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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  February 9, 2018 5:00pm-5:46pm GMT

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today at five: victims' families demand that two members of an islamic state execution cell should face trial. alexanda kotey and el shafee el—sheikh were captured by syrian kurdish forces — the daughter of one of their victims says they must pay. if it goes to trial, i'll certainly be there, i certainly want to look them in the eye and let them know that i am who i am and they have destroyed a big part of my life. be speaking live to a security expert about what information the ca ptu red expert about what information the captured men might be able to give. the other main stories on bbc news at five. a warning from the eu's chief brexit negotiatior that a transition period isn't a a given, because of continuing disagreements. the handshake of history, as the sister of north korea's kim jong un meets the south korean president. the meeting took place at the start of the winter olympics, which got underway in pyongchang with a spectacular opening ceremony. in a breakthrough that could lead to new fertility treatments,
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scientists grow human eggs in a laboratory for the first time. remote driving system activated. weight, which side of the road as it? just drive. calm down. and in the film review we'll be talking black panther, as marvel‘s highly—anticipated movie is released. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at five. our main story, families of some of the victims of two british islamic state jihadists, who've been captured in syria, have called for the men to face justice in court. alexanda kotey and el shafee elsheikh were seized by kurdish forces last month.
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bethany haines, whose father david was murdered by the cell, says the men should be forced to look the people whose lives they'd destroyed in the eye. nicolas henin, a french journalist held by the group, says they should stand trial in britain. us officials say the group has murdered more than 20 hostages. richard galpin reports. 34—year—old alexanda kotey was captured in eastern syria last month, along with 29—year—old el shafee elsheikh. the news only confirmed now by us officials. they were caught by syrian kurdish fighters like these, who are backed by the americans. us forces have been interrogating the two men. the other members of the notorious british gang of is fighters were aine davis, who's injail in turkey, and the ringleader, mohammed emwazi, known asjihadijohn, killed in a drone strike in 2015.
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kotey and elsheikh were the last to be found. today the police went to the family home of el shafee elsheikh in west london. all the gang came from the same area, and were radicalised here before leaving for syria and iraq. makeshift bomb shelters in the bottom of a school... the american journalist james foley was the first of at least 27 western hostages, who us officials say were beheaded by the gang. the killing videoed, and then put on the internet. and this is david haines, a british aid worker, who was also captured by islamic state and beheaded in 2014. alan henning, a former taxi driver, who became a volunteer aid worker in syria in 2013 was the second british man to be murdered. the videos showed mohammed emwazi, jihadijohn, killing each
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of these men and others. this morning the daughter of david haines gave her reaction. they should die a long, slow, painful death. realistically that is not going to happen. and you have to come to terms with that. the best thing for them is to be locked up and throw away the key. they should never be allowed back into society, because they willjust recruit people, and they will just do this again. if it goes to trial, i'll certainly be there. i certainly want to look them in the eye and let them know that i'm who i am. and they've destroyed a big part of my life. some westerners guarded by the british gang did manage to get out alive, including frenchjournalist nicola henin, who's delighted by the capture of kotey and elsheik but want proper trial.
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revenge is an endless cycle, where justice eventually aims at extinguishing violence by setting up all the grievances and bringing back peace. and this is what i want. but it's possible kotey and elsheikh may end up here at guantanamo bay, where there would not be a normal trial. although it's not confirmed, the bbc believes they've been stripped of their british citizenship, which means they could remain in american hands. richard galpin, bbc news. let us discuss what might happen next. michael clarke is the former director general of the royal united services institute, the defence and security focused think tank. good evening. in terms of that final point, in fact, good evening. in terms of that final point, infact, being good evening. in terms of that final point, in fact, being stripped of british citizenship, how does it work? who decides that? the fact that it has apparently happened, what does even tell you about all of this? it tells you that the british authorities are in a bit of a quandary. it happens because the
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home secretary has powers to strip people of british citizenship. if people of british citizenship. if people are dual citizens you can do that and take away their bridges and —— british citizenship if they are a citizen of another country and it is contrary to international law to do it if they only have citizenship of your country. the government gave themselves powers under counterterrorism acts to do that and they have stripped about 81 people of sitters ship it is believed in the last ten years. generally speaking in ways that they are allowed to do but it can be legally challenged if in international law and under the universal declaration of human rights, if you take away their only citizenship so the home 0ffice their only citizenship so the home office at the moment are not saying anything because i imagine they find it very sensitive. it is much more easy if the british government simply say these people have committed crimes against americans and if they are handed over to america through an extradition process and they stand trial in
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america then undoubtedly they will either be executed or more likely given very long sentences, 150 years 01’ given very long sentences, 150 years or something like that, which is normally the american penal system and then it is out of our hands. i am sure the british government would prefer it is something the americans handle and for the relatives who feel they want to look these people in the face then they can go to an american court of law and do that. how much information do you fix —— think might have been got out of these men already. we know they have been questioned. what will the authorities be looking for the? quite a lot. there are several hundred people who the authorities have lost contact with. we know that about 800 british people went to iraq and syria to fight for isis and at least two or 300 of those people have now disappeared and a lot of them in southern turkey or other areas. some are turning up in south libya. the authorities know that
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they cannot now place all of the people that they thought they knew where they were and they are either in raqqa or mosul or where ever. any information these characters have provided about the whereabouts or the fate of those people is helpful because it helps to tidy the files up because it helps to tidy the files up so that the authorities in britain know what they are dealing with. if they are actually looking out for 150 people who are coming back to the uk then it obviously matters as opposed to 400. i think they will want to have reconstructed they will want to have reconstructed the fate of these individuals. they will want to know where they were or what they were doing and who did they see when they left and that kind of information which is what they will have been pressed again. you use the word pressed but they are not going to want to reveal who their contacts are and where they are living. do we make an assumption that a lot of that information might just come from phones that they
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might have been carrying at the time and that sort of thing? yes, there isa and that sort of thing? yes, there is a popular assumption that someone will be tortured and beaten up and thatis will be tortured and beaten up and that is not true. they are held by kurdish forces and i suspect that british security officials might be present. the fact is you get a lot more out of these characters by making them offers and inducements, in the sense that if they are given to the americans, you know what will happen and if you come to british you will certainly have a more co mforta ble you will certainly have a more comfortable life sentence than what you might face in america and what ever they were carrying, there will bea ever they were carrying, there will be a lot ofa ever they were carrying, there will be a lot of a forensic evidence on them and their clothes will have forensics and that will tell them a lot and by having them there they can deduce a lot and by negotiating with what they want to happen next you can also extract a lot of material and in effect you do deals even though these two must know they will never see the outside of a prison cell for the rest of their
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lives. very interesting to talk to you. we will discuss this again. thank you for your time. now,. the eu's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier, has warned that continuing disagreements between the uk and brussels mean a transition period is not a given, repeating himself in english, for emphasis. speaking after a week of technical discussions between civil servants, mr barnier highlighted what he called three substantial disputes, including the government's refusal to guarantee permanent rights to eu nationals who move to britain during the transition period. to be frank i am surprised by these disagreements. i think the position of the european union is very logical. the uk wants to enjoy the advantages of the single market and the customs union and the con policies and it has therefore to
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access all of the rules and the obligations until the end of transition, that is very logical. it also has to to accept the ineluctable consequences of its decision to leave the european union and leave its institutions and its policies. to be quite frank, if these disagreements persist the transition is not a given. if these disagreements persist, the transition is not a given. that was pa rt transition is not a given. that was part of what michel barnier had to say in brussels just a little bit earlier today. as a response to that we have had comments from david davis, the brexit secretary. he issued a strong response to everything that michel barnier had to say and we will have more about that from our political correspondent. 0ur political correspondent chris mason is in westminster. all of these comments have been
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fascinating. tell us more about this. good evening. the tone has been sour with a fruity and salty language between the two sides. we should expect that because this is a negotiation. michel barnier was effectively negotiating in public on behalf of the 27 remaining members of the european union and that is is job. the big difference today is that it was just him and it didn't involve david davis because, as you say, these negotiations have been at the technical and civil service level rather than ata and civil service level rather than at a ministerial level. david davis responded to the remarks from michel barnier in a statement in the last half—hour. the brexit secretary said, there has been intense work this week. he said it is surprising to hear that michel barnier is unclear on the uk position in relation to the implementation
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period, the transition period of roughly two hours —— years from the end of march next year, he goes onto say that there is a fundamental contradiction on the approach that the commission is taking. today they acknowledge that way to resolve disputes and infringements is needed. that is during the implementation period. at the same time they dismissed the uk ‘s push for reasonable safeguards to ensure oui’ for reasonable safeguards to ensure our interests are protected. it is not possible to have it both ways. this is meant to be the easy bit, nailing down this implementation period, this transition period, is meant to be the easy bit that is nailed down in the next month or so before the far more substantive discussions about what the future relationship looks like. clearly there is a bit of ironing out to be donein there is a bit of ironing out to be done in the negotiations on this in the coming weeks because there is a disagreement between the two sides about precisely how the transition should look. there is an acceptance on both sides that it should be pretty much identical to staying into the european union except legally we will be on the outside, but there are clearly issues on the margins that are clearly causing concern on both sides. we know there
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is also disagreement within the conservative party. how much of that is playing in to what we are seeing here and everything you are describing over the last week or so? there are clearly some in the conservative party who are deeply uncomfortable with any sort of implementation or transitional period because they see it as the worst of all options. that phrase the vassal state has been thrown around. from their perspective the danger is that the uk becomes will ta ke danger is that the uk becomes will take from the european union at a time when it is no longer a rule maker. that said, in the upper echelons of the party in government, there is an acceptance that a transitional period necessary and it is one that senior conservatives are happy to live with, even those who articulate in a language of brexit prior to the referendum. 0thers articulate in a language of brexit prior to the referendum. others feel the transitional period is essential and the two years will not be long enough. whether disagreements of the conservative party really start to play out and have a longer term
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bearing is on what the future relationship, the end state solution looks like. you still have this huge castle there and it is very tricky for the prime minister plot highway through this between those whose instincts say that the uk relationship with the eu after brexit should be one of pretty close alignment with the european union and others who make the argument that the whole point of brexit is to ensure that there is such —— significant diverges between the uk in the future and the european union. goodness. plenty more to talk about another time. it is not boring, is it? so where does this leave the brexit negotiations on the issue of trade? here's chris morris from the bbc‘s reality check team. there are now less than two months before the beginning of the financial year in which brexit actually happens so it is hardly surprising that pressure from business for greater clarity is becoming intense. we havejust heard
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that negotiations between the uk and eu officials have been taking place in brussels again this week with plenty still to be resolved over the withdrawal agreement and the details ofa withdrawal agreement and the details of a transition period after brexit. in the long term this is what people wa nt to in the long term this is what people want to know. how is the uk pozner future relationship with the eu going to work? it means reaching a agreement on trade relations, negotiating a security treaty, and working out how future foreign policy co—operation will work in practice. it is trade, in fact, the entire economic relationship that is proving most difficult to pin down. formal negotiations haven't even started yet and yesterday we had a reminder that the lack of clarity is making people nervous, even outside of europe. if there is no profitability of continuing operation in the uk, notjapanese only, no private company can continue operation, so it is as
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simple as that and this is all high sta kes that simple as that and this is all high stakes that i think all of us need to keep in mind. the uk government plans to leave the eu single market and the customs union, the closest form of cooperation between countries anywhere in the world. we also know they want to maintain frictionless trade with no tariffs and checks and the minimum of bureaucracy. the eu says it is not possible unless the uk sticks extremely closely to all of its rules and regulations. now, the uk position is still being negotiated in cabinet but it wants the freedom to diverged from eu rules on certain areas, agriculture is an obvious example and foreign trade deals are another. it also says publicly that it wants to finalise all negotiations on the future before the uk leads the eu in march 2019. the eu says it is not really realistic and there is not enough time to sort it all out. it wants a
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broad political declaration finalised by october. as for diverges, it has warned the uk repeatedly that it cannot expect a cherry pick the best bits of the current relationship without taking on the common responsibilities. there is so much pressure on the government to set out what explicitly what it wants to negotiate. do not forget, if you see headlines proclaiming that an agreement is reached, that is just in the uk. you have to get the other 27 eu countries on board as well and they all have their own interests. another reason why this is such a complex process. chris morris from our reality check team. this is bbc news at 5:00pm. the headlines: two british members of an islamic state execution cell should face trial, according to the victims' families. a warning from michel barnier that a
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transition period is not a given because of the disappointments. —— disagreements. after the diplomacy, the games begin. the winter olympics get under way in south korea. lizzie yarnold bids to become the first briton to successfully defend a winter olympics title. the northern ireland manager has had an extension formally announced. it is the longest and most lucrative extension —— contract the irish f a ‘s history. more sportjust after half past. thank you. see you later. the charity 0xfam has denied allegations it covered up the use of prostitutes by its aid workers in haiti. responding to a report in the times newspaper, the charity admitted that the behaviour of some of its staff had been totally u na cce pta ble. but 0xfam said it had publicly announced an investigation
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into the allegations when they surfaced in 2011. sarah campbell is here. let us explain a little bit more. as that suggested, we are talking about things that happened seven years ago. why is it being discussed now? this was the aftermath of the earthquake in haiti and many people died and a million people were left homeless and 0xfam was one of the charities drafted in to help the population recover and of the british public donated millions of pounds in order to help them do that and it is the conduct of some of those staff that has been on the front page of the times newspaper today. that is why we are talking about it. the newspaper alleges there were sex parties where men invited young prostitutes to guesthouses, including according to one source under age girls and that
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the 0xfam country director, a belgian man, had used prostitutes at the villa that was being rented by 0xfam. 0xfam has confirmed that there was an investigation at the time and that there is no question that prostitutes were employed and paid for by 0xfam staff, although they say the use of underage girls was never proven. back in 2011 the director immediately resigned eddie did not face any disciplinary action. the same is true of two other employees and for members of staff were dismissed. 0xfam say the investigation was made public at the time but they didn't inform the local police even prostitution is in haiti and therefore crimes had been committed. dame barbara stocking was the chief executive at the time and was asked whether they didn't inform the authorities because they were worried about what it might mean for the 0xfam name and reputation. worried about what it might mean for the 0xfam name and reputationm worried about what it might mean for the 0xfam name and reputation. it is not about the name 0xfam, the issue was about making sure we did it right in haiti. this was the middle ofan right in haiti. this was the middle of an earthquake response and most
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of an earthquake response and most of our workers were asian and in the end there were none of them involved in that. and you have to be enormously careful that you do not make it impossible for us to continue doing the work especially with those staff from aet. she also said that the incident led to the creation of safeguarding team and the confidential whistle—blowing hotline to try and prevent something like this ever happening again in first place. are there still some people asking questions about what the charity actually reported at the time? this is the allegation and dame barbara said the charity had been very transparent and there was no cover—up and they had informed the charity commission about the incident. the report today is quite interesting. they say they were informed about the investigation 2011 and dizzying included some inappropriate sexual behaviour but it didn't detail the precise allegations, including potential sexual crimes involving minors and
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they did not seek a final copy of they did not seek a final copy of the report. they finally add that allegations such as these involving 0xfa m allegations such as these involving 0xfam staff do risk undermining public ‘s trust. thank you very much. a man has beenjailed for 21 months after pretending his family had died in the grenfell tower fire. anh nhu nguyen, admitted three counts of fraud. he attempted to gain £12,000, hotel accommodation and clothing from the victim relief fund after the fire. human eggs have been grown in a laboratory for the first time. scientists from edinburgh university removed egg cells from ovary tissue at their earliest stage of development, and grew them to the point they were ready for fertilisation. james gallagher explains. in laboratories in edinburgh, scientists have grown human eggs. they've taken the immature eggs women are born with and transformed them so they're ready to be fertilised. it's taken decades of work to copy what happens inside women's ovaries. we never imagined that we would be
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getting these kind of results using human tissue, so it's a significant step. but of course, the main objective for us is to prove and to determine the safety of these techniques, so that they could, in the future, go into some kind of application. it could be used to help young girls with cancer as treatment can damage their fertility. so how might it work? a girl diagnosed with cancer would have a sample of her ovary frozen before cancer treatment. then later, as an adult, the tissue would be defrosted, an egg grown, fertilised and then put in the womb. there may even be other applications in fertility treatment, but only 10% of eggs completed theirjourney to maturity, and none were fertilised, so it's still uncertain how viable they are.
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experts say more research is needed before it can be used clinically. there's going to be quite a few more years before this technique can be used clinically. the eggs applied from this procedure would have to be made much more efficiently at a high success rate, it has to be tested genetically, they would have to be tested to see if they fertilised normally and developing to normal embryos. so quite a few things to go through. but the work marks an important proof of principle. it will also give researchers the opportunity to explore how human eggs develop, much of which remains a mystery. james gallagher, bbc news. this is the life—size cast of aditya doak skeleton. he is on tour. he has been replaced with an enormous blue whale. he has made it to the dorset
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cou nty whale. he has made it to the dorset county museum where duncan kennedy reports. it's ta ken about 150 million years... dippy is here. i think we're in business! ..and five days to bring dippy the dinosaur to dorset. 0k, dippy‘s 292 bones may be made of plaster, but this iconic replica of a real diplodocus is still palaeontology perfection right up to his head. a nice moment. it was touch and go as to whether it would fit in, but it's perfect so i'm happy. how much does he weigh altogether? lorraine cornish of the natural history museum has led a team of technicians to the delicate job of moving delicate dippy to dorchester‘s county museum. i think dippy‘s the people's dinosaur. a lot of people came to see him in london, fond memories of bringing their own children,
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it tells great stories and really inspires people. the first of those children were certainly wowed today. what's the best bit about him? his tail, because he can whack people around. what's so great about dippy? that he's ginormous. he's massive, isn't he? dippy first appeared at london's natural history museum in 1905 and cost £2,000. but the museum decided it was time for a change and is sending dippy on a nationwide tour requiring a massive job of reassembly in seven destinations around britain. in fact now that dippy has been put together they think in dorchester alone 70,000 people will come to see him. after that he'll head off to the midlands, wales, and to scotland on a grand tour of the uk.
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they think that over the course of the next three years, something like five million people will engage with this incredible project. and where better for dippy‘s first stop than dorset‘sjurassic coast? if dippy was going to choose to go somewhere he'd probably choose the jurassic coast to find out all about the fossils and the other creatures living in what is now the british isles at around the time that he was roaming what is now wyoming in america. wherever dippy goes it will be free to see him. a chance for older visitors to relive childhood memories and for younger ones to create some. duncan kennedy, bbc news, in dorchester. let us pause to catch up with the weather prospects. louise has joined to weather prospects. louise hasjoined to be. all flavours of winter through the night to night because clear skies to start with with a touch of frost and then we see some rain and snow. it will take its time to arrive and so
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for much of central and eastern england it will be a cold start to saturday morning but the rain and snow moving later. the snow primarily affects scotland and parts of northern england and northern ireland. you can see it clearly out the north—west. clearer skies further east. temperatures just below freezing in a few spots. you might start off with a bit of dry and sunny weather but as we go through the morning there will be snow and some of it could be ten centimetres and falling at low levels in scotland. cloud and rain pushing to north—west england out where in the south—west and some of it will be heavy—handed drifts to the east steadily through the afternoon. temperatures struggle at about 6 degrees. the best of the brightness by the end of the day perhaps in the far north of scotland. this is bbc news — the headlines:
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victims' families demand that two members of an islamic state execution cell should face trial. alexanda kotey and el shafee elsheikh are said to have taken part in the torture and killing of several hostages. there is a warning from the eu's chief negotiator that the transition period isn't a given because of continuing disagreements. the charity 0xfam says the actions of aid workers reported to have used prostitutes when stationed in haiti were "totally u na cce pta ble". families of some of the victims of those two jihadists have called for the men to face justice in court. two members of a cell, here they are
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again, alexanda kotey and el shafee. they were seized by kurdish forces last month. the american journalist, james foley was abducted in syria in 2012 and he was dismembered by that particular cell in 2014. diane foley, it is good of you to talk to us foley, it is good of you to talk to us here on bbc news this evening. what would you like to see happen to these two men now they have been captured? well, thank you for having me. i want to express thanks to scotla nd me. i want to express thanks to scotland yard and our fbi for being persistent in finding these two individuals. two of many, who have inflicted such pain are not only hostages, including my son, but certainly on the people of syria and
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folks within europe. i am very grateful and i hope justice folks within europe. i am very grateful and i hopejustice can be served, but they can be held accountable through a public trial and be held accountable for all they have inflicted on so many. does that meana have inflicted on so many. does that mean a trial as far as you are concerned, and does it mean in america? that depends on... you know, i would love to see them come to the united states, but of course there are people suffering in the uk. it is up to our governments to decide where they can get a fair trial. but, ithink decide where they can get a fair trial. but, i think it is vital to end this impunity. they have gotten away with so many atrocities and
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human rights violations. i hope this is the beginning of that ending. and if the trial was held in the us, is that something that you and your family would feel able to attend, that you would want to attend? 0h yes. i feel that is that you would want to attend? 0h yes. ifeel that is part that you would want to attend? 0h yes. i feel that is part of, that you would want to attend? 0h yes. ifeel that is part of, we need to make sure thatjustice is served and this kind of hatred is stopped. so, yes, definitely. what went through your mind when you were given the news that these two, at least, had been found and captured? to be honest, it gave me hope that john cantley can be found and brought home. and also another american can be found. itjust gave me hope this can be the beginning of the end of all of this. however, i
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know the violence continues in syria ina huge know the violence continues in syria in a huge way. but i still hope this isa in a huge way. but i still hope this is a step in the right direction. and your son, certainly those of us on the outside think of him as being extraordinarily brave for what he was doing for the work he was carrying out in that region. how do you think of him, how do you reflect on the work he was endeavouring to do? jim challenges me. he challenges us do? jim challenges me. he challenges us to have the courage to do the right thing and make things better in the future for courageous journalists and other humanitarian workers. we desperately need their workers. we desperately need their work in the world, but we need to protect them and make them a priority. so his legacy continues
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through the james foley legacy foundation. jim inspires me and certainly the good british citizens who also met the same fate, they bring much inspiration to the world. they brought much good in the world. we need these great people but we need to protect them and make sure they have a chance to come home. i am very, very grateful for the persistence of scotland yard and the fbi to apprehending these two. diane foley, we wish you and your foley all the best, it is good of you to talk to us on the bbc. thank you for your time. thank you very much. diane foley, mother of james your time. thank you very much. diane foley, mother ofjames foley, talking to us from new hamster —— hampshire. let's get the sport now. the winter
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0lympics got underway today. the targets set by uk sport is between four and ten. lizzy yarnold flew the flag for team gb at the opening ceremony. she is bidding to become the first briton to successfully defend an olympic title. she has had a poor season and the team has lost katie 0rmerod, who potentially could have won a medal in two events until she fractured her heel. this is the biggest uk winter olympics team with 59 athletes. we have lots of potential across lots of different sports. she was one of our great medal contenders and that is a shame she is not with us. but we still feel the rest of the team can perform. it is the second week of the six nations with the second round of matches and a huge game at twickenham with england and wales
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tomorrow. eddiejones twickenham with england and wales tomorrow. eddie jones is twickenham with england and wales tomorrow. eddiejones is back to his old tricks, quietly trying to get in the heads of the welsh setup. questioning whether rhys patchell has the bottle, as he said, for the match. earlier the wales captain had this to say. people forget rhys patchell has been around the squad for a few years. he would probably like a few more caps as a people who have been in and amongst it but he has experience among the camp. it is a step up, playing away at twickenham against england, but he is ready for that and is focused on thejob in hand. michael 0'neill‘s bouye extension as the northern ireland manager has been successfully extended. he has taken the longest and most lucrative contract in the irish fa's history. i know thejob in hand is one i will devote my life and salted, the job i know thejob in hand is one i will devote my life and salted, thejob i took on six years ago is still as appealing and exciting as it was
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then. the nature of football, it is a lucrative business, but for me, it is the personal nature of this job that has been a big factor in the decision to stay on. walter smith will not be taking the scotland job. he had become the favourite after o'neill he had become the favourite after 0'neill turned it down but smith ruled himself out after talks with the scottish fa. good news for the fa ns the scottish fa. good news for the fans of leicester city, it appears their fallout with rama fans of leicester city, it appears theirfallout with rama —— mahrez riyadh has come to an end. he could even feature against the club he most even feature against the club he m ost wa nted even feature against the club he most wanted to john, manchester city tomorrow. that is all we have time for, but there is lots more on the bbc sport website. we will have more for you at 6:30pm when we from twickenham. we're going to talk more about the winter olympics but more about the
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politics behind it all. we have been watching the glorious scenes of the opening ceremony today, as lizzie was reflecting but there is a lot of politics to this and this, in itself, is fascinating. this is the two tea ms itself, is fascinating. this is the two teams coming together, north and south korea. 0ne flag, one banner and there were huge cheers when they entered the stadium for this opening ceremony. there have been political meetings that we might not have expected to see. let's discuss this and the politics of it all. i'm joined by drjung woo lee, lecturer in sport and leisure policy at the university of edinburgh. amidst the pageantry and the spectacle of the opening ceremony, it is interesting that as much as that, as much as the sport, we are discussing relations between north and south korea. this in itself is really striking, isn't it? the
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0lympic really striking, isn't it? the olympic games is important because north and south korea have restored the bilateral diplomatic channels for the olympics. in that sense, the winter olympics functioned as a contact point for the two sides. it is important we have bisla sensitive 0lympic issue first before negotiating the more serious political issues to break the ice and build mutual trust. in that respect, the fact that they marched together at the opening ceremony and also organised the unified ice hockey team for the first time in history, it is development for the korean peninsula. did you expect to see the handshake we have seen, as well as the two teams coming
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together in the stadium. did you ever think we would reach this point or is it something that has been potentially building for a while? this event was totally unexpected. even though south korea has invited north korea to participate in the winter olympics, we didn't know until the new year when the north korean leader, kim jong—un, announced they intended to send athletes over to pyeongchang. these games are 17 days long, what has to happen once it is all over, once the sporting spectacle is over? how can meaningful dialogue be continued? this is difficult, given the
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relationship between north and south korea does fluctuate. however, it is very important to keep this political momentum, not only during the olympic games, but also after the olympic games, but also after the event. especially, in south korea and the us, they need to be more patient at the moment because they have postponed military exercise until the end of the 0lympic exercise until the end of the olympic and paralympic games. however, it is not a good idea to do the military exercise after the sporting event. the us need to observe the outcome after the korean dialogue. the military exercise can be seen as provocation by north korea and this will lead to returning to the relationship
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between north and south korea again. as you suggest, let's see what happens, the post—0lympic dialogue, perhaps we will be discussing that once the winter olympics is over. but now, thank you very much. this is bbc news. the headlines now: two british members of an islamic state execution cell should face trial, according to the victims' families. there is a warning from the eu's chief negotiator that a transition period isn't a given. and 0xfam says the actions of aid workers, reported to have used prostitutes when stationed in haiti after the earthquake, were totally unacceptable. now on bbc news a look ahead to sportsday at 6:30 tonight. coming up on bbc news, i will be
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live at twickenham ahead of the second round of the six nations championship. the big one this weekend, england against wales as eddiejones' side weekend, england against wales as eddie jones' side look weekend, england against wales as eddiejones' side look to secure another victory which would move them closer to securing three, six nations titles and no other team has done that in the history of the competition. we will be in pyeongchang after the opening ceremony. we will be previewing all of tea m ceremony. we will be previewing all of team gb's medal hopefuls ahead of 16 days of competition across 11 different ovens. that is all to come, but now it is time for the film review. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. so mark, what do we have this week?
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we have black panther, which opens on tuesday. we have pad man, based on tuesday. we have pad man, based ona on tuesday. we have pad man, based on a true, inspiring story. and 50 shades, it all comes to an end. black panther, why isn't it opening until tuesday? i presume black panther, why isn't it opening untiltuesday? i presume it is because it will give it a long, opening weekend. it has been eagerly awaited. at the beginning of the film, it is a technologically advanced society and they must

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