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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  February 9, 2018 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

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shows how you are a school. but it shows how much affection we still have for this incredible dinosaur. the eiffel tower in paris has been closed for the second time this week — because of snow and black ice. the organisation that runs the tower says de—icing it is a complex procedure, because salt is corrosive, and sand could damage the tower‘s lift mechanisms. the tower, which attracts six million visitors a year, will be closed today and tomorrow. let's find out the weather let's find out the weather picture. let's find out the weather picture. we had snow this morning in the far north and west as you can see by this snow and rain radar. this was through the night, heavy rain cleared from the south—east and cold air pushed in and plenty of snow showers falling across the far north—west. it's brought a west— east split with the weather because it in areas so far have been rather grey and glam. further west you had beautiful blue sky and sunshine as you can see by this weather watchers picture. he showers you have had
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have been win to become a light dusting of snow here. through the rest of the afternoon the rain is going to ease away from the south—east corner and we'll see sunny spells but it won't be very warm. highest values through the afternoon around 5—7d and a brisk north—westerly wind making it feel cool on exposed coasts. through the evening train arrives to the west, a real west— east to divide. as it bumps into cold air in scotland and northern ireland, a spell of snow for a time. here and in sheltered eastern areas we will see the lowest values, blue tone suggesting temperatures will be below freezing first thing tomorrow morning. snow could be an issue during the early hours of saturday. 5—10 centimetres, maybe nine. icy stretches with the combination of rain and snow moving into the east. snow showers across the lake district, rain through wales and south—west england, and thatis that is going to drift steadily east. for many across england and
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wales, not shaping up to be a particularly great saturday afternoon. conditions will improve through scotland, brightness coming through. temperature 6—iid. double digit in the south—west but with the cloud and rain, pretty miserable. i understand there are important rugby matches taking place over the weekend. lots of rain around on saturday. the winds will be a feature into ireland, it could have an effect on the kicking game. once we got rid of that rain and move into sunday, we could see gales or severe gales on the southern flank of the low as it pulls away. behind, well, winter proper on sunday. these showers will be falling as snow across north—west scotland, northern ireland, north—west england. that said, a drier day, but bitterly cold for many of us. top temperatures around 4—8d. plenty of whether to look out for over the weekend. more
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details on the afternoon live show. take care, jane. details on the afternoon live show. take care,jane. a details on the afternoon live show. take care, jane. a reminder of the main story here this lunchtime. two british jihadis captured in syria have been accused of murdering more than 20 prisoners. that is all from the bbc news at one pm. goodbye from me. on bbc one wejoin the bbc news at one pm. goodbye from me. on bbc one we join the bbc the bbc news at one pm. goodbye from me. on bbc one wejoin the bbc news tea m me. on bbc one wejoin the bbc news team wherever you are. have a good afternoon. hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 2. two british jihadis captured in syria have been accused of murdering more than 20 prisoners, and subjecting others to extreme torture. if it goes to trial i'll certainly be there, i certainly will look them in the eye and let them know i am who i am and they have destroyed a big part of my life. allegations that aid workers for one of the country's biggest charities, oxfam, regularly used prostitutes when stationed in haiti in 2011. it's not a given — the eu throws doubt on a brexit transition period — michel barnier says he's surprised' by the ‘substantial‘ disagreements between uk and the eu.
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a handshake of history — as the sister of north korea's kim jong—un meets the south korean president at the opening of the winter olympics. the athletes from dprk and are ok, by marching together, sent a powerful message of peace to the world. —— dprk and rok. powerful message of peace to the world. -- dprk and rok. coming up, all the sport with you. once the ceremony is all the sport with you. once the ceremony is over all the sport with you. once the ceremony is over it's all about the sport. we'll be talking about great britain's cha nters, they've sport. we'll be talking about great britain's chanters, they've sent three times as many athletes to these games as they did four years ago and are targeting a record medal haul, just one more than in saatchi. for technical reasons we've got to louise here with a quick synopsis of what we're looking to in the weather. snow for scotland first thing saturday morning, some heavy rain to come as well. saturday looks
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miserable. best of the sunshine, but cold on sunday. who needs graphics? also coming up — dippy on tour — the natural history museum's iconic dinosaur starts his adventure on thejurassic coast. hello everyone. this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. two british fighters believed to have been part of a cell of the islamic state group that beheaded hostages have been captured — alexanda kotey, and el shafee elsheikh were captured by syrian kurdish forces. they were two of the four british is members widely known as "the beatles". but now they're caught — the question is what happens to them next. sould they face trial? and if so — where.. in britain, where there's some confusion as to exactly how ‘british' they now are..
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or in amerca.. where there may be some in the trump administration who would like to send them to guantanamo bay. richard galpin reports. 34—year—old alexanda kotey was captured in eastern syria last month, along with 29—year—old el shafee elsheikh. the news only confirmed now by us officials. they were caught by syrian kurdish fighters like these, who are backed by the americans. us forces have been interrogating the two men. the other members of the notorious british gang of is fighters were aine davis, who's injail in turkey, and the ringleader, mohammed emwazi, known asjihadijohn, killed in a drone strike in 2015. kotey and elsheikh were the last to be found. today, the police went to the family home of el shafee elsheikh in west london. all the gang came from the same area, and were radicalised here before leaving for syria and iraq. makeshift bomb shelters in the bottom of a school... the american journalist james foley was the first of at lease
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27 western hostages, who us officials say were beheaded by the gang. the killing videoed, and then put on the internet. and this is david haines, a british aid worker, who was also captured by islamic state and beheaded in 2014. alan henning, a former taxi driver, who became a volunteer aid worker in syria in 2013 was the second british man to be murdered. the videos showed mohammed emwazi, jihadijohn, killing each of these men and others. they should die a long, slow, painful death. and i think quite a lot of people understand that, that they shouldn't be allowed to live. but realistically, that's not going to happen. and you have to come to terms with that. the best thing for them is to be locked up and throw away the key. they should never be allowed back into society,
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because they willjust recruit people, and they will just do this again. if it goes to trial, i'll certainly be there. i certainly want to look them in the eye and let them know that i'm who i am. and they've destroyed a big part of my life. some westerners guarded by the british gang did manage to get out alive, including frenchjournalist nicolas henin, who's delighted by the capture of kottey and sheffield take but want proper trial. revenge is an endless cycle, where justice eventually aims at extinguishing violence by setting up all the grievances and bringing back peace. and this is what i want. but it's possible kotey and elsheikh may end up here at guantanamo bay, where there would not be a normal trial. although it's not confirmed, the bbc believes they've been stripped of their british citizenship, which means
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they could remain in american hands. richard galpin, bbc news. with me in the studio to discuss this is will geddes, an international security specialist and founder of private security firm icp. the question is, will they face a trial? we'll talk about where later. the principle is they should face trial. there is an awful lot of pressure and to a certain extent not play into the terrorism agenda, in particular the islamic state agenda, we would exact same type ofjustice on them in terms of incarceration without any due process. politically, and for a counter propaganda argument, it's important for them to be put through a judicial process. having said that, the sentencing would have to be of the most severe level possible. let's deal with wear. they are two british men but had been stripped of their citizenship. will britain be
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possibly relieved not to have to deal with them and allow the americans to? there are distinct advantages by the americans processing these two and us being able to link english responsibility insomuch as certainly the processes of interview. they have no doubt implemented those to determine this very critical data about islamic state's current status. potentially some of thejihadists state's current status. potentially some of the jihadists who may be returning. they've given some information up. quite a bit by all accounts, but to be honest the story has broken from some of my sources, earlier than the americans would have liked. apparently there was information must lines of inquiry, still being one, that this release the new york media has certainly put them into a bit of a tailspin, a very small one, but tailspin nonetheless in terms of trying to expedite some of that information. there is a lot of critical data from these two that could have some bearing. when we talk about
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obtaining information from them do we know how it's being done? the americans have a broader portfolio if we can call it that in terms of their interviewing or enhanced interviewing processes than we would in the uk. america is a very good, strong ally in the intelligence community with the uk. information will be shared inevitably between the two. we've advanced since the days of abu ghraib for example. certainly there have been some good arguments as to some of those extreme measures considered, whether they are in fact counter—productive. they will have drawn more information in a shorter period of time. there will be those that say the rights of these two mean nothing given the severity and horror of what they are alleged to have committed. this brings us full circle to the point we discussed at the beginning. should we fall into the beginning. should we fall into the same parameters islamic state are endorsing in terms of denying
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them any kind of civil or human rights? what do we think these two have done? allegedly they have carried out in excess of two dozen executions and countless crucifixions, beheadings, torturing of the various types. these two are devil incarnate. the punishment should be commensurate to the crimes they've allegedly carried out. what do you think is going to happen next? i think they'll still be processed. and the timing is key as to when they are then ultimately brought out in public for processing. the process of any kind ofjudicial hearing prosecution is going to be done very carefully. there is a lot of intelligence that the agencies will not want to disclose. i think that will be the time at which it is key. it's also keep not to be counter—productive by furthering their poster boy status to those that still follow that
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islamic state agenda. as ever thank you very much. you're watching afternoon live. the headlinesz. two british islamic state fighters thought to have been part of a cell that tortured and beheaded hostages are captured in syria. the charity oxfam says the actions of aid workers reported to have used prostitutes when stationed in haiti were "totally u na cce pta ble". the eu's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier says a proposed transition period after britain leaves the single market and customs union "is not a given" and checks at the irish border were "unavoidable". in sport a spectacular opening ceremony has taken place at the winter olympics in pyeongchang. skeleton gold medallist lizzy yarnold was flying the flag for team gb. michael o'neill‘s four year contract extension as northern ireland manager has been formally announced. he recently turned down the chance to succeed gordon strachan as scotland boss. riyad mahrez has trained with the club for the first time since a proposed
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january move to manchester city fell through. that is all the sport for now. more at half past two. the eu's chief negotiatior, michel barnier, has thrown into doubt the uk's plans for a transition period after brexit — saying it's not a given, if disagreements in the negotiations persist. mr barnier also told a news conference that checks at the irish border would be unavoidable, once britain has left the single market and customs union. these future relationship would need to avoid hard borders and protect the good friday agreement. once again, it is important to tell the truth. a uk decision to leave the single market and to leave the customs union would make border checks unavoidable. our correspondent adam fleming is in brussels , and a short time ago he gave my colleague ben brown an update. what's going on at the moment is
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that the officials in that building, the european commission, and their british counterparts are trying to turn the commitments made between the prime minister and jean—claude juncker in december, written down in a document called the joint report, they are trying to turn that into an actual text of a treaty, the withdrawal agreement, the actual brexit treaty. they've got to make it legally watertight and sounds like a treaty should. they are discussing how to turn those pledges on avoiding a hard border in northern ireland into legal language. michel barnier says at the moment they will proceed on the basis they will go for the uk's third favourite option, which is continued regulatory alignment with the single market and customs union, which to some people sounds like staying in the single market and the customs union, which the uk doesn't want. having said that, the uk is now going to present its other two options. coming up with a really good future relationship that means this won't be a problem, coming up
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with specific solutions to the border which means you don't need border which means you don't need border checks. oxfam is newspaper reports here in the uk are alleging that aid workers for one of the country's biggest charities, oxfam, regularly used prostitutes when stationed in haiti in 2011. prostitution is illegal there, and the use of sex workers is banned by the charity's code of conduct. we can speak to the chief executive of oxfam at the time — dame barbara stocking. thank you for coming in. you were first to wear something like this was going to be reported in 2011 thanks to a. when you read the reactions what was your reaction? —— fax to a whistle—blower.” reactions what was your reaction? —— fax to a whistle-blower. i said we have to do an investigation and find out what's going on. which we did. the investigation was set up immediately. we had to deal with all those different people involved. and deal with the disciplinary matters around that to get it absolutely closed down. once you have found
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that these allegations were true why didn't you sack them? we did quite a lot of them. the first one we did... the country director was informed about the allegations first off as the investigation team arrived. in order to make sure people weren't actually put off from talking to us, we allowed him... he immediately resigned frankly. then we look that and we'll accept that. then we got into the disciplinary actions around six more. reading the times, it says what you said was, we don't need the damage this could do to us. we'll find a dignified and easy way for you to go. no, what we needed was him to stay there and cooperate, that's what we needed in that series of investigations that was going to ta ke of investigations that was going to take place. what we didn't want, though some of it happened, was have people who were going to give evidence to be bullied or anything else. at least he was saying, i've done very wrong and i'm going.
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therefore it was prepared to help us make sure we could get the investigation done properly. make sure we could get the investigation done properlym make sure we could get the investigation done properly. it was more than one person, how wide did this go? we investigated nine in the end including the country director. four dismissed, three resigned early, two resigned in the process of the investigation before they could be dismissed, two were found not culpable. how much of your handling was down to not wanting to damage the name oxfam? it's not about the name, the issue was about trying to make sure we did this right in haiti, we were in the middle of an earthquake response, most of our workers were hydration. in the end there were no higher nations involved. —— there were no haitians involved. don't put those alexanda kotey staff... had they broken the law? —— don't put those haitian. the haitian staff went
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implicated in this and we didn't wa nt implicated in this and we didn't want haitian people locally attacked when it wasn't their fault. you want haitian people locally attacked when it wasn't theirfault. you have to remember the circumstances, there was no rule of law there. which makes it worse. yes, this is why, this is incredibly important, as you are saying. the issue is, this is the sort of environment you're working in doing humanitarian response, whether conflict or in earthquakes. basically you have to keep working to keep your culture right, that people understand absolutely what the code of conduct is. when you spot a problem you deal with it absolutely firmly and clearly a nd with it absolutely firmly and clearly and straight what we did. you didn't. we did, in about a month or $0 you didn't. we did, in about a month or so we you didn't. we did, in about a month or so we actually managed to investigate nine different staff and deal with all of them. the haitian tea m deal with all of them. the haitian team leader who you say resigned, he was paid off? he was not paid off, absolutely not. get no pension,
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anything. his pension might have beenin anything. his pension might have been in other things, he worked for a number of agencies, but he wasn't paid off by oxfam. how damaging is this to oxfam and the huge majority of workers who work for oxfam who do a fine of workers who work for oxfam who do afinejob? of workers who work for oxfam who do a fine job? exactly, that is what investigating and dealing with it very fast and making very clear to staff that this is what will happen to you if you do any of these things, that is what is important about it. after this i wrote to every single one of the staff worldwide. that's 6000 staff, spelling out again, which i've done previously, exactly what the code of conduct meant, what the code of conduct meant, what the code of conduct was. we put in a new whistle—blowing line, because in places like that it's difficult for junior staff to say anything. they are worried about theirjobs if they do. making sure people could come out and say, my letter even says, we don't feel we are getting enough complaints about what's going on. please tell us if you know anything
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is happening and we'll deal with it. which is what we were doing. oxfam was part of the appeal after the earthquake, millions of pounds raised from the public. i wonder how some of them will feel to think some of the money might have gone on the use of prostitutes. i don't know it did. the point is that is why we made it clear at the time, this was not secret, we put out a press release as the investigation started, put out a press release... your press release said there was no fraud. it talked about poor behaviour, absolutely. of course we ta ke behaviour, absolutely. of course we take that very seriously which is why those people lost their jobs, thatis why those people lost their jobs, that is what we did, absolutely. we didn't hide this, we put it out in the media, we reported to the charity commission and... did you tell the authorities, the haitian authorities? they were not exactly worrying about these things, they
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we re worrying about these things, they were worrying about the state of the country, there was little rule of law. we took legal advice and they said police would not be dealing with it at that time. it makes for very unhappy reading, the times report. are there any bits of it you disagree with? i disagree we were not transparent. we were very transparent at the time. when i was chief executive it was always my policy about coming out. things go wrong in these countries, these are countries... you don't expect them to go wrong by the people going to help. which is why you have to be vigilant all the time. even after this we looked at our policies, our training. we put in a new whistle—blower line, we did everything to reinforce the message is. but these countries are very difficult to work in for anybody. you've seen the headline, it was like a caligula or g with prostitutes in oxfam t—shirts. what do you think when you read that?|j
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don't do you think when you read that?” don't know where that came from, we have nothing on record about that in our investigation. there are pictures supposedly around which have since disappeared. that was not what i heard at the time, i never heard anything like that and i was there at the time. i'm concerned about where the main informant for this story has come from, who is somebody i do not think should be relied upon frankly. can you say that when it was a very brave person who came up in the first place to whistle—blower to you ? who came up in the first place to whistle-blower to you? i'm not saying things were not going on, i don't know about caligula, i never heard anything like that. i understood some of the behaviours about using prostitutes and bringing them to oxfam's guesthouses, which was absolutely and completely wrong. that is why we send the investigation team and why we made sure we dealt with the staff out there. these things happen around there. these things happen around the world, they are appalling. there. these things happen around
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the world, they are appallingm there. these things happen around the world, they are appalling. if it had happened in london, here, your staff doing something illegal in london, what would you have done, sacked them? we sacked quite a lot of those people involved in it, in fa ct. of those people involved in it, in fact. two we only didn't because we didn't have the evidence at the time they resigned. that is the issue. there was only one we said we wanted first of all to have there to make sure we could get the evidence from the others. that was why. hindsight isa the others. that was why. hindsight is a wonderful thing, what would you have done differently? we might have looked at that question of whether we should have kept him on for the month. i still don't know. on the ground in these difficult circumstances i'm not sure i would have done things differently. i wish it didn't happen. maybe i wish before that we were working hard on the code of conduct, training and all those things. i can only think, could we have done more then? it was not... it was how many more things, what could we have done to stop this happening in the first place, not
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necessarily what we did when we found out. when you spoke to rowland for the first time and he admitted what he'd done, what did you say to him? i told him it was absolutely unacceptable and as far as i can we collect seven years ago, he then apologised to deeply, said it was appalling behaviour and accepted it straightaway. there was no question he was going at all. right from the beginning. was he embarrassed? yes very. were you angry? angry, i don't know whether the word is anger, i was just absolutely determined to make sure that was investigated properly and people dealt with, so i felt absolutely determined. no anger that someone who is there, paid for by the british government, british public donations, doing a job with the time pressure that there clearly
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was, able to behave in that way... and they didn't feature? in those... again in these circumstances your job as chief executive is to sort it out as soon as possible so it doesn't continue in minutes longer. that was my key driving feeling in that, that is why i was speaking to him on the phone, that's why i was saying you've done this, you'll have to go, basically. it's about being determined and determined to put it right is key in all of that. it's very good of you to come and talk about it, thank you very much. human eggs have been grown in a laboratory for the first time. scientists from edinburgh university removed egg cells from ovary tissue at their earliest stage of development, and grew them to the point they were ready for fertilisation. the team says the findings could lead to new ways of preserving women's fertility. james gallagher explains. in laboratories in edinburgh, scientists have grown human eggs. they've taken the immature eggs women are born with and transformed them so they're ready to be fertilised. it's taken decades of work to copy what happens inside women's ovaries. we never imagined that we would be
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getting these kind of results using human tissue, so it's a significant step. but of course, the main objective for us is to prove and to determine the safety of these techniques, so that they could, in the future, go into some kind of application. it could be used to help young girls with cancer as treatment can damage their fertility. so how might it work? a girl diagnosed with cancer would have a sample of her ovaries frozen before cancer treatment. then later, as an adult, the tissue would be defrosted, and egg grown, fertilised and then put in the womb. there may even be other applications in fertility treatment, but only 10% of eggs completed theirjourney to maturity, and none were fertilised, so it's still uncertain how viable they are. experts say more research is needed before it can be used clinically. there's going to be quite a few more
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years before this technique can be used clinically. the eggs applied from this procedure would have to be made much more efficiently at a high success rate, it has to b tested genetically, they would have to be tested to see if they fertilised normally and developing to normal embryos. so quite a few things to go through. but the work marks an important proof of principle. it will also give researchers the opportunity to explore how human eggs develop, much of which remains a mystery. james gallagher, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. louise has her graphics and can talk to us about pyeongchang, it is not news, it is called! good news
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because it is getting warmer. these are the graphics for the seven—day forecast... turn around! just turn around! we won't be using these graphics are very long! i have passed my test but i need you to know that i'm a beginner so anything could go wrong, this is why i need the psign! could go wrong, this is why i need the p sign! the temperature —13 on sunday and then becomes positive. the winds are significant, it will get milder, that significant wind—chill factor will play a part but as we go into the middle of next week the winds will ease off and it will get less cold. that is good news. good news for the skiers. are you a fan of rugby? what will it be like tomorrow? very exciting. it will be wet. i am sure the players are used to this by now. the winds could be an issue for the irish match because they will be a little
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stronger. that might have an implication in the kicking game. generally speaking not too bad. and also, simon, not bad for murrayfield. blue skies and sunshine, although cold. now you will be saying that it will be getting cold across the country for the next few days. february, winter, we have seen rain, that's cleared away but we've also got snow showers as the colder air starts to descend across the country. so things are looking changeable as we go into the weekend. the northwest has had a beautiful day so far. i know we've got snow showers which has produced a light dusting of snow but generally speaking not bad. cloud and rain starting to bush and that is it bumps into the cold air they will be snow across much of scotland and northern england. apparently people can't hear you very well. there is some noise on your microphone. it isn't me! i am sorry,
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we will have to stop here. you see, you put a p sign on your back and there's the proof! you've got a few minutes to sort yourself out, louise. thank you. let's go to sport. this is going well, hugh, or at the opening ceremony, talk about the razzmatazz. it was pretty spectacular, simon. we'll be seeing the pictures later so i'll leave you to make your minds about home. there was a great moment for the defending the skeleton gold medallist comic lizzy yarnold. she was leading at the gb team at the ceremony, she is one of the relatively few potential medallists, they are targeting getting between four and five medals
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and last time they only brought home five. there are three times as many people in the squad as they were four years ago at sochi, only targeting one more medal but i think it might be difficult for some of those athletes to make the top three in the events. it would be a record—breaking total if team gp can do it so we'll see how they get on. a bit ofa do it so we'll see how they get on. a bit of a blow, paula katie ormerod. what few days her —— house poor katie ormerod. her olympic dreams turned to a nightmare. since she arrived in south korea on wednesday she is fractured her wrist, she was adamant that she would compete but now she has been left "gutted" as she says after breaking her heel in training overnight on the way to surgery. she's already had that operation, as you can see, the outcome there, she will stay in hospitalfor you can see, the outcome there, she will stay in hospital for a week or so. will stay in hospital for a week or so. at the age of 20, hopefully she will get her olympic chance again in
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four yea rs' will get her olympic chance again in four years' time. that injury will still come as a blow to uk sport and their medal target. she is an extreme sport and has had her version of injuries already. she's very young. the incredible thing is that she has this brilliant resilience, she comes back but from injuries. you would not wish this on anyone in the team. it will be sad for the rest of the team not to have her there. she is a very positive member of the team. that's a big ask for its own sake. we wish her the best and when she is fit and well she can start looking forward and focusing on the future and fulfilling the great potential and she has. the winter olympics famous for impressive tricks and daring moves. we had plenty of those in the qualifying today. the world number one from canada who took silver in sochi four years ago and he will be the strong favourite going for gold in the mogulfinal on the strong favourite going for gold in the mogul final on sunday. michael o'neill‘s four yeah
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extension to his contract has been finalised, he recently turned down the offer to manage scotland but has accepted the longest, most lucrative contract in the history of the irish fa. walter smith won't take the scotla nd fa. walter smith won't take the scotland job again. he was the favourite to succeed gordon strachan after michael o'neill turned it down. it is understood smith ruled himself out after talks with the scottish fa. some good news forfans of leicester city today. it seems the club's fallout with riyad mahrez is coming to an end. the bbc understands the algeria international has drained the first time since the club rejected a number of bids from premier league leaders manchester city at the end of the january transfer window. now it's the second round of matches in by it's the second round of matches in rugby union six nations this weekend. england have been training at twickenham this morning before their meeting with wales. head coach
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eddiejones their meeting with wales. head coach eddie jones ramping up their meeting with wales. head coach eddiejones ramping up the mind games. he has questioned whether wales's fill in fly half rhys patchell has the bottle for the match. he hasn't played much rugby at all, he's young, he hasn't got greatly experienced players behind him and he will have chris robshaw at him, farrell, care, all people who played a lot of rugby. the pressure on him will be enormous. has he got the bottle to handle it? the westwood of england has said he needed his wits about him after a day at the european tour in perth. —— lee westwood. after his second and he is level with defending champion brad rumford halfway through. they wore one stroke clear of the field before the sunday matchplay finale. that all the sport for now, simon, catch up with all the winter olympics action on the bbc sport website and on the red button. don't go too far away because if we have another problem
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with the weather, i'll be coming back to your! i don't know much about the weather! you are not alone. thanks for that. you are watching afternoon live on bbc news. police in canada have found the remains of at least six people, in the grounds of a house linked to an alleged serial killer. bruce mcarthur was arrested last month and charged with murdering five men. charlotte gallagher reports. police in toronto have called this investigation unprecedented, detectives have now found the remains of at least six people hidden in large plant pots in a suburban home, where the suspect carried out landscape gardening. this man, 66—year—old bruce mcarthur, has been charged with the murders of five men, and detectives believe more charges may follow. forensic teams are searching 30 properties, battling plunging temperatures to dig through the frozen ground. officers are also examining
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bruce mcarthur‘s computer and mobile phone and investigating a possible link between gay dating apps and the murders. there is an extensive digital investigation going on, going through online applications, going through cellphones, different apps. we are preparing warrants, and have prepared warrants on different providers. that is a very big part of this investigation as well. in december, police tried to calm community concern that there was a serial killer stalking the area, following a handful of disappearances in the gay village. now, officers are in the midst of a huge investigation that spans across canada's largest city. the authorities are reviewing hundreds of missing persons cases dating back to at least 2010, amid fears that the number of victims may rise. charlotte gallagher, bbc news. the reuters news agency says it believes two of its journalists have been arrested in myanmar because of their investigation into the mass killing
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of rohingya muslims. the agency says two rohingyas were hacked to death by buddhist villagers — and another eight shot by the army. our south—east asia correspondent jonathan head is in bangkok and told me more about what reuters say they have uncovered. there have been a number of allegations of atrocities, against the rohingya dexter since last. a lot of the refugees who have fled there have given chilling accounts and they have been estimates of thousands of people killed in these operations. reuters is looking at one particular village which, it's clear from the satellite pictures that the rohingya areas were com pletely that the rohingya areas were completely destroyed in early september. their myanmar —based reporters were able to establish contact inside the village and with the security forces to piece together a much more detailed account of an actual execution, they
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say a summary execution of ten rohingya man. in the report they say these men were selected at random from those trying to escape on the beach to bangladesh, lined up, a mass grave was dug and then they we re mass grave was dug and then they were hacked and shot into this grave. it is the detail and writers have, and the fact that they have confirmation from people who took pa rt confirmation from people who took part in that killing that it happened that makes the investigation so devastating for the myanmar government which has essentially denied all human rights abuses. although in the case of this one, knowing the investigation was coming and they have acknowledged unlawful behaviour. that is what what is saying, they were very advanced with this investigation at the point where they're two reporters were invited to meet two police officers in december, were handed some documents, which, as it turns out, don't seem to be that important. and were then charged with breaking the official secrets act and now in prison for that. reuters say that is exactly why they are imprisoned, in a possible
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attempt to stop writers from publishing this important investigation. richard handley had downs syndrome and was just 33 years old when he died from complications caused by severe constipation. yesterday, an inquest found there were "gross and very significant failings" in his care. the government is currently reviewing all deaths of people with learning disabilities in england, and is due to publish the first of its findings next month. they told the bbc there is concern over a significant number of cases. jayne mccubbin reports. richard was cheeky and had a huge sense of the ridiculous. toilet humour. yes. close to richard's heart. because that's how the family dealt with what was a lifelong problem for richard. constipation. a problem which should have been manageable, but which killed him when he was 33. it's just so incomprehensible, isn't it? it so devastating, really. it shouldn't have happened. richard's diet was well looked after by his family and his care home,
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but when that care home turned into supported living he was allowed to eat what he liked. by the time he was admitted to ipswich hospital his constipation was so severe he appeared full—term pregnant. i saw a picture of him, actually, when he was lying on the hospital bed. the picture was taken after he had had one of the procedures to hopefully reduce the size of his tummy, and looking at that picture i couldn't believe my eyes. if all those measures to protect him had been in place, it wouldn't have happened. he would still be here? he would still be here, yes. i'd still have a son. you'd still have a brother. yesterday, an inquest here in ipswich found missed opportunities to help richard and gross failures to act by the hospital. report after report has shown there are too many avoidable deaths and three years agojeremy hunt ordered a world first,
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scrutiny of every single death of a learning disabled person in england. this will be a very important moment to step out and look at the way we look after that particular highly vulnerable group. that review will publish its first report next month, but we've learnt that one in ten deaths looked at so far have come with red flag indicators. that might mean, as with richard, there is evidence that treatment was delayed, or perhaps there is evidence of abuse or neglect, or concerns have been raised by a family member. this woman led the serious case review into richard's death and also the scandal of winterbourne view. she says both cases exposed a system which cares deeply at the point of birth, but less as a child becomes an adult. we know that they can be fantastic when an infant arrives in this world. we know that the nhs has done some astonishing things to keep those infants alive. however, that appears to taper and certainly sustained austerity has shown us that services have reduced and workforces
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have diminished and that has left families, some families, floundering. and do you think has cost some learning disabled people their life? yes, indeed. it has. richard's family have received apologies from the hospital, their council and the care provider. all say lessons have been learnt, a phrase often used after an avoidable death. the department of health say they must stop. from july, trusts will have to publish data on deaths and evidence of improvement. nhs england say they are committed to improving the lives of people with a learning disability. jayne mccubbin reporting. ina in a moment the business news, first the headlines this afternoon. two british islamic state fighters thought to have been part of a cell that tortured and beheaded hostages are captured in syria. the charity oxfam says the actions of aid workers reported to have used prostitutes when stationed in haiti were "totally u na cce pta ble".
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the eu's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier says a proposed transition period for the uk after march 19th "is not a given". here's your business headlines on afternoon live. lots of figures out on the uk economy this morning. the trade deficit — the shortfall between its imports and exports — widened again in the last three months of 2017, as the cost of oil pushed up imports. industrial production fell in december, dropping by 1.3% from november, though much of the fall was thanks to the shut down of a big north sea pipeline. and output in the construction sector fell by 0.7% — over three month period to december. the owner of the daily mirror is to buy the company behind titles including the daily express, the daily star and ok magazine. trinity mirror will pay £126.7m for the publishing assets of northern & shell, which is chaired by richard desmond.
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the sale, which has been on the cards for some time, ends mr desmond's 18 years as a uk newspaper owner. more falls on asian stock markets although european shares have opened reasonably calmly. hong kong's hang seng index saw its biggest drop since the global financial crisis in 2008. key financial markets in japan and china also fell. the us markets have rebounded slightly, opening on friday with the snp and the dowjones both up about 196. snp and the dowjones both up about 1%. turmoil is the word that we saw and it is a turbulent couple of days, isn't it. indeed. as i was mentioning, in the us today, it is interesting that both the dowjones industrial average and the s&p 500 have opened sharply up. driven largely by this rise in technology and financial stocks. the dowjones up and financial stocks. the dowjones up around 1%, although the two still
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on course for their worst weekly performance in six years or thereabouts. as you were mentioning, yesterday, to mulch as was the word. we saw both of those major us markets and what is known as correction territory which is one market drops 10% from its peak, in this case the january peaks resort for those us markets, the dow fell by more than a thousand points for a second time in a week, that led to this hefty sell—off in asia and the downward trend continuing in europe. the force we have seen in london and in frankfurt and in paris are nowhere near as dramatic as the losses that we saw in the us —— befalls that we have seen. the irony is that the falls in the us and those we saw here yesterday, all to do with interest rates, they all about being based on a strong economy. there's good news at the heart of this. absolutely right. that was the point made today by the
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bank of england's new deputy governor. both came out saying, these sort of corrections come within an 18 month period is nothing to worry about. what has been driving these rises on the markets that we are so used to seeing has been a healthy economic backdrop, especially in the states this week. that rise in economic performance can help to lift rates, and potentially inflation. some investors may have overlooked that. the rises we have seen making these pull—backs not unusual are driven by this specific us story of potential rises in interest rates and also increases we have seen in bond yields, us treasuries, we've seen the cost of bothering on that front going up which indicates a potential rise in rates. our very ownjoe miller is live
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on wall street to tell us what's been happening over in the us today. jose markets in the us have been open for about 20 minutes. any movement? all positive movement this morning, if there's anything we've learned we can't say the dust has settled too soon because we might get another day like yesterday when the dowjones fell by over a thousand points, one of its biggest drops in its history. this week traders have been left with nothing but their own existential angst which is when things get a bit choppy. yesterday, as you said before, people were looking at government debt and looking at the prices falling to 4— year lows, seeing future interest rate rises
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and beginning to worry. but if you talk to the institutional investors, old hands have been out and fears, they are not worried. they were expecting this. —— old hands who have been at it for years. they have seen many have been at it for years. they have seen many cycles of low interest rates and a 10% correction is par for the cause at this point. that's the message in london as well. moving away from the existential and set of traders to more concrete things! today they have just voted to pass a two—year budget, meaning that the government's potentially second shutdown in three weeks could end before the working day begins. good news but what is the implication for the deficit? as you say, that is connected to the markets here. it is because this bill that was passed in the wee hours of the morning adds at least $300 billion to the deficit and perhaps more over the coming years. it really is the sort of thing that,
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in the old days, republicans would be screaming about, when president obama and the democrats would have tried to pass something like that. this amount of government debt, government spending, it was not usualfor government spending, it was not usual for many years, now it passes muster that a murmur. in the building behind me there will be some eyebrows raised, it may feed into this volatility. interesting. many thanks, jose, on wall street. —— many thanks, joe. fall is that we saw overnight in the usa and asia, not that steep, and of in the us both markets have now opened up. we'll talk to you later, thanks very much. dippy, the lifesize cast of a diplodocus skeleton, is on tour — he left london's natural history museum last year and was replaced with a huge blue whale. now he's made it to
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the jurassic coast. he's pulling in new fans there. well, at the dorset county museum. duncan kennedy reports. it's taken it's ta ken about 150 it's taken about 150 million years... i think we are in business! and five days to bring dippy the dinosaur to dorset. ok, and five days to bring dippy the dinosaurto dorset. ok, dippy‘s and five days to bring dippy the dinosaur to dorset. ok, dippy‘s 292 bones may be made of plastic that this iconic replica of a real diplodocus is palaeontology perfection right up until his head. it was touch and go as to whether he'd fit in that it's perfect so i'm happy. how much does and we altogether? varane happy. how much does and we altogether? va rane cornish happy. how much does and we altogether? varane cornish of the natural history museum has led a
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tea m natural history museum has led a team of technicians to the delicate job of moving delicate dippy to the dorset museum. a lot of people came to see him in london, fond memories of bringing their own children, it tells great stories and really inspires people. the first of those children were certainly wild today. what's the best bit about him? his tail, because he can whack people around. what is so great about dippy? that he is china must. antenucci is massive, isn't he? diplodocus first appeared at london's natural history museum in 1905 and cost £2000. but the museum decided was time for a change and is sending dippy on a nationwide tour requiring a massivejob sending dippy on a nationwide tour requiring a massive job of free assembly and seven destinations around britain. infact assembly and seven destinations around britain. in fact now that dippy has been put together they think in dorchester alone 70,000 people will come to see him. after
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that he'll head off to the midlands, wales, and then scotland on a grand tour of the uk. they think that over the course of the next three years, something like 5 million people will engage with this incredible project. and where better for dippy‘s first stop fan dorset‘s jurassic coast? and where better for dippy‘s first stop fan dorset‘sjurassic coast? if he was choosing to go somewhere he'd probably choose thejurassic he was choosing to go somewhere he'd probably choose the jurassic coast to find out all about the fossils and the other creatures living in what is now the british isles at around the time that he was roaming what is now wyoming in america. wherever dippy goes it will be free to see him. a chance for older visitors to relive childhood memories and the younger ones to create some. duncan kennedy, bbc news, in dorchester. the eiffel tower in paris has been closed for the second time this week because of snow and black ice. the organisation that runs the tower says de—icing it is a complex procedure,
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because salt is corrosive, and sand could damage the tower‘s lift mechanisms. the tower, which attracts six million visitors a year, will be closed today and tomorrow. if you were looking at that smugly, don't, it's heading this way next week! louise with the details. rain woke me this morning, now replaced by wintry showers which are likely to continue to the afternoon although interspersed with lovely spells of sunshine. it has been a beautiful afternoon in the north—west, in cumbria, and those showers you have seen producing a light dusting of snow. for the remainder of the afternoon it looks somewhat like this, handbag of cloud from the train into the south—east corner, temperatures still struggling at between four and 7
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degrees. overnight cloud and rain could gather from the west, this moving in from the atlantic as it bumps into this code across scotland and northern ireland, we will see for sometimes snow on the leading edge. sheltered eastern areas of england will stay cold and possibly frosty first thing tomorrow, the blue tones denoting those temperatures falling below freezing. but the snow will be the main issue first thing on saturday, as much as five to ten centimetres in scotland, icy stretches if you are out early. some snow showers across north—west england stretching down into wales, rainy across wales and south—west england which will linger for most of the day. on saturday, weather conditions should improve, i suspect, across much of scotland to brighter skies although it stays wet grey and dismal, the further west you are with the rain sweeping in from the east, maybe staying dry for much of the afternoon in the extreme
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south—east corner, between six and 11 degrees. if you are staying in to watch the rugby that's probably the best place, if you are lucky enough to have tickets, it should be a windy affairfor to have tickets, it should be a windy affair for ireland and there will be rain, not quite at twickenham yet still a wet afternoon. we finally get rid of that frontal system bringing the rain and then it will turn windy for some time to the southern flank of that low, severe gales early on sunday morning and then on sunday it looks like winter proper, plenty of showers, and these will have snow across western scotland, northern ireland, into western england and temperatures struggling as well. highest values of between two and 7 degrees so it stays and settled over the next few days, it also looks likely to stay cold. more details from me with the headlines coming up very shortly. hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. today at 3pm. families of the victims of two british jihadists captured in syria
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have called for the men to stand trial as they are accused of murdering more than 20 hostages. trial as they are accused of murdering more than 20 hostagesm it goes to trial i'll certainly be there, wants to look them in the eye and let them know i am who i am and they have destroyed a big part of my life. it's not a given. eu throws doubt on a brexit transition period. michel barnier says he's surprised by the substantial disagreements between the uk and eu. oxfam has condemned the actions of aid work is —— work is alleged to have used prostitutes on aid work in high duty. the sister of kim jong—un meets the south korean president at the winter olympics opening. the athletes from the dprk and rok, by marching together, send a powerful message of peace to the world. coming up an afternoon live, all the sport with you. we talk about sport
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after that opening ceremony. a great moment for lizzy yarnold. she left that 59 strong gb team squad. just five will need to bring back medals for it to be a record haulfor great britain. we shall see if they can do it. louise lear has the weather. a beautiful in the north and west of the uk with blue skies and sunshine. it's cold with it. showers have been falling bringing a light dusting of snow. more details coming up. also coming up, dippy on tour. the national history museum's iconic dinosaur starts his journey on the jurassic coast. this is afternoon live, i'm simon
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mccoy. two british fighters believed to have been part of a cell of the islamic state group that beheaded hostages have been captured — alexanda kotey, and el shafee elsheikh were captured by syrian kurdish forces. they were two of the four british is members widely known as "the beatles". but now they're caught — the question is what happens to them next. sould they face trial? and if so — where.. in britain, where there's some confusion as to exactly how ‘british' they now are. or in amerca where there may be some in the trump administration who would like to send them to guantanamo bay. richard galpin reports. 34—year—old alexanda kotey was captured in eastern syria last month, along with 29—year—old el shafee elsheikh. the news only confirmed now by us officials. they were caught by syrian kurdish fighters like these, who are backed by the americans. us forces have been interrogating the two men. the other members of the notorious
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british gang of is fighters were aine davis, who's injail in turkey, and the ringleader, mohammed emwazi, known asjihadijohn, killed in a drone strike in 2015. kotey and elsheikh were the last to be found. today, the police went to the family home of el shafee elsheikh in west london. all the gang came from the same area, and were radicalised here before leaving for syria and iraq. makeshift bomb shelters in the bottom of a school... the american journalist james foley was the first of at lease 27 western hostages, who us officials say were beheaded by the gang. the killing videoed, and then put on the internet. and this is david haines, a british aid worker, who was also captured by islamic state and beheaded in 2014. alan henning, a former taxi driver, who became a volunteer aid worker in syria in 2013 was the second british man to be murdered.
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the videos showed mohammed emwazi, jihadijohn, killing each of these men and others. david haines's daughter gave her response to the capture of el shafee elsheikh and alexanda kotey, accused of capturing hostages. they should die a long, slow, painful death. but realistically, that's not going to happen. and you have to come to terms with that. the best thing for them is to be locked up and throw away the key. they should never be allowed back into society, because they willjust recruit people, and they will just do this again. if it goes to trial, i'll certainly be there. i certainly want to look them in the eye and let them know that i'm who i am. and they've destroyed a big part of my life. some westerners guarded by the british gang did manage to get out alive, including frenchjournalist nicolas henin, who's delighted by the capture of kotey and elsheikh but wants
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a proper trial. revenge is an endless cycle, where justice eventually aims at extinguishing violence by setting up all the grievances and bringing back peace. and this is what i want. but it's possible kotey and elsheikh may end up here at guantanamo bay, where there would not be a normal trial. although it's not confirmed, the bbc believes they've been stripped of their british citizenship, which means they could remain in american hands. richard galpin, bbc news. i asked a security specialist whether he thought the two individuals would now stand trial.” think politically and also for a counter propaganda argument it's important for them to be put through a judicial process. but having said that i think the sentencing would
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have to be of the most severe levels possible. let's deal with wear. they are two british men. they've been stripped of their citizenship. will britain be possibly even relieved not to have to deal with them? barack distinct advantages by the americans processing these two. and us americans processing these two. and us being able to link which that responsibility. insomuch as the processes of interview that they have no doubt implemented already to determine this, about is's current status, the jihadists who determine this, about is's current status, thejihadists who might determine this, about is's current status, the jihadists who might be returning to home nations. they've given up quite a bit of information by all accounts. the story has broken, i believe from my sources, earlier than the americans would have liked. really? yes, apparently there was some information still being run that this release by the new york media has certainly put them into a bit of a tailspin. a
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very small tailspin, but a tailspin nonetheless in terms of trying to expedite some of that information. bearing in mind there was a lot of critical data from these two, that could have some bearing. when we talk about obtaining information from them do win out how it's being done? said on the americans have a broader portfolio if we can call it that in terms of their interviewing or enhanced into being processes than we would in the uk. america is a good, strong ally in the intelligence community with the uk. information will be shared inevitably between the two. we've advanced some time, certainly to a greater degree, since the days of abu grape for example. certainly there have been good arguments as to some of those extreme measures considered, whether they are counter—productive. they will have drawn more information potentially within a shorter period of time. there will be those who say the rights of these two mean nothing given the severity and horror of what they are alleged to have
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committed. again it brings us full circle to the point we discussed at the beginning, which is, should we fall into the same kind of para meters fall into the same kind of parameters that islamic state are endorsing? in terms of denying them any kind of civil human rights. what we think these two have done? allegedly they have carried out in excess of two dozen executions and countless beheadings, torturing of various types. these two are the devil incarnate and the punishment should be commensurate to the crimes they've allegedly carried out. very briefly what do you think will happen next? they'll still be processed and until such time... the timing is key as to when they are ultimately brought out in public for processing. i think the process of any kind of judicial processing. i think the process of any kind ofjudicial hearing buttler prosecution will be done very carefully, certainly there is a lot of intelligence the agencies will not want to disclose. that will be
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the timing that is key. it's also keen not to be counter—productive by furthering their poster boy status to those that still follow that islamic state agenda. will get is talking to me earlier. the eu's chief negotiatior, michel barnier, has thrown into doubt the uk's plans for a transition period after brexit — saying it's not a given, if disagreements in the negotiations persist. mr barnier also told a news conference that checks at the irish border would be unavoidable, once britain has left the single market and customs union. these future relationship would need to avoid hard borders and protect the good friday agreement. once again, it is important to tell the truth. a uk decision to leave the single market and to leave the customs union would make border checks unavoidable. our correspondent adam fleming is in brussels , and a short time this is going well. i countered four
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disagreements between the two side aired in that press conference. david davis wasn't there. he didn't attend this round of talks because it was just officials, so he didn't get the other side of the argument put from the other podium, it was all the eu side today. the stuff about the irish border, michel barnier was reminding everybody that issue was parked in december and wasn't fully solved. it still remains to be solved. what's going on is turning the commitments made in december about avoiding a hard border into legally binding treaty text which is proving quite tricky and will expose potential divisions again. the other really big thing is his language about the transition period, what the british government prefers to call the limitation phase, the period between brexit date... day in 2018 and 2020. michel
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barnier said it would be harder to agree than most expected because of objections the uk have raised. the uk is complaining about three things. they don't want eu citizen to come to the uk after brexit date during the brandishing period to have the right to stay. the eu does. the eu wants means to object to new eu rules and regulations introduced during the limitation phase. the eu isn't sure about that. the uk wants to keep its opt ins to policing, justice and home affairs measures. the eu says you don't get to keep them. the message was, those objections make it harder to agree. the message you get from the brits would be, this is a negotiation, we are negotiating. just watching him today, you get the sense this is going backwards. i'm not sure i would put it as strongly as that, the proof of the pudding will begin eating. there have been moments of crisis, so many moments of disagreement along the way. they've always managed to find something that ended up being palatable to
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both sides at the point at which it had to happen. we're not at deadline crisis mode yet. there was an interesting little... i would call ita interesting little... i would call it a fast this morning. it shows some of the tricksy nests between the sides. ollie robbins, the chief civil service brexit negotiator, was planning to do a presentation on the uk's latest thinking about the future relationship, all the stuff the cabinet has been discussing this week, did his opposite number in the european commission, michel barnier‘s deputy. they are at this level. michel barnier wants to come to that meeting but he is at this level and ollie robins isn't allowed to speak to him. that is david davis's job. that discussion didn't happen. michel barnier says it was a direct clash. the british aren't sure, they are trying to reschedule for the afternoon. the brits say it'll go ahead but they use a this afternoon all they are discussing is date for the next round of brexit
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talks. they are not even sure exactly what they are discussing today and who is allowed to be in the room while they do it. as i said, things aren't going very well. anyway, we'll leave it there, adam thank you very much, adam fleming in brussels. the winter limericks and south korea are likely to do the coldest in history with temperatures of —25 celsius. north and south korean athletes entered the stadium to loud cheers as one team. the sister of north korean leader kim job also shared a handshake with the south korean president. with me now is a reader in diplomatic and international studies at the school of oriental and african studies at the university of london. focusing on diplomacy through sport. an historic handshake. already being called that. around the world as such. is it? it certainly has a
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degree of ramifications, certainly, there will clearly be thoughts flowing from this that mean diplomacy, the opposition for the conversation has been provided through sport. —— the opportunity. it doesn't mean to say there haven't been opportunities in the past where sport has become part of the conversation. we have a great lens on the world of diplomacy in this olympic games. through history reads in olympics playing a vital role. sometimes a not positive role in international relations. when we talk about two neighbours like this, it isa talk about two neighbours like this, it is a bit weird we're celebrating the fact one has crossed the border to go into the other. the history of tension on the korean peninsula is a long one, not one without a chequered history. we have to think about the presidents and important we can attribute to a handshake, even the image of that. what mandela
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said about sport, it has the power to change the world. the platform sport provides, the coming together and communicative power of sport, really sets this apart. the reason we should be more optimistic about reconciliation on the korean peninsula than we have been for quite awhile. have we been too pessimistic about the relationship between north and south? on the face of it it does look quite as cold as we might have been led to believe till now. certainly the rhetoric and rhetoric we here in london is perhaps different from the reality on the ground, there is a great deal of links between north and south in terms of familial ties. they really do transcend some of the boundaries that a national border or demilitarised zone as exists between the two koreas provides. listening to the rhetoric of president trump means one doesn't necessarily get the best insight into the reality in the best insight into the reality in the korean peninsula. certainly colleagues, individuals on the
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ground in career have seen more of a warmth, more affirmation of korean unity. in terms of the personalities involved, kim jong—un's sister, that's a big deal. certainly is, the first time a member of the equivalent of a royal family from north korea have come south of the border. a handshake, you know, is an important symbol, not least because that photograph will be copied around the world, and will be shown in the future as a means of reconciliation. whether the opportunity is taken in six or 12 months' time is when the proof of the pudding will be.” months' time is when the proof of the pudding will be. i can't possibly speculate, i've no idea what it must be like, but sitting in the oval office one might imagine president trump not wildly impressed by the pictures. certainly he has his vice president sat in the row in front. there is an opportunity for president trump to shape that conversation and by all accounts vice president pence didn't attend a meeting last evening. that is still
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an opportunity. the fact this is in some senses a local dispute played out on an international stage, doesn't mean... the chinese also have influence. these pictures we're looking at. the unified front of north and south korea, these pictures didn't go out on north korean television. it's significant. one of the reasons for the show of unity is the audience, an international audience on behalf of the north korean regime. there may well be some replay of this event in north korea. it's not typical either, north korean television doesn't carry live transmissions often. certainly there is a delay to make sure they maintain their political message and that is the prerogative of that national government. fascinating. thank you for coming in. our headlines this afternoon. two british islamic state fighters bought been part of the cell which tortured and beheaded hostages
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ca ptu red tortured and beheaded hostages captured in syria. the charity oxfam says the actions of aid workers reported to use prostitutes when stationed injaidee were completely unacceptable. —— stationed in haiti. michel barnier says the transition period is not a given. trinity mirror is to buy the express and the star newspapers in a deal worth £127 million. we get the latest from our media correspondent. in the sport, a spectacular opening ceremony has taken place at the winter olympics in pyeongchang. skeleton gold medallist lizzy yarnold flying the flag for team gb. freestyle snowboard katie ormerod has been ruled out with injury. michael o'neill‘s format the year contract extension as northern ireland manager has been formally announced. he manager has been formally announced. h e rece ntly manager has been formally announced. he recently turned down the chance to succeed gordon strachan as scotla nd to succeed gordon strachan as scotland boss. leicester city winger riyad mahrez has trained with the clu b riyad mahrez has trained with the club for the first time since a
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proposed january move to manchester city fell through. his manager said yesterday he would not play against city in the premier league this weekend. on those stories just after half past. the charity oxfam says the behaviour of samantha ‘s of its staff in haiti seven years ago is of samantha ‘s of its staff in haiti seven years ago is totally unacceptable. —— some of its staff. there are reports aid workers use prostitutes after stationed there after an earthquake. prostitution is illegal in haiti and the use of sex workers banned by the charity code of conduct. the chief executive of oxfa m of conduct. the chief executive of oxfam at the time, dame barbara stocking, told me on first hearing of the allegations she was horrified. my my immediate reaction was to say look we have to do an investigation now, we have to find out what's really going on, which we did, the investigation was set up immediately. then we had to deal with all those people, the different people involved and deal with the disciplinary matters around that to
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get that absolutely closed down. once you had fun out these allegations were true... yes. why didn't you sack them? we did quite a lot of them, the first one, the country director was informed about the allegations first off as the investigation team arrived. in order to make sure people weren't actually put off from talking to us, we allowed him... he immediately resigned frankly. we looked at that and said yes we'll accept that. we got into the disciplinary actions around six more. if you read the times, less nuanced, what you said was we don't basically need the damage this could do to us, we'll find a dignified and easy way for you to go. no, what we needed was him to stay there and cooperate, that's what we needed to do in that series of investigations that was going to take place. but we didn't want, though some of it happened, what have people who were going to give evidence to be bullied or anything else in any way. at least he was saying i've done wrong and
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i'm going. to make sure we could get the investigation done properly. i'm going. to make sure we could get the investigation done properlym was more than one person. we investigated nine in the end including the country director. four we re including the country director. four were dismissed, three... he resigned early, two resigned in the process of the investigation before we could dismiss them. two were found not culpable. how much of your handling was down to not wanting to damage the name oxfam? it's not about the name oxfam, the issue was about trying to make sure we did this right in haiti, we were in the middle of an earthquake response. most workers were haitian. in fact in the end there were no haitians involved in that. you have to be enormously careful you don't actually really make it impossible for us to continue doing the work, particularly with those haitian staff. your staff have broken the law. those were not the stuff that had broken the law, that the point. the haitian staff were not
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implicated. what we didn't want was haitians locally attacked when it wasn't barefoot at all. there was no rule of law there. which makes this worse. this is why... this is incredibly important, as you are saying. the issue is, this is the sort of environment you're working in when you doing humanitarian response. you have to keep working to keep your culture right. understand absolutely what the code of conduct is. when you spot a proper new deal with that absolutely firmly and clearly an straightaway. that's what we did. you didn't. we did. ina that's what we did. you didn't. we did. in a short time, in about a month or so, we managed to investigate nine different staff and deal with all of them. that was dame barbara stocking talking to me earlier. trinity mirror has agreed to by the express and the star newspapers as well as ok magazine from richard
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osman's housing for £127 million. the company will be able to save money by sharing content and reducing duplication. the chief executive, simon fox, says there will be changes. there will over time bejob cuts because will be changes. there will over time be job cuts because we are going to remove duplication. mainly in back—office functions. we're bringing two similar businesses together and when you do that inevitably there is a certain amount of duplication. this transaction doesn't affect our regional newspapers at all, we operate around 100 regional papers, manchester evening news through to the plymouth herald. trinity mirror as a group makes over £120 million. we are absolutely committed to continuing our investment in our great regional titles both in print and digitally. that get analysis with our media correspondent who is here. david sillito. is this part of a wider
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sense we've been looking at for decades, the demise of newspapers. 0k, decades, the demise of newspapers. ok, the mirrorand decades, the demise of newspapers. ok, the mirror and the express, 50 yea rs ok, the mirror and the express, 50 years ago, this would have been utterly unthinkable. because these we re utterly unthinkable. because these were the two giants of fleet street, the two biggest papers. together selling just under 9 million copies a day. if you get the mirror and the express today, at their total circulations, less than a million. that is how big a decline there has been. it has halved over the last ten years. look at the figures every month, they carry on going down. the issueis month, they carry on going down. the issue is how do you deal with decline? you've got to cut your costs, find ways of doing things cheaper in order to keep profits going until someone can come up with a plan to make means work and pay when you can get it for free on your phone. these newspapers, the mirror and the express, not exactly in the same political pay each. will there
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bea same political pay each. will there be a change? what are they saying? you couldn't get more oppositional in terms of their political orientation. simon fox said today they will be absolute editorial independence, he's not going to tell them to change at all of the express. the decision is a business decision. and if anyone looked at how newspapers are, they are things of habit. the people who are still buying them are older, conservative and carry on buying the newspaper. under the age of a0 it is more and more rare you see somebody who pays for a newspaper each day. so are you going to change the political outlook when you've got a strong, loyal audience? it might be going down each year but they are strong and loyal. probably not. it'll probably stay exactly the same, just with fewer staff. there will be one person covering football match, they will report for the mirror, for the star, for the express. we mention
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the papers. ok magazine, there are other parts of businesses and people will be familiar with. you've got 0k, will be familiar with. you've got ok, you, star, a whole stable of magazines. it's interesting because this is the end of richard osman's a3 year career in publishing. he's had a colourful life. this is him... when he started everybody said it was the death of the business. it certainly hasn't been. it's extraordinary, it's made a profit, it carried on being a successful newspaper and made him money. look he paid £125 million for it in 2000 and has managed to sell it, albeit with ok and new magazine in there for 126 million plus an extra 70 million to pay for a bit extra for the pensions. into the business deal, making money out of newspapers, he's done pretty well. —— in terms of a business deal. newspapers, he's done pretty well. -- in terms of a business deal. the new aircraft carrier has arrived in
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travolta. the six to 5000 tonne vessel joined the royal travolta. the six to 5000 tonne vesseljoined the royal navy fleet in december and has been carrying out helicopter trials since last week. the 1000 strong group will resume sea week. the 1000 strong group will resume sea trials on the future flagship after it refuels and takes on supplies. let's have a look at the weather. louise lear has that. we saw heavy rain moving west to east across the country. then behind a scattering of wintry showers. that was courtesy of this little fellow and the wind coming round from the north—west. cold but at least that is where the best of the sunshine has been. further east, nuisance cloud so far today. a gloomy story as you can see. in greater london. further west, beautiful blue skies and sunshine, as denoted by this weather watchers picture sent from cumbria. the showers giving a light dusting of snow. through the evening and overnight, cloud will gather and the rain will push in from the west.
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on the leading edge we will see it turning increasingly to snow for a time through scotland and northern ireland. psi is further east. a cold start to saturday morning. hence the reason the temperature gradient dips below freezing. the blue tones. snow could be an issue first thing if travelling in scotland. snow and ice cover as much as 5—10 centimetres before that snow eases away. lying still first thing in the morning across scotland, maybe snow showers lingering through the lake district and parts of cumbria. further south, rain through wales and south—west england, that rain drifting east as we go through the day. so it's an improving weather story i suspect across parts of scotland into the afternoon. brighter spells. the rain will turn heavy as it moves through north—west england, wales, south—west england, eventually towards the south—east, staying dry during daylight hours in south—east england. a miserable afternoon for many. we might scrape double digits but it won't feel like it. there are
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important rugby matches taking place this weekend. on saturday it won't surprise you to hear there will be rain around. more of a significant breeze as well, noticeable wind could affect the kicking game for ireland. as we move out of saturday the area of low pressure will move away. on the southern flank we could see gales or severe gales across the north—west. then we can trace those isobars to the north—west. it means as we head towards sunday it is winter proper. the showers falling snow across scotland, northern ireland and north—west england. best of the sunshine further east. that's it. enjoy. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. two british jihadists belonging two britishjihadists belonging to so—called islamic state have been captured. the daughter of an aid worker they killed says she is delighted by the news. they have destroyed
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a big part of my life. and hopefully there will be some sort ofjustice. the charity oxfam has condemned the behaviour of seven former members of its staff in haiti, after newspaper allegations that the aid workers regularly used prostitutes when stationed in the country in 2011. eu negotiator michel barnier warns that a transitional deal after the uk leaves the eu "is not a given". he says that substantial disagreements between britain and the eu need to be overcome. and a historic handshake — as the sister of north at the opening ceremony of the winter olympics. we continue the sports news with hugh. after the razzle—dazzle of the opening ceremony some pressure on tea m opening ceremony some pressure on team gb. there were some special moments at the opening ceremony. you mentioned some when it comes to korea. a special moment indeed for lizzy yarnold, skeleton gold
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medallist last time, she led out tea m medallist last time, she led out team gb at the ceremony, four medals is the minimum target set for the team, there are no 59 athletes in the team, three times as many as in sochi, four years ago. five medals would be a record tally but one main hope, snowboarder katie ormerod has been ruled out with a fractured right heel, a blow to the team's chances of improving their tally. the target is five, the middle rages between four and ten. we've got a lot of potential in different sports. she was one of our great contenders, there are many reasons why she isn't with us but we feel that the rest of the team can still perform. five medals a big ask, ten would be incredible. highlights of that opening ceremony on bbc two from seven o'clock. there's others bought around, england versus wales in the six nations tomorrow. a great
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time of yearfor in the six nations tomorrow. a great time of year for those old—fashioned rivalries and england head coach eddiejones is rivalries and england head coach eddie jones is back rivalries and england head coach eddiejones is back to his tricks, quietly trying to get in the heads of the welsh set up before the match tomorrow at twickenham. he questioned whether rhys patchell, the welsh fill—in fly half, had the bottle for the game. he even said the wales captain alun wynjones would doubt his team mate. let's hear what both jones would doubt his team mate. let's hear what bothjones man had to say. he hasn't played test match rugby at all, she is young, he hasn't got greatly experienced players around him, he will have chris robshaw and farrell at him, and george ford so the pressure on him will be enormous. i the pressure on him will be enormous. i wonder the pressure on him will be enormous. i wonder if he's got the bottle to handle it. nine people forget r hys bottle to handle it. nine people forget rhys patchell has been around who scored the years. you'd probably like a few more caps, but i say he's got experience and it is a step up, nobody would deny that, playing at
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twickenham against england but he's ready for that and focusing on the job at hand. coverage of the six nations across the bbc. michael o'neill ‘s four—year contract extension as northern ireland manager has been formally announced. the a8—year—old recently turned down the chance to succeed gordon strachan as the new scotland boss, instead opting to accept the longest and most lucrative contract in the history of the irish fa. walter smith won't take that scotland job either, that would have been for a second time, he was the favourite to succeed gordon strachan after michael o'neill turned down the job at smith appears to have ruled himself out after talks with the scottish fa. good news for leicester city fans, it appears that the clubs fall out with riyad mahrez is coming to an end. the algerian international trained for the first time today since the club rejected several bids from premier league leaders manchester city on the final
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day of the january transfer window. he could even feature for leicester city in the late kick off tomorrow. lee westwood said he needed his wits about him after a challenging day at the european tour event in perth. in strong winds he had a second round of 70, he is now level with defending champion brett rumford at half way. they are one shot clear of the field with one round of stroke play to go before sunday's matchplay finale. and that is all the sport for now, simon. hugh, thank you. back to the main story, two british extremists believed to be members of one of the islamic state's one of the most notorious source said to have been captured by kurdish fighters in syria. david lowe from the research group at beckett university has recently written a book on terrorist law and policing. what should happen to these two?
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ideally, they should face trial. with them being in us hands, taken to us criminal court, let do process ta ke to us criminal court, let do process take its place and this will also demonstrate to the world that this is the difference between a western democracy and a totalitarian violent regime we saw of the likes of islamic state who will give a strong message out because their rights will also be protected, they will have a right to a defence solicitor, a right to trial byjury in the us. there are strict rules on selecting a jury. and of course they can put forward their defence. given what these two have done, some in the trump administration perhaps would like to send them straight to guantanamo bay. this would be a problem on two counts. one it would send out the wrong signals, with a background of guantanamo bay and what has happened it hasn't exactly been a positive experience, it's been a positive experience, it's been a positive experience, it's been a greater recruitment tool for islamist groups like islamic state,
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al-qaeda and so on, to show that there is one rule for if you like, us citizens and one rule for muslims who are not us citizens. it gives out the wrong message. and also, if they did go to guantanamo bay, there could be that possibility that the uk government might look to extradite them but that is not an easy process and i think the us is government, with president trump and his stance, that negotiation could be difficult. because no doubt this is an opportunity for president trump to show that the us can take a ha rd trump to show that the us can take a hard line against terrorists but also give them a fair trial, so we give out the wrong message rather than sending them to guantanamo. two of the so—called beetles have strong british accidents and are obviously british, why shouldn't they come here? they are in us hands of the moment. like anything, we have an
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international crime, be it terrorism organised crime, the offences taking that would not be valid, if they go for trial, face trialfor that would not be valid, if they go for trial, face trial for murder, and were convicted they would get a long sentence. so in some ways justice would be done. if they can to the uk a similar process would ta ke to the uk a similar process would take place here. we have our own murder trials which are terrorist related but i think we need to accept that they are in the hands of the us and allowed due process to ta ke the us and allowed due process to take its place. when you say that they should face trial and face a long time in prison, it underestimates the horror of what these two supposed to have done. without a doubt. we know what one
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such person dead and was well—publicised, the fourth one has been convicted in a turkish court for seven and a half years which seems like a light sentence, but what has been alleged about these two individuals is that they have been involved in mock executions, crucifixions, torture, and maybe for executions themselves but if there's none of that, the reason they have been put up the murder is because of joint criminal enterprise and that principle also exists in the states. doctor david lowe, thank you so much. human eggs have been grown in a laboratory for the first time. scientists from edinburgh university removed egg cells from ovary tissue at their earliest stage of development, and grew them to the point they were ready for fertilisation.
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the team says the findings could lead to new ways of preserving women's fertility. james gallagher explains. in laboratories in edinburgh, scientists have grown human eggs. they've taken the immature eggs women are born with and transformed them so they're ready to be fertilised. it's taken decades of work to copy what happens inside women's ovaries. we never imagined that we would be getting these kind of results using human tissue, so it's a significant step. but of course, the main objective for us is to prove and to determine the safety of these techniques, so that they could, in the future, go into some kind of application. it could be used to help young girls with cancer, as treatment can damage their fertility. so how might it work? a girl diagnosed with cancer would have a sample of her ovaries frozen before cancer treatment. then later, as an adult, the tissue would be defrosted, an egg grown, fertilised and then put in the womb. there may even be other applications in fertility treatment,
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but only 10% of eggs completed theirjourney to maturity, and none were fertilised, so it's still uncertain how viable they are. experts say more research is needed before it can be used clinically. there's going to be quite a few more years before this technique can be used clinically. the eggs applied from this procedure would have to be made much more efficiently at a higher success rate, it has to be tested genetically, they would have to be tested to see if they fertilised normally and developing to normal embryos. so quite a few things to go through. but the work marks an important proof of principle. it will also give researchers the opportunity to explore how human eggs develop, much of which remains a mystery. james gallagher, bbc news. you're watching afternoon live.
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richard handley had downs syndrome and was just 33 years old when he died from complications caused by severe constipation. yesterday, an inquest found there were "gross and very significant failings" in his care. the government is currently reviewing all deaths of people with learning disabilities in england, and is due to publish the first of its findings next month. they told the bbc there is concern over a significant number of cases. jayne mccubbin reports. richard was cheeky and had a huge sense of the ridiculous. toilet humour. yes. close to richard's heart. because that's how the family dealt with what was a lifelong problem for richard. constipation. a problem which should have been manageable, but which killed him when he was 33. it's just so incomprehensible, isn't it? it's so devastating, really. it shouldn't have happened. richard's diet was well looked after by his family and his care home, but when that home turned into supported living he was allowed to eat what he liked. by the time he was admitted to ipswich hospital his constipation was so severe he appeared full—term pregnant. i saw a picture of him,
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actually, when he was lying in the hospital bed. the picture was taken after he had had one of the procedures to hopefully reduce the size of his tummy, and looking at that picture i couldn't believe my eyes. if all those measures to protect him had been in place, it wouldn't have happened. he would still be here? he would still be here, yes. i'd still have a son. you'd still have a brother. yesterday, an inquest here in ipswich found missed opportunities to help richard and gross failures to act by the hospital. report after report has shown there are too many avoidable deaths and three years agojeremy hunt ordered a world first, scrutiny of every single death of a learning disabled person in england. this will be a very important moment to step out and look at the way we look after that particular highly vulnerable group. that review will publish its first report next month, but we've learnt that one in ten deaths looked at so far have come
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with red flag indicators. that might mean, as with richard, there is evidence that treatment was delayed, or perhaps there is evidence of abuse or neglect, or concerns have been raised by a family member. this woman led the serious case review into richard's death and also the scandal of winterbourne view. she says both cases exposed a system which cares deeply at the point of birth, but less as a child becomes an adult. we know that they can be fantastic when an infant arrives in this world. we know that the nhs has done some astonishing things to keep those infants alive. however, that appears to taper and certainly sustained austerity has shown us that services have reduced and workforces have diminished and that has left families, some families, floundering. and do you think has cost some learning disabled people their life? yes, indeed.
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it has. richard's family have received apologies from the hospital, their council and the care provider. all say lessons have been learnt, a phrase often used after an avoidable death. the department of health say they must stop. from july, trusts will have to publish data on deaths and evidence of improvement. nhs england say they are committed to improving the lives of people with a learning disability. jayne mccubbin with that report. police in canada have found the remains of at least six people, in the grounds of a house linked to an alleged serial killer. bruce mcarthur was arrested last month and charged with murdering five men. charlotte gallagher reports. detectives have now found the remains of at least six people hidden in large plant pots in a suburban home, where the suspect
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carried out landscape gardening. this man, 66—year—old bruce mcarthur, has been charged with the murders of five men, and detectives believe more charges may follow. forensic teams are now searching 30 properties, battling the plummeting temperatures to dig through the frozen ground. officers are also examining bruce mcarthur‘s computer and mobile phone, and are investigating a possible link between gay dating apps and the murders. there is an extensive digital investigation going on, going through online applications, going through cellphones, different apps. we are preparing warrants, and have prepared warrants on different providers. that is a very big part of this investigation as well. in december, police tried to calm community concern that there was a serial killer stalking the area, following a handful of disappearances in an area known as the gay village.
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now, officers are in the midst of a huge investigation that spans across canada's largest city. the authorities are reviewing hundreds of missing persons cases dating back to at least 2010, amid fears that the number of victims may rise. charlotte gallagher, bbc news. ina minute in a minute the business news, first the headlines. the hopping course for two jihadists the headlines. the hopping course for twojihadists to be put on the headlines. the hopping course for two jihadists to be put on trial as they are part of a cell that tortured hostages. the charity box a nswe rs re ports tortured hostages. the charity box answers reports that two of its workers supposedly used prostitutes when working in heidi are acceptable. michel barnier says the proposed transition period for the uk after 2019 is not a given. thank
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you, your other business headlines. lots of figures out on the uk economy this morning. the trade deficit, the shortfall between imports and exports, wide and again in the last three months of 2017 is the cost of oil pushed up imports. industrial production fell in december, dropping from 1.3% in november although much of it was thanks to the shutdown of the big north sea pipeline. and outward in the construction sector fell in the three months to december. more on that in and feel. the owner of the daily mirror is to buy the company behind titles including the daily express, the daily star and ok magazine. trinity will pay one point £2.6 million of the publishing assets of more than an shell, chaired by richard desmond. the sale, which has been on the cards for some time ends richard desmond's near 18 years the uk newspaper owner. and after rocky week the uk
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to egg us markets have rebounded slightly. the markets have been reasonably come with the ftse100 down about 1% in the afternoon although key asian markets have fallen overnight with the hong kong index recording its biggest drop since the 2008 financial crisis. a load of economic data coming out about the uk. what have we learned? it isa about the uk. what have we learned? it is a mixed picture. these numbers came from the office for national statistics and referred to december, how the uk economy performed in the last month of last year. the positives from it, ongoing strength in manufacturing output, and a pick—up in construction and although that sector continues sluggish. a widening in the trade deficit though. what does that tell us overall? it depends who you ask. according to the can firm cya ernest
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and young, they see the underlying picture is very positive, pointing to the slump in industrial production and saying it will pick up production and saying it will pick up injanuary. that's a pick—up they expect in oil and gas extraction. they also say the data is consistent with the gdp growth we saw in the last quarter of 2017, 0.5% which is the best performing quarter of last year. however the chief economist from the british chamber of commerce has zeroed in on this widening uk trade deficit and this slump in industrial output, as indicators that in the long—term economic picture is sluggish. he says that if this trend continues, this widening, this trend continues, this widening, this gap, between exports and the imports, well, thanks to rising oil prices higher imports, the net trade contribution to uk gdp growth in the near term, he says, contribution to uk gdp growth in the nearterm, he says, could contribution to uk gdp growth in the near term, he says, could be limited at best. pretty damning therefrom the bcc. to get more on this let me
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bring in thomas cole, a former trade negotiator and head of research policy at open britain. what did you make of those numbers? the key thing is that it shows again the importance of the eu 27 market for imports and exports have the uk. when we look at the 2017 figures and compare them with 2016 the netherlands is now are more important source of uk goods imported to this country than the united states is. but once more demonstrates firstly the importance of the trade relationship to the uk and also the uncertainty looking forward as the brexit negotiations and fold with the uk looking to disentangle itself from the customs market as well as the customs union. —— from the single market and the customs union. it's been a big week in terms of brexit negotiations. just today we heard from uk brexit negotiator michel barnier, saying
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the transition period was not a given. what do you think of that.” think we have to be careful about this because it's an extension of the current negotiation period, why is the government looking for an extension, they don't think there's enough time until march 2019 to negotiate future relationship with the european union. the bad side for the european union. the bad side for the uk is the minute you enter this transition period which could be longer than two years, you have to accept all the rules and have no say over them. you'lljust have to accept them point—blank having a say on them. and interestingly when it comes to trade, due to britain's membership of the eu all those countries are saying, we are not necessarily interested in continuing trading relationships with the uk now. perhaps we should see if we can improve our trading relationships with the uk because of that, there's
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an awful lot of uncertainty. has any of that uncertainty been assuaged during the course of the last week through intensive negotiations going on? we know that the so—called canada option and norway option were on the table, are we any clearer as to which trade option they are nudging towards? in a word, no. the interesting thing is, the leaks this week from the governments own sources demonstrate that according to government data every single brexit model which we have modelled, show that wherever you are in the uk you will be worse off and the models they've looked at. and now we are right now at the moment, where transition talks are being negotiated with a view to getting some sort of agreement in six or seven weeks, and at that point to move on to the future trading relationship this great uncertainty with parliament going into recess
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next week i don't see any big decisions being taken and it may not be until the end of february or early march that we get much clarity at all. although having said that, putting its cards on the table and explaining what they want to the eu, they have failed to do so. let's look at the markets. here in london, this fall, we can see both major markets are trading up. a mixed picture, as you say. thank you very much, alice. dippy, the lifesize cast of a diplodocus skeleton, is on tour — he left london's natural history museum last year and was replaced with a huge blue whale. now he's made it to the jurassic coast. he's pulling in new fans there. well, at the dorset county museum. duncan kennedy reports. it's ta ken about 150 million years...
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i think we're in business! and five days to bring dippy the dinosaur to dorset. ok, dippy‘s 292 bones may be made of plastic, but this iconic replica of a real diplodocus is palaeontology perfection right up to his head. it was touch and go as to whether it would fit in, but it's perfect so i'm happy. how much does he weigh altogether? lorraine cornish of the natural history museum has led a team of technicians to the delicate job of moving delicate dippy to dorchester‘s county museum. i think dippy‘s
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the people's dinosaur. a lot of people came to see him in london, fond memories of bringing their own children, it tells great stories and really inspires people. the first of those children were certainly wowed today. what's the best bit about him? his tail, because he can whack people around. what's so great about dippy? that he's ginormous. he's massive, isn't he? dippy first appeared at london's natural history museum in 1905 and cost £2000. but the museum decided it was time for a change and is sending dippy on a nationwide tour requiring a massive job of reassembly in seven destinations around britain. in fact now that dippy has been put together they think in dorchester alone 70,000 people will come to see him. after that he'll head off to the midlands, wales, and to scotland on a grand tour of the uk. they think that over the course of the next three years, something like 5 million people will
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engage with this incredible project. and where better for dippy‘s first stop than dorset‘sjurassic coast? if dippy was going to choose to go somewhere he'd probably choose the jurassic coast to find out all about the fossils and the other creatures living in what is now the british isles at around the time that he was roaming what is now wyoming in america. wherever dippy goes it will be free to see him. a chance for older visitors to relive childhood memories and for younger ones to create some. duncan kennedy, bbc news, in dorchester. duncan and in dorset. now the weather with louise. let's look at what is in store for saturday, rain pushing an overnight which will change things tomorrow, the best of
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the dry weather overnight will be in the dry weather overnight will be in the east, where it will be cold and frosty, a lot of cloud and some rain, eventually we should see snow as this frontal system centre called evra scotland and northern ireland. we keep the clear skies into central and eastern areas, temperatures falling just below freezing, a cold start, perhaps not much to in the wa ke start, perhaps not much to in the wake of frost but a noticeable breeze. through the day the snow will ease over we could start with between five and ten centimetres across scotland, it should ease off to the morning. the rain however, through northern england and south—east wales will pep up through the day and become heavy and persistent for much of the afternoon. top temperatures between six and 11 degrees. whatever you are doing, enjoy yourweekend. hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at apm: calls for two british jihadis ca ptu red calls for two british jihadis captured in syria to be put in trial from some relatives of their victims
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as they are accused of murdering more than 20 hostages. if it goes to trial i'll certainly be there, i certainly will look them in the eye and let them know i am who i am and they have destroyed a big part of my life. not a given. the eu throws doubt on a brexit transition period. michel barnier says he's surprised by the substantial disagreements between the uk and eu. a handshake in history as the sister of north korea's kim jong—un meets the south korean president at the opening of the winter olympics. the athletes from dprk and rok, by marching together, sent a powerful message of peace to the world. we continue that's been in our sport. lizzie has details. all eyes on south korea. we're talking winter olympics and can team gb win a record—breaking number of medals. the opening ceremony took place in
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pyeongchang today. more viewjust after half past. with the weather is louise. good afternoon, beautiful day in the north and west of the uk. with blue sky and sunshine. it's cold with it. showers that have been falling leaving a light dusting of snow. more details coming. making news, trinity mirror is to known as "the beatles".
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but now theukeeagehiéf the question is what happens to them next. should they face trial? and if so — where.. in britain, where there's some confusion as to exactly how ‘british' they now are.. or in amerca.. where there may be some in the trump administration who would like to send them to guantanamo bay. richard galpin reports. 3a—year—old alexanda kotey was captured in eastern syria last month, along with 29—year—old el shafee elsheikh. the news only confirmed now by us officials. they were caught by syrian kurdish fighters like these, who are backed by the americans. us forces have been interrogating the two men. the other members of the notorious british gang of is fighters were aine davis, who's injail in turkey, and the ringleader, mohammed emwazi, known asjihadijohn, killed in a drone strike in 2015.
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kotey and elsheikh were the last to be found. today, the police went to the family home of
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