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tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  February 7, 2018 7:00pm-8:01pm GMT

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you're watching beyond one hundred days. the us government tries to avert another shutdown two days before it i’u ns another shutdown two days before it runs out of money. senators say they've got a two year budget deal — now they have to sell it to the house before the government runs out of money on friday. and it's not even clear whether president trump wants to keep the government up and running — he says a shutdown isn't such a bad idea after all. let's have a shutdown — it's worth it for our country. they have military parades in paris and moscow — so why not in washington? the white house is looking at plans. the prime minister summons her brexit war cabinet — can they finally come up with a clear decision on what the government actually wants? also on the programme. iranian women defy the authorities by taking off their headscarves — but is president rouhani listening to them? dark skin, blue eyes and long flowing locks, this is the face of prehistoric britain. get in touch with us using the
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hashtag 'beyond—one—hundred—days' hello and welcome — i'm katty kay in washington and christian fraser is in london. the american government is struggling to do what families around the world manage to do every single day — balance their budgets. the senate has just agreed to a two year deal but they still have to get the house of representatives to sign on to their plan. the bipartisan deal in the senate gives both sides a bit of what they want. republicans get more money for the us military. democrats get money for health programmes and disaster relief. this doesn't deliver the much promised immigration reform but it is a rare thing — american lawmakers actually coming together to work out solutions. here's a listen. this bill is the product of extensive negotiations among congressional leaders and the white house. no one would suggest it is
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perfect. but we worked hard to find common ground and stay focused on serving the american people. after months of legislative logjam is this budget deal is a genuine breakthrough. after months of fiscal brinkmanship this budget deal is the first real sprout of bipartisanship. and it should break the long cycle of spending crises that have snarled this congress and hampered our middle—class. one problem to getting this deal passed is that we don't know what the president wants — he's suggested a shutdown may not be such a bad idea. if we don't change it, let's have a shutdown. it is worth it for our country. i'd love to see a shutdown if we don't get this stuff taken care of. let's get more on this from republican congressman francis
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rooney who joins us live from capitol hill. is the american government about to keep the us government open and do itsjob? keep the us government open and do its job? that is the rumour at least for six weeks! not for two years as the senate has just said? for six weeks! not for two years as the senate hasjust said? well we know they're talking about a two—year deal but will take some time to get papered up and maybe have a six weeks continuing resolution until they figure it out. around here it is not closed until it is closed. so we will be back here in six weeks' time negotiating yet again? do you realise what this looks like around the world?|j yet again? do you realise what this looks like around the world? i have got two words for that, banana republic. so why notjust say look they have done it in the senate and
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got this wonderful bipartisan agreement, we will agree to it to do the responsible thing and keep government open. the house has its constitutional duty to evaluate it and the members must vote in the way they feel appropriate. but i hope we can continue that spirit of bipartisanship that seems to have arisen in the senate this morning and come up with this two—year deal. and stop worrying about this monthly funding of the government. and stop worrying about this monthly funding of the governmentlj and stop worrying about this monthly funding of the government. i thought the most surprising thing about today was senate leader mitch mcconnell describing chuck schumer as my good friend! and of course what has happened is the majority have sweeten the pill and that is how deals get done. the question is can you get past the fiscal conservatives in the house?” can you get past the fiscal conservatives in the house? i do not know. i think there will be a lot of momentum to continue the bipartisan spirit and fund the government long time. and to get more money for
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defence on our side of things because we feel the fence has been crippled. a large number of aeroplanes do not allow flight because of a lack of parts. we have the smallest navy since before the first world war. so the republicans in your party, some of them do not wa nt to in your party, some of them do not want to lift the debt ceiling and then the president comes along suggesting a military parade. here is the defence secretary speaking earlier. i think we're all aware in this country of the affection and respect the president has for the military. and putting together some options, we will send them to the white house for a decision. so what to think, parade is a good idea?” have never thought much about the military parade in the united states. in the first place it struck me as something that is not such a great idea because it is a waste of money. these little countries do that to look big. but we do not need
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to do that. thank you very much for joining us. of course plenty of other countries do celebrate their armed forces. it is not something thatis armed forces. it is not something that is traditionally done here in america. the last one was in 1993 at the end of the gulf war. but here in the end of the gulf war. but here in the uk of course we have the trooping of the colour. mr trump, his fascination with parades was spurred perhaps by the invitation to paris on bastille day as the guest of emmanuel macron. russia has victory day celebrating the soviet union and their victory over nazi germany. something like 10,000 troops taking part. and then of course north korea which holds several parades every year and are no not so subtle display of military
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might. well i was watching lindsay graham the republican senator who was asked about this and he said honouring the service and sacrifice of american service personnel, i'm all for that but i do not what kind of soviet hardware display. but if i kids marching past the white house and we have people and celebrate the vetera ns and we have people and celebrate the veterans then why not. it is interesting because it has raised some eyebrows. in other countries as well as here in washington with people saying is this about honouring the veterans or about donald trump wanting to show that he has a big powerful military. we know this president has surrounded himself by generals in his cabinet ina way himself by generals in his cabinet in a way that is fairly unprecedented in us politics. he seems to have some kind of fondness for its strong men around the world who have similar military displays. i think that is the question, is it about the president and him wanting to have some display of his power or
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is it about service and honouring the service of us veterans and in that case they could be a lot more support for it in the country i would say. you might be right. he wa nts to would say. you might be right. he wants to do it in november. when the uk leaves the european union in march 2019 the two sides hope to enter into a transition period, to allow more time to agree a final deal. today the eu published its draft withdrawal agreement. brussels says that during that transition the uk must abide by all the rules of the single market — without any say in making those rules — and it wants the power to impose penalties, if the uk breaks aspects of the agreement. that could mean they would have the power to ground uk flights, or to impose tarrifs on british goods. or to suspend access to the single market. the brexiteers are up in arms. it isjust one more problem for the prime minister, who today was chairing the first of two meetings this week with her brexit war cabinet. ellie price has the details. the european union exit and trades strategy and negotiation subcommittee,
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or to give it it's more exciting name, the war cabinet, is chaired by the prime minister and consists of ten senior ministers. today they will discuss northern ireland and immigration in the first of two crunch meetings. and tomorrow they will move on to trade and the future partnership. so will we get any firm decisions on the uk position? probably not. today the british chamber of commerce has written to the prime minister calling for more clarity, urging ministers to deliver a clear, unequivocal statement of intent on brexit. and this morning the eu has published a draft section of the final withdrawal agreement, saying they should be a mechanism for allowing the eu to suspend certain benefits of single market membership during the transition period. the uk government has sought to play that down, this is a draft document, they say, produced by the eu that simply reflects the stated directives. both sides are hoping to be able to reach agreement on the terms of the implementation or transition period by the time they meet at the european council summit in march. we're joined now from westminster
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by the head of trade policy at the british chamber of commerce anastassia beliakova. they have written a letter to the prime minister to say that patience is wearing thin and businesses want to know what is going on. what impact is this having, this lack of certainty in practical terms on your members? this is impacting business confidence which in turn is impacting investment decisions. we know there will be a transition period until at least the end of 2020. that gives some short—term certainty but the question is what happens later. when businesses are looking at three or five year cycle they're not able to make investment decisions. and unless the government sta rts decisions. and unless the government starts to outline its vision they will holding off on investment which could have wider economic effects.
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do you think the government should negotiate with the eu effectively with a gun held to its head? ambiguity is helpful in negotiations. it is helpful in the political environment. however u nless political environment. however unless there is more clarity from the uk government we will see what we're seeing now, the eu coming out with documents and statements of intent, whilst there is silence from the uk side. so this creates too much noise and a lack of balance and businesses have less confidence. so we would like to see the uk government being much more clear evenif government being much more clear even if this clarity emerges gradually. well stay with us. tim martin is the chairman of] d wetherspoon — which is one of the biggest independent pub chains here in the uk — and hejoins us now in the studio. do you feel you need more clarity? i do not think so, i think there has to bea do not think so, i think there has to be a certain ambiguity as we've just heard in negotiations.
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sometimes when i have been negotiating i've tried to have the inscrutable face of us thinks as the lawyers call it, a poker face. sol think no reason for businesses to worry, we can do well outside the eu,i worry, we can do well outside the eu, ido worry, we can do well outside the eu, i do not like confidence. government vat receipts were up 15% in december compared to a year ago, income tax at 5%. and 300,000 or so more jobs. sol income tax at 5%. and 300,000 or so more jobs. so i do think, i do worry so more jobs. so i do think, i do worry so many business organisations and particular the cbi are saying we need this and that. and putting power in my opinion into the hands of the eu negotiators. i have some sympathy with people who like things ought to be laid out but we are business people and we deal with uncertainty. christian just that the british government is that the risk
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of negotiating with a gun held to its head but the truth is if they wa nt its head but the truth is if they want a transition britain does not have a strong negotiating hand. that may be so, i personally do not think we need a transition. we've heard all sorts of reasons as to why. it is strange because i run a reasonably large business, 37,000 people and not one person or not one consultant, not one lawyer, not one government adviser has said here is what you have to do before you leave the eu. i think we could leave monday and we would have lower food prices, abolishing the powers that the eu places on food from non—eu countries. and regain control of fishing rights. so not to be horrid to people in europe but if we took a more robust attitude we would get a better deal and we have nothing to fear anyway. anastasia, a more
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robust attitude from british business and we could leave tomorrow? businesses would like to ta ke tomorrow? businesses would like to take advantage of the opportunities presented by brexit as well as prepare for the change is the head and the potential costs of it. but they are unable to do so if we do not even know what some of the practical answer is to the brexit questions will be. for example vat, we do not know yet if we will definitely pay import vat, whether there will be chances for business to despair on this. all of these questions need to be answered by government. some of them will be dependent on the negotiations but some are fully in the gift of the government so some are fully in the gift of the government so we some are fully in the gift of the government so we would like more clarity on the practicalities as $0011 clarity on the practicalities as soon as possible. i do not think the government can give clarity on things like terrorists because i think the sensible thing to do if we leave the eu is do what australia and new zealand and singapore have
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done and abolish almost all import tariffs on food. the government cannot say that in negotiations because it is trying to convince the eu to have mutual terror free trade. a tricky situation. —— tariff free trade. one theory doing the rounds is that the prime minister should have set out clearly, she has set out clearly what she wants, that you wa nt to out clearly what she wants, that you want to leave the single market and had no customs union of any kind but perhaps she could have set up more detail when of course she first became leader. because there was not this traditional leadership contest where everyone had to set out their stall, no one knew really where she stood and maybe at that point it was the moment where she could have found a path between the remainer is an brexiteers in the cabinet. well the devil in the detail. a coalition deal has been struck in germany, between the centre—left social democrats and angela merkel‘s conservatives.
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the agreement looks set to end four months of deadlock following an inconclusive general election last september. the deal will still need to be approved by social democrat party members, many of whom fear that re—entering a grand coalition would damage the party. a british—based monitoring group says the latest syrian government air strikes have killed more than twenty civilians in the rebel—held region of eastern ghouta, near damascus. it said a total of eighty people had died since the attacks began earlier this week. the un has appealed for an immediate ceasefire. british supermarket tesco is facing the country's largest ever equal pay law suit which could affect up to 200,000 mostly female shop workers. the women who work on the shop floor say they earn considerably less than men who work in the compa ny‘s distribution centres. lawyers estimate the supermarket could be liable for up to four billion pounds — around five and a half billion dollars — in back pay if it loses. since the revolution in 1979, the iranian government has made the hijab, the black head scarf, an emblem of its religious and political identity. but now iranian women are taking a stand — increasing numbers of them
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are protesting, demanding their right to wear whatever they want in public. some have been posting images on social media — here's a woman standing in public, bareheaded — and it has led to dozens of arrests. religious leaders have called for ‘strong action‘ in the courts, iran's president hassan rouhani has said that the voices of protesters need to be listened to. sanam naraghi—anderlini who is the co—founder and executive director of the international civil society action network is here with me now. thank you for coming in. your mother protested in 1979 when this law was first implemented. when they first announced the imposition she was amongst 100,000 women who went out onto the streets but my grandmother also protested back in the early 20th century when the hijab was
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banned so in my own family we've seen it being banned and in my grandmother ‘s generation and then my mother ‘s generation but for my generation... these social media posts are getting a lot of attention, the iranian government has said this is all an outside conspiracy and these women have been deceived. in taking off the hijab. that is not true, it has been since the 1980s when the hijab was first imposed it was very much a black shroud, very wide legged pants, your wrists and neck are to be covered. women have been pushing back the headscarf since the 1980s, i've been going back regularly and i remember in the 1990s seeing pedicured toes which was a big issue at the time. you see the colour and shape, it has been a consistent struggle by iranian women of all ages and generations, rural and urban, years. and to suggest all of a sudden
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because it is social media and western media picking it up, that is doing a huge disservice to women and especially those who for years have paid the price, they have been beaten and find, it has been an ongoing issue for 39 years. 29 arrested this time around. 0f ongoing issue for 39 years. 29 arrested this time around. of course it plays into the power struggle within iran, president rouhani, saying young people should be listened to. the conservative theologians in iran, to the cbs hijab is sort of an emblem of the islamic state? it certainly has symbolic value, absolutely. and i think people have understood from the beginning that when you impose the beginning that when you impose the hijab you're always going to have resistance. the contrast between iran and the region in the last 30 years, iran the social trajectory has been to push back the hijab. egypt orjordan where it has not been mandatory you have walked
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women wearing it. if this is an existential issue for the iranian regime then how far will they go to make sure that women carry on wearing it, if they see it as emblematic of the state of islam? well what we see in iran is that there is a transformation that has been taking place again through the yea rs. been taking place again through the years. and this issue precisely because they allowed women to shorten their codes and make the scarves just literally a thin veil, has already been something we've seen changes with. i do not think that if the hijab is removed tomorrow that we will see sudden change because the substantive issues for women on the ground, that issues for women on the ground, that is the inequality enshrined in the law. so i think this is symbolic and important but the substance is somewhere else. thank you very much. interesting that these women are
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facing arrest just interesting that these women are facing arrestjust by removing the headscarf in public and it is something that has been on popular ever since the iranian revolution amongst women and to defy the authorities does mean they know the risk the prospect of arrest. scientists say they now know what the first modern briton looked like ten thousand years ago — and it's something of a surprise. they believe that so—called cheddar man — who lived in south west england — had skin that was dark to black, and blue eyes. researchers have used ground breaking dna analysis techniques to examine his skeleton which was discovered in somerset in 1903. jon kay reports. one, two, three. putting flesh on his bones. the face of cheddar man finally revealed. by extracting his dna and scanning his skull, experts say they have created him in unprecedented detail. and he looks very different from what they were expecting.
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the hair, the eyes, the face. that combination of blue eyes and dark skin, really very striking. something we would not have imagined. and to also get from the dna details of his biology. the fact that he couldn't digest milk as an adult. that is something that came really with the advent of farming. and 10,000 years ago people didn't have that. look how he's changed. this is what scientists used to think he looked like. a reconstruction from 20 years ago when dna analysis was nowhere near as developed. cheddar man and i share a common female relative. this is modern—day cheddar man. adrian targett lives in the same village and shares dna with the skeleton found in the gorge. so, time to meet his ancestor. do you want to see your great, great, great, great, great, great, great grandfather? ok, here he comes. and... oh, my.
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what do you think? it is remarkable, isn't it? i think there is probably some resemblance. yes, i think there are certainly other members in my family who he bears a resemblance to. yes, some of my cousins. you can see that in there? yes. i think my eyes are blue! lets have a look. they are blue! they are blue. his hair is not quite as grey as mine is. or my beard! so 10,000 years after he died, 100 years after he was found, finally a face to fit the name of adrian's ancestor. jon kay, bbc news, cheddar in somerset. iam i am disappointed by this. because it was initially assumed cheddar man
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had pale skin and fair hair and i thought maybe i am a direct descendant but apparently not. they say 10% of white british ancestry can be linked to this ancient population. so i thought maybe i'm not one of them and then in the newspaper today it said the 10% link to this ancestry, their ancestors would have performed grisly cannibalistic rituals including gnawing on human toes and fingers and drinking from polished skullca ps. and drinking from polished skullcaps. maybe and drinking from polished skullca ps. maybe it and drinking from polished skullcaps. maybe it is a good thing i'm not directly linked!” skullcaps. maybe it is a good thing i'm not directly linked! i feel an existential crisis coming on, christian. do you want to talk about it? are you 0k? christian. do you want to talk about it? are you ok? i think they could come up with a better name them cheddar man. well almost all of our crew here in washington thought that cheddar came from was confident so i had to educate people. but i look at
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cheddar man and think he looks suspiciously like someone who came from another continent, what we might today call an immigrant in fa ct. might today call an immigrant in fact. maybe all countries were linked together, who knows. not that kind of blonde anglo—saxon bloke you might have expected. this is beyond 100 days from the bbc. coming up for viewers on the bbc news channel and bbc world news — space oddity — what does elon musk‘s car in orbit really mean for exploration of the finalfrontier? and the return of the milkman as the backlash on plastics continues. that's still to come. good evening. after a cold start to
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win state many of us had a reasonably pleasant winter day. —— wednesday. further north the crowd increased and it was a grey afternoon but with that cloud comes afternoon but with that cloud comes a lift in temperatures. the milder air has been out in the atlantic so far today. that is moving south and east in the form of cloud. already temperatures dropping across the south and east. further north and west we have cloudy conditions and outbreaks of rain and hills though. looking at the temperature charts, frost free night for the majority. further south and east is where we see the frost. so cold start
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thursday morning but this is where we see the slice of milder air moving across england and wales before colder air moving in later on. in between the two we have a weather front for the morning rush—hour. not much in the way of rain in the far south. but along this area we stay cloudy all day long and there will be some further bursts of rain. turning heavier into the afternoon. lost of that in scotla nd the afternoon. lost of that in scotland and northern ireland some wintry showers and hazy sunshine elsewhere. east anglia and the south—east we start with some hazy sunshine but temperatures are up on recent days. into the evening rush hour we have heavy rain in the evening spreading across many parts
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of wales and western and northern england. clearer conditions in its wa ke england. clearer conditions in its wake so after some wintry showers on friday morning becoming a little less abundant. although still a covering of snow possible on scottish mountains. but turning colder even with sunshine around. the weekend set to turn windy especially on saturday night with rain at times. brighter and colder on sunday. this is beyond 100 days with me, katty kay, in washington — christian fraser's in london. our top stories: there's a deal to avoid a us government shutdown, but senators must sell it to the house before the money runs out on friday. the us vice—president mike pence says the us will not allow north korea to hijack the winter olympic games in south korea. coming up in the next half hour: is it fair for president trump to claim credit for falling unemployment among black americans? driving the future of scientific discovery, elon musk‘s red convertible heads towards deep space.
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let us know your thoughts by using the hashtag beyond100days. former vice—presidentjoe biden has been sharing his thoughts on president trump. speaking to cnn he called the president "a joke". mr biden said the president's attacks on the fbi are doing everything russian president vladimir putin had ever wanted, sowing doubt in the us legal system. this is the court. —— this is the court. -- this is the cloud. —— quote. what indeed. is it accurate to suggest the dialogue here in washington is really doing moscow's bidding? let's put that to former us defense secretary william cohen whojoins me now in the studio. do you agree withjoe biden? you
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also spent a lot of time travelling around the world. yes, i moderated, 01’ around the world. yes, i moderated, or participated in a discussion, with joe or participated in a discussion, withjoe biden, or participated in a discussion, with joe biden, 300,000 or participated in a discussion, withjoe biden, 300,000 people in washington, so i do share his view. i think the president is doing president putin's work, sewing distrust in our institutions, the fbi, the justice department, fbi, thejustice department, the rule of law. this is something that is only working to the benefit of president putin, to see people no longer have a sense of confidence in the institutions which are designed to promote the rule of law. if there is one thing the united states stands for it is the rule of law. no man 01’ stands for it is the rule of law. no man or woman is above that, including the president of the united states. he happens to feel that he is, because his supervisors are in charge of thejustice department. that is totally antithetical to everything we believe in this country, that anyone can be above or break the law and not be held accountable, so i think attacking the fbi, thejustice department, sowing confusion and
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distrust with the american people, you can't trust what mr mueller‘s doing, what the justice you can't trust what mr mueller‘s doing, what thejustice department is doing, and therefore any report must be trustworthy, i think that is undermining the rule of law in this country. speaking about something not traditional, this idea ofa of a military parade, and wejust heard general mattis in the last hour say, yes, the pentagon is drawing up plans, the duty of the pentagon of course to draw up plans thatis pentagon of course to draw up plans that is what the white house once. some people think it is a great idea to celebrate america's military whereas others think it is a rather autocratic celebration of america's military power. we do you come down as former defence secretary?” military power. we do you come down as former defence secretary? i think it is an unnecessary expenditure of resources . it is an unnecessary expenditure of resources. your witnessing the shutdown of the government day after day and this is a parade celebrating president trump? he would say it is to celebrate the men and women of the armed forces. we have the 4th of july, we have veteran's day. frankly
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i would like to see him pay tribute to our military by giving the medal of freedom to john to our military by giving the medal of freedom tojohn mccain, a great patriot of this country who symbolised what sacrifices really are all about. i would have him put money into training. we have had a number of accidents with our submarine force. we need more training, more readiness, more capability. i think that is an unnecessary display of american patriotism. the american people unpatriotic and we celebrate that on vetera ns unpatriotic and we celebrate that on veterans day and the 11th ofjuly. i think it is unnecessary. can ijust circle back to the memo and allegations against the fbi. the chair of 0versight, putting justice above the political process, he says this has nothing to do with the russia investigation. he says it is an investigation into bias within the fbi. isn't it right that the clean—up that concern?” the fbi. isn't it right that the clean-up that concern? i served for ten yea rs clean-up that concern? i served for ten years on the intelligence committee in the senate, and format
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of those years i was vice—chair of the committee. i have never seen a situation in which you had this kind ofa situation in which you had this kind of a break in terms of the integrity of a break in terms of the integrity of the committee, in terms of releasing information on a partisan basis. to me that is just another aspect that this is something that been going on to diminish the credibility of our institutions, and i think to have the republicans put out one version, a sanitised version, and now have their democrats try to come up with theirs, it is simply undermining the institution itself and frankly i am appalled by what is taking place on capitol hill. i think this is working to the disadvantage of the american people. william cohen, former defence secretary and senator, of course, thank you for coming in tojoin us. right now there's a dummy astronaut, sitting in an electric car, listening to david bowie, orbiting around the earth. this is true. yes, it all began as a bit of fun, the crowning glory of an ambitious space project — but it has actually worked!
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take a look at this. it's elon musk‘s tesla roadster that has been up there for nearly 2a hours. 0n the dashboard a note to the fake astronaut sitting in the drivers seat reads, "don't panic." and in the car there is also a note for any aliens that might intercept it: "made on earth, by humans." the tesla travelled to space aboard the world's most powerful rocket the spacex falcon heavy — and even elon musk, the man behind it, seems surprised that it has actually worked. here's the tweet: "apparently there's a car in orbit around earth." it is currently heading towards an asteroid belt between mars and jupiter. which presumably won't be good for the paintwork. but what does all this mean for the future of space exploration? joining us live from houston is leroy chiao, former commander of the international space station. it is great to see you. i mean, i
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was just dumbstruck by these rockets coming back to earth yesterday and landing on their ipods. 0rrey, the third one went somewhere into the sea, but extraordinary achievement, but then i looked today again and thought, we have gone no further forward than the apollo missions —— landing on their pods. 0k, forward than the apollo missions —— landing on their pods. ok, the third one when somewhere into the sea.” would not say we have gone backwards. the third one, it is a very different rockets than the apollo rockets. similar to the saturn five in that the first burn kerosene and liquid oxygen, but what you are seeing is a modern version ofa you are seeing is a modern version of a rocket, heavy—lift rocket, that can go into orbits of this is the first step of the commercial ventures towards actually doing an exploration programme which is extraordinary. this was not created
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using government funds but was done entirely using spacex funds. but of course it will be there for commercial reasons, to take heavier payloads, perhaps by satellite, so the russians and chinese will be watching. what do you think it will do to the space race? well, you know, it actually has excess capacity sold to take the heavy satellites or space probes, we can launch laws on rockets that are half the payload size of this rocket. the fa ct the payload size of this rocket. the fact he has built this to lift so much more than necessary, just to wa nt much more than necessary, just to want a heavy satellite, you know, that is really what distinguishes it and makes it into that step i was talking about towards commercial exploration of space. so it is really a n exploration of space. so it is really an exciting development. and, leroy, you are also saying it could get us considerably significantly closer to the prospect of putting a man 01’ closer to the prospect of putting a man or woman on mars? that's right. with the current rockets that we
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we re with the current rockets that we were flying before the falcon heavy were flying before the falcon heavy we we re were flying before the falcon heavy we were not able to get any significant payload out of law orbit without using multiple launches, assembly in orbit, then refuelling in orbit probably in order to build a spacecraft that could propel itself away. using more powerful rockets like the falcon heavy, you can lift heavier payloads and put them into, you know, directly into orbit around the sun, as elon is doing with his roadster, or with people on the way to mars. now and he is developing an even bigger rocket which he, tongue in cheek, calls the bfr, big falcon rocket, and is moving towards that getting people to mars. thank you. can we dip into the live shots of this car?
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there it is. they were saying it might go behind the moon in which case it would go dark, but it hasn't, so i think it is on its way to the asteroid belt, some way towards mars. it just to the asteroid belt, some way towards mars. itjust doesn't look real, does it? laughter there was a little story there. i don't know... you sent me an e—mail today. you are kind of getting into this, i'm impressed, but you sent me this, i'm impressed, but you sent me this story about... i'm trying to stay on the team! yes, beyond the milky way, the first planet found outside the galaxy, and then i thought about how long it would take to get there so i did some research. 3.8 billion years, and this is the problem. the rocket has lots of power but it doesn't have speeds up as we find someone... there they are, the new planets outside our galaxy, which are revolving around a star and some of them are made of rock, apparently, but 3.8 billion yea rs. we rock, apparently, but 3.8 billion years. we will not live that long. cani years. we will not live that long. can ijust years. we will not live that long. can i just see your years. we will not live that long. can ijust see your research did come from my daughter who is
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studying astrophysics. i wouldn't like people to suddenly think you area like people to suddenly think you are a professor of this as well, among all the other things you know about. yes, she did give me all the details, sorry, maya. thank you, maya, for that! president trump has persistently taken credit for falling black unemployment, claiming his policies mean that african americans have never had it so good. while it's true that black unemployment did fall in the first year of the trump administration, last month it actually went up, from 6.8% to 7.7%. african american unemployment rates started falling in 2010 under president 0bama — so how much of the decline is due to the policies of this administration? laura trevelyan reports from delaware, where african american joblessness is at almost 10%, more than twice the national average. this is no ordinary bus. it's a mobile job centre. it goes around areas of high unemployment in the state of delaware, and today the bus is in northeast wilmington. we have different jobs available on a daily basis. staff help people looking for work, offering advice on everything from resumes to interviews.
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delaware's economy isn't seeing as much growth as other states, and almost 10% of african—americans here are unemployed. stressful. tiaonna has a job — she's looking for a better paid position. which isn't easy. what difference would it make to your life getting the nextjob? ameen, it will make a difference for my future. it will make a difference for my income, for everything, really. karryl mcmanus is an official with delaware's department of labor. she says the long—term impact of being without work cannot be underestimated. work means stronger and more stable families and, you know, ultimately leads to stronger communities. alan beecham is filling out forms at the kingswood community centre. he's about to start a newjob as a youth counsellor. being unemployed was a strain on him
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and his family, and he's thrilled to be working again. so excited about it. i have a social security now. i don't really have to worry about where my next money will come from, if we have enough money at the end of the month to pay oui’ rent, oui’ car 01’ anything like that. president trump is saying that it's his policies that are the reason unemployment is falling among african americans. what do you make of that? something incredible... it is somebody else's work. he has been in office for a year. just stop it. behind president trump's desire to claim credit for following black unemployment lies a stubborn problem. here in delaware, for example, black unemployment rates are three times that of white unemployment rates, so even with an improving economy it's much harder for african—americans to find a job. those who study rates of black unemployment say the decline in african american joblessness is something that began under president
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0bama. something that began under president obama. this has been a longer downward trend, since about 2013, 2014, and so what we are seeing is just the tail end of that longer trend. i think it is more important we focus on why there is a persistent disparity between black and white unemployment, and if we are able to tackle that problem then i would say that is an accomplishment and that is something we should celebrate. donald trump's plan for rebuilding america's crumbling infrastructure succeeds, economists say it has the potential to bring down african—american unemployment, something the president could rightly claim credit for. laura trevelyan, bbc news, delaware. delighted to say i am joined once again here in the london studio by former advisor to george w bush, ron christie. he is ona he is on a bus and holiday but not allowed to enjoy it because i am making him coming to speak about things like this! hello. good to see you. the percentage of african americans unemployed has fallen, as
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we are all saying, but there is the stopper and disparity. why do you think it is still there? part of it could be systemic racism, part could be lack of educational opportunities. if you don't have a couege opportunities. if you don't have a college diploma in america your options are severely limited so if you look at the number of african americans, christian, the gap divot—mac graduated from college with a format your degree in america it isa with a format your degree in america it is a very small percentage compared to the number of the publishing —— those who graduated from college with a four year degree. i suppose the other part of this, does tax reform help black people into employment?” this, does tax reform help black people into employment? i think every president likes to take a victory lap, but in this case i think the president should be a bit more nuanced. if you're talking about a one—month changed where it has gone down to under 7% for the first time in 45 years, then you have an update and it goes back up, i think have an update and it goes back up, ithinka have an update and it goes back up, i think a three—year average is more realistic. if you look at the three—year black
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unemployment average it is 7.1%, but, yes, i do believe part of the bonuses and tax cuts will help people of colour, get those tailored ca re people of colour, get those tailored care vouchers taken care of, transportation, those types of things, so i think that is a good things, so i think that is a good thing for all americans and people of colour in particular. ron, i will go out on a limb and say the president trump is not a president who does nuance particularly but you will remember back in 2008 president 0bama came into office and there was a lot of optimism in this country that that would mean significant progress for black americans, and the narrowing of the gap between black and white americans and it did not pan out as many african—americans not pan out as many african—america ns thought it not pan out as many african—americans thought it would. that gets to the persistent nature of the problem, doesn't it? that gets to the persistent nature of the problem, doesn't mm that gets to the persistent nature of the problem, doesn't it? it does. good to see you, katty. i am encouraged by these numbers. if you look at when president 0bama first came into office the african—american appointment rate was nearly 30% so it has been cut by nearly half and going to christian's questions i do believe tax reforms, the regulatory reform, will make it
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more attractive for businesses to hire people in general and people of colour in particular. at ever the optimist, i think they are heading in the right direction. when are you getting back to washington? katty, i am coming home tomorrow, coming on! we miss you! get away from christian! this is beyond 100 days. still to come: remember this? korea analyst professor kelly went viral after his young children interrupted a bbc interview. it's now up for an award — we'll hear what he makes of that shortly. two of the victims of the black cab rapistjohn worboys and the london mayor sadiq khan, have been given the go—ahead to challenge the decision to release him from prison. daniel sandford reports. driven into the royal courts of justice in a high security van the black cab rate thisjohn worboys was
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led in handcuffs by four prison officers, as his victim started their legal battle to prevent his release from prison. worboys was convicted in 2009 of one rate, four sexual assaults, one attempted sexual assaults, one attempted sexual assault, one assault by penetration and 12 offences of drugging his victims. thejudge the judge apologised as he sat in the doctor any victims who were upset by him being there in person. 0ne victim said this morning she had never expected him to be released. when we were told it an indefinite sentence... it was just, well, justice has been served, he has been dealt with. he is serving a life sentence now. because that is the way it was put across to us. so we never thought for one second that he would be eligible for parole. in court the qc condemned what she
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called the blanket secrecy, and the failure to produce any kind of reasons was unlawful, she said. we can't challenge the decision until we know the reasons for it. we have to know whether that reasoning is within the bounds of reasonable pa role within the bounds of reasonable parole board or whether it is really so parole board or whether it is really so unreasonable or has failed to ta ke so unreasonable or has failed to take into account relevant considerations. john worboys, who devised a kit for drugging and assaulting his victims in his taxi, didn't have a lawyer at the start of the hearing but was able to talk to one halfway through. the us vice—president, mike pence, has delivered a warning to north korea — saying washington won't allow it to hijack the winter 0lympics with propaganda. we now know the younger sister of north korean leader, kimjong—un, will attend the opening ceremony.
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kim yo—jong will be the first immediate kim family member to cross the border. she was promoted in the north korean government last year and works in the party's propaganda department. she's blacklisted by the us over alleged links to human rights abuses. speaking injapan, ahead of friday's opening of the games in south korea, mr pence said the north would not be allowed to use the olympic banner to hide the reality that it enslaves its own people and threatens the region. this is what north and south korean specialist, professor robert kelly, thinks of it all. there has been a lot of overreaction to the olympic participation. i mean, it's good, right? north korea is such a dangerous place and with nuclear weapons it even more dangerous. so it's always good when we can reach out to them, so their coming is a good thing, that we're having negotiations is a good thing, but ultimately what really matters is what kind of concessions will they give us and what do they want in exchange for that? the rest of it is of atmospheric. the noise and the sound and the fury
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and the rest of it, and it doesn't really change anything. i don't think the vice president really needs to worry about north korea capturing the olympic what matters ultimately is the two site at the table, what will they really exchange, and it is a month away. i am almost loathe to say this because professor kelly is an eminent expert on career, but you might recognise him, because of course he gave an interview to the bbc about north and south korea, and then this happened... bbc about north and south korea, and then this happened. . ” bbc about north and south korea, and then this happened... i would argue this is a triumph of democracy, scandals happen all the time and the important thing is how we respond to those scandals. what will it mean for the wider region? i think one of your children hasjust for the wider region? i think one of your children has just what then? shifting sands in the region? do you think relations with the north will change. i would be surprised if they do. pardon me. my apologies! laughter studio: i love it! laughter one of my kids will come in soon.
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now professor kelly is up for an award for viral video moment of 2017 and we will find out soon if he were actually win. —— if he will win. that video has been viewed more than 8 million times on the bbc‘s youtube channel alone. his kids even inspired a cartoon series. here he is talking about the fame side of things. people take photographs of me getting out of my car and buying milk at costco, you know, and when it came to immigration and emigration of the serbs recognise me. it is weird. you're that guy, right? yes, and that guy, then they ask for a picture. it is sort of bizarre. i don't know anything about being a celebrity. he is a good sport! 0k, ok, he definitely has to win. there was no other moment in 2017 that ca ptu red was no other moment in 2017 that captured the kind of viral nature of how information spreads, the inadvertent nature of television and video... and inadvertent nature of television and video. .. and nannies. inadvertent nature of television and video... and nannies. i love it! ok.
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the effect of plastic waste on the environment and seas for plastic is only 23% and in the uk only around half of all plastic bottles get recycled. but norway easily surpasses america and the uk — 98% of their bottles get recycled. that's thanks to an ingenious system where people pay a deposit on every bottle — and get the money back once the empty bottles are returned and posted into a machine. there's talk of a similar scheme being adopted in the uk. i have already got a head start on this. anyone who follows me on twitter will know that in my house we are reducing our use of plastics — we are now getting delivered in bottles. this was my doorstep the other day. a big shout out to my milkman, andy nicholson. i get the milk bottles a week and it is better! you remember this, incidentally? this is how they
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used to go round in britain delivering milk, back in the 1960s, some pictures of these electric milk floats that used to go around, so i did some research today, and in 1975, 90 4% of uk milk was delivered in glass bottles, and that had dropped to 3% in 2014. but you're on your destroying again —— in 1875 94% of you cannot. —— in 1975, 90 4%. i don't get milk delivered and i don't even know if it is possible here to get milk delivered in glass bottles. we do compost, but i once hitched a ride on a milk float. it took me an awful long time to get from cambridge to a town about five miles away. first of all, they are not very fast, not like elon musk‘s red car, now going round space and heading to an asteroid. they were pretty slow, and you do stop and
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deliver milk at every other house, or you did back when i was hitching in the 1980s. my dad was a milkman. was he? yes, in 1975 he used to deliver 260 litres a day and around 700 eggs a week and he would go out at four o'clock in the morning and come back at seven, then go to his second job, and he told me today, i was talking about this with him, he said he went to night school on thursday to get his a—level. a quick question. how is your milk actually delivered? by somebody in one of those very slow carts like your dad used to drive? no he comes in so early that i don't see. like father christmas? but the milk is there, and it is called, and honestly, it is better. the milk tastes better? yes, it really is. calder, fresher, it just works and yes, it really is. calder, fresher, itjust works and you're doing your bit for the environment so that is my push for the milkmen around the country. what about summer when it is very hot? you have to get up early so it doesn't get warm, and
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get there before the bluetits start eating the foil on the top and eating the foil on the top and eating the foil on the top and eating the melt... you will be the do on your doorstep at about four o'clock in the morning injuly, having just watched american football on it! absolutely. that is it from us. we will be back same time tomorrow. with more milk stories! we will see you then. good evening. after a very cold start to read and stay many of you had a reasonably pleasant winter's day. we kept the sunshine across these areas like we see from this weather watcher shot. this is where we see some of the colder area deliberate weather overnight. a grey afternoon in north berwick but with that cloud comes a list and temperatures. the milder air has been over the atlantic so far today and you can see on our chart this slice of yellow is where the warmer air has been in amongst the clothes,
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spreading southwards and eastwards and will be with many of us tomorrow. before it arrives across the south and east we have already seen temperatures drop. temperatures will wax and wane through the night but it breaks of rain and hill snow, scotland, mainly rain in northern ireland and patchy rain in north—west england later. looking at the temperature chart, no blues on the temperature chart, no blues on the charts of frost free night for the charts of frost free night for the vast majority but further south and east is where we will see the frost, perhaps as low as —6 in some parts of east anglia in particular. a cold start to thursday but this is where we will see the milder push across england and wales before colder air works and later on. in between the two we have a weather front, so for the morning rush hour this is where we will see the thickest of the cloud extended, somerset and dorset, across wales. not much in the way of rain around. patchy light rain and drizzle is an perhaps the odd burst here and they are. we will stay cloudy all day long and there will be some further
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bursts of rain around at times. it could turn heavier into the afternoon as you see the colour blue dark and across the west of wales. north of that, 12—mac wintry showers, some hazy sunshine elsewhere, and we will start with some hazy sunshine in the south east, still quite chilly but elsewhere temperatures up in recent days to get to around 10 degrees down here. some heavy rain then during the evening spreading its way across many parts of wales, western and northern england than in anger and northern england than in anger and the south—east. clear conditions in the week and then with showers on thursday morning —— friday mine they will become a bit less abundant but snow still possible on the scottish mountains but it will turn colder with some sunshine around. the weekend is set to turn windy, particularly on saturday night, rain at times bit brighter, cooler and colder on sunday. this is bbc news. the headlines at
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8.00. the headlines at 8.00. victims of the serial sex attackerjohn worboys, have now been given permission, to challenge the decision by the parole board, to release him. government forecasts of the effects of brexit, suggest negative growth across all areas of the uk. jon venables, one of the killers of the toddlerjames bulger, has admitted possessing indecent images of children for a second time. he's been sentenced to just over three years in prison. and britain's biggest retailer, tesco, could face a bill of four billion pounds, after hundreds of thousands of female employees make a claim for equal pay. also coming up this hour, a special report on how we can reduce the amount of plastic in our lives. could the uk follow norway's example and recycle almost all our plastic bottles? and...
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