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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  February 5, 2018 5:00pm-6:00pm GMT

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today at 5 — a warning from the eu — that britain faces "unavoidable" trade barriers if it leaves the customs union after brexit. at downing street — the eu's chief negotiator meets brexit secretary david davis and asks for greater clarity about the uk's approach to the next stage of the brexit talks. without the customs union, outside the single market, barriers to trade and goods and services are an avoidable. it's perfectly clear what we want to do and there is no doubt about it as you said your self we are leaving the customs union and aiming for a good future for britain. we'll have the latest on the talks — as downing street says it's confident of agreement on the next stage by next month. the other main stories on bbc news at 5:00. a british man with asperger‘s syndrome — accused of hacking into computers at the fbi and nasa has won his appeal against extradition to the united states. lloyds bank and virgin money has
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banned bitcoin purchases on its credit cards it says people need protecting from debts they may never be able to repay. donald trump provokes another row claiming the nhs is "going broke and not working" but ministers say they're proud of the health service. and — cold and freezing fog disrupt travel — as temperatures are set to fall sharply across the uk this week. it's five o'clock. our main story is the latest stage of the brexit negotiations, taking place in london today. the european union's chief negotiator, michel barnier, has warned that trade barriers for goods and services are "unavoidable" for the uk once it leaves the eu if it leaves the single market
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and customs union as planned. mr barnier was in downing street where he said the time had come for the uk "to make a choice". the talks followed days of public squabbling among conservative mps on the desirability or otherwise of staying inside a customs union. our political correspondent leila nathoo reports. on his way to london, the eu's chief brexit negotiator, keen for talks to resume, and to speed up. good afternoon. my feeling, not a minute to lose, because we want to achieve a deal, and, once again, not a minute to lose. there's so much work to do, so we have decided for this reason to speed up all the contacts. theresa may has been under pressure
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to say more about the kind of brexit she wants. as she returned to downing street this morning no 10 insisted britain was clear that they would be leaving the customs union. so what does that mean? at the moment britain can trade freely with the eu, as eu member states don't impose import taxes or tariffs on each other‘s goods. all member states also impose the same taxes on goods coming in from outside the bloc, so individual states cannot do their own deals with other countries. and that's what theresa may wants to change, by ruling out staying in any sort of customs union with the eu after brexit. what i would say about the customs union is that if we were members of it it would inhibit our ability to strike deals with other countries, and that is one of the benefits of brexit, that we can have more flexiblity.
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and we can extend those trade deals across the world. but the prime minister's critics warn that such a break with the eu will be damaging for the economy, disrupting trade with a crucial partner, and raising questions about trade across the irish border. there are a lot of answers we need to know to be able to react. 5s; 11; . views on forward yet to
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e eggshzgu age, flung: , ,, theresa may has tried to appease restive tory brexiteers, but there will need to be a compromised agreement on detail for any of the discussions to move on. leila nathoo, bbc news, westminster. let's talk a bit about the outcome. we can speak to a chief political correspondent vicki young. bring us up—to—date on what we know now about the discussions and if there are still red lines that exist for the negotiators. these talks we re for the negotiators. these talks were to be focused on the transition
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period. that's after we leave the eu at the end of march next year. the eu said that should run for 20 months, it's about creating some stability, particularly for business so stability, particularly for business so they don't have to change their arrangements once for a transition period and then again when they come to the new arrangement. things have been taken over by downing street categorically ruling out membership ofa categorically ruling out membership of a customs union, the customs union, that has pleased brexiteers who want to make sure we can forge our own trade arrangements and deals with other countries. so, for them, they are pretty pleased about that. a group of so—called remainer conservatives have come play and saying how this is going to work if we have a hard border in ireland? we have to be in some times of customs
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arrangement. no surprise that mr barnier raised the consequences of such an arrangement. the future partnership with the eu, at that point, we need clarity about the proposals for this partnership. the only thing i can say without the customs union and outside the single market, barriers to trade and goods and services are unavoidable. the time has come to make a choice. a sombre message from monsieur barnier. he showed some irritation. you are the ones that want to leave the eu, show others what you want.
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the government says they have been perfectly clear all along. they don't want an existing arrangement, they are in a different position to other countries because they have beenin other countries because they have been in the eu and are very closely aligned. theresa may thinks there is no reason why we can't have this frictionless trade deal. this is what david davis said in response. we have published a great deal of information about our proposals in terms of customs arrangements and other arrangements with respect to being outside of the eu. we want a co nfe re nce being outside of the eu. we want a conference if free trade agreement and to make that as frictionless as possible. to make trade as free as possible. to make trade as free as possible while still giving ourselves the opportunity to make free trade deals with the rest of the world, the fastest growth, 90% of the rest of the growth will come from there. according to the numbers of the eu itself. it's perfectly
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clear what we want to do. as you said yourself, were leaving the customs union but aiming for a good future. for many that will sound like the uk wanting to cherry pick to get all the best bits for its own way. senior cabinet ministers will meet twice to try and thrash out that future relationship. amber rudd raised eyebrows when she said you'd be surprised, there is a lot more agreement than you would think. we will find out later this week. thank you very much. the latest from westminster. a man accused of hacking into us government computers has won a high court challenge against his extradition to the united states. lauri love — who has aspergers syndrome — is alleged to have carried out a series of cyber attacks against private companies and agencies including nasa and the us army. but the judges here said it would be "oppressive" to send him for trial in america — where he could have faced 90 years in prison if found guilty, as our correspondent angus crawford reports.
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lauri love is a wanted man. us authorities say he is a hacker who stole vast amounts of data. for his supporters, he's vulnerable, with asperger‘s syndrome. if sent to america, he could face a lifetime in jail. today, the high court had to decide if he could be extradited. thejudges ruled the risk of severe depression and suicide was too great. we're very happy and relieved. we're very thankful for the high court, for thejudges, for their wisdom and discernment. thankful for all the support we've had, without which i'm not sure i would have made it this far. for lauri's father, a hugely symbolic day. there is a consensus of agreement about the things that really matter, about decency, about justice, about fairness. i've always believed to be born in these islands is to win the lottery of life, and that what makes britain great, makes it great britain, is not our power or our might
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but the fact it's a great place to live. but what is his son actually accused of? us authorities say he was part of the hacking group anonymous, breaking into the systems of the us army, nasa and the fbi and stealing what he found, boasting of his exploits. he was traced via a romanian e—mail address and a paypal account. he's been interviewed here by the national crime agency, but not charged. lauri love's future, though, is still uncertain. though he can't be sent to the us for trial, he may still be prosecuted here. angus crawford, bbc news. let's talk a little bit more about this interesting case. kevin kendridge is one of the lawyers who has been representing lauri love. how unusual is this decision? it's
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the first time it's been tested. the forum bar was introduced by then home secretary theresa may in 2013. it means that if an alleged offence occurred across two different jurisdictions and if there is a extradition request, the court is entitled to bar it if it wouldn't be in the interest ofjustice for it to ta ke in the interest ofjustice for it to take place. howard theyjudge that? they look at such things as how practical it is for a trial to take place in the requested country, in this case england, could they get thejudges and this case england, could they get the judges and witnesses there? would there be significant delay? are prosecutors here willing to deal with it. also looking at the cuban rights of the person. in lauri
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love's case, we are looking at his medical conditions and his family. there is the question of whether the prosecution could take place here and separate parameters to do with the welfare of the individual in anotherjurisdiction.” the welfare of the individual in anotherjurisdiction. i should have added that also the rights of the victims in the us would be taken into consideration. that would be added to the balance. in this case, what swung it is that lauri love is com pletely what swung it is that lauri love is completely dependent on his parents. removed from the safety, his physical and mental health would go down very rapidly to the point where he writes not even be able to give proper evidence in trials. is this in any one's interests to take place? the overriding thing here was his state of health, his mental and physical health. his current state is not good but the question is to what extent it would deteriorate if
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extradited. today's outcome for some people will be a puzzle because on the face of it, these allegations have been made, very serious allegations, and they would probably say, is he going to face any trial for this? what would the answer be? this has nothing to do with whether he might be prosecuted in england. i can't really comment on that aspect of it. it's an important distinction. he could be dealt with in england and that was an argument made in the hearing.|j in england and that was an argument made in the hearing. i understand there are restrictions on what you can say but some people will hear the decision today and think, that means, without extradition, he's not going to be tried. that's going to be excluded? that's right. it will be excluded? that's right. it will be up to the crown prosecution service. do you think, at this
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point, what does past experience tells about the likelihood of that happening? well, to look at past cases would probably not be very telling because each case turns on its own facts. to the prosecutors here, it's their own decision and i don't really want to comment too much on it. tell us a little bit about how lauri love have responded. we heard a bit earlierfrom about how lauri love have responded. we heard a bit earlier from the family. you know them. tell others about the reaction. his family are very relieved. they genuinely believe that he would be in serious trouble in prison in america. for them, it's a very, on a personal level, a huge relief. did they expect today to turn out as it has done? i think they were very cautious about today. i didn't speak to them at great length, my great
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contact to them at great length, my great co nta ct was to them at great length, my great contact was with lauri. how would you describe to viewers lauri ‘s state in the last few months before the hearing reached its conclusion. it's clear he has mental issues when you deal with him on a one—to—one basis. it was clear that the prospect of a decision very soon was weighing down on him very heavily. so, now, just to tie up, it's a matter of, clearly, taking today's decision into account and ijust think that, is there a sense of being in another waiting game to see if anything else happens? the prosecutors need to make their decision and we are not involved in
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that. by that time, we will see what happens. good to talk to you, kevin. thank you for coming in and explaining what has happened. that was one of the lawyers who has been helping out the family of lauri love in this case. it is 17 minutes past five. michel barnier has told the uk "that the time has come to make a choice" on the customs union, warning "being outside means there will be unavoidable barriers to trade". the high court has ruled that a man with aspergers syndrome, lauri love, who's accused of hacking into us government computers should not be extradited. lloyds ba n k lloyds bank and virgin money have banned purchases of bitcoin on their
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credit cards. john moss was misguided but correct regarding his decisions during the liverpool top match yesterday. walter smith may return to the scotla nd walter smith may return to the scotland manager's job. ben walter smith may return to the scotland manager'sjob. ben youngs has been ruled out of the squad for the six nations this weekend. he will be replaced i richard wigglesworth. lloyds banking group has banned its customers from buying bitcoin and other crypto—currencies on their credit cards. they have now been joined by virgin money. the ban — starting today — applies to lloyds bank, bank of scotland, halifax and mbna customers. it will not apply to debit cards, only to the banking group's 8 million credit card customers. bitcoins are created
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through a complex process known as "mining" — and then monitored by a network of computers across the world and over the course of the past year the value of a single bitcoin has fluctuated wildly. this time last year one bitcoin was worth approximately 700 pounds. the value jumped over the course of last year and it peaked atjust under 1a thousand pounds. but the value has fallen in recent weeks and one bitcoin is now worth around six thousand pounds. asi as i say, pretty volatile. our business correspondent simon gompertz is in the bbc‘s business unit. we now have lloyds joined by virgin money. are we likely to see other names added? lloyds is the biggest operator in the credit card market. we've been trying to find out what other banks are going to do and
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there is a little bit of confusion but ba rclayca rd there is a little bit of confusion but barclaycard is saying its credit ca rd but barclaycard is saying its credit card customers but barclaycard is saying its credit ca rd customers can but barclaycard is saying its credit card customers can still use their credit cards to buy bitcoin and other crypto currencies. rbs, the same. it's a mix situation. this move by lloyds has added further downward pressure to the value of bitcoin. worth less than £6,000, going down closer to £5,000 as we speak. very volatile. this is the wild west of internet finance. it is behaving like a buckaroo, up and down. lloyds bank say customers need to be protected and the banks are also protecting themselves because they are extending credit to the customer and there is a possibility during the 55 days of interest—free credit on your card you use a lot of
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money and someone credit on your card you use a lot of money and someone won't be able to pay the bank back when their bitcoin falls in value. the situation as we are waiting to see what other banks will do. bitcoin enthusiasts have been saying it's not fair for the bank to say we can't use our money in this way. the situation is, it's the bank's money. its credit. you can use a debit card to buy that kind of crypto currency. joining me now is ryan holder — bitcoin user and web developer at text100, a global technology agency. thanks for coming in. thanks for joining us. for those viewers who are still slightly confused about the concept of a crypto currency, virtual currency, yet something that we understand is traded and whose
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value can go up and down. how would you describe it? have a go at defining bitcoin. i would say it is a simplya defining bitcoin. i would say it is a simply a new form of money. we are used to it being tied to a nation, the british pound, the american dollar, you are used to the process of visiting america and converting pounds to dollars to spend there. bitcoin is a currency of the internet. therefore, it should be able to be used wherever the internet is accessible. why is it so volatile, values rising and falling so sharply. it's floated on a free market so it's in a process of price discovery. there is no particular reason it should be one prize or another. it's a free—market process
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of finding the correct price. why is it attractive as a currency to some people and our people right to be wa ry people and our people right to be wary sceptical about it? its popularity and the way it can be used in the way traditional currencies can't be. one of the advantages of bitcoin is that it doesn't have any issuing house. so, the... doesn't have any issuing house. so, the. . . what doesn't have any issuing house. so, the... what does that mean? nobody is regulating it or monitoring it? it means that nobody is in charge of it. is that a good thing or a bad thing? it remains to be seen. it's just a new thing. it's like a social experiment. if something is taken away from financial institutions and
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given over to simple mathematical rules, can it actually work? why would you use it? what would be the point? just explain what kind of uses you could put it to, in effect, how would you describe how you might useit? how would you describe how you might use it? it's just how would you describe how you might use it? it'sjust money. you can use it to buy things and sell things. anything. you can use it as a store of value if you want to have some savings. even if it is going up and down wildly. would you not think, you might run the risk of having quite a lot more in that account but also quite a lot less, as well? because it's early days for bitcoin, when people way of the potential positives and negatives, they see it is very early and because there is a fixed total amount, if the
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experiment succeeds, the bit coin experiment, which it is, then the price should buy the nature of the mathematical rules behind it should be above what it is today. is it fairto be above what it is today. is it fair to say it's a crypto currency that people could use if they are trying to get behind or around the law? it could be used by people who are, frankly, not wanting to conduct business in an open way. cross borders, internationally. does it lend itself to that? no. i think if you want to do that, you're going to would be hard cash which is untraceable. bit coin is not untraceable. bit coin is not untraceable. thank so much. take a seat. relax. ryan holder, very good to have him with as even though he was very keen to get away. donald trump has sparked another diplomatic row with britain. making a political point about reforms to us healthcare
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the us president tweeted "thousands of people are marching in the uk because their u system is going broke and not working". donald trump appeared to be referencing a pro—nhs protest which took place over the weekend where demonstrators urged the government to provide more beds, staff and funds to ease the problems facing the health service. the rally in london has been covered on us tv networks today in the last hour downing street have responded to the comments — the prime minister's 0fficial spokes person said: "the prime minister is proud of having an nhs that is free at the point of delivery." number 10 has also backed health secretaryjeremy hunt — who has responsed to the president's comments by saying that none of the british protestors would want to live in a country where "28 million people had no health cover" and that he was "proud to be from the country that invented universal coverage — where all get care no matter the size of their bank balance". the pressures facing the nhs have been hitting the headlines
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throughout the winter. with increasing demands and an ageing population, many people are discussing the future funding of the health service. a group of independent health experts commissioned by the liberal democrats has recommended creating a new tax to replace national insurance. the money would be ring—fenced for the nhs and social care in england. 0ur health editor hugh pym has the details. chanting: save our nhs! thousands of demonstrators marched through london at the weekend calling for increased funding for the nhs. health unionsjoined other campaigners, arguing there was a winter crisis which needed urgent action and investment. today a report from health experts, including the former head of nhs england, has come up with new proposals to tackle the nhs's funding problems. the report, commissioned by the liberal democrats, calls for an extra £4 billion on top of inflation for the nhs in england in the next financial year, more than double the increase announced in the budget.
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a single, ring—fenced tax for health and social care replacing national insurance. and reinstating a commitment to cap the costs paid by individuals for social care. it is important that we understand the nhs is not a wasteful service. it is a service that is creating a very healthy population and continues to do so. but if we want that, we have to fund it. if we don't want it, that's a decision we should be making as a population and this new form of taxation, ring fenced, would make that a lot easier. but a ring fenced tax dedicated to health and social care may not be as straightforward as it seems. some health economists say it could raise more questions than answers. what happens when the tax doesn't raise and produce enough money that you want to spend on the nhs? that begs the question, what is enough and who decides on that? it seems to me you can't escape some of the difficult political decisions about how much we would like to spend on health and social care.
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getting the over 65s who want to carry on working to pay national insurance is one proposal in the report to cover higher nhs spending. the liberal democrat leader, visiting a hospital today, says whatever form it takes higher taxation will be needed. taxes are never popular but i think we do have to be honest with the public. if we want a first—class nhs, and i think we do as a country, we've got to pay for it and we've got to pay for it in a way that is related to people's ability to pay. in response, the department for health and social care said the nhs had been prioritised in the budget and an extra £2 billion had already been provided for social care in england. there are, though, growing calls for long—term thinking on funding, as the nhs celebrates its 70th birthday this year. hugh pym, bbc news. and in the next half hour i'll be speaking to three women
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who have braved some of the worst snow storms in the world. i'll be joined by three of the ice maidens — british army soldiers who have become the first women to cross antarctica using muscle power alone. it is one heck of an achievement. so, at 530%, we will look at the weather, here. it's debris, what you expect? so we have seen some it's debris, what you expect? so we have seen some sunny it's debris, what you expect? so we have seen some sunny spells and some snow showers so far today. there is more to come in the snow showers. we did have some were true showers, but as we go through the night, tonight, it looks as though the snow will be further north and west across scotland, through northern ireland, and eventually into north—west england, as well. ahead of it, we are seeing widespread frost across
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the country. bitterly cold start, and a frosty one. this weather still causing some issues for the early morning rush—hour. if you're sitting across northern england, rain but ahead of that, it that south east corner there will be some sunshine coming through. as we go through the day, the weather front world weekend. sandwiched either side, sunny spells but not one. that weather front will potentially bring snow showers through east yorkshire, lincolnshire, east anglia, and maybe to the east of london. this is bbc news. the headlines: the eu chief negotiator michel barnier warns the uk ‘the time has come' to decide whether it stays in the customs union after brexit. downing street rules out staying in any form of customs union. we have said in terms that we want a
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comment is free trade agreement. the british man — lauri love has won his appeal against extradition to the united states — after being accused of hacking into government computers — including the fbi and nasa. lloyds bank bans its customers from buying bitcoin on their credit cards. the value of the crypto—currency has fallen sharply in recent weeks. donald trump triggers another twitter spat with the british government by claiming the nhs was "going broke and not working". the health secretaryjeremy hunt has responded saying he's "proud" of the british system. time to catch up with the day's bought. the refereejon moss has acknowledged he was
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in asking fourth official martin atkinson for assistance via television when awarding tottenham's first penalty against liverpool yesterday. but a statement from the english referees body has backed moss' handling of the incident which saw harry kane fouled by loris karius. referee moss consulted with his assistant eddie smart to clarify whether kane was offside as the ball came through to him before eventually awarding the spot—kick. former scotland manager walter smith could be in line for a return to the job with the national team. the 69—year—old is one of several names currently under consideration by the scottish fa. former rangers and everton manager smith took over as scotland boss in 200a. he had three years in charge before returning for a second spell at ibrox. tom brady says that he will be back next season after tasting defeat in a super bowl for the third time in his career. despite being a1, he
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will return to try and win a six when they glittering career that has led to him being called the greatest of all time. england have called upon richard wigglesworth. this is wigglesworth, who are now provide coverfor wigglesworth, who are now provide cover for danny wigglesworth, who are now provide coverfor danny care, wigglesworth, who are now provide cover for danny care, who came on for ben youngs in rome. meanwhile... ireland will be without flankerjosh van der flier for the rest of the six nations. he injured his knee ligamentsjust before the end of the first half of their victory against france on saturday. the leinster man will also miss the rest of their club season. chris froome will begin his 2018 cycling season next week in spain, despite being under investigation for the use of his asthma medication last year. the four—time tour de france winner will be part of the team sky line—up for the ruta del sol. that starts a week on wednesday.
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froome returned an "adverse" drugs test at the vuelta a espana in september, but denies any wrongdoing. a new athletics world cup event will ta ke a new athletics world cup event will take place in london this summer. the london stadium will host the games this july, it the london stadium will host the games thisjuly, it will be almost a year after it hosted the world championships. britain and the usa will take part along with south africa, poland, france, germany and jamaica. athletes will compete in all fields and track events up to 5000 metres. —— 1500 metres. a survey by the professional players federation has found that more than half of the 800 former athletes that responded said that they had problems with their mental or physical health following retirement. when i came back from the olympics in 2004, winning two gold medals,
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the only british person to have done it, lots of doors open for me. but what was strange is that that came to an end, and i didn't know what i was going for any more. since the age of ia, i wanted to be in the army as a physical training instructor. i achieved that. then, aged 34, i had become olympic champion, and suddenly i had no idea who i was and what i wanted to be. and you can find out more on all of those stories. head to the website has he be very latest on the football news including highlights of the super bowl. that is it from me from now, but i will have more free you on sports day at half past six. the european union's chief negotiator, michel barnier says that... that is the crucial
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convocation. michel barnier was in downing street today for the latest talks with david davis. he said that the time had come to make a choice on its overall brexit goals. as michel barnier and david davis hold talks in downing street — chris morris from the bbc‘s reality check team explains what stage we're at in the brexit negotiations. it feels like there are two broad sets of negotiations going on at the moment. one between the eu and the uk and another within the british government, trying to reach agreement on what it wants the future relationship with the eu to look like. and the eu has emphasised on numerous occasions that until it has a clearer idea of the uk position, formal negotiations on the future cannot really begin. so what is happening at the moment? well, to start with there is still a lot of work to be done on the outstanding issues from phase
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one of the talks. we discussed them a lot last year, the future status of the irish border, a financial settlement or divorce bill, and the future rights of eu citizens here and uk citizens elsewhere in europe. and when it comes to number one, the irish border, the issue of customs arrangements which we are hearing a lot about today, looms large. how can you have an invisible border there without some kind of customs union? now, the challenge is to resolve all of these issues in the next few months and turn them into a legal text, a withdrawal agreement that would have to be ratified and signed before the uk leaves the eu in march 2019. at the same time, negotiations are about to begin on a transition period after brexit for up to two years. those arrangements mean the uk would have to follow all the eu rules and regulations without having any say in making them. but they would give businesses and governments more time to plan for the future. but what will that future actually look like? well, negotiations on that have not even really begun yet and the other 27 eu countries
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are still considering theirjoint position while they wait for more clarity from london. now, trade is the obvious issue. will the uk remain closely aligned with eu rules and regulations? will it try to forge its own path, or, as seems likely, will it try to negotiate a mixture of the two? the eu is already warning against cherry picking the best bits. there are also a host of other issues on which we cooperate closely with the eu, things like security and policing and foreign policy for example. new relationships need to be negotiated there as well. so plenty to do is putting it mildly. no wonder that michel barnier said today that there isn't a minute to lose, but unravelling a relationship that has developed over more than a0 years was never going to be easy. i can say, without a customs union, and outside the single market, barriers to trade and goods and services are unavoidable. we have already published a great deal of information about our proposal in terms of what the customs arrangement would be, and the other arrangements would be outside the union. now, trade is the obvious issue. will the uk remain closely aligned with eu rules and regulations? will it try to forge its own path, or, as seems likely, will it try to negotiate a mixture of the two? the eu is already warning against
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cherry picking the best bits. there are also a host of other issues on which we cooperate closely with the eu, things like security and policing and foreign policy for example. new relationships need to be negotiated there as well. so plenty to do is putting it mildly. no wonder that michel barnier said today that there isn't a minute to lose, but unravelling a relationship that has developed over more than a0 years was never going to be easy. a white supremacist has been convicted of a terrorist offence , after planning to carry out an attack on a gay pride event in cumbria. 20—year—old ethan stables plotted to target people attending an lgbt event at a pub in barrow. prosecutors said he had expressed homophobic, nazi and racist views online. you may find some of the evidence upsetting. our home affairs correspondent dominic casciani reports. ethan stables, self—confessed neo nazi. for more than six months he planned
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to carry out an attack. the 20—year—old with a history of depression had been homeless in barrow, and eventually moved into a small dilapidated flat in the town. behind his front door lastjune, he spoke online about how he hated gay people. he began to amass weapons. and recorded this shocking video. it's just like gay people, much nicer when they're on fire. he told members of a private neo nazi facebook group there were pride flags flying over a nearby pub and it was time to turn hate into action. in a series of increasingly frightening posts, stables revealed his plan. "i'm going to war tonight," he told them. "ivm "i'm going to walk in with a machete and slaughter every single one."
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some readers encouraged him, but one replied, that's not right, ethan. he posted this reconnaissance poster and signed off: barmaid katy bolger was setting up for the night when armed officers, tipped off by a facebook user, rushed in. it frightened me. i felt like a deer in the headlights, they said there had been a terrorist threat made against the pub and this person was going to come in while the event was on and basically harm people. i was so angry afterwards to think someone would actually do something like that to a peaceful place. with the armed police over there, the manhunt across barrow continued and shortly after 10pm ethan stables was arrested on this road, between his flat and the target. the prosecutor said this was his last act of reconnaissance before he would have gone home to get his weapons. this is what police recorded finding after they broke into his flat — a swastika flag on the wall,
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weapons including an axe laid out and prepared, evidence that stables was trying to make his own explosives. it would have been a bloodbath, no getting away from that. i just wish it was taken more seriously... lee wicks runs the lgbt support group that was the target and said the far right are once more becoming emboldened as they go unchallenged on social media. personally i think facebook should have closed his account. i was quite horrified to see his main picture was him looking very aryan in front of a swastika banner, flag, and the literature was very extreme nazi propaganda. facebook has not commented on why stables remained online, despite at least four complaints against him. during his defence he claimed he never meant his words and that he was in fact bisexual. his conviction today for preparing an act of terrorism means he could face a life sentence.
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dominic casciani, bbc news, barrow. fentanyl — it's a strong painkiller — thousands of times more powerful than morphine — and dozens of people have died in the last couple of years after taking it to get a high. today a 25—year—old drug dealer from newport was sentenced to eight years in prison for exporting and selling it on the dark web. our correspondentjeremy cooke, has been taking a look at where the drug is coming from and who's being affected by it. it looks like chemical warfare. fentanyl — it's a strong painkiller — thousands of times more powerful than morphine — and dozens of people have died in the last couple of years after taking it to get a high. today a 25—year—old drug dealer from newport was sentenced to eight years in prison for exporting and selling it on the dark web.
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it looks like chemical warfare. but, this is a police raid on a drug dealer who was selling fentanyl from his home. serious time for a serious drug, which has taken lives up and down the country. robert was six and five by two inches wide. he was the kindest gentleman in the world. full of life, full of promise. but, when 18—year—old robert fraser went to buy cannabis, the dealer gave him something new. something different, something deadly. i got a phone call from my ex—husband to say that he just walked in and found robert dead in bed. and, i just remember thinking, he hasn't said that, he can't have said that, it's not true. roberts knew nothing about fentanyl. a synthetic opioids drug that users either snort, swallow or inject. it is related to heroin but can be thousands of times more powerful. fentanyl is a killer. and, the drug dealers are playing russian roulette with our lives. they give our children drugs, and my child died from it. dealing with fentanyl is a game changerfor the police and the emergency services, and in this government licence lab...
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it can be absorbed by the skin, so, we just don't want any risk. ...they have been been trained to be super careful, because just a few grains of fenta nyl can kill. so, it's powerful and cheap, and for dealers, that means big profits. they've seen it all here. heroin, cocaine, crystal meth. but, nothing like this. fentanyl isjust in a different category altogether, and the potential harm that it can cause is just way above anything that we have had in the past. but, where is it coming from? cbbc is undercover in china, on the trail of the suppliers. —— the bbc. we are meeting with a laboratory boss and his translator. so, one kilogram of fentanyl. .. china has banned production of some types of fe nta nyl, banned production of some types of fentanyl, but banned production of some types of fenta nyl, but labs can banned production of some types of fentanyl, but labs can work around the law by making small changes. and, they are happy to ship the drug anywhere in the world. cancellation
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mac within minutes we are being offered a deal. the bbc bought no drugs, but it is clear that fentanyl is on sale to anybody who wants to buy it. this one is very powerful, very strong? can you send it to england ‘cause very strong? can you send it to england 'cause yes, very strong. yes, to england. from china, to britain. really, it looks much like any other sort of online marketplace. jamie bartlett is an author who writes about the so—called dark net, the hidden and an regulated corner of the internet. cannabis, ecstasy, psychedelics. .. a08 offerings of fentanyl on this site alone. it makes all of these
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products that we would never within reach... especially of young people, far more easy to get than ever before. in teesside alone, over the past year, at least six deaths have been linked to the drug. cannon ended up unit —— been linked to the drug. cannon ended up unit -- ended up using what i thought was heroin. it was fe nta nyl, i thought was heroin. it was fenta nyl, not i thought was heroin. it was fentanyl, not too sure. kenny has had a history of drug abuse and overdosed on fentanyl. luckily, he was near an antidote. overdose. that is as much as i can remember. i injected it and overdosed. i was dead. it was like blood was covering my eyes. the spike of death across north—east england puts fentanyl firmly on the radar of the national
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crime agency. they know that the drug has taken thousands of lives in america and are determined to top it. it is a priority, today. we have a numberof it. it is a priority, today. we have a number of officers working solely on that threat. michelle knows the cost of fenta nyl. how it on that threat. michelle knows the cost of fentanyl. how it took robert's life, what it does to families. people are sitting in their bedrooms, clicking a button and getting it. in the world i grew up and getting it. in the world i grew up in, it wasn't like that, and i don't want that feature for my little light either, for my surviving little lad. michelle is now a surviving little lad. michelle is nowa campaign, surviving little lad. michelle is now a campaign, determined to make us all aware of the dangers of fe nta nyl, us all aware of the dangers of fenta nyl, how us all aware of the dangers of fentanyl, how easy it is to get, and how easily it kills. go to the following address for
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details and support: you can call any time for free. by by all means access either of those if you want a bit more advice on some of the problems and questions raised. six female members of the british army have become the first all—female group to ski coast—to—coast across antarctica using muscle power alone. the six—strong ice maiden team took 62 days to do the journey to the south pole and onwards to the west coast — dragging sledges that weighed more than their own bodies. quite a massive achievement that we are talking about. with me are three of the ice maidens — team leader major nics wetherill, major sandy hennis and lance sergeant sophie montagne.
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good to see you. thank you very much indeed. i would like to say, but of all, because viewers will want me too, congratulations! it's an incredible achievement. i suppose, ifi incredible achievement. i suppose, if i start off, by asking, how did you get the position when you on the expedition in the first 'cause well, it was that she might thought. these quys it was that she might thought. these guys can blame me for it. i went to a talk about seven years ago, when i heard somebody telling us all about his expedition across antarctica, andi his expedition across antarctica, and i realised that i wasn't happy being one of the members of the audience, but wanted to do it myself. so, i had that idea ten yea rs myself. so, i had that idea ten years ago, and then, about four yea rs years ago, and then, about four years ago, and then, about four years ago, met matt taylor, who we put this thing together... and then we decided to open it up to all the women in the army. —— nat taylor. they were stunned that lots of
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people got back in touch with us. these were some of them. you got there. it is an incredible achievement, tell us a little bit more about the experience of its? how would you describe it?|j more about the experience of its? how would you describe it? i think that everybody has a view of antarctica, and it means different things for different people. for me, it was about being in that wilderness, that's complete whiteness everywhere. and, the hugeness of the sky. when you get dropped off by the plane and just say it isjust us, the six of us, on our own with no clue. that was really huge. and then, busy, the next thing to hit us was, some really extreme weather. after one day of skiing, we had to mac days of being tent bound, and capped with —— trapped with 100 column into an hour winds. —— kilometre an hour winds.
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it's certain... it certainly looks like the conditions are windy. the conditions were very volatile or not? and they started off, warmly by scott over to the start point, it was quite stormy at the start of the season. after that, it warms up, was quite stormy at the start of the season. afterthat, it warms up, i say it want up. it's all relative. the most we had was —50 six. it was averaging normally around —20 five. how do you prepare yourself kind of temperature change? whee we had been to norway on three factors expeditions. beasley did not get that called. we had been down to minus 20. there is nothing that you can do to prepare for that. we have these little masks that hung down from our goggles in front of our faces to try and protect us as you
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breathe in. but, on sundays, it was almost like your teeth got cold. high point or low points? high point was definitely breaching it. that was definitely breaching it. that was ultimately had all been focused on. it was the point when reworking to head back and start hitting home. lots of emotions. and also finishing. but in that invisible line. so, what am i seeing here? so yes, that is the ceremonial south pole. we all went in together and touched it, and it was a very emotional time. shots are great, aren't they? what are your thoughts in that? it was all really cool. trying to work out how you're going to approach it. you want it to look and feel right. slight fumbling to
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get the full line and then wrapped around it. so, that wasjust before christmas. christmas was a week later, or something. how christmas. christmas was a week later, orsomething. how did christmas. christmas was a week later, or something. how did you spend christmas day? business as usual. eat, sleep, ski, repeat. we gave ourselves and our oft in the evening. we finished early. so, having reached there, what was it like to repeat the rest of it? how do you maintain that sense of vision once he had achieved the big thing. we really had to stay focused. when we reach the south pole, it was only really a third of the way. i focused on the next point. i didn't really think about the end point. just keep skiing, one day at a time. how long did you ski a day on average. ten
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hours. some fans up to 11. by the time we got the last point, we from average 28 k a day, to as k a day. -- 35 average 28 k a day, to as k a day. "35k average 28 k a day, to as k a day. —— 35 k today. average 28 k a day, to as k a day. -- 35 k today. everybody kept focused. they realise that they could start dipping into their reserves. even that, we ended up finishing in such a healthy state, one thing that we are all really proud of, is that most people say that we don't look like we have just crossed antarctica. i love this image of the kit. i asked about the preparation, but, of course, there is the other prep, which is to do with supreme physical fitness. is the other prep, which is to do with supreme physicalfitness. what kind of regime did you have for how long? two years. so what did you do?
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we spoke to a lot of people who had done it before. experts, particularly in the army, the physical training instructors. they gave us a strength and conditioning programme, but also, most of the time we were jacking tyres, so we had these big land rover tyres that we all had to hook up to... she was dragging it through the streets of london. yes, my commute to work. yes, i suppose that dragging it around, that's pretty good. we also had to free ourselves up. we all had —— feed ourselves up. we all put an average of ten kilograms. we could eat what we liked. sounds quite attractive, actually. you won'tjust there to be saying that you had done it. you are supporting breast cancer ca re it. you are supporting breast cancer care and the army cadet forces association, why those two causes? well, we felt that we needed to have
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a military cause, and one of our main aims was to inspire people, the younger generation to get involved in adventurous training. so, that was the cadet force. and breast cancer care, was the cadet force. and breast cancer ca re, because was the cadet force. and breast cancer care, because breast cancer lakanalup cancer care, because breast cancer lakanal up after not just cancer care, because breast cancer lakanal up after notjust the patients, but everybody involved. as an all—female team, almost everybody is affected by best cancer be it's directly or indirectly, and we thought that was such a huge cause this to our heart. ijust thought that was such a huge cause this to our heart. i just want to say, brilliantjob. this to our heart. i just want to say, brilliant job. and this to our heart. i just want to say, brilliantjob. and lovely to meet you all. thank you for coming in to share it with us. time for a look at the weather. hi there. we have also seen simply as guy hansen sunshine. where you have the sunny spells, today, the temperatures will really fall away quite sharply early on through the night. quite a hard frost forming. at the same time, yes we have got more wintry weather heading... but,
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primarily snow as it moves inland. so, cold and frosty, a scattering of showers, these are likely to continue on and off tomorrow, with some hail in there as well. our weather fronts slips its way... and wea ke ns a weather fronts slips its way... and weakens a little. it is not going to bea weakens a little. it is not going to be a one—day two to four degrees. we could see more snow for a time across north—east england, lincolnshire, east anglia, and maybe london overnight. that is worth bearing in mind, it might bring some early snow over the early hours of wednesday morning. brussels tells britain that the time has come to choose what its future relationship with the eu
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will be after brexit. the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, in london for talks, warns that the decision to leave the customs union will impact trade. without the customs union, and outside the single market, barriers to trade and goods and services are unavoidable. we want a comprehensive free trade agreement, and with it a customs agreement, and to make that as frictionless as possible to make as much trade as currently exists, as free as possible. we will look at what impact leaving the customs union will have on britain. also tonight. a man accused of hacking into us government computer systems wins his legal battle against extradition.
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