are learning how to play this instrument, the oud. it's related to the european lute and has origins as far back as the time of the pharaohs. what's really great about this place is that you don'tjust learn how to play the oud, you can actually watch one being made. starting with the wood itself, and this is where the whole process begins. the craftsman here says by working eight hours a day for a month, he can make two of these instruments. this is artisanship of the highest order. thank you so much. it's been a privilege to watch you at work, thank you. so, fresh from the workshop. now, let's see if we can make any music out of it. and i'm not going to find
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out more about the oud from just anybody, but actually, quite possibly the most famous female oud player in the world. what is unique about it? the uniqueness, it has a bowl at the back, not like the guitar, it's not a flat... so, this bowl gives a deepness in the sound and also, we don't have frets... right. so that gives richness. yeah. particularly in abu dhabi, i think the oud is very important for older people because you can find — in every home, you can find a oud.
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maybe they are playing it for fun, not very professionally, but they like oud here. ok, time for me to get a lesson from the expert. these double strings are a bit tricky for a starter. very good. ok, that's relatively easy. that's very good, for the first time. can you play chords with this, or? that very good for the first time.” was lucky, i was just playing one note. and he very much. —— thank
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you. hello, this is breakfast with chris mason and tina daheley. a warning that cuts to the royal marines would undermine uk security.

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