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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 9, 2018 1:00pm-2:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 1.00pm. the daughter of murdered islamic state hostage david haines, expresses her relief at the capture of two british islamic state fighters in syria who are thought to have been part of the cell which tortured him. 0h! you kind of realise that they are real and to think, that is it. that feeling of relief that they have got them. the eu's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier says a proposed transition period after britain leaves the single market and customs union "is not a given" and checks at the irish border were "unavoidable". the charity oxfam has condemned staff over reports they regularly used prostitutes when stationed in haiti on a mission to help those affected by a devastating earthquake in 2010. also this hour, at the winter 0lympics get underway in south korea with the elaborate opening ceremony.
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and, at the ceremony, a historic handshake between a south korean president and the sister of north korean leader, kim mac. —— kim jong—un. a scientific breakthrough that could help preserve the fertility of young cancer patients — human eggs have been successfully grown in the laboratory for the first time. it's been on display at the natural history museum since 1905 — but now dippy the diplodocus is starting a three year tour of the uk. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the daughter of a man, murdered by the islamic state group in syria, has welcomed the capture of two british men who are
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thought to have been part of its notorious execution cell. bethany haines, whose father david was killed in 2014 , told the bbc she hoped alexanda kotey and el shafee elsheikh would be locked up for good, and said she was relieved they couldn't hurt anyone else. the two men, from london, are accused of being part of a unit which executed 27 western hostages and tortured many more, as andy moore reports. alexanda kotey and el shafee elsheikh — the two britons captured by kurdish forces last month and questioned by the americans. together with aine davis and mohammed emwazi, they formed the kidnap gang that became known as the beatles, because they were usually masked and their captors could hear only their british accents. british aid worker alan henning was just one of at least two dozen foreign hostages they held captive and then executed.
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last year, the american state department designated kotey and elsheikh as wanted terrorists who had fought for islamic state. kotey was born in paddington in london. he was of ghanaian and greek cypriot background. the citation said he used exceptionally cruel torture methods, including electronic shock and waterboarding. elsheikh‘s family had fled sudan in the 1990s. he became a british citizen. according to the state department, he'd earned a reputation for waterboarding, mock executions and crucifixions. the two men were captured by the american—backed syrian democratic forces, a kurdish—led militia. the story was confirmed by american officials, after it first appeared in the new york times. the fate of the two men is unknown. they could be sent to the us detention centre at guantanamo bay or they could stand trial
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in the states. the foreign office in the uk said it would not comment on individual cases or ongoing investigations. bethany haines, the daughter of david haines, told bbc scotland how she heard the news. i was at home just doing a bit of studying and i got a message on instagram from a journalist at about eight o'clock at night, and it was to tell me the news that that there was rumours that the americans had caught the two remaining beatles that has been a part of my dad's murder. how did you feel? what were the emotions? at first i was sceptical. there are always rumours, you do tend to get the occasional one that is not true, and then, i got a news alert on my phone, from the bbc confirming it, and i thought, right, this is real. and, at first, i wasjust completely in shock, i didn't know what to feel, i didn't know what to think,
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and then, you kind of realise it's real, and you think, that's it. they are gone, they cannot hurt anybody else. it is that feeling of relief that they got them. and obviously, i am sure it is still really difficult now, it never goes away, but does some of it come back to you, last night? it does, because you... people say that you learn to get over it, but you never get over it, you just learn how to deal with it and manage the different emotions that play in your head every day. it does bring it all back. i remember seeing him in an orangejumpsuit, and that was those men too were responsible for that, and they were responsible for the torture of these other hostages, and the deaths of quite a lot of man and i'm actually close with a lot of their families. and what do you want to happen to these men? my personal opinion
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is that they should die a long, slow painful death. i think quite a lot of people will understand that, that they shouldn't be allowed to live, but realistically, that's not going to happen. and, you've got to come to terms with that. the best thing that could happen is they get locked up and throw away the key. they should never be allowed back in society. they willjust recruit people, and they willjust do this again. if it does go to trial, what are your thoughts about that? if it goes to trial, i will certainly be there. i certainly want to look them in the eye and let them know that i am who i am and they have destroyed a big part of my life. and hopefully there will be some sort ofjustice. do you think, then seeing you, what would your hope be? i would hope that they would show some sort of remorse. seeing the families, and seeing the people that they have actually affected, and it is not, for them, they just think it's
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a video, but it's not, it's real people's lives, and hopefully, they will start to realise that and, if they are capable, even show a bit of the morse. you would expect it to be probably a decision for washington, to work out where they go. the options are really to stand trial in the united states, particularly for the murder of us hostages, or potentially guantanamo bay. it is an option. donald trump himself has talked about trying to put more people in there, although there are convocations do that. coming back to the uk, my understand is that even though the home office would comment on individual cases, that these men
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have been deprived of their british citizenship, so that there is the ability to do that, or quite how, it is not clear really at the moment. i think that there are a range of options at the moment about where they go, but certainly no answer. and, which is dealing with them, would be security services want to see if they can get useful information out of them? and the report is that they already have. it looks like they were detained in the middle of january, that they were interrogated for some time. the possessions that they had with them we re possessions that they had with them were analysed, such as bones. that is very important, because as well as the issue of what happens to them, what intelligence they bring is vital. there has been this concern about foreign fighters. thousands went out to so—called islamic state, hundreds from britain. it is not clear what happened to them all, how many died, how many are still in iraq and syria, how many 30 other battlefield and other regions. how many are tied to get back to europe, how many
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might be in turkey. that is a really important issue for western security services to understand, because it goes to the issue of what the threat is from them. so, what happens to these individuals, who is with them, who as they know about, what the roots are that people might be taken, that type of intelligence is absolutely vital. do not know that some people have made it back into the uk, having made its... how much do we know about them? we do know that quite if you have come back. most came back much earlier in the syrian conflict. some of them came out for reasons that were ambiguous. how far they were involved in fighting or not, as opposed to other forms of support for groups out there. some have been monitored by security services, some have been arrested. they will get assessed by security services in the process, so thatis security services in the process, so that is the issue, but with the fall of rack there was always going to be
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this question, where did they go, what were they trying to do? hamlet ofa what were they trying to do? hamlet of a threat to papers? that is very much top of the agenda for western security services. thank you very much. at this stage, the president is to signa at this stage, the president is to sign a stopgap funding measure it later on today in a move to reopen the federal government. the federal government shuts down at midnight. it looks like it will be very short lived. the president will be signing the bipartisan budget act this morning, friday morning. that has just come through from washington. i am sure there will be more to emerge on that. the eu's chief brexit negotiator has said the uk's decision to leave the single market and customs union
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would mean checks at the irish border were "unavoidable". an agreement between the government and brussels in december committed the parties to an open border in ireland after britain leaves the bloc. speaking at a briefing with journalists in the last hour, mr barnier said any solution for the irish border must be precise and unambiguous. any solution must be precise, clear and unambiguous. as you know, port provides for three options. —— ourjoint —— our joint report —— ourjoint report provides the three options. first, solving the issues on the island of ireland through the future relationship. and this future relationship would need to avoid a border and protect north — south cooperation, and the good friday agreement. 0nce — south cooperation, and the good friday agreement. once again, it is
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important to tell the truth. a uk decision to leave the single market and to leave the customs union would make border checks an avoidable. —— unavoidable. secondly, the uk has proposed specific solutions to the unique circumstances on the island of ireland, and we are awaiting for such solutions. the third option, is to maintain full regulatory of ireland, with those rules of the single market, as the customs union. —— current or future, single market, as the customs union. —— current orfuture, which single market, as the customs union. —— current or future, which supports north— south cooperation, and the whole island economy, and the good friday agreement. 0ption one and two can only be made operational in the context of the future relationship. in the meantime, it is our
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responsibility to include the third option in the text of the agreement, to guarantee that there will be no ha rd to guarantee that there will be no hard border, whatever the circumstances. michel barnier also warned that disagreements between the uk and the rest of the eu meant a proposed transition period after britain leaves the bloc "is not a given". translation: to be franki am surprised by these disagreements. i think the positions of the european union are very logical, i think. the uk wants to enjoy the advantages of the single market, the customs union, it has therefore to accept all the rules and the obligations until the end of transition. very logical. it also has to except the consequences of its decision to leave the european union, to leave it institutions and its policies. to be quite frank, if these
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disagreements persist, the transition is not a given. michel barnier part of that quite lengthy news briefing in the last little while in brussels. let's speak to our brussels reporter adam fleming. this is what has happened. they were meant to discuss the future relationship and the uk's approach to future relationship this morning. and a stand that that was going to beat 0llie robbins, who will speak to michel barnier‘s deputy, who is his opposite number. i have heard that michel barnier came to that meeting and that 0llie robins is not allowed to speak to him because they
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are not in the same level, michel barnier negotiates with david davis, not 0llie robins. however, european sources are saying not 0llie robins. however, european sources are saying that that will not happen this afternoon, they will just have a talk about future date of negotiation. that is likely a mess and we will only know what actually happens by tea—time tonight, and that is one of i think four think that i heard in this press c0 nfe re nce four think that i heard in this press conference where there are problems between the two sides. 0k let's talk through a couple of the others. on the irish border, that was quite interesting, wasn't it? he was quite interesting, wasn't it? he was saying that border checks would be unavoidable if the uk leaves the customs union and the single market? that again, is an issue where we are keen to have to wait to find out what willie happens. what is going on is that officials in that building and their british cou nterpa rts building and their british counterparts are trying to turn the commitments made between the prime minister and jean—claude juncker in
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december written down in the document in the joint report, the tried to turn that into the actual text of a treaty, the withdrawal agreement, the actual brexit treaty. they need to make that legally watertight and sound like a treaty should. they are discussing on how to turn this pledge on avoiding a ha rd to turn this pledge on avoiding a hard border on another island, into legal language. at the moment, they are going to proceed on the basis that they are going to go for the uk's third favourite option which is continued regulatory alignment with the single market and the customs union, which to some people that like staying in the single market and the customs union, which the uk does not want. however, having said that, the uk is then going to present its other two options, coming up with a really good negotiation, coming up with specific solutions for the borders which means that
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they don't need border checks. 0fficially, they don't need border checks. officially, the text that they are going to discuss now is going to be the uk's third favourite option, but the uk's third favourite option, but the uk's third favourite option, but the uk was still discussed there are other options in parallel for that. iam other options in parallel for that. i am sorry that it is so compensated, that is why that at the beginning that we would have two weight to see what actually happens. adam fleming, infull weight to see what actually happens. adam fleming, in full expeller tube modes talking to my colleagues, and clearly there are further meetings this afternoon, so more on bbc news this afternoon, so more on bbc news this afternoon, so more on bbc news this afternoon about that. the daughter of murdered islamic state hostage david haines, expresses her relief at the capture of two british islamic state fighters in syria who are thought to have been part of the cell which tortured him. the eu's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier says a proposed transition period after britain leaves the single market and customs union "is not a given" and checks at the irish border were "unavoidable". the charity 0xfam has condemned
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staff over reports they regularly used prostitutes when stationed in haiti on a mission to help those affected by a devastating earthquake in 2010. also this hour, at the winter 0lympics get underway in south korea newspaper reports here in the uk are alleging that aid workers for one of the country's biggest charities, 0xfam, regularly used prostitutes when stationed in haiti in 2011. prostitution is illegal there, and the use of sex workers is banned by the charity's code of conduct. 0ur correspondent adina campbell told my colleague ben brown the nature of the allegations. these are very damning claims on the front page of the times newspaper. the paper says that senior aid workers hired prostitutes after the earthquake hit back
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in 2010, following... then of course there was the international relief effort. this of course was a massive disaster, more than 200,000 people were killed. 1.5 million people forced to live in makeshift shelters. during the international relief effort, the times newspaper said, these aid workers, whilst they were staying in guest houses and homes paid for by the charity used this accommodation to hire prostitutes and to then conduct these sex parties, and there are also allegations of harassment, bullying and downloading pornography, as well. so, what have 0xfam said? they put out a statement in response to the times? they have responded and they say that they immediately started an investigation in 2011, as soon as it was made aware of these allegations, and says that the behaviour uncovered by some of the members of staff was completely
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unacceptable, and as a result, four members of staff were dismissed, in concluding the country director, before the end of the investigation. it does say though that allegations of underage girls being involved were not proven, but 0xfam now has a dedicated safeguarding team and a whistle—blowing hotline, as well. it is important is it that 0xfam is one of the uk's biggest charities. it receives hundreds of millions of pounds in donations, notjust from the british government, but also from the general public, as well. now, we have also had a statement from the charity commission, and it says that allegations involving the
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0xfa m says that allegations involving the 0xfam staff risk undermining public trust. it says that they made the commission aware that it was carrying out the investigation, but that's the reports did not go into precise detail of these allegations. the opening ceremony of the 2018 winter olympic games has been taken place. puppets, and the parade. it all place. puppets, and the parade. it a ll starts place. puppets, and the parade. it all starts the official start of the 23rd winter olympics. team gb are the athletes —— among the athletes taking part. yarnold acted as flag bearer. and there have been a number
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of significant moments for negotiations between god and south korea in all this. athletes acting under a unified banner, the south korean president shared a handshake with kim jong—uns sister. researchers at edinburgh university have grown human eggs in a laboratory for the first time. the findings could lead to new ways of preserving women's fertility. here's our health and science correspondent, james gallagher. in laboratories in edinburgh, scientists have grown human eggs. they've taken immature eggs that women are born with and transformed them so they are ready to be fertilised. it's taken decades of work to copy what happens inside women's ovaries. we never imagined that we would be
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getting these kind of results using human tissue. so it's a significant step, but, of course, the main objective for us is to improve and determine the safety of these techniques, so that they could, in the future, go into some kind of application. it could be used for young girls with cancer, as treatment can damage their fertility. so how might it work? a girl diagnosed with cancer would have a sample of her ovary frozen before cancer treatment, then later, as an adult, the tissue would be defrosted, an egg grown, fertilised, and then put in the womb. there may even be other applications in fertility treatment. this treatment is at an early stage and needs refining. none of the eggs have been fertilised, so it is still uncertain how viable they are. after spending more than a century at the natural history museum in london, dippy the dinosaur has begun his uk tour.
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0ur correspondentjohn maguire has spent the morning in dorset, where the giant skeleton is making his first stop. had been an incredible challenge already to get him here to dorset. hejust about already to get him here to dorset. he just about squeezes in. this already to get him here to dorset. hejust about squeezes in. this is how they did it. you can tell from this time—lapse footage just how they manage to get him in here, he is 292 -- they manage to get him in here, he is 292 —— he has 292 buster of paris bones. even the head on the right 50 kilos, and this is what the head looks like. this was made with a 3—d printer, but as you can see a very, very big animal, with very, very small brain. i sensed that there we re small brain. i sensed that there were 292 bones to make up dippy. at the moment, there are only 291, because we are going to put the very
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last bones, one of the toe bones onto dippy grammar right now. 11—year—old harry is going to do the honours for us. why did you carry on and do that for us. philip i will hand over the toby is as we do it. it is quite a delicate operation, isn't it? it is, yeah. do your member? we put that on. excellent, excellent. perfect! perfect! harry, how was that? exciting. lorraine, you have been working with dippy since 1980? wisely so magical —— why is he so magical? what is the appeal? he is amazing. we have had a fantastic history. dinosaurs just invoke the imagination, did they? and dippy is something that the children visited, parents have taken
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their children, so he is the people's dinosaur, that is what i say, and we are so excited to be working with dorset museum to actually bring him to life. he really does look as if he has been broughtjuly. in the next two years, he will be going to birmingham, belfast, glasgow, rochdale, ending up belfast, glasgow, rochdale, ending up in norwich in 2020. really a spectacular sight, unfortunately you're not be able to get as close as this, but pretty close. i suppose this is what it would have felt like to bea this is what it would have felt like to be a live 150 million years ago. —— a leaf. let's find out what the weather has good afternoon, we have saw some heavy rain. that was all courtesy of this little fella. at least that is
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where the best of the sunshine has been. further easily have been quite a bit of news and cloud so far today. in the west, a beautiful blues i —— blue sky and sunshine. the showers that are falling up producing a light of dusting of snow. the raval push in from the western night, and on the leading edge of that, we will see it turning increasingly to snow for a time. scotla nd increasingly to snow for a time. scotland and northern ireland. a cold start to saturday morning, hence the reason that the temperature gradient steps down both freezing. the snow could be an issue first thing. snow, and i, as much as 5-10 first thing. snow, and i, as much as 5—10 centimetres before that though easing away. there will be some lying snow across scotland, maybe... further south, it will be rain. that
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rain will bejesting further south, it will be rain. that rain will be jesting its way eastwards as we go through the day. so, it is an improving weather story, i suspect, across parts of scotla nd story, i suspect, across parts of scotland through the afternoon, but the rain will turn quite heavy as it moves through north—west england, wales, south—west england and eventually towards the south east, perhaps think try during daylight hours. but i'm a pretty miserable afternoon for many of us. we might just escape double digits, but it's not good to be dry. now i understand that that there are important but the match is taking part this weekend. it would surprise you to hear that there will be rain around. in adjustable wind which will potentially affect the kicking game for ireland. as we move at a saturday, on the southern plank we could see it for a time guilt or severe gales across north—west england, and then we can trace those eyes about all the way up into the north west, meaning that as we head to wards sunday, winter proper. the showers will be falling as noah.
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best of the sunshine, further east. that is it, enjoy. two britishjihadis two british jihadis captured two britishjihadis captured in syria have been accused of murdering more than 20 prisoners. relatives of hostages killed by the men say they should be locked up and the key thrown away. if it goes to trial, i will certainly be there, i want to look them in the eye and let them know that i am who i am, and they have destroyed a big part of my life. we will have the latest on their capture. also this lunchtime: the eu throws doubt on a transition period. michel barnier was that it is not a given. the winter elonex have officially opened in south korea. this is the scene live in pyeongchang. there was a show of
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unity as athletes from north and south korea entered the stadium together as one team. and, a handshake between the president of south korea and the sister of the north korean leader. it was greeted by cheers. the athletes... by marching together, sent a powerful message of peace to the world. also -- also, the world's's most famous dinosaur goes on tour. dippy the diplodocus could be coming to a town near you. and any sport on bbc news: after talks with the scottish fa, former boss walter smith hasn't ruled out a return as the country's new head coach. —— has ruled out a return. hello, good afternoon. welcome to
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the bbc news at 1pm. victims of two british jihadis have called for them to face justice british jihadis have called for them to facejustice in british jihadis have called for them to face justice in court. bethany haines says that they need to look the lives of those people they ruined in the eye. richard galpin has the latest. 34—year—old alexanda kotey was captured in eastern syria last month, along with 29—year—old el shafee elsheikh. the news only confirmed now by us officials. they were caught by syrian kurdish fighters like these,
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who are backed by the americans. us forces have been interrogating the two men. the other members of the notorious british gang of is fighters were aine davis, who's injail in turkey, and the ringleader, mohammed emwazi, known asjihadijohn, killed in a drone strike in 2015. kotey and elsheikh were the last to be found. today, the police went to the family home of el shafee elsheikh in west london. all the gang came from the same area, and were radicalised here before leaving for syria and iraq. makeshift bomb shelters in the bottom of a school... the american journalist james foley was the first of at lease 27 western hostages, who us officials say were beheaded by the gang. the killing videoed, and then put on the internet. and this is david haines, a british aid worker, who was also captured by islamic state and beheaded in 2014. alan henning, a former taxi driver,
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who became a volunteer aid worker in syria in 2013 was the second british man to be murdered. the videos showed mohammed emwazi, jihadijohn, killing each of these men and others. they should die a long, slow, painful death. and i think quite a lot of people understand that, that they shouldn't be allowed to live. but realistically, that's not going to happen. and you have to come to terms with that. the best thing for them is to be locked up and throw away the key. they should never be allowed back into society, because they willjust recruit people, and they will just do this again. if it goes to trial, i'll certainly be there. i certainly want to look them in the eye and let them know that i'm who i am. and they've destroyed a big part of my life. some westerners guarded
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by the british gang did manage to get out alive, including frenchjournalist nicola henan, who's delighted by the capture of kottey and sheffield take but want proper trial. revenge is an endless cycle, where justice eventually aims at extinguishing violence by setting up all the grievances and bringing back peace. and this is what i want. but it's possible kottey and elsheikh may end up here at guantanamo bay, where there would not be a normal trial. although it's not confirmed, the bbc believes they've been stripped of their british citizenship, which means they could remain in american hands. richard galpin, bbc news. are we getting a clearer sense of what will happen next? clearly some options that we heard there are, it is possible they could go on trial
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in the united states particularly for the killing of us hostages, likely that the doj will be building a case to do that, and possible that some people in the trump administration will want to send to want and obey, there have been people who have said they would like to resume sending detainees from what they call the battlefield to la nta na my has what they call the battlefield to lantana my has happened in the past, but has not been done for some yea rs. but has not been done for some years. —— guantanamo bay. assuming they are in full control of the individuals, because the kurdish forces originally picked them up, the role in that is less clear for britain, because it is thought these men have been deprived of their british citizenship under special powers, and so britain's role, or ability to put them on trial here, looks less certain possible, priority, there will be getting as much intelligence from the men, to understand what has happened to otherforeign understand what has happened to
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other foreign fighters, to understand what has happened to otherforeign fighters, to national that have been out in iraq and syria and to understand where they are and if they still pose a threat. there is the issue of what happens to them in the future but also trying to get as much information as they can from them. the eu's chief negotiatior, michel barnier, has thrown into doubt the uk's plans for a transition period after brexit, saying it's not a given, if disagreements in the negotiations persist. mr barnier also told a news conference that checks at the irish border would be unavoidable, once britain has left the single market and customs union. this must protect the good friday agreement, and once again, it is important to tell the truth, uk decision to leave the single market
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and leave the customs union would make border checks unavoidable. adam fleming is in brussels. this future relationship will need to avoid the border and protect the corporation, and the good friday agreement. it is important to tell the truth, the uk decision to leave the single market and to leave the customs union would make border checks unavoidable. this issue of avoiding a hard border in the island of ireland has only been parked, not solved, and it is still quite a tricky one, he also wanted to send a message that the british objections to the eu's plans for how this transition or in valente jhon pirez will work mean that it might not be agreed as quickly as the uk would like, and to that the british would say, it is a negotiation, they are negotiating, thatis negotiation, they are negotiating, that is what they are doing. slightly weird episode, disagreement between both sides about whether michel barnier could be in the room this morning while british civil servants were talking to european commission civil servants and that one has not yet been solved. i described last month as dryjanuary for brexit, not that much seemed to
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be happening, not the case in february(!) laughter adam fleming, thank you very much. so where does this leave the brexit negotiations on the issue of trade? here's chris morris from the bbc‘s reality check team. there are now less than two months before the beginning of the financial year in which brexit actually happens, so it's hardly surprising that pressure from business for greater clarity is becoming intense. negotiations between uk and eu officials have been taking place in brussels again this week, with plenty still to be resolved over the withdrawal agreement and the details of a transition period after brexit. but in the long term this is what people want to know — how is the uk's future relationship with the eu going to work? that means reaching agreement on trade arrangements. trying to negotiate a security treaty. and working out how future foreign policy cooperation will work in practice. and it is trade, in fact the entire economic relationship, that is proving the most difficult to pin down.
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formal negotiations haven't even started yet. and yesterday we had a reminder that the lack of clarity is making people nervous, even outside of europe. if there is no profitability of continuing operations in uk, not japanese only, no private company can continue operation. so it's as simple as that. and this is all high stakes that i think all of us need to keep in mind. so what do we know? well, the uk government plans to leave the eu single market and customs union, the closest form of cooperation between countries anywhere in the world. but we also know they want to maintain frictionless trade, no tariffs, no checks, the minimum of bureaucracy. but the eu says that's not possible, unless the uk sticks extremely closely to all of its
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rules and regulations. the uk position is still being negotiated in cabinet, but it wants the freedom to diverge from eu rules in certain areas, agriculture is one obvious example, foreign trade deals another. it also says publicly that it wants to finalise all negotiations on the future before the uk leaves the eu in march 2019. the eu says that's not realistic, there's not enough time to sort it all out. it wants a broad political declaration finalised by october, but says negotiations will have to continue in a transition period after brexit. as for divergence, well, it's warned the uk repeatedly that it can't expect to cherry pick the best bits of the current relationship without taking on the common responsibilities. so that's why there's now so much pressure on the government to set out more explicitly what it wants to negotiate. and don't forget, if you see headlines proclaiming "agreement reached". that's just here in the uk. you have to get the other 27 eu countries on board as well, they all have their own interests, and that's one of the reasons why this is such a complex process. human eggs have been grown
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in a laboratory for the first time. scientists from edinburgh university removed egg cells from ovary tissue at their earliest stage of development, and grew them to the point they were ready for fertilisation. the team says the findings could lead to new ways of preserving women's fertility. james gallagher explains. in laboratories in edinburgh, scientists have grown human eggs. they've taken immature eggs that women are born with and transformed them so they are ready to be fertilised. it's taken decades of work to copy what happens inside women's ovaries. we never imagined that we would be getting these kind of results using human tissue. so it's a significant step, but, of course, the main objective for us is to improve and determine the safety of these techniques, so that they could, in the future, go into some kind of application. it could be used for young girls with cancer, as treatment can damage their fertility. so how might it work? a girl diagnosed with cancer
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would have a sample of her ovary frozen before cancer treatment, then later, as an adult, the tissue would be defrosted, an egg grown, fertilised, and then put in the womb. there may even be other applications in fertility treatment. this treatment is at an early stage and needs refining. none of the eggs have been fertilised, so it is still uncertain how viable they are. james gallagher, bbc news. it will be quite a few more years before this can be used clinically. the eggs must be used more efficiently at a high success rate, tested clinically, we need to see if they develop normally into embryos, quite a they develop normally into embryos, quitea a they develop normally into embryos, quite a a few things to go through.
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the work marks an important proof of principle and will give researchers the opportunity to explore how human ex—developed, much of which remains a mystery. —— how human eggs. james gallagher, bbc news. the publishing group trinity mirror has announced a deal of nearly £127 million to buy the daily express and the daily star and 0k magazine. 0ur media correspondent david sillito is here. 50 yea rs 50 years ago this would have been unthinkable, these were the two giants of fleet street, selling somewhere between eight and 9 million copies a day, now, adding them together, they sell less than a million, you can see the decline that has happened in the newspaper world and this is all about essentially how to deal with that decline. the trinity mirror group combined back office staff, they can save £20 million out of the costs, they can ring a bit more profit out of it, however, when you look at it,
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this is about that arresting decline, it does not address the basic problem, does not come up with a solution that everyone is looking for, how do you make news page in a time when people can get it for free on their phones —— how do you make news pay. top stories: two britishjihadis ca ptu red top stories: two britishjihadis captured in syria have been accused of murdering more than 20 prisoners. coming up on the programme, round two of the six nations, old rivals england and wales prepare to come face—to—face at twickenham tomorrow. coming up in sport, riyad mahrez‘s viewed with leicester city looks to be over, he is set to train with team—mates for the first time since a move to manchester city fell through last month. the 23rd winter olympics have
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officially opened in south korea, and they're likely to be the coldest in history, with temperatures of minus 25 degrees celcius. in a mark of unity, north and south korean athletes entered the stadium, to loud cheers, as one team. for 17 days, more than 3,000 of the world's best athletes will compete in venues across the country, in more than a hundred medal events. team gb is aiming for its most successful winter games yet. andy swiss sent this report. 0pening ceremonies are always a spectacle but few have seen quite so significant, on a freezing night, although thankfully not as cold as it has been, pyeongchang welcomed the world. the theme of the ceremony was irrelevant one, peace and harmony, seen through the eyes of five children exploring a winter landscape. there was
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more drama in the stands. a rapprochement, the president of south korea shaking hands with the sister of north korean president kim jong—un, us vice president mike pence looking on, even a few weeks ago, undrinkable. the athletes came m, ago, undrinkable. the athletes came in, lizzie yarnold led the team gb delegation, certainly enjoyed their moment, the biggest british winter 0lympic moment, the biggest british winter olympic team ever, and they are targeting their best ever performance. and then, entering under a neutralflag, performance. and then, entering under a neutral flag, 0lympic athletes from russia, their presence here highly contentious, no russian colours, because russia is banned from these games after their recent doping scandal, and yet some 168 of their athletes have been allowed to compete as neutrals. an early
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0lympic compete as neutrals. an early olympic medal compete as neutrals. an early 0lympic medalfor compete as neutrals. an early olympic medal for bravery surely goes to the flag bearer for tonga, what freezing temperatures(!) finally, historically, the moment they had all been waiting for, under a flagrant presenting their peninsula, north and south korea parading as one, joint flag bearers from each country, a sudden thawing of tensions expressed in a remarkable show of unity. more handshakes between the north and south korean delegations and high emotion in the stadium. the ceremony continued with its theme of harmony, spectacle of sound and light, before the olympic president paid tribute to the show of unity between north and south korea. in sport, we are all equal. this is how you show the unique power of sport to unite people. a great example of this unifying power is the joint march
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here tonight of the two teams from the national 0lympic committees of the national 0lympic committees of the republic of korea and the democratic people's republic of korea. applause we thank you. we are all touched by this wonderful gesture. we alljoin and support you, in your message of peace. it was soon left to the south korean president to officially open the games. there was no doubting the sentiment of the night, a dove of peace eliminating the stadium before a fitting climax, as two ice hockey players, one from north korea, one from south korea, took the olympic torch on its finaljourney, to the lighting of the cauldron. and so,
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even before the sport, these games have produced some indelible images, a memorable day for the olympics, a historic one for career. —— korea. let's head to the olympic stadium, politically, quite a moment, steven. absolutely remarkable, we would not have expected anything like this just a few months ago. virtually no communication between the two koreas and here they are marching in together, i guess that it is part of the spirit of the olympics that you can achieve things like this and it is hard to be cynical about it when you see them coming in together, the stadium full of people cheering. 0ne of the images people will run under, that of us vice president mike pence, sitting in one row of chairs, and just behind him, the sister of
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the north korean leader, within handshake distance, you know, on the one hand we have the americans, trying to discourage south korea from rewarding north korea too much at these games, and yet, it does seem that the spirit of communication is winning out over the message that is saying to try to keep the north koreans more isolated. and, andy, in terms of the sport itself, how do you rate the chances of team gb? high hopes for team gb, targeting their best winter olympics ever, between four and ten medals, they have not got off to a great start, snowboarder katie ormerod is already out of the games after fracturing her heel during training yesterday, nasty fracture, had to go off for emergency surgery, ple nty had to go off for emergency surgery, plenty other medal hopes still to come, including a lease christie, speed skater, competed in the sochi games four years ago, crashed out of
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all three of her events, received death threats, thought about quitting, she is back as a triple world champion. —— elise christie. she has an excellent chance of winning a medal. the temperatures here, have been much milder, but thatis here, have been much milder, but that is the talking point, temperatures forecast to plummet to around —15 towards the end of the week, maybe —30 with wind chill, shaping up to be one of the coldest winter olympics in history. make sure that you wrap up. police in canada have found the remains of at least six people in the grounds of a house links to an alleged serial killer. bruce mcarthur was arrested last month and charged with murdering five men. charlotte gallagher reports. police in toronto have called this investigation unprecedented, detectives have now found the remains of at least six people hidden in large plant pots in a suburban home, where the suspect
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carried out landscape gardening. this man, 66—year—old lewis macarthur, has been charged with the murders of five men, and detectives believe that more charges may follow. ——. bruce mcarthurfrenzied teams are searching 30 properties, battling plunging temperatures to dig through the frozen ground. —— bruce mcarthur. officers are also examining the computer and mobile phone of bruce macarthur and investigating a possible link between gay dating apps and the murders. there is an extensive digital investigation going on, going through online, applications, going through online, applications, going through online, applications, going through cellphones, different apps. preparing warrants, have prepared warrants on different providers. that is a very big part of this investigation. in december, police tried to calm down community concerned that there was a serial killer stalking the area, following
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a handful of disappearances in the 93v a handful of disappearances in the gay village. now, officers are in the midst of a huge investigation that spans across canada's largest city. the authorities are reviewing hundreds of missing persons cases dating back to at least 2010, amid fears that the number of victims may rise. the second round of rugby's six nations gets under way this weekend, and england head coach eddiejones has ramped up the mind games in advance of their meeting with wales. joe wilson reports. build them up and knock them down, it happens in all sports metaphorically but in rugby often little, eagle eyed eddiejones spotted something in cardiff last weekend, a new look welsh team excelled beating scotland, led by a young fly half, rhys patchell, on his six nations debut, but it will
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be different against england, say england. massive step up for him, he has not played much test rugby at all, he is a young guy, has not got greatly experienced players around him, the pressure on him will be enormous, it is whether he has something to handle it. a little bit insulting, when a coach questions the mental approach? no, not at all, i think that is rugby, how you are made, those questions will be asked, it is not about experience, those questions will be asked. it is about your make up. you have two answer these questions, that is the pressure of the sport. rebuilding at twickenham is bricks, mortar and metal, as you can see from the stadium, that requires money, rebuilding a team in the six nations, that is a lot more difficult. scotland, the blues, so
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crestfallen in cardiff that they have brought in their most experienced players to play france, can't let another match slip by them. england ran in seven tries against italy last weekend, will be different against wales, both teams can agree upon that. eddiejones's interventions are usually designed to make an impact, so, who has got the bottle? dippy, the lifesize cast of a diplodoccus skeleton, is on tour, he left london's natural history museum last year and was replaced with a huge blue whale. now he's made it to the jurassic coast... well the dorset county museum. duncan kennedy is there. what an incredible sight he makes, this is the first time in 113 years that he has been seen outside london, for the past year or so he has been
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undergoing conservation and repair work, but now, he in dorchester, it is the first leg of his nationwide tour. it has taken 150 million years and five days to bring dippy the dinosaur to dorset. 0k, five days to bring dippy the dinosaurto dorset. 0k, his five days to bring dippy the dinosaur to dorset. 0k, his 292 bones may be made out of plaster, but this iconic replica of the real doodledug diplodocus is still perfection, right up to his head. —— diplodocus. touch and go whether he was going to fit in but it is perfect and we are happy. how much does it way altogether? team of seven technicians have made the difficultjob of moving into the cou nty difficultjob of moving into the county museum. he is the people's
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dinosaur, a lot of people have come to see him in london, fond memories for children and people bringing their own children, tells great stories, really people. and the first of those children were certainly wowed today. what is the best bit about it? his tail, because it can whack people round the head. what is so great about dippy? that he is enormous, he is massive. dippy first appeared at london's natural history museum in 1905, and costed thousand pounds, but it was decided it was time for a change, and he is sent on a nationwide tour, requiring a massivejob of sent on a nationwide tour, requiring a massive job of reassembly in seven locations around britain. now that dippy has been put together, they think that here in dorchester alone, 70,000 people will come to see him, after that, heading off to the
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midlands, wales, scotland, on a grand tour of the uk. they think that over the course of the next three years, something like 5 million people will engage with this incredible project. and where better for dippy‘s first stop than dorset‘s jurassic coast. if he was going to choose to go somewhere, he would bubble be choose to come to the jurassic coast to learn about fossils and all the other creatures that were living in the british isles around the time that he was roaming what is now wyoming, in america. -- all the other fossils. wherever dippy it will be free to see him, a chance for older visitors to relive childhood memories and for younger ones to create some. —— wherever dippy goes, it will be free to see him. if you are at school in this area, forget about coming, he is all booked up until may, there are individual tickets around. —— if you are a school. but it shows how
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much affection we still have for this incredible dinosaur. the eiffel tower in paris has been closed for the second time this week — because of snow and black ice. the organisation that runs the tower says de—icing it is a complex procedure, because salt is corrosive, and sand could damage the tower‘s lift mechanisms. the tower, which attracts six million visitors a year, will be closed today and tomorrow. let's find out the weather let's find out the weather picture. let's find out the weather picture. we had snow this morning in the far north and west as you can see by this snow and rain radar. this was through the night, heavy rain cleared from the south—east and cold air pushed in and plenty of snow showers falling across the far north—west. it's brought a west— east split with the weather because it in areas so far have been rather grey and glam. further west you had beautiful blue sky and sunshine as you can see by this weather watchers picture. he showers you
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