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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  February 15, 2018 11:00am-1:00pm GMT

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good morning. at least 17 people are known to have died in the attack at marjory stoneman douglas high school. 17 people have been killed after a gunman opens fire at a high school in florida , a 19—year—old former pupil is in custody. you come to the conclusion that this is just absolutely pure evil. after the resignation ofjacob zuma, the anc leader, cyril ramaphosa, prepares to be sworn in as south africa's new president. a new study suggests that highly processed foods such as cakes and crisps could increase your chances of getting cancer. more than a thousand diving bands we re more than a thousand diving bands were issued to children last year. also coming up — growing up in a war zone... one in every six children are now living in a global conflict zone, a new report by save the children says.
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and it is day six of the winter olympics. there are hopes that the british skeleton racer, don parsons could secure a medal. good morning. it's the 15th february. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the district of parkland — just over an hour's drive north of miami — was named florida's safest city last year. now, a former pupil armed with a semi—automatic rifle has opened fire at the south florida school, killing pupils and teachers. at least 17 people are known to have died in the attack at marjory stoneman douglas high school. it started at 2.30 in the afternoon just before the end of the school day.
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it is the worst school shooting since sandy hook in connecticut in 2012 and is the sixth school shooting in 2018 that has either wounded or killed students. there have already been a total 18 school shootings in the united states so far this year. president trump tweeted his condolences saying: there has been no mention of gun control or whether donald trump is considering any change in gun legislation. the suspect has been named as nikolas cruz, a 19—year—old former pupil who had been expelled from the school, who has been arrested. police say the shooting has devastated the community. nada tawfik has this report. this was supposed to be one of the safest communities in the country. in an instant, these students became helpless targets, sheltering in place and fearing for their lives.
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officials now suggest this was a well—planned plot to maximise the loss of life. just moments before the end of the school day, a former student reportedly pulled the fire alarm at marjory stoneman douglas high school to draw out his unsuspecting victims. there had already been a drill earlier in the day but confused teachers followed procedure and began to exit the building. as soon the fire alarm got hold, and kids were evacuating, i heard five pops. i was like, "that's not a drill." we never did a drill like that. when we started evacuating back away towards the back, towards the the middle school, i knew it was more than a drill because we've never done that. armed with an ar—15 semiautomatic rifle, he began firing outside and then continued inside the school as panic and chaos erupted. police were warning the shooter was still at large, even as emergency workers rushed to treat those wounded. swat teams evacuated distressed students. in a row, some with hands in the air, others clinging to each
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otherfor support, they frantically rushed to safety. i see you, i see you, i see you! parents, sick with worry, waited for news. the suspect was arrested without incident an hour later in a neighbouring city. police identified him as nikolas cruz, who had been expelled. he was taken into custody, i believe, about an hour after he left stoneman douglas, after he committed this horrific, homicidal, detestable act. this is the 18th school shooting in the united states this year. it's a uniquely american epidemic that has only gotten worse. yet this country is more divided than ever on how to solve the problem. the governor of florida, rick scott, called the shooting pure evil. but, he also refused to be drawn
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into a discussion about gun control. you're furious. how could this ever happen in this country? how could this happen in this state? this is a state that is focused on keeping all of our children safe. you come to the conclusion this is just absolutely pure evil. this state is not tolerating violence. we have law enforcement that will always show up to defend our safety. my my prayers are with everybody impacted. i cannot imagine how they are feeling, wondering if they have lost a family member. those who do know that they have lost a family member, ijust know that they have lost a family member, i just can't know that they have lost a family member, ijust can't imagine how their lives are going to change. let's talk to cbs correspondent laura podesta who's in parkland, florida for us now. what more can you tell us at this stage about those who were killed and injured and about the 19—year—old gunman? and injured and about the 19-year-old gunman? what we have
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just learned is that one of the victims was an assistant but bull coach who used his body to shield the bullets from penetrating his students, so that we know that we have one hero stewarding amax story out of this. as far as we know, the gunman, nikolas cruz was expelled a year ago for disciplinary reasons. we hear that he was attending a mother ‘s goal in the area. there will be interviewing him, going through social media post and tried to figure out the motive, why this happened. and also, we have seen that tweet who said that no child, teacher or anyone else had everfeel u nsafe teacher or anyone else had everfeel unsafe in an american school, but we also know the statistics. we are reminded brutally of them in this attack, the 18th is shooting at a school in the us this year, and we are not even in too much yet. beyond those words, is there any sign that
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congress will take action and start to debate gun control seriously? well, see that today, and tamara... you are right, this conversation is one that needs to be had immediately, but it is also one that we have had immediately after every single mass casualties then. it has become a bit cyclical welby had politicians on both sides took about gun control and mental illness. there is a conversation, but then it dies down. we talk about the nra, the national rifle association, and the national rifle association, and the powerful lobby that they have. could you explain... i think people outside the united states find it very ha rd to outside the united states find it very hard to understand why there is this lack of ability to even really debate the issue of gun control, and bring about what many might say is logical and reasonable changes to
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it? certainly, there is a powerful lobby providing politicians with millions of dollars. i am sure that the petitions feels that an allegiance to that. of course, this isa allegiance to that. of course, this is a discussion that needs to be had, though. we havejust had 17 people perish. these are children, and people at both sides of the aisle know that something needs to be done. so, i am aisle know that something needs to be done. so, iam hopeful that today, tomorrow, in the coming day that there will be this discussion about gun control, that there will bea about gun control, that there will be a discussion about mental illness and we can hopefully reconcile this issue. and presumably this is something that you have heard from the people that you have been speaking to in the time that you have been there at parkland. people in this area say, if it can happen here, it can happen anywhere. this isa here, it can happen anywhere. this is a gorgeous neighbourhood, it is
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manicured lawns, it is picturesque. it looks naked is out of a movie set. it is not a place where you would imagine now to be this mass casualty events, tragedy infiltrating all of these families' lives. so, when these type of shootings happen, a beautiful neighbourhoods like this, people begin to realise this could happen to anywhere, to my family, to my relatives' family, and something needs to be done. 0k. thank you so much. the anc leader, cyril ramaphosa, will be sworn in as south africa's new president later today, following the resignation of jacob zuma. his nine years in office has been marred by allegations of corruption and his own party, the anc had threatened to force him out with a vote of no confidence. our africa editor, fegal keane, reports. the moment of decision came late, when the former guerrilla fighter at last recognised he could not win. president jacob zuma addressed to the south african nation and faced reality.
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the anc should never be divided in my name. i have therefore come to the decision to resign as president of the republic with immediate effect. a populist, a crowd pleaser, he appealed to the anc grassroots and, with their backing, became party leader in 2009. even though he already faced serious corruption charges, it was his relationship with this family, the guptas, indian immigrants, that created the public outrage that finally forced the anc to act. the guptas are accused of using their connections with the president to acquire state enterprises and assets worth millions of pounds. so powerful, it is alleged, they could hire and fire cabinet ministers. by the end of this dramatic day, jacob zuma seemed friendless and politically isolated.
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resigning before he could be humiliated in parliament. fergal keane, bbc news. we will be live injohannesburg for oui’ correspondence, we will be live injohannesburg for our correspondence, but let's just go on trial next story quickly. there could be a link between a diet of ultra—processed foods and cancer, that's according to researchers in france. the study of more than 100,0000 people suggests that those who ate more products such as fizzy drinks, mass produced bread and processed meats, had the highest rates of cancer. here's our health and science correspondent james gallagher. ultra—processed foods include cakes, chocolate, mass—produced bread, crisps and pizza. it's delicious temptation and too much is bad for the waistline. we know being overweight increases the risk of cancer, but is there something else about these foods that raises
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the risk even further? the study followed 105,000 french people for five years. it suggests increasing the amounts of our diet that are ultra—processed by 10% is linked to a 12% increase in the risk of cancer. yet even the researchers say more work is needed to establish why such foods might increase cancer risk. so what should we do? a balanced diet, but actually, even more importantly, is maintaining a healthy weight and if we eat too many ultra—processed foods, then we do pile on the pounds. and although this study didn't look closely at weight, we know very clearly what the links with that are and cancer. so i think it's a warning to us to have a healthy diet and be aware of the links between our diet and cancer. so, ithink so, i think it is a warning to us... other experts said the term "ultra—processed food" was so broad, it's hard to know what's really going on, and that other unhealthy habits could be muddying the waters. it's why the study is being described as an initial insight rather than definitive proof
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of of ultra—processed foods' role in cancer. james gallagher, bbc news. we're joined now by bernard srourfrom amsterdam, from the french institute of health and medical research, the lead author of this report. thank you very much for your time today. just spell out to us first of all, what sort of foods are we talking about, and how are they different from processed foods? actually, ultra—processed food, depending on the classifications are a bit different from the processed food. processed foods are raw foods to which we have added culinary ingredients, just like salt and sugar, but ultra—processed foods are usually prepared by adding additives 01’ usually prepared by adding additives or texturising agents, or even other
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products that can cease to be microbiologically safe, and which can give the product and ability to the highly palatable and affordable. so the difference is in what is added to them, correct? yes. and one of the key findings of this report says that with a 10% increase in ultra—processed food, there is an increase of 12% increased rent of cancer, and is 11% increase of breast cancer. how secure are you in those bindings? two you need more work to establish whether it is the actual foods that are because of this increase, or the additives that are because? it is an observational study. we cannot conclude to a causality between the consumption of ultra—processed food and the cancer
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risk, however it is a prospective study, but we observed the nutritional behaviours and consumptions and intakes of our volu nteers consumptions and intakes of our volunteers in our... and be follows them into an eight year follow—up. so, we cannot establish a causality, because it is an observational study, and it's not a randomised control trial. however, ethically, we cannot perform randomised controlled trials in certain conditions, because there are several hypotheses for ultra—processed food. several hypotheses for ultra—processed foodlj several hypotheses for ultra-processed food. i know that the research has took into account other risk factors from the people that you study, such as a family history of cancer, smoking, and so on, but what is new from all of this, about our knowledge of what we should and should not eat? to the same basic rules apply? we all know for example that we should not eat too much sugar, too much salt, too
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many fatty foods, and try and get as many fatty foods, and try and get as many vegetables, fruits, fibre and so on many vegetables, fruits, fibre and so on into our diet. does the advice, basically, stay the same as advice, basically, stay the same as a result of the study? i mean, the novelty that the study adds goes way beyond the nutritional quality of food. because, only run additional analysis on our statistics, we have found that the associations are not simply due to the nutritional quality of ultra—processed food. so, we can have other effects which are caused by either food additives, or even compound so, the take—home message would be, in addition to eating more fruit and vegetable, and less sugar and less salt, it is to prioritise minimally 01’ salt, it is to prioritise minimally or unprocessed food. and avoid as
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much as possible, ultra—processed food and industrial products. much as possible, ultra—processed food and industrial productsm much as possible, ultra—processed food and industrial products. it is good to have that. we want that take—home message. bernard, thank you very much. the lead author of that report. thank you so much for yourtime, that report. thank you so much for your time, today. let's return to the news that jacob zuma. our correspondent pumza fihlani is in johannesburg. one commentator i heard earlier on today said that we can expect more competent governments from cyril ramaphosa. is that a feeling that is shared? that is something that is being touted about. he is a well known as self—made businessman with interests spanning over various
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industries. he is known as being pragmatic and decisive. these are policies that he is hoping to bring —— people are hoping he brings to government in the same way. in the same way that the culture of a company would change if there is a new ceo, we are hoping that this tra nslates new ceo, we are hoping that this translates to how he runs governments here in south africa. wise the economy, unemployment, crime, corruption, do we know how they will tackle these policies keys they will tackle these policies keys the policies will not change. there will not be any major shake—up to the policies as they stand, but giving a sense that the culture in which there has been impunity and a sense of lawlessness, has come to an end. that people will be held to account, but he does also say that he wants to create an environment that was favourable to business.
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jacob zuma was criticised for being wishy—washy, and having unpolitical interactions with government. he is seen as someone who interactions with government. he is seen as someone who is more forthright and want to take business into confidence about where the economy is falling short, but also with ordinary south africans. and, in his farewell address, jacob zuma said that the anc should not be divided in his name, but he also criticised the way that he party has handled his departure. do you think there is going to be a disgruntled faction of zuma supporters who my transport cyril ramaphosa's progress. mr zuma is somebody who has been popular here, who have even in the height of a lot of the crisis, has had massive support. cyril ramaphosa has been trying to do, in the last few days, which is why we have had this slow transition, was to try and windows people over. he has said that he does not want further divisions to
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the national congress, and a indeed to south africa, so presidency jacob zuma will still have a role to play, but also cyril ramaphosa will need to step up and be seen to be forming some sort of bridge with the outgoing president so as to not cause those further risks that he mentioned that his speech last night. thank you so much for that. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: 17 people have been killed as a gunman opened fire in florida. a 19—year—old is in custody. after the resignation of jacob zuma, 19—year—old is in custody. after the resignation ofjacob zuma, the anc leader, cyril ramaphosa prepares to be sworn in as —— sworn in as south africa's president. ultra—processed foods code increase your chance of
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getting cancer. dom parsons is on the medal hunt. he isjust 302nd outside the bronze medal position. his two final runs come tomorrow. it was one of the event postponed from yesterday, because of the bad weather. and, these are live pictures from the women's hurlers match against china. in the round—robin stage of the curling competition. it is on bbc one right now if you would like to follow it. and, i will have much more on all of those stories and especial special and pics report just those stories and especial special and pics reportjust after half past 11. -- and pics reportjust after half past 11. —— special winter olympics report just after half 11. —— special winter olympics reportjust after half past 11. the government has publicly blamed russian military intelligence for a cyber attack last year, which affected businesses around the world.
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the defence secretary, gavin williamson, said russia was "ripping up the rule book by undermining democracy and weaponising information". russia has denied responsibility for the attack. sinn fein is expected to outline its next move today following the collapse of negotiations to restore power—sharing at stormont. talks ended yesterday when the democratic unionist party said there was no prospect of a deal. both parties have been locked in negotiations for 13 months. this is what people from all sides of the political spectrum in belfast made of the news. our correspondent chris page is in belfast. good morning to you. what are you hearing about sinn fein's next move and the next move for the dup, the secretary of state who hopes to unlock something to move these negotiations forward? well, the
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political parties will be discussing amongst themselves where they go from here, sinn fein have been having a meeting of their own here at stormont, this morning. they divided a bats they excite a considered response today. it ended up considered response today. it ended up in considered response today. it ended upina considered response today. it ended up in a very acrimonious break—up with not much hope of reconciliation, even on valentine's day. the relationship between the dup and sinn fein, which was never a happy one, does seem to have reached something of a new low, in particular, the issue that they can't seem to get a deal on, is that of the irish language. sinn fein ‘s said they want a stand—alone piece of legislation which will promote the irish language. the dup say that they want a broader law which will incorporate cultural elements which are also more importance to unionists. that is a bit of a zero—sum situation. that has proved a particularly difficult circle to
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square. there are other issues separating the parties, for example, same—sex marriage. sinn fein want to legalise that, in northern ireland, and the dup don't. the roles are disagreements about the troubles, and another round of talks have ended. pretty acrimoniously this time. both parties very same firmly blaming each other. bradley has only beenin blaming each other. bradley has only been in thejob blaming each other. bradley has only been in the job for a fuel use, and said that the government now has to consider practical steps, but that may well mean is that a budget for the northern ireland in the next financial year will have to be passed at westminster, rather than at stormont. just briefly on that point, at the risk of sounding like groundhog day, are we actually closer now to a return to direct rule? well, the british and irish governments have been very latin to mention those two words. they maintain that power—sharing is the only way forward. the reality is that the longer that stormont is in
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this period of limbo, and civil serva nts this period of limbo, and civil servants aren't effectively working, we are going to have to find some sort of alternator to run this. to try and keep public services running efficiently. chris, becky is a much for that. the consumers‘ association, "which", says faulty household appliances are causing about 60 fires every week in the uk. it says a third of fires are started by washing machines and tumble dryers. "which" has written to ministers, giving them 90 days to draw up a plan to address the issue. oxfam has said it sacked its country director in haiti last yearfor mismanagement. the charity said damien berrendorf had faced allegations of inappropriate behaviour, but it said his dismissal was not related to sexual misconduct, or the scandal in 2011 involving aid workers in haiti paying local women for sex. dubious financial advisors exploited former steel workers in a pensions
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mis—selling scandal according to mps. the work and pensions select committee says it cost the people involved thousands and the financial conduct authority did too little to protect them. our wales correspondent, sian lloyd, reports. last year, members of the old british steel pension scheme faced a huge decision about their retirement savings after tata, which had taken over the liabilities, said it was no longer viable. workers could choose to transfer their benefits out of the scheme. a report by a committee of mps says some of those who did were exploited, shamelessly bamboozled by dubious financial advisers. there have been people who probably had been fleeced of the most valuable asset they will have ever had, which they built up as part of their pension scheme, of which these financial vultures have been after and in too many cases been successful in getting their claws on. we uncovered the case of richard bevan, who'd
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transferred his benefit into a private scheme after seeking independent financial advice. he estimates the decision has cost him around £200,000. i'm not a gullible sort of person but i've obviously been led into doing something that wasn't right for me, by a financial adviser, you know? and it's pretty...it‘s not a nice place to be at the moment. the financial conduct authority is criticised in this report for not acting quickly enough after concerns were raised. it says it is reviewing its rules on pension transfers but for steelworkers like richard, any changes will be too late. sian lloyd, bbc news. our correspondent tomos morgan is in port talbot. good morning to you. some strong line was being used talking about workers being fleeced out of money that they should have had. just for the benefit of our viewers, remind
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us the benefit of our viewers, remind us of the background to all of this, festival? well, this all started just over two years ago, now. financially, they off—loaded around a thousand jobs, in wales. and, one of the reasons they said they had to do that, was they were rumoured to be losing, around £1 million a day, and the way that they said after they put the company up for sale, that they would be able to carry on and remain solvent was to uncouple themselves from the british steel pension scheme. the original scheme, which had a £700 million deficit. they gave the workers a option, to uncouple themselves from that scheme andjoina new uncouple themselves from that scheme and join a new scheme, otherwise they would be an solvent. they voted for that at the start of last year, and that is why they had three options which was to leave onto the new psp as scheme, to move automatically into a protection
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fund, which would have been worse off for a majority of people, or to tra nsfer off for a majority of people, or to transfer out completely. many people wa nt transfer out completely. many people want happy with the situation that had developed over the previous two yea rs, had developed over the previous two years, and well—being contacted by suspects financial advisers who were advising them to move out into schemes that maybe weren't suitable for them. one of the things that we have also highlighted in the report, was that if they did not make the decision to move into the new psp as two, then they should have moved into the protection fund, so this report and the unions were calling for a change in legislation, so that if this situation were to happen again in the future, then people would have consented that they would fall into the better option, which would have been for the majority of people, falling into psp as two. now for a look at the weather.
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simon king has the details. there has been some sunshine, in fa ct there has been some sunshine, in fact for most parts of england and wales, we are to enjoy is a pretty decent weather compare to the last few days. quite cloudy and wet and windy. this is the scene at the moment in essex. not bad at the beach, there. won old two showers. some circles the high ground of scotland. if you wintry showers, here. you could catch the odd shower as well. for most of us, dry and sunny. ten bridges across the south double figures, further north a bit chilly. five or 6 degrees. through the evening, the risk of surmise into friday morning, and in northern ireland. you could see some of those showers continuing through the night. into friday, while there will
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bea night. into friday, while there will be a few more showers continuing in this both western parts for most of us, it will be dry and also sunny. goodbye. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: at least 17 people were killed when a gunman opened fire at a school in florida. a 19—year—old former pupil is in custody. kids were evacuated. i was like, thatis kids were evacuated. i was like, that is not a drill. we never did a drill like that. following the resignation of president zuma, the anc leader cyril ramaphosa will soon be sworn in as the new president of south africa. new research suggests eating ultra—processed foods, including chicken nuggets and sweetened drinks, is linked to an increased risk of cancer. more than 1,000 driving bans were issued last year to children who were not legally old enough to drive, some were as young as 12. one in six children are now living in a conflict zone, claims
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a new report by save the children. now it is time to catch up with the very latest from the winter olympics in pyeongchang. hello, i'm hugh ferris with the latest on day six of the winter olympics. britain's dom parsons insists the team's skeleton suits do not represent an arms race, after claiming they'll have little impact in deciding the medals tomorrow. the sport's governing body declared them compliant despite complaints from other teams. parsons is ranked fourth with two runs to go, as ben croucher reports. look closely, everyone else is at
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the second skin on the skeleton. these speed suits have come under scrutiny, whether they give an advantage or not. it is a good fit for dom parsons, he lies in touching distance of the podium after impressive performances at pyeongchang. i hope i can sleep tonight. the last for years has been leading up to this moment so i have got to make the most of it. the showpiece on the slopes is the men's downhill, the winter equivalent of the 100 metre final, all or nothing. aksel lund svindal had nothing to show from sochi, he will take home a shiny gold medal this time. magnificent, and the vikings are celebrating! at 35, the oldest alpine skiing champion. elsewhere
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switzerland's lara guut had been expecting to challenge for a medal but she missed her shot. if it is crashes you were after, snowboard cross seldom leaves you dissatisfied. wacky races on smoke. put the dastardly antics behind him, the defending champion hit the front and nobody could catch him. let's bring you up to date with some of the other highlights from pyeongchang. germany's aljona savchenko and bruno massot won the pairs figure skating gold after recovering from a mistake in theirfirst programme yesterday. they had been fourth overnight after massot had completed a double instead of a triple salchow. but they beat their own world record in today's free skate, scoring 159.31 points to finish ahead of the pairs from china and canada. sweden's hanna oeberg had a perfect shooting performance to thank for her gold in the women's individual biathlon.
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20 out of 20 targets hit. this was one of the events postponed yesterday because of the bad weather. after two golds so far in pyeongchang, germany's lara dahlmeier picked up a bronze. the curling's back on today with the round robin matches continuing. the men's team responded to their defeat to defending champions canada with a win this morning against japan. skip kyle smith's hammer on the final end was enough to win 6—5. it is something we talked about, to try to be more consistent throughout the entire game, instead of having good and bad spells. i think we put that into action today. we managed to get the bail out short when we needed it. meanwhile these are live riches of the women's match against china, also in the round robin stage. they are coming towards the
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end of end two with the chinese attempting to get on the board for the first time. we will stick with this, from the skip as they attempt to upset the great britain side, who have done well so far. if it gets closest, it's a point, and china level things up. you can follow that on bbc one, as you can the rest of the winter olympics throughout the day. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. more children than ever before are living in conflict areas, at risk of death and violence, according to a new released by the charity save the children. countries such as syria, afghanistan and somalia came out as the worst country for young people. in the report, the charity said at least 357 million children — that's one out of every six children — were living in conflict zones. that's an increase of 75% since the early ‘90s.
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and there's a 300% increase in the number of children killed and maimed since 2010, according to a record of incidents verified by the un. with me is george graham, director of conflict and humanitarian policy at save the children. thank you forjoining us and this report clearly makes grim reading. the 1990s, that is what you are comparing yourfigures the 1990s, that is what you are comparing your figures to and that was hardly a time without conflict, yet there has been a 75% increase since then. i'm sure the agencies like yourself and other charities could not have predicted such an increase, could they? exactly, back then we hoped we were moving into a more peaceful world which was safer for children and all civilians but it hasn't played out that way. in 2011 we welcome —— we were working
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mainly on food crises. then it all got a lot worse and quite quickly. these conflicts have persisted so now many years after then, you still have children being caught up in huge numbers in really horrific conflict. and from the perspective of save the children, how difficult hasn't to scale up the response to meet the needs of so many children caught by conflict? it is a huge challenge. the overstretch we all feel is enormous. we cannot reach every single child in conflict, all 350 million of them, so it's been a huge challenge. another reason why it isa huge challenge. another reason why it is a challenge and one of the sta rkest points it is a challenge and one of the starkest points the report makes is there has been an increase of 15 times of parties to conflicts deliberately blocking aid. is that
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what you mean when the report says the changing way in which was fought is making it difficult for children? yes, we didn't predict for example that people would be using siege warfare tactics as they currently are in syria. that wasn't something the world expected to see again so that's one thing, and more broadly walk is taking place in cities. we are looking at the effect of explosive weapons on children's small bodies and i'm sorry to say it isa small bodies and i'm sorry to say it is a lot worse so if you are child ina is a lot worse so if you are child in a city like aleppo or parts of yemen and you are suffering nightly bombing, that is part of the reason the devastation is so great. what is the devastation is so great. what is the message you want governments to ta ke the message you want governments to take from this? what is to be done about this state of affairs? there are about this state of affairs? there a re rules of about this state of affairs? there are rules of war, so one thing is to encourage everybody to be absolutely
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unequivocal in standing up for the rules of war and that means not turning a blind eye if for example our allies are fudging it here and there. if there aren't rules, the bad guys will say it is a free for all and that's what we are seeing in some places in the world. they need to find ways to bring perpetrators to find ways to bring perpetrators to account. at the moment if you commit against a child in a conflict, you will probably get away with it, and we also need to rebuild the shattered lives of these children and that is something the public can help with. and i want to ask you about the situation with oxfam, the use of prostitutes awesomely underage, how much damage is that doing to the charity sector in general and denting the reputation of the charity sector? the first thing to say is how shocking it is for us and how angry
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these stories make me personally, to see that people who, like me, say we are out there to make the biggest difference we can for vulnerable people in the world and in this case are people in the world and in this case a re clearly not. people in the world and in this case are clearly not. it makes me sad for the victims of this, so weak in all of the agencies in the charity will have been taking a good look at ourselves and checking we have the processes in place but we need, but also we have the culture right internally to make sure it is a safe place and people can report violations and that there is zero tolerance of that sort of behaviour. george graham from save the children, thank you. let's return to our main story this morning. at least 17 people have been killed after a gunman opened fire
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with a semi automatic rifle at marjory stoneman douglas high school in florida. the united states has already witnessed 18 school shooting this year — and this is the eighth in which schoolchildren have been killed or injured. police and swat teams swarmed the campus and began evacuating terrified students from the school, which is about an hour north of miami, as parents and ambulances gathered on the scene. in the panic hundreds of students took shelter in classrooms and cupboards while emergency services searched and cleared the school campus. police say the shooting has devastated the community and shot stu d e nts devastated the community and shot students and parents have been describing what they saw. the fire alarm got pulled and kids were evacuating. and i was like, that's not a drill. we never did a drill like that. we started evacuating towards the back, towards the middle school. i knew it was more than a drill because we haven't done that. we just had to wait. and we kept hearing shooters and we didn't know if it was fireworks or shooters. we keptjust going back and forth. and then it started going on the news and
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we found out what was really going on. literallyjust came from there, picking up some kids along the way, because a lot of the kids are really distraught, as you can imagine, so it'sjust terrifying. terrifying for the parents, and for the kids. very emotional. we have just received pictures of the suspect, nikolas cruz, getting out of a police car in handcuffs and a hospital gown, being taken into custody. we think this was possibly in miami. he is 19 years old, a former pupil of the school in question, was expelled recently from that school and is said by some of those who know him to have loved showing off his guns. these pictures just coming to us of nikolas cruz,
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the suspect in the florida school shooting. as news spread of the attack, there was an impassioned plea on the floor of the senate from a democrat whose district includes the sandy hook elementary school where 20 children were shot and killed just over five years ago. this happens nowhere else other than the united states of america. this epidemic of mass slaughter, this scourge of school shooting after school shooting. it only happens here not because of coincidence, not because of bad luck, but as a consequence of our inaction. we are responsible. that was senator chris murphy. a scottish international aid charity has confirmed it has dealt with two cases of allegations of sexual misconduct involving children. the scottish catholic international aid fund said one case involved a junior staff member for a joint
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organisation with other charities in ethiopia, and the other a volunteer in burundi. i want to reassure people throughout scotla nd i want to reassure people throughout scotland they can trust sciaf and we are doing everything we possibly can to make people in our programme safe. one of these cases took place in 2016, and the other in 2012. one was in ethiopia, which involved a junior member of staff was immediately dismissed. the other in burundi involved a volunteer in one of the villages where our partners was working and they were equally immediately dismissed. we can get more details from our reporter. what
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more details from our reporter. what more do you know about these incidents? the case in 2012 involving the 24—year—old man from burundi was dropped because of insufficient evidence available. the second case, involving the ethiopian man, ajunior second case, involving the ethiopian man, a junior member of staff accused of sexual misconduct with a boy under the age of 16, this has been reported to police, both cases we re been reported to police, both cases were reported to police immediately, and the charity dismissed both of these people immediately. this particular case in ethiopia in 2016 is still yet to come to trial. sciaf says neither of the alleged victims we re says neither of the alleged victims were being helped by the charity and the incidents didn't take place during any of their projects. they claim they dealt with the cases decisively and they want, as you heard in the clipped, to reassure supporters they are confident they are doing everything they can internally to minimise the risk of
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anything like this happening again. briefly, the timeline of this, has sciaf mentioned these cases because of the oxfam case? how did this information come to light? that was a question asked this morning of the director of sciaf, and he put the point that because of the issues around oxfam this week, that is why these things have come to light. clearly sciaf want to be talking about the issues that happened there. they were asked why this wasn't reported five years ago, if this was about to —— about donations, but the directors —— director said they had done everything appropriate at the time. thank you. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first the headlines on bbc newsroom live: 17 people have been killed after gunmen opened fire at a school in
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florida. the 19—year—old former pupil is in custody. after the resignation of jacob pupil is in custody. after the resignation ofjacob zuma, the anc leader cyril ramaphosa prepares to be sworn in as south africanew president. new research suggests eating ultra—processed foods, including chicken nuggets and sweetened drinks, is linked to an increased risk of cancer. in the business news... british steel pension scheme members were targeted by ‘vulture' financial advisers after tata was allowed to off—load its retirement fund, according to a report from the work and pensions select committee. the uk government has yet to issue its response to the neglect claim. more on that in just a moment. european plane maker airbus has taken another £1.2 billion hit on its troubled a400m military transport plane, bringing the total charges on the troubled defence project to over £7 billion so far. the news overshadowed otherwise upbeat full—year results.
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net profit increased 35% to almost £2.56 billion. lidl has opened five new stores today to bring its total to 700. the new shops in edinburgh, stockton, hull, polegate and rosehill in south london have led to 200 newjobs. the budget supermarket chain, which has operated in the uk since 1994, says it plans to open more than 50 new stores this year. hello there. "shamelessly bamboozled" — that's how a parliamentary report has described members of the british steel workers pension scheme, who were given unsuitable financial advice, leading some to lose out on thousands. it happened last year when tata restructured the scheme, meaning its 124,000 members had to decide what to do with that money. earlier we spoke to tom mcphail, head of policy
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at hargreaves la nsdown. there were clearly some system failures here, the report highlighted various things which could have been done differently to protect the steelworkers. there was a particular set of circumstances towards the end of last year where they had to make a fairly complex decisions in a short period of time. the trust and pension scheme had been undermined, they knew whichever of the two options they were presented with, the new replacement scheme or going into the lifeboat protection fund would have resulted in some loss of money for them. in that environment, unscrupulous advisers started knocking on their doors and offering a third option which involved transferring money out of pension schemes into an individual pension and in the process giving up the valuable guarantees they have built up in the original final salary scheme. guarantees they have built up in the originalfinalsalary scheme. some members chose to take that option, a couple of thousand of them, the
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tra nsfer values couple of thousand of them, the transfer values were hundreds of thousands of pounds but the fees being taken were clearly not appropriate for the circumstances and so now some of these workers have found themselves seriously out of pocket as a consequence. mps are putting renewed pressure on city firms to improve their gender diversity. companies including banking giants goldman sachs and jp morgan have been called on to sign a gender diversity pledge which was first published in 2016. treasury committee chair nicky morgan has written to 33 financial services firms who have yet to sign up. she has asked the companies to confirm to the committee by friday if they plan to join the initiative, or explain why they have decided not to do so. joining us now is anna mccaffrey, an employment lawyer at taylor wessing. many thanks for joining many thanks forjoining me on the programme. an interesting tactic by nicky morgan, effectively naming and shaming some of these giants of the city, what do you make of it?|j
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think it's an interesting approach, obviously an intervention meant to encourage those who haven't signed up encourage those who haven't signed up to sign encourage those who haven't signed up encourage those who haven't signed up to sign up or risked reputational damage and explain why not. it seems to have worked in that goldman sachs have said they will sign up and others are considering doing so. talk me through the four main aims of the charter set up in 2016. generally speaking, to encourage more gender diversity at a senior management level in financial services, so one of the main things firms are supposed to do is make sure a member of the panel is responsible for gender diversity. firms are encouraged to set internal targets for gender diversity at a senior level, tips publish annual report showing how they are getting on in meeting those targets, and
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finding ways to link pay to performance or success against those targets. and getting on for nearly two years later, how successful has the charter been so far? over 60 companies have signed up to it, representing around 50% of the workforce is so that's a positive step forward. we talk about gender diversity and any progress is something to be welcomed, but clearly they are looking at trying to be as inclusive as possible and to be as inclusive as possible and to have the big players, including bigger banking institutions also involved. for now, many thanks. let's have a look at what the markets are to today. the uk's top share index pushed higher on thursday as a rally among stocks exposed to south africa as well as banks and miners — so sectors more sensitive to the economic cycle — helped the ftse in the early stages of a recovery. it looks like thursday is set to be
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the second day of gains in a row for the blue chip index after it licks its wounds following last week's hefty sell—off. the south african currency the rand has held near a three—year high after presidentjacob zuma resigned. sterling has gained against the dollar, cementing gains on the back of a broadly weakened green back, with traders eyeing earnings data next week to give the pound fresh momentum. top rise on the ftse is currently insurer old mutual while standard life aberdeen is the biggest loser after being served notice on a £109 billion asset management deal by its largest client, lloyds banking group, further denting shares in the recently—merged group. more business for you throughout the day. thank you, alice. children, some as young as 12, are being banned from driving before they are old enough to get behind the wheel of a car. the number disqualified from driving has risen by 50% over the last four
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yea rs. the killed him and we didn't get to see him... well, we saw him but we had to look through a window. a window, we couldn't touch him. we couldn't touch him, we couldn't see him, it was a horror movie. distraught sisters describing the agony of losing their 15—year—old brother in a fatal car crash. darnell harte was killed alongside two other children and two men. they were passengers in a stolen car which hit a tree at high speed in leeds last november. a 15—year—old boy was jailed for 11.5 years for dangerous driving, but he's far from alone in being an underage driver. i was putting people in danger. i know that's other people's life, you know, it matters to another family. mikey started driving on the streets of bradford aged 16, he and his friends used to hire a car to take out onto the roads. if there a group of us, you know, we'll all chip in and we'll let an older person know we want a car and they will get a car from someone
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else and bring it to us. i do get a rush, you know, when i want to put my foot down and go crazy. in 2014, almost 700 children aged 16 and under were disqualified from driving. however, last year that number had risen to more than 1,000, an increase of 47%. this is the tip of the iceberg because of course they have to be caught breaking the law in this way and inevitably many won't be, they will get away scot—free. elyse and natasha are now calling for tougherjail terms. the ministry forjustice said it will bring forward changes to the law as soon as an entry time allows. phil bodmer, bbc news. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. first we leave you with for a look at the weather. hello, simon. hello, simon. hello, we have had strong winds but
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things are changing and we have good spells of sunshine. weather watchers have been busy and this is one of the scenes at the moment in northern ireland with blue skies down by the beach. as you can see from the satellite imagery, that sunshine is evident across england and wales but further north and west noticed more cloud here and with that some showers moving in. in the aisles of lewis we have a shower recently passed by. if i stand to the side, you can just about make out a rainbow as well. for the rest of the afternoon, snow showers piling in across northern and western scotland, some wintry showers in northern ireland and perhaps the pennines as well, but elsewhere we continue with the blue skies and sunshine. in the south ten or 11 degrees, but further north little more chilly at five or six celsius. overnight snow piling in across scotland, but elsewhere with clear
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skies it will be colder than it was last night with temperatures hovering at around freezing into friday morning. with that, there's the risk of some frost and across and northern ireland with the further snow showers moving in through the morning, the risk of some ice as well. something to be aware of for the morning in scotland and northern ireland. elsewhere through friday, similar to today's. plenty of sunshine across england and wales, in fact fewer showers around tomorrow compared to today but always across north—west scotland, and northern ireland cloud and the threat of rain. temperatures rising slightly across the far north, but again double—figure is across southern and western areas. why are those temperatures rising? it's because we have high developing around the azores and with that, the air is coming in from the south—west
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and that is in milder direction at this time of year. going into the weekend, we will see that mild bear continuing to feed in so far money over the weekend temperatures will get into double figures. on saturday sunny spells, the odd shower and some cloud around on sunday with the threat of some rain moving into western areas. but those temperatures reaching maybe even 12 celsius, so overall looking fairly decent over the next few days and indeed into the weekend. that's it from me, goodbye. in an this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at midday:
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17 people have been killed after a gunman opens fire at a high school in florida, a 19—year—old former pupil is in custody. this is a state that has focused on keeping all of its children safe. you come to the conclusion that this is just absolutely, pure evil. after the resignation ofjacob zuma, the anc leader, cyril ramaphosa, prepares to be sworn in as south africa's new president. a new study suggests that ultra processed foods such as cakes and crisps could increase your chances of getting cancer. also coming up, children as young as 12 are being banned from driving after being caught on the road illegally. last year, more than a thousand driving bans were issued to children who were not legally old enough to drive. and a petition urging the picture
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sharing app, snapchat, an do a redesign has been signed by more than a million people. and team gb could be set to win its first medal of the 2018 winter olympics after dom parsons put himself in contention in the men's skeleton competition. in it's the 15th february. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the district of parkland — just over an hour's drive north of miami — was named florida's safest city last year. now, a former pupil armed with a semi—automatic rifle has opened fire at the south florida school, killing pupils and teachers. at least 17 people are known to have died in the attack at marjory stoneman douglas high school.
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it started at 2.30pm in the afternoon just before the end of the school day. it is the worst school shooting since sandy hook in connecticut in 2012 and is the sixth school shooting in 2018 that has either wounded or killed students. there have already been a total 18 school shootings in the united states so far this year. in the last few minutes we have had these images of the suspect, nicholas cruz who is being held on 17 counts of premeditated murder. we can see him being led into custody by police. nikolas cruz had posted many pictures of himself with weapons on his now deleted instagram account, and neighbours said that he was known to shoot at chickens and talked about shooting lizard and squirrels. president trump tweeted his
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condolences saying: there has been no mention of gun control or whether donald trump is considering any change in gun legislation. police say the shooting has devastated the community. nada tawfik has this report. this was supposed to be one of the safest communities in the country. in an instant, these students became helpless targets, sheltering in place and fearing for their lives. officials now suggest this was a well—planned plot just moments before the end of the school day, a former student reportedly pulled the fire alarm at marjory stoneman douglas high school to draw out his unsuspecting victims. there had already been a drill earlier in the day but confused teachers followed procedure and began to exit the building. as soon the fire alarm got hold, and kids were evacuating, i heard five pops.
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i was like, "that's not a drill." we never did a drill like that. when we started evacuating back away towards the back, towards the the middle school, i knew it was more than a drill because we've never done that. armed with an ar—15 semiautomatic rifle, he began firing outside and then continued inside the school as panic and chaos erupted. police were warning the shooter was still at large, even as emergency workers rushed to treat those wounded. swat teams evacuated distressed students. in a row, some with hands in the air, others clinging to each other for support, they frantically rushed to safety. i see you, i see you, i see you! parents, sick with worry, waited for news. the suspect was arrested without incident an hour later in a neighbouring city. police identified him as nikolas cruz, who had been expelled. he was taken into custody, i believe, about an hour after he left stoneman douglas, after he committed this horrific, homicidal, detestable act.
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this is the 18th school shooting in the united states this year. it's a uniquely american epidemic that has only gotten worse. yet this country is more divided than ever on how to solve the problem. and we can just and we canjust show and we can just show you this and we canjust show you this image that has been released of the suspect nikolas cruz, who we are told is being held on 17 counts of premeditated murder. here's the 19—year—old former student at the high school where he carried out the shooting at margaret stone. he had been expelled for disciplinary reasons. just to show you again, these images that we had coming in to ask them the last few minutes of him being taken into custody,
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wearing a hospital down. we believe that he is in custody somewhere in miami, and local sheriffs in the cou nty miami, and local sheriffs in the county where the school is say that he had at least one ar—15 assault rifle as well as multiple magazines for that rifle. so, rifle as well as multiple magazines forthat rifle. so, he is rifle as well as multiple magazines for that rifle. so, he is being held, the 19—year—old, nikolas cruz, on 17 counts of murder. those are the latest images coming in to us. the governor of florida, rick scott, called the shooting pure evil. but, he also refused to be drawn into a discussion about gun control. you're furious. how could this ever happen in this country? how could this happen in this state? this is a state that is focused on keeping all of our children safe. you come to the conclusion this is just absolutely pure evil. this state is not tolerating violence. we have law enforcement that will always show up to defend our safety.
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my prayers are with everybody impacted. i cannot imagine how they are feeling, wondering if they have lost a family member. those who do know that they have lost a family member, ijust can't imagine how their lives are going to change. right now we are going to cost to the south african parliament where cyril ramaphosa is being sworn in as south africa's president. we are going to stay with this of course, cyril ramaphosa becoming south africa's president afterjacob zuma resigned under intense pressure yesterday, and we lost those pictures, clearly. we are going to try and get them back. mr zuma is
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under pressure from his own anc party to which told him to step down orface party to which told him to step down or face a vote of no—confidence. i think that we can go back to the parliament now. that's just listen infora parliament now. that's just listen in for a moment, parliament now. that's just listen infora moment, and parliament now. that's just listen in for a moment, and then hopefully cmb sworn in momentarily.” in for a moment, and then hopefully cmb sworn in momentarily. i am aware that such a motion has been submitted but it is not on the order paper. full for discussion today. members will be aware that these matters are discussed in the programme committee, which met today and yesterday. rather the chief justice has ordained visiting today for the purposes of electing the president. in the light of this, i must accordingly order that we proceed with the business of the day as it appears on the order paper.
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honourable speaker, by pre—empting things that were not rising, you have indicated that mrjacob zuma is resigned, and we should be given a minute of truth to respond. just to explain what is happening here, the speaker was just about to call the chiefjustice to swear in cyril ramaphosa when a member of parliament raised a point of order. that is what is being spoken about, what is being dealt with, now. all things being equal, which gets to that swearing in fairly soon. of course, cyril ramaphosa due to become the president after the resignation of jacob zuma become the president after the resignation ofjacob zuma who had been told to step down or indeed face a vote of no—confidence. ramaphosa, of course, has manyjobs
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to tackle as the president of south africa, including dealing with unemployment, crime, corruption, and lets talk to our correspondence, who is in johannesburg for us lets talk to our correspondence, who is injohannesburg for us about all of this. we're waiting to see the actual swearing in, but what can we expect from cyril ramaphosa, of course? he is still in the same party as jacob zuma. it is still the anc. but what will be new about his presidency? tenner he certainly is in the —— presidency? tenner he certainly is in the -- he certainly is in the same party. but, people are hoping that his own personal stance on how he has run his personal life and his wide spanning businesses is a quality that he is going to be in tamoaieta bring into running government. he is a man known to be pragmatic, he is known to be decisive. he is known to be someone
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who can talk tough, but also have the right sort of tone when things need to be handled. unlike jacob zuma who has been seen in the past to be too pleased bae —— too eager to be too pleased bae —— too eager to please everyone. they are looking for a safe pair of hands, but they are looking to somebody who is going to seem like they have a firm handle on the country, and also creating an environment where corruption will be dealt with, where lawlessness will be something that is handled and handled appropriately and speedily. and, do many people see mr ramaphosa as being the true air of nelson mandela more than jacob as being the true air of nelson mandela more thanjacob ‘s ever was? not quite, not quite. he is not quite as saintly as many people have believed mr mandela was. that is
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because he is ruling in a south africa that is completely different. south africa are in their fourth year of democracy, so not as starry eyed as they were. democracy has matured here, and also, with that, south africa has found their boys. just in this period that we see jacob zuma plaine pushed out, a lot of that did come from civil society and ordinary south africans protesting. they are not going to be as lee disson —— as lenient as they work with nelson mandela, because they do know now what has gone right, and what has not. they will be holding into account. inside the parliament building, the speaker is asking the members of parliament in the red suits to please take their seats, because she wants to take their... she wants to get on with their... she wants to get on with the swearing in. we have got the
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members of parliament that are in the red, who are known as the economic feed tamoaieta freedom fighters. they are a radical spirit who broke off from the anc. their leader was once one of the stored supporters of the president and is now one of his harshest critics. while they celebrating that he has finally left, they want parliament to be dissolved. they are arguing that this is the same anc that and resist a various attempts to remove him. they want the whole thing called off and they want an early election... that was the motion that the anc was going to piggyback on if the president hadn't designed tonne resigned last night. this is something that they announce
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within the last hour. instead, they wa nt within the last hour. instead, they want parliament to be dissolved, and as the speaker is expending there, thatis as the speaker is expending there, that is not what the day is set for. the process that has been agreed to by parliamentarians is the election ofa by parliamentarians is the election of a new president, so they are trying to rally back and forth there using parliament due process and what should happen next. just to remind our viewers that what they are seeing on the right of our screens is the south african parliament. the speaker had just been about to call the chiefjustice to swearing cyril ramaphosa as the new president, when a point of order was raised by the economic freedom fighters party which had brought a motion of no—confidence against the previous president, jacob zuma. it is one of those situations where we think the swearing in might bejust about to happen, but perhaps on the other hand, isn't. it could take
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some time. thank you very much. we will try to get back to cape town for that swearing in, when it does happen. in fact... for that swearing in, when it does happen. infact... lets for that swearing in, when it does happen. in fact... lets asbo would these pictures, because let's listen in and find out what is happening. —— let's just bear with these pictures. order! order! order! order. madam speaker. that is the economic freedom fighters party leaving parliament now. they wanted parliament to be dissolved and for south africa to face new elections,
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but perhaps now that they have left, the swearing in may happen. this is what we thought we were going to a few minutes ago, but a point of order was raised... the house will now proceed with the election of the new president of south africa. the constitution requires the chief justice to preside over the election. i now invite the chief justice to take the chair. applause thank you honourable speaker. let me
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begin by reiterating that the purpose of this setting is to elect the president of the republic of south africa as envisaged by section 86 of the constitution. it is necessary to make sure that there is no lapse and that nobody is left with any doubt in the nation to compliance with the principles of because it is and i therefore begin. by because it is and i therefore begin. by reading section 86 of because as you should. it reads: " at its first
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sitting of the election, and whenever necessary to fill a vacancy, whenever necessary to fill a vacancy, the national assembly must elect a woman or a man from among its members to be the president. the chiefjustice must reside over the election of the president, or dissipate anotherjudge. election of the president, or dissipate another judge. the procedure set out in part a of schedule three applies to the election of the president. an election of the president. an election to fill a vacancy in the office of president must be held, at a time and on a date determined by the chiefjustice, but no more than 30 days after the vacancy occurs.
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" i suppose it is in half for me to give an assurance that i have seen the letter written by the president julie signed —— duly signed, today that he is resigning with immediate effect. but, maybe let me read it out: " effect. but, maybe let me read it out:" resigning effect. but, maybe let me read it out: " resigning from effect. but, maybe let me read it out:" resigning from the office of president of the republic of south africa. this serves to inform you that i offer my resignation of the republic of south africa, as per the attached presidential act. iwould like to take this opportunity deep to thank you, all members of parliament and the public at large for giving me parliament and the public at large forgiving me an parliament and the public at large for giving me an opportunity to lead
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this country from 2009. yours sincerely, mrjacob zuma, president of the public of south africa, and it" and is signed. "i jacob zuma hereby resign with immediate effect. this decision will be communicated to the speaker of the national assembly. this decision is recorded in terms of section 101, subsection one of the constitution of the republic of south africa, 1996. given under my hand at pretoria on this, the 14th day of debris, 2018, president. and then ——" and then it is signed. in response, i sent a letter to her a communication titles
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election of the president of the republic, and it reads in order to fill a vacancy created by the resignation of president j fill a vacancy created by the resignation of president] zuma, i have determined that firstly, 15th debris 2018 and 1400 hrs will be the date and time in which a new president of south africa will be elected. that then confirms that there is indeed a vacancy as envisaged by the concert she should, and that the existing on —— existence the of the vacancy was communicated to me, and in response and in compliance with section 86, i determine the date and time at which thatis determine the date and time at which that is to be done. the election of
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the president is to be done. i have two announced that as court rules that will government those proceedings to be distributed to members of this house i placing copies on the seats and those are the rules, contemplated by the constitution, i also announce that i have appointed the following persons to be retaining offices to assist me in this proceeding. reads list of names
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they have ta ken they have taken the oath or affirmation of office before me, a little while ago. the meeting will now proceed to the election of the president. we are moving away from south africa, for the moment, because the jury in the trial of former football coach, barry purnell, —— bennell. unanimous
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guilty verdict earlier on in the week, thejerry guilty verdict earlier on in the week, the jerry is guilty verdict earlier on in the week, thejerry is coming back on the seven remaining charges. what do you have for us? well, what have got for you is a brief update, but i should warn that at the moment the jury should warn that at the moment the jury is continuing to deliberate on four counts, so we must be careful about what we say. what i can say is that there were seven outstanding count that there were seven outstanding cou nt after that there were seven outstanding count after tuesday afternoon when we received guilty verdicts on 36 of 48 charges that barry bennell was facing off sexually abusing boys in the 1980s add up to 1990, how the three verdict that we have had this morning is all guilty. he is guilty of abusing a victim and as victim
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five. gary kepu at the time was aged between 11 and 14. mr cliff allege that the abuse happened between 1981 and 1986, and bennell had, in fact, the other day already been convicted of sex counts against gary cliff. he also has been convicted by a majority of 10—1 of abusing another victim, who was aged 13 at the time. a young man named mickey fallon who was from plymouth and was allowed i his parents to go and live at barry bennell‘s housed in the hope that it would lead to a career in football. there was for other accounts. the jury there was for other accounts. the jury has been sent out by the judge to continue to liberating on those. they said that so far there has been unable to reach verdicts on those accounts, and that is where they are now. deliberating again. ok, ben. thank you for that update. and, we are going to go back now to south
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africa, to the parliament in cape town where we are expecting cyril ramaphosa to be sworn in as the new president of the very shortly. we saw the speaker of the parliament called the chief justice saw the speaker of the parliament called the chiefjustice to swear him ina called the chiefjustice to swear him in a feud when it a go. there was a point of order raised by the economic freedom fighters party, and they wanted to stop the proceedings. they got up, and left the parliament building, or chamber, and now we have moved on to at least the run—up to the swearing in. we saw these chiefjustice to the swearing in. we saw these chief justice speaking to the swearing in. we saw these chiefjustice speaking a few minutes ago, and let us listen in to find out what is happening, right now. we transform ourselves like oliver
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report before him, ramaphosa's leadership style will not simply be a matter of historical and academic matter. he is a product of deeply ingrained principles, and values. but, above all, above all, you is a selfless —— he is a selfless, disciplined leader, and he knows that he is here to serve the people of south africa. and bring about an inclusive and prosperous economy for all south africans in which to benefit. i thank you. all south africans in which to benefit. ithank you. honourable acting president, isneryes, i do.
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-- yes, i do. is there another nomination? as the nomination and submitted to be checked,is nomination and submitted to be checked, is there another nomination? honourable chief justice? yes. i did intend to make another nomination, i just justice? yes. i did intend to make another nomination, ijust want to bring the falling to your intention, the nominationjust made was referring to a act that does not exist. it referred to at 110 of 1986, the concert she sure is 1996, so 1986, the concert she sure is 1996, so if it isa 1986, the concert she sure is 1996, so if it is a mistake, it must be rectified. thank you. thank you, honourable. the reason why the
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nomination form has to be submitted is so that we can satisfy ourselves that there is compliance. any other nomination? well, as we watch what is happening in the south african parliament, i am joined by in the south african parliament, i amjoined bya in the south african parliament, i am joined by a professor of world politics at the school of oriental and african studies. we saw the chiefjustice asked cyril ramaphosa if you accepted the nomination, and ask if there were any other nominations, but we might have imagined that this would be a thick ceremony, but they're right intojet and is not of other speakers, suggesting they trust what is
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happening there? tenner it is the south african parliament. it is the anc as a political party. everyone gets to have their say. it is a very laborious process, but other people have got things to get off their chest as they make a transition from one. . . chest as they make a transition from one... there will be a number of people pledging loyalty you might have been associated with president zuma's regime, who want to be seen as on the coat—tails of cyril ramaphosa. so, let's talk about the new president, for a bit. he started and developed what became south africa's largest union, the union of mineworkers. he was involved in the anti—apartheid struggle. at the right hand of nelson mandela for a long time, and a hugely successful and wealthy businessmen. is he a well all about individual to lead the country? tenner here's really well qualified in the first instance
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because he's very wealthy, he would because he's very wealthy, he would be corrupt and still mistake. he is a ferociously not good —— ferociously good negotiator. i think he has very much the interests of the country at heart. he is pragmatic, he has a lot of ideas, whether he will actually be able to ta ke whether he will actually be able to take south africa around the corner out of a very deep hole, the titleholderjacob zuma dug himself, thatis titleholderjacob zuma dug himself, that is a very good question. you mean an economic or hole with high and implement. it is a disaster. i did think that the south africans understand just how deeply the hole has been done. there is no attention and clear to economic planning. there has been no care whatsoever to technocratic management, particularly of public utilities. the amount of money that is going to apply to capital progress, to guarantee water etc, those things
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alone will be astronomical. and will there be disgruntled zuma supporters trying to hold him back orare supporters trying to hold him back or are these the people who will be rapidly switching allegiance? or are these the people who will be rapidly switching allegiance ?|j rapidly switching allegiance?” think there will be some rapid switching of allegiance.” think there will be some rapid switching of allegiance. i will interrupt you if i may, apologies, we are going to listen to the chief justice again. applause singing. so that is the moment with no other
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nominees for presidency. cyril ramaphosa has been duly elected as south africa's new president. we got there, didn't we, after a few interruptions, interjections from various speakers. some who wanted to praise cyril ramaphosa but some come in the case of the freedom fighters who interrupted with a point of order and then left the chamber, who wa nted order and then left the chamber, who wanted to call for entirely new elections. how difficult will it be for cyril ramaphosa, with these voices of opposition and is he going to be able to allow the voices of opposition to air their views in the south africa that he is now leading? i think south africa that he is now leading? ithink in south africa that he is now leading? i think in the south african parliament the economic freedom fighters will continue to voice
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their concerns about the economy. they are speaking for a growing number of economically disencha nt they are speaking for a growing number of economically disenchant —— disenfranchised people. let's listen again to what's happening. they will now invite the speaker to take the seat. 0k, ok, well we wait to hear for the speaker or the speaker to take her seat and continue our conversation with professor stephen chan from the school of oriental and african studies at the university of london. what do you think will ramaphosa
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wa nt what do you think will ramaphosa want to hit the ground running with? what will his priorities be now?” think he will inaugurate a major anti—corruption think he will inaugurate a major anti—corru ption drive think he will inaugurate a major anti—corruption drive and he needs to continue that kind of momentum, which means the former president zuma will be one of the targets. to leave the old regime behind but also to send a signal is this kind of thing must die out in south africa. he has to come up with positive financial and economic policies quickly. he cannot create workjust like that or give major tax holidays for the corporations for them to make work. it will take deep meditation and planning to get this right. we saw the markets respond when zuma announced he was standing down, so cyril ramaphosa may have a brief honeymoon period with the rest of the world. will he find the world hoping he will be the man to turn the country around and responding in kind if they see he's heading in the
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right direction? yes, he's the only hope the outside world actually has. the big question is whether inward investment from the outside will turn intojob creation investment from the outside will turn into job creation to people who have nothing on the ground. professor stephen chan, very good to get your expertise, as we watched cyril ramaphosa be proclaimed the new president of south africa. thank you very much. this is bbc newsroom live — our latest headlines: a 19—year—old man is being held on 17 counts of premeditated murder after a gunman opened fire at a school in florida. kids were evacuated. i was like, thatis kids were evacuated. i was like, that is not a drill. we never get a drill like that. the south african
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parliament has elected anc leader cyril ramaphosa as the new president of south africa. new research suggests eating ultra—processed foods, including chicken nuggets and sweetened drinks, is linked to an increased risk of cancer. more than 1,000 driving bans were issued last year to children who were not legally old enough to drive, some were as young as 12. more than a million people have signed a petition urging snapchat, the picture—sharing app, to undo its recent redesign. and in the last few minutes... the former football coach barry bennell has been found guilty of three further counts of serious sexual assault. four other charges are still being considered by thejury. there could be a link between a diet of ultra—processed foods
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and cancer, that's according to researchers in france. the study of more than 100,0000 people suggests that those who ate more products such as fizzy drinks, mass produced bread and processed meats, had the highest rates of cancer. here's our health and science correspondent james gallagher. ultra—processed foods include cakes, chocolate, mass—produced bread, crisps and pizza. it's delicious temptation and too much is bad for the waistline. we know being overweight increases the risk of cancer, but is there something else about these foods that raises the risk even further? the study followed 105,000 french people for five years. it suggests increasing the amounts of our diet that are ultra—processed by 10% is linked to a 12% increase in the risk of cancer. yet even the researchers say more work is needed to establish why such foods might increase cancer risk. so what should we do? a balanced diet, but actually, even more importantly, is maintaining a healthy weight and if we eat too many ultra—processed foods, then we do pile on the pounds. and although this study didn't look closely at weight, we know very clearly what the links with that are and cancer.
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so i think it's a warning to us to have a healthy diet and be aware of the links between our diet and cancer. so, i think it is a warning to us... other experts said the term "ultra—processed food" was so broad, it's hard to know what's really going on, and that other unhealthy habits could be muddying the waters. it's why the study is being described as an initial insight rather than definitive proof of of ultra—processed foods' role in cancer. james gallagher, bbc news. the latest redesign to the picture sharing app snapchat has left users up in arms, with over1 million people signing a petition calling for a rollback of the changes. the move, intended to separate friends from the branded content of celebrities and brands, was prompted by worries that a blurring of the two had contributed to the rise in fake news. but users are saying the new layout is difficult to use. i'm joined now by our technology correspondent chris foxx.
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what is the difference between snapchat before the design and now? before, as they said, friends and celebrities and publishers such as bbc news were all in one big list together so you could tap through the latest stories and have a look. now they have been separated out and the ceo said the reason for that was because mixing friends and publishers have led to the creation of fa ke publishers have led to the creation of fake news. its a bit like what facebook has done? yes, they are giving more prominence to friends' content in the feed which a lot of people have asked for, and why not give them a separate feed? so now if you swipe to the left you get m essa g es you swipe to the left you get messages from your friends and if
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you swipe to the right you get content from publishers and television programmes. so why are people saying it is more difficult to use now? some of the popular features have been more hidden away, and before with having one feed people found that preferable. they wa nted people found that preferable. they wanted everything in one place, they didn't want to have to swipe one way, and one way for the other things. however snapchat has always been criticised by people of an older generation who find it difficult to use anyway because there aren't always icons on the screen, there aren't always icons on the screen, you there aren't always icons on the screen, you have to do swipes or pinches to get to certain screens. adults are usually baffled by it but the kids know how to use it. around a million people signing this petition, is that a significant number in the grand scheme of things for snapchat, and will snapchat listen to what they are saying?” think a million people signing a petition is a lot of people.
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ultimately people don't like change so ultimately people don't like change so this does happen. snapchat has 67 million users so it is a small number but they haven't rolled this change out anywhere. they have just rolled it out in france as well saw a lot of people signing the petition now are doing so in french. so they might listen, we will see. thanks for explaining. sinn fein is expected to outline its next move today following the collapse of negotiations to restore power—sharing at stormont. talks ended yesterday when the democratic unionist party said there was no prospect of a deal. both parties have been locked in negotiations for 13 months. this is what people from all sides of the political spectrum in belfast made of the news. i think it's a big disappointment and ijust wish she could get over the line and get things up and running. some might have to rethink who we vote for in future if they don't get on with each other and think of different parties in future.
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certainly i'm looking at different parties to make a right choice but unfortunately we will see in the future — something has to change. i think she isjust right. we don't even know what the irish language act means. on the cards, no way. it's time the two prime ministers come together, you know? i hoped that they would find some kind of solution when i first heard about it over a year ago. but the longer it goes on, i believe the worse the situation we may all find ourselves in. ijust think both sides at the moment are being, obviously they have problems with either side's arguments and things, but they are trying to put their differences aside and try and sort out the country, which is falling apart slightly. earlier our correspondent chris page spoke to us. well, the political parties will be
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discussing amongst themselves where they go from here, sinn fein have been having a meeting of their own here at stormont, this morning. they said they will set out a considered response today. it ended up in a very acrimonious break—up with not much hope of reconciliation. the relationship between the dup and sinn fein, which was never a happy one, does seem to have reached something of a new low. in particular, the issue that they can't seem to get a deal on, is that of the irish language. sinn fein said they want a stand—alone piece of legislation which will promote the irish language. the dup say that they want a broader law which will incorporate cultural elements which are also more important to unionists. that is a bit of a zero—sum situation. that has proved a particularly difficult circle to square. there are other issues separating the parties, for example, same—sex marriage.
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sinn fein want to legalise that, in northern ireland, and the dup don't. there are also disagreements about the troubles, and another round of talks have ended. pretty acrimoniously this time. both parties very firmly blaming each other. bradley has only been in the job for a few weeks, and said that the government now has to consider practical steps. that may well mean is that a budget for northern ireland in the next financial year will have to be passed at westminster, rather than at stormont. just briefly on that point, at the risk of sounding like groundhog day, are we actually closer now to a return to direct rule? well, the british and irish governments have been very reluctant to mention those two words. they maintain that power—sharing is the only way forward. the reality is that the longer that stormont is in this period of limbo, and civil servants aren't able
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to make major decisions, we are going to have to find some sort of alternator to run this. to try and keep public services running efficiently. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: 17 people have been killed after a gunman opens fire at a high school in florida. the government has publicly blamed russian military intelligence for a cyber attack last year, which affected businesses around the world.
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the defence secretary, gavin williamson, said russia was "ripping up the rule book by undermining democracy and weaponising information". russia has denied responsibility for the attack. the consumers‘ association, "which", says faulty household appliances are causing about 60 fires every week in the uk. it says a third of fires are started by washing machines and tumble dryers. "which" has written to ministers, giving them 90 days to draw up a plan to address the issue. dubious financial advisors exploited former steel workers in a pensions mis—selling scandal according to mps. the work and pensions select committee says it cost the people involved thousands and the financial conduct authority did too little to protect them. our wales correspondent, sian lloyd, reports. last year, members of the old british steel pension scheme faced a huge decision about their retirement savings after tata, which had taken over the liabilities, said it was no longer viable. workers could choose to transfer their benefits out of the scheme. a report by a committee of mps says some of those who did were exploited,
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shamelessly bamboozled by dubious financial advisers. there have been people who probably had been fleeced of the most valuable asset they will have ever had, which they built up as part of their pension scheme, of which these financial vultures have been after and in too many cases been successful in getting their claws on. we uncovered the case of richard bevan, who'd transferred his benefit into a private scheme after seeking independent financial advice. he estimates the decision has cost him around £200,000. i'm not a gullible sort of person but i've obviously been led into doing something that wasn't right for me, by a financial adviser, you know? and it's pretty...it‘s not a nice place to be at the moment. the financial conduct authority is criticised in this report for not acting quickly enough after concerns were raised.
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it says it is reviewing its rules on pension transfers but for steelworkers like richard, any changes will be too late. sian lloyd, bbc news. oxfam has said it sacked its country director in haiti last yearfor mismanagement. the charity said damien berrendorf had faced allegations of inappropriate behaviour, but it said his dismissal was not related to sexual misconduct, or the scandal in 2011 involving aid workers in haiti paying local women for sex. children, some as young as 12, are being banned from driving before they are legally old enough to get behind the wheel of a car. the bbc has discovered the number of children aged 16 and under, who have been disqualified from driving, has risen by almost 50% over the past four years. phil bodmer has been to meet the sisters of a young boy, who was killed by a teenager who was driving illegally. they killed him and we
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didn't get to see him... well, we saw him, but we had to look through a window. a window, we couldn't touch him. we couldn't touch him, we couldn't see him, it was a horror movie. distraught sisters describing the agony of losing their 15—year—old brother in a fatal car crash. our house and family will never be the same. darnell harte was killed alongside two other children and two men. they were passengers in a stolen car which hit a tree at high speed in leeds last november. a 15—year—old boy was jailed for 4.5 years for dangerous driving, but he's far from alone in being an underage driver. i was putting people in danger. i know that's other people's life, you know, it matters to another family. mikey started driving on the streets of bradford aged 16, he and his friends used to hire a car to take out onto the roads. if there a group of us, you know, we'll all chip in and we'll let an older person know we want a car and they will get a car from someone else and bring it to us.
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i do get a rush, you know, when i want to put my foot down and go crazy. ripping it around sidestreets. especially when the boys are there, cheering you on. you just want to go faster. in 2014, almost 700 children aged 16 and under were disqualified from driving. however, last year, that number had risen to more than 1,000, an increase of 47%. this is the tip of the iceberg because of course they have to be caught breaking the law in this way and inevitably many won't be, they will get away scot—free. we also know there has been a massive reduction in the number of roads policing officers, about a 27% reduction since 2010. elyse and natasha are now calling for tougherjail terms.
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i think the whole guidelines of the sentencing around death by dangerous driving needs to be changed. whether it be an adult or a child, you have still killed somebody. the government says it is committed to making sure the courts have the powers to deal with driving offences and will bring forward proposals for changes in the law as soon as parliamentary time allows. phil bodmer, bbc news. set up on the site of a colliery, antony gormley‘s the angel of the north celebrates its 20 anniversary this week. it initially divided opinion with the late art critic, brian sewell describing it as a "monstrosity". fiona trott examines how the 200—tonne steel sculpture has gone onto become one of britain's most popular landmarks. the unmistakable angel of the north, towering over the a1 in gateshead. it's one of the most photographed landmarks in britain and viewed by 31 million people every year.
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i've grown to love it. i think people do have a very warm feeling about it. it's an artwork that doesn't stand on its own as an artwork in a gallery but it's very much part of everyday life, in gateshead and in this region. in the middle of the night 20 years ago, the angel of the north made its slowjourney up the a1. it was built in hartlepool. its body, as long as four double—decker buses. its wings, wider than a boeing 757. people gathered at the former colliery site in gateshead to watch it put in place. an historic moment. at first people were sceptical, why an angel? why so monumental? but soon they claimed it as their own, and that's exactly what the sculptor wanted. the fact is it's not my angel, it is the angel of the north and that means a lot to me.
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i had an idea, but it was realised, it was made by the people of the north—east and it comes from that extraordinary story of the relationship between coalmining, iron, engineering and that history of the industrial revolution. for many, it's a special place. there have even been marriage proposals here. local people say it's put the north—east on the map. northumberland is fabulous and the angel i think depicts just how good we are up here. well, i'm up from london and ijust wanted to see it for myself. i've heard about it before and, yeah, it's pretty impressive if you ask me. i think i didn't like it in the beginning, i think a lot of people would say that, but it's really grown on me and now i love it. the popularity of the angel has brought more money to the area too. since it arrived here, overnight visitor numbers
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have increased by 14%. this has led to a revenue increase of 48%. newcastle and gateshead make around £1.5 billion a year through tourism and they say the angel is a major contributor to that. on its 20th birthday, the angel is preparing for a medical. like all structures, its joints need to be checked so it can stand proud forfuture generations. fiona trott, bbc news, gateshead. in a moment the news at one with reeta chakrabarti. first the weather. after what has been a wild start of the week, things are quieting down as we end the week and head on into the weekend. in fact for the rest of
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the weekend. in fact for the rest of the day and into the evening, most of the wintry showers will be confined to scotland and northern ireland. elsewhere it will be clear and cold with a widespread frost. that's because we are in between weather systems with high pressure influencing the weather. these are shower clouds and a substantial amount of rain, sleet and snow, as we continue to push into northern and western scotland in particular. a few showers as well for northern ireland, elsewhere are clear and cold night with a fairly widespread frost and watch out for ice across northern and western areas, where we will continue to see wintry showers. heading into friday, a quiet start for money. a cold one with frost around. there will be a good deal of sunshine around. for northern ireland, some sunny spells too but there will also be showers, most of there will also be showers, most of the north and west side. also in
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north—west scotland, not quite as windy as we have seen. double—figure values, up to 11 degrees. something milder moving up from the south. as we head into the weekend, it looks like we will continue to seek a north—south divide with strong winds across the northern half of the country, but further south a greater chance of seeing dry weather. for saturday, southern areas not doing too badly at all. there will be a fairamount of too badly at all. there will be a fair amount of cloud around, sunny spells breaking through. feeling mild as well but to the north it will be windy with further showers around and snow over the hills and it will be another cool one. for sunday, a cloudy picture with most of the cloud across northern and western areas. the south and east of england staying dry, and feeling quite mild, 9—11dc. further north, less cold than it has been of late but still on the cool side with
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showers falling over the hills. into next week it stays pretty mild, relatively benign with low amounts of cloud and some sunshine. a gunman is in police custody in florida after killing at least 17 students and teachers at his former school. panic as pupils tried to flee to safety — some in the building hid under desks, and barricaded doors as loud shots rang out. then all of a sudden we hear one of our student government teachers say "run as fast as you can", and we hear a gunshot. the gunman, 19—year—old nikolas cruz, is charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder. you come to the conclusion that this is absolutely pure evil. we'll have all the latest — and asking what it will take for any
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