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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  February 19, 2018 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

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you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 2: the prime minister is to launch a review of tuition fees in england, admitting it's "one of the most expensive systems" in the world. you have a system of fees and education that some issues have arisen. concern from notjust students, but the parents and grandparents, but the level of debt they have built up. this is the scene is derbyshire, where the prime minister will be speaking that speech soon. paedophile football coach barry bennell appears in the dock to be sentenced. some of his victims tell him face to face what effect his crimes had on them. a man thought to be one of britain's most prolific paedophiles, matthew falder, has been jailed for 32 years after admitting 137 offences. oxfam reveals that three of the men accused of sexual misconduct in haiti, physically threatened witnesses during a 2011 investigation. and coming up, we have all the sport with holly. we are talking curling. that is
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right. once again it has got was gripped. it is tense in the latest women's match. more on that and all the sport coming up later. sarah keith lucas has the weather. calm for now? it is. we have got some rain in the east. things are set to turn colder, perhaps even some snow showers later in the week. all the details in about half an hour. also coming up... the big winner at the baftas — ladies in black. the colour on the red carpet as the stars came out in support of the #metoo movement. but for the best actress a need to address the dress issue. i have a little trouble with compliance. good afternoon.
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there seems to be a broad acceptance that the current system of university funding, whereby all undergraduate courses in england cost more than £9,000 a year in fees, needs to change. students currently face one of the most expensive systems of university tuition in the world. in the next few minutes, the prime minister will announce a review of education for over—18s. labour has already said it wants to scrap tuition fees. they're asking — if you're going to cut fees, which courses do you cut most? and which universities, in particular, should you target? ben wright has this report. it prime minister who had free university tuition, visits sixth formers in london to discuss student debt and the courses they plan. one mentions theoretical physics. 0h gosh extra ——!
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mentions theoretical physics. 0h gosh extra --! that is the reaction stu d e nts gosh extra --! that is the reaction students and many parents have about because of higher education in england. the government says the system needs to be examined again. we have a system were some issues have arisen. concern notjust from stu d e nts have arisen. concern notjust from students themselves but parents and grandparents about the level of debt they have built up. and a concern that universities charge the same, whatever course you are doing. currently english universities are free to charge up to £3000 per year. with labour promising to scrap tuition fees altogether, there is political pressure on the conservative government to tackle this issue. you have to be fair to the student and the taxpayer. we need to dramatically reform higher education, support further
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education. we have to make sure that disadvantaged students get to the best universities and get good jobs at the end of it. the government will consider the reintroduction of maintenance grants. there is even dispute among students by the policy trade—offs. dispute among students by the policy trade-offs. i knew that i would get into debt of more than £50,000. now we have a situation where we don't have maintenance grants. so students like me from working—class backgrounds are going to have to seek out new loans, and that puts people off. i would be disappointed if tuition fees were cut if that was at the expense of bursaries. one of the key things is helping people doubt themselves. ministers are not saying the state should be picking up the bill for university tuition. the challenge for the government is coming up with a set of policies that don'tjust look like a pale imitation of what labour is offering. the prime minister will say later that for many students the level of
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fees do not relate to the costa quality of the course. she says there could be more variety in the cost of the fees. she is in search of the silver bullet which will give lower fees but not lead to escalating costs for the government. i'm afraid there isn't a silver bullet. there are choices to be made. i suspect she will try to put those choices off until after brexit. number 10 says this will cover technical and vocational education as well. and a rebalancing of education towards vocational study could be the biggest change being considered. we can speak to our assistant political editor, norman smith. if she starts speaking we will go straight to her. she has got a tough ask, hasn't he? she has. a real danger is the government has this year—long review and ends up wagging his finger at universities, but not much else. the difficulty is that
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mrs may has tied her own hands. she has already made very clear that she doesn't want the taxpayer having to stomp up to cut university fees. she has been clear she will not get rid of the current system. and education secretary has made clear he is not going to tell universities what they should charge for individual courses, which means at the end of the day you're pretty much left saying to universities, please just cut the fees that you are charging for some of your less rewarding courses, maybe look at introducing shorter courses, perhaps introduce so—called commuter courses, where stu d e nts so—called commuter courses, where students can study from home. but you are passing the ball back to the universities. i think the danger there is that today the universities have shown themselves remarkably resista nt to have shown themselves remarkably resistant to offering lower fees, because as we know, they all charge top whack for all their courses.
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they say, we have got loads of people applying, even from disadvantaged backgrounds. the number applying has gone up hugely. why should we? what are we doing wrong? the risk is that today sets up wrong? the risk is that today sets upa up a lot of expectations that something is going to happen to reduce what mrs may will call one of the most expensive tuition fee systems in the world. everyone thinks, great, she's going to do something about this. at the end of the day it is left to universities, who may choose not to do much. and an announcement of a review is not how to attract younger voters? that is the other danger. you get into the land of reviews. we have already had the review in 2010. there was another review in 2002. you can find the these issues, the easiest way out for a government is a review.
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social care, goodness me, how many reviews have we had into social care? and there comes a time when you want —— when if you want to grasp something, you have to make a decision, even if it is controversial and difficult. the fear will be we will go round the houses for about a year and and up with something that perhaps doesn't really fundamentally change things. it is more of a nip and tuck than radical reform. i'll work on the basis that we will return to you very soon. a lecturer at birmingham university, said to be one of britain's worst offenders, has beenjailed for 32 years for sexual offences against children. matthew falder pleaded guilty to 137 charges, including encouraging the rape of a minor and blackmailing his victims into sending him obscene footage of themselves carrying out degrading acts. the operation to catch falder included law enforcement agencies across the world. us homeland security described him as "the worst child exploitation offender" it had ever seen on the internet. sima kotecha is outside
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the court in birmingham. i visit i have done? what is it i'm supposed to have done? doctor matthew falder being arrested at his workplace last year. the 29—year—old spent years posing as a female artist online, to trick his victims into sending him naked pictures of themselves. distributing indecent images of children. he searched their profiles on social media and used the information into blackmailing them to send him more images. even installed secret cameras in people's homes. falder contract at more than 300 people worldwide, offering them money in exchange for folders. his youngest victim was just 13. one of his victims told us she could no longer trust anybody. ididn't want trust anybody. i didn't want to stay at home because he knew where i lived. i
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couldn't concentrate on anything. i couldn't concentrate on anything. i couldn't talk to my family. i felt like i was ashamed of what i was doing. ididn't like i was ashamed of what i was doing. i didn't want to go out on the street because he may be there. ididn't the street because he may be there. i didn't feel safe anywhere. last year he pleaded guilty to 137 charges, including encouraging the rape of a child and possessing a paedophile manual. you have got a victim, you may have an e—mail contact, that is it. it is an e—mail contact, that is it. it is a trick inks —— tricky starting point. what here then god is people like him who are using all the tools available to him to stay hidden. falder was under surveillance for several months during a four—year investigation. the cambridge graduate was identified by the national crime agency. for the first time at work with partner agencies across the world, including the fbi, the australian federal police and euro poll, to find the man behind the messages. there were contacts made with people in slovenia,
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australia, victims in the united states. and victims all over england, wales and scotland. we then had to try to piece together information across many different police forces. falder lived in these block of flats. he worked at birmingham university. officers say his motivation was power and control. he wa nted motivation was power and control. he wanted his victims to feel embarrassed and humiliated. and he was confident he could outwit the authorities. he reached out to vulnerable people seeking work on websites, such as gumtree, with the intention of manipulating them. he used names such as 666 devil and evil mind to communicate with other paedophiles. on the darknet he wrote about one of his victims, saying... "to be honest, and thinking that basin and mentally struggling she seems to be, i should be able to get some good
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nudes from her willingly. i'm not —— i don't care... " thejudge nudes from her willingly. i'm not —— i don't care... " the judge told him, you wanted to assume total control over your victims. you were cruel and manipulative. a couple of tweaks in response to that. the national crime agency have said that falder boasted he would never be caught. another tweet from gchq. what they say is that their hearts go out to the victims of matthew falder‘s horrific crimes. reaction there from the nca and
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gchq. breaking news. we arejust gchq. breaking news. we are just hearing that nearly 300 staff have been axed at russell hume, the meat supplier that has just collapsed into administration. the move comes after production was halted. products were recalled when the food standards agency long—stay hygiene investigation in january. agency long—stay hygiene investigation injanuary. the pub giant, wetherspoon ‘s, is among those to pull their contracts with russell hume after temporarily taking stake of the menu. administrators kpmg say 266 staff have been made redundant from a workforce of 302. more on that later. it's emerged that three of the oxfam employees accused of sexual misconduct in haiti, physically threatened witnesses during a 2011 investigation. the charity has published an internal report which said more needed to be done to prevent problem staff working for other charities. but despite the warnings, several men linked to the alleged
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abuse did subsequently take up roles at other charitable organisations. james landale reports. for more than half a century, oxfam has been helping those in need such as these victims of conflict in nigeria in the late 1960s. but the hard—won reputation has been put at risk by the behaviour of some staff in haiti in 2011. an internal report published today, shows one was dismissed and redesigned using prostitutes on oxfam premises. —— three resigned. two more were dismissed for bullying and intimidation — one of whom also downloaded pornography. and another man was sacked for failing to protect staff. what some mps want now is for offenders like these to be placed on a public register. i don't think these reports should be secret, and now that it is out in the open we can do something significant about it, and that is what i will be asking them to do — to have a central
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register so that we lead the world, and so that we know anyone we give money to, any charity has got the right procedures in place and that the children and women are absolutely safe. the report also says three of the men physically threatened witnesses during the investigation, something which shocked the prime minister. the behaviour we have now discovered was horrific, far below the standards we expect for the charities we work with. and i understand there have been further revelations today, which show that actually there was physical intimidation of witnesses. this is horrific, exactly the problem we see which means all too often people do not feel able to come forward to report what has happened to them, the behaviour they have been on the receiving end of. oxfam shops have been a familiar sight in high street for years. the prime minister spokesperson said this morning there is still a long way to go to public trust.
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former football coach barry bennell has appeared in court to be sentenced, after being found guilty of 50 counts of sexual abuse against 12 victims. bennell — who coached at a number of clubs, including crewe and man city — had appeared via videolink from prison for the rest of his five and a half week trial, because of health problems. danny savage has this from liverpool for us. thejudge has the judge has retired thejudge has retired to consider his sentence. he will be doing that at quarter past two this afternoon. this morning between 12 and one we heard from many of the victims of barry bennell, giving their personal impact statements about how what had happened to them has affected their lives. one man repeatedly sexually assaulted by ben in the 1980s, said he didn't tell his parents what had happened until two years ago. his father replied to him that he was sorry for not being a good dad, and
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those words broke the victim's heart, he said. he turned to alcohol to blot out the trauma of what had happened to him. he had stopped his children going to sleep overs because of what had happened to him asa because of what had happened to him as a child. another victim walked to the dock were barry bennell were sitting and said, barry, barry, why? you didn't get any reaction from bennell. he was moved away by a security clerk. it gives an illustration of how strong the feelings are and the emotions were at the court hearing. another man said he turned to drugs to deal with what happened. he ended up in the young offenders institution. several victims contemplated suicide. a clear picture has emerged the bennell being manipulative and controlling. he turned the dreams of young footballers into nightmares over a period of time. and those nightmares are still hunting many of those victims today. this will not give many of these men closure
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today. they are still living with the trauma of what happened to them all those years ago. all the while their tormentors said in the dock, staring at the floor, giving no reaction. former shareholders in carillion are calling for its management to be investigated. someone told mps the executives must have known or should have known about its cash flow problems before it went into liquidation. at the same time, say mps, investors were fleeing for the hills. joe lynam reports. carillion collapsed last month with debts of almost £1 billion and their pensions black culled almost as large again. today we heard from carillion's former biggest shareholders. in letters to mps examining the collapse, one fund manager, said there should be an investigation into the compa ny‘s there should be an investigation into the company's former management. another big show —— shareholder, standard life aberdeen,
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said carillion management had played down any potential risks. a canadian shareholder needed four attempts to get a meeting with the former ceo. we have had a set up people working continued faithfully to work. there we re continued faithfully to work. there were people on the bridge of the company drawing their mega salaries. as soon as the share log —— shareholders had a look, they rent for the hills. that was the real warning sign. none of the regulators seemed to be aware of what was happening. and you are left holding shares in carillion when it was liquidated lost all of their money. —— anyone left holding shares. thousands of former employees lostjobs left holding shares. thousands of former employees lost jobs and livelihoods. more on that breaking news that 300 staff could be axed at russell hume. it isa staff could be axed at russell hume. it is a meat supplier. emma simpson is here. what has happened? you may remember that russell hume became the centre of a big food standards
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agency investigation injanuary. it is headquartered in derby. it has got six sites, from one in london, birmingham, liverpool, one in yorkshire, one in scotland. and the pla nts were yorkshire, one in scotland. and the plants were stopped. nothing was going in, nothing was leaving because of concerns about food hygiene, rules not being adhered to. this all emerged when wetherspoon ts, this all emerged when wetherspoon ‘s, one of its biggest customers, pulled its very popular steak night. thousands of stakes had to be destroyed and recalled because of concerns about russell hume. it then emerged it was notjust wetherspoons, it was jamie's italian and other companies who had been caught up in this food alert. the food standards agency has been continuing to investigate russell hume. nothing has been leaving the plant. it has had cash flow problems. today we got the news it
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had fallen into administration with the loss of 266 jobs. kpmg, the administrator, saying the recent product recall and holes in operations has caused significant customer attrition. this has led the directors to take the decision to place the company into administration. regrettably, with little prospect of production restarting on—site, 266 people have been made redundant. what happens next? that is it for them, isn't it? kpmg will look to find a buyerfor them, isn't it? kpmg will look to find a buyer for the sites, the business, any assets. main —— meantime, the food standards agency investigation continues. they are still pouring over this company. their concern has been on use by dates. in the meantime, trading has stopped and it has collapsed.
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emma, thank you. employers are being accused of having antiquated attitudes to recruiting women, after a survey of 1100 bosses revealed that more than half believed a woman should have to disclose if she was pregnant during a job interview. the equality and human rights commission has accused firms of "living in the dark ages", and says its study shows many employers need more support to understand the basics of discrimination law. richard lister reports. they do see you coming, don't they? sarah rees was on maternity leave when she noticed her name had vanished from her employer's website. her daughter, caitlin, had just been born, but it was weeks before sarah was told formally she'd been let go. i felt really sad, and i almost felt ashamed that, you know, what had i done wrong? because i had only gone and had a baby and, yet, i knew that i loved the job i was doing. and there was still a place for me in that organisation because, months later, they did employ new staff in jobs because, new staff in jobs that i could have done quite easily. although having a child is a life—changing experience, the law says it shouldn't affect a woman's employment rights.
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but a survey of 1,100 of britain's bosses revealed more than a third thought it was ok to ask a female job applicant about pregnancy plans. more than 40% thought pregnancy puts an "unnecessary cost burden" on the workplace. and six in ten bosses believe a woman should disclose whether she's pregnant during the recruitment process. we were shocked but, unfortunately, not surprised. but what we want to do is to work with employers to move things forward. and that's why we're asking employers to put a stake on the ground and tojoin our working forward initiative, to work alongside other employers and take advantage of tips, guidance and advice and support. the confederation of british industry has acknowledged there is a problem, saying today's poll "shows how far away have to go in some firms to change attitudes towards pregnant workers and new mothers. businesses should not ask about prospective employees' family plans at interview, nor act on any assumptions about their career plans. "
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solicitors like this one have helped around 4,000 women bring unfair dismissal cases against their employers in the past four years. around half of one settlement. bina hale won her case, but it was a gruelling process. 54,000 women a year lose theirjobs because of such discrimination. so there is awareness, it's just we need the government to do something now with those findings. in this day and age, this shouldn't be happening. women are a valuable part of the workforce. government figures show one in nine working mothers lose theirjobs due to maternity discrimination. today's poll reveals just how deeply ingrained that discrimination still is in workplaces across the country. richard lister, bbc news. let's ta ke let's take you to derbyshire, were
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theresa may will be announcing a review into tuition fees. the introductions have started. engaged in learning at the college, taking a wide variety of subjects and qualifications, from 14—year—olds doing vocational qualifications alongside gcses, two adults learning new skills, pa rt—time, adults learning new skills, part—time, alongside their careers. this variety and choice is what makes it possible to make sure that so many good find the right educational routes for them to make sure that they can be all they can be, but also that this country has the skill it needs. we have an enviable reputation in this country for higher education and further education. but the world economy keeps changing, the bar keeps being raised. we need to change, too. we need to make sure we have an 18 plus system that works for everyone, to make sure that in terms of
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participation everybody that can benefit can do so. to make sure they can benefit can do so. to make sure they ca n a ccess benefit can do so. to make sure they can access the right course for them, the best fit, in terms of their talent and the skills that our economy and society needs. and to make sure there is value for money for everybody. so we needed to build on our reforms that are already in train, make sure there is a giant —— joined up system for all that is fit for the future. this vibrant college strikes me as a perfect setting to launch this government review. so again, thank you to the college for hosting us. and without further ado, it gives me great pleasure to introduce the prime minister. new education secretary damian hinds introducing theresa may. thank you very much, damian. my thanks to mandy for hosting us at the college today. i took my very first steps into elected politics as a local
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councillor in south london. for two yea rs i councillor in south london. for two years i was the chairman of the education authority in murton. it was an experience i will never forget because i saw how vital good schools and colleges are to a community. how the hopes and aspirations which parents have further children, and which young people have for their futures, further children, and which young people have for theirfutures, are bound up with the quality of education on offer. and here in this fantastic setting, in a building from derby's proud past, which today is helping to define a fantastic future for this city and this county as part of derby college, the immense value of great local institutions providing people with an education that truly works for them, is clear. i drew on my experiences in south london when i first became an mp and made my maiden speech in parliament on the subject of education in 1997. i said then that the aim of education
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policy should be to provide the right education for every child. that for some children that would be an education that is firmly based in learning practical and vocational skills. for others it would be an education based on academic excellence. a lot has changed in the last 20 years. that core principle that the needs of every child and every young person deserve to be met, still drives my vision of the education system our country needs. and the need for such a system has never been greater. first, because the new technologies which are shaping the economy of the future, will transform the world of work and demand new knowledge and skills in the decades ahead. technologies such as biotech and new advances in data science have the potential to drive up science have the potential to drive up living standards and open new possibilities for human achievement and personalfulfilment. possibilities for human achievement and personal fulfilment. but possibilities for human achievement and personalfulfilment. but if possibilities for human achievement and personal fulfilment. but if we are to seize those opportunities, if
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we are to make britain a great engine room of this technological revolution in the 21st century, we need to make the most of all of our talents. the sixth form students i met at featherstone high school this morning, and the young people studying here at derby college, will be starting their careers in the new economy of the 20 20s and 20 30s. to give them the skills they need, we need an education and training system which is more flexible and more diverse than it is today. one which enriches their lives with knowledge, gives each of them a great start in life, and is there for them when they needed. and there is another reason why we must act now to deliver that education system that truly works for everyone. the britain of the 20 20s will be a britain of the 20 20s will be a britain outside of the european union, pursuing a new course in the world. i want the britain which these young people will be living in to bea these young people will be living in to be a self—confident, overlooking britain. the best friend and ally of
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our eu partners, but also a bridge which is out in the world, forming even closer ties with friends and allies right across the globe. we will learn together, collaborating in research, improve our understanding of the world. we will trade together, spreading opportunity and prosperity more widely. and we will stand together in support of shared values, which unites britain with many like—minded countries. where a thriving economy drives up living standards and whether prosperity which economic growth generates is more fairly shared in our society, we need education to be the key that unlocks the door to a better future. through education we can become a country where everyone,
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from every background made gains the skills they need to get a good job and live a happy and fulfilled life. to achieve that we must have an education system at all levels which serves the needs of every child. the experience many people young people have of our systems today, it is clear we do not have such a system today. imagine two children, currently in secondary school in thinking about their futures. one currently in secondary school in thinking about theirfutures. one is a working—class boy from here, in derby. he aspires to a career as a lawyer but he doesn't have a social network to draw on with any links to the profession and he doesn't know if someone like him can make it. the road he will have to take to achieve his dream is much more challenging than the one his counterpart who is privately educated will face. almost a quarter of the students come from the 7% of the population going to
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private school and the professions which draw recruits primarily from these institutions remain an representative of the country as a whole, skewed in favour of a particular social class. for a boy from a working—class home here in derby, the odds are stacked against him. asa derby, the odds are stacked against him. as a country we will all lose out when we do not make the most of everyone's alan and abilities. i imaginea everyone's alan and abilities. i imagine a second child, a girl from a middle—class background who is privately educated. her dream is to bea privately educated. her dream is to be a software developer and she wishes she could go straight into the industry but she faces another set of pressures which tell her that studying academic a—levels and making a ucas application to russell group universities what the world expects a fire. the idea that there might be another path, just as promising better suited to her individual hopes and dreams doesn't occur. in each case, the system is not working for the individual or
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for our country. pauljohnson of the iss to he wrote about the experiences his two sons had of leaving school. one, a naturalfit university found the application process simple and straightforward. the other, who wanted to pursue a technical course, found it much more difficult because everything points to university as the default. roughly half of young people go to university and roughly half do not. in 20 years since we introduced tuition public debate on tertiary education has been dominated by discussion of how we fund and support those who go to university and there has been nothing like the same attention paid to how we support the training and develop the skills of the young people who do not. most politicians, most journalists, most political commentators, took the academic group themselves and will expect their children to do the same. there remains a perception that going to
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university is really the only desirable route well going into training is something for other people's. if we're going to succeed in building a fairer society and a stronger economy, we need to throw away this outdated attitude for good and create a system of tertiary education that works for all our young people. that means equality of access to academic university education which is not dependent on background and it means a much greater focus on the technical alternatives as well. one of the great social achievements of the last half—century has been the transformation of an academic university education from something enjoyed most exclusively by a social elite, in something which is open to everyone. but making university truly accessible to young people from every background is not made easier by a funding system which leaves students from the lowest income households bearing the highest levels of debt, with many
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graduates left questioning the return they get for their investment. and for those young people who do not go on to academic study, the roots into further technical and vocational training today are hard to navigate. the standards across the sector are too varied and the funding available to support them is patchy. the uk's participation rate in advance technical education, teaching people skills that will be crucial for the future, is low by international standards. the latest annual figures show that fewer than 16,000 people completed higher qualifications through the further education system. that is compared to almost 350,000 undergraduate degrees which we re 350,000 undergraduate degrees which were awarded last year. this imbalance has an economic cost with some businesses finding it hard to recruit skilled workers they need. but it also has a social cost in wasted human potential which we, too often, ignore. so now is the time to
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ta ke often, ignore. so now is the time to take action, to create a system that is flexible enough to ensure that eve ryo ne is flexible enough to ensure that everyone gets the education that suits them and that is what the review, which i'm launching today, sets out to deliver. in so doing it will build on the enormous progress we have already made on raising standards in schools since 2010. the success of standards in schools since 2010. the su ccess of every standards in schools since 2010. the success of every young person, whatever they do want to do in life, is shaped by the education they receive at school and conservatives have put restoring rigour and high standards in our primary and secondary schools at the heart of our education reforms. we launched a major expansion of the academy programme, putting school teachers in charge of bringing greater specialism to the mix. i have welcomed this. that is why i put
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this in the conservative election ma nifesto this in the conservative election manifesto in 2001 as shadow education secretary. and now, free schools score some of the very highest results at gcse put up the range of reforms we put into place are leading to improved outcomes for young people. 1.9 million more children are being taught in schools that are good understanding. the attainment gap is shrinking at primary and secondary school and england is improving internationally. thejob is not yet done that we are making excellent progress and enormous credit is due to the teachers whose hard work has driven these improved outcomes. on top of the firm foundation of a great primary and secondary education and the reforms we are putting in place to introduce high—quality levels, we need to ensure that options open to young people as they move into adulthood are more diverse, that the routes into further education and training are clearer, and that all options are clearer, and that all options
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are fully accessible to everyone. that is why today launching a major and wide—ranging review in to post 18 education. the review will be supported by an expert panel and i am delighted that philip walker has agreed to chair the panel. it will focus on key questions. how we are sure that tertiary education is accessible for everyone from every background, how the funding system provides value for money for stu d e nts provides value for money for students and taxpayers, how we incentivise choice and competition across the sector and how we deliver the skills we need as a country. this is a review which, for the first time, looks at the whole post—18 education sector in the round, breaking down false boundaries between further and higher education, so we can create a system which is trulyjoined up. universities, many of which provide technical as well as academic courses, will be considered alongside college institutes of
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technology, and apprenticeship providers. there are huge success stories to be found right across the sector at every level. by taking a broad view, philip and his expert panel will be able to make recommendations to help the sector be better in the future. our universities are world leaders and jules in britain's round. 16 british universities are in the world's 104—macro are in the top ten. i want to know how we can build on that success and, at the same time, ensure that people from all backgrounds share the benefits of university study. so, the review will examine how we can give people from disadvantaged backgrounds and equal chance to succeed for the back includes how disadvantaged students and learners receive maintenance support were both from government and universities and colleges but the review will also look more widely and examine our own system of
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student funding. there are many aspects of the current system that works well. universities in england are better funded than they have been for a generation for the sharing the cost of university between taxpayers and a whole and the graduates who directly benefit from university study is a fair principle. it has enabled us to lift the cap on the number of places that was in effect a cap on aspirations and universities can expand and so broaden access. but i know that other aspects of the system are a cause for serious concern that not just for the students themselves but pa rents just for the students themselves but parents and grandparents as well. this is a concern i share will stop the competitive market between universities, which the system of variable tuition fees envisaged, has not emerged full stop all but a handful of universities charge the maximum possible fees for undergraduate courses. three—year courses remain the norm. the level of fees charged to not relate to the cost or quality of the course. so we now have one of the most expensive
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systems of university tuition in the world and we have already begun to ta ke world and we have already begun to take action to address some of these concerns we scrapped the increase in fees that was judiciary and we increased the amount graduates cannon before they start repaying their fees to cannon before they start repaying theirfees to £25,000. cannon before they start repaying their fees to £25,000. the review will look at the whole question of how students and graduates contribute to the cost of their studies, including the level terms and duration of their contribution. our goal is a funding system which provides value for money for graduates and taxpayers, so the principle that students as well as taxpayers should contribute to the cost of their studies is an important one. i believe, as do most people, including students, that those who benefit directly from higher education should contribute reputable to the cost of it when thatis reputable to the cost of it when that is only fair. the alternative, shifting the whole burden of universityjudicial onto the shoulders of taxpayers as a whole, would have three consequences.
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first, it would inevitably mean tax increases for the majority of people who did not go to university and who, on average, earn less than those who did. second it would mean our universities competing with schools and hospitals. as the sources which can in the past, meant they lost out, putting their international pre—eminence at risk, and third, it would mean the necessary introduction of a cap on numbers, with the treasury regulating the number of places an institution could offer and preventing the expansion which has driven wider access in recent years. and that is not my idea of a fair or progressive system. but philip and his colleagues will also look beyond universities, to examine choice and competition right across the sector and recommend practical solutions. this will build on reforms which are already in trained to increase the options available across further and higher education. over the last few yea rs, higher education. over the last few
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years, reforms to technical education have improved every aspect of the offer available to young people. we now have higher standards for apprenticeships vocational courses, t levels are on the way which will provide another alternative to a level. the new network will specialise in the advanced technical skills our economy needs. this review will now identify how we can help young people make more effective choices between these different options. that could include giving young people better guidance about the earning potential of differentjobs and what different qualifications are needed to get them so they can make more informed decisions about their futures. this make more informed decisions about theirfutures. this isn'tjust about young people. retraining throughout the course of your career, to change jobs or gain promotion will only become more necessary as new technologies have an impact on our economy. we need to support flexible, lifelong learning, including part—time and distance learning something which the current
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funding system does not always make easy. so, by focusing on these four key priorities, making tertiary education accessible to all, promoting choice and competition in the sector, delivering skills our economy needs are getting value for money for students and taxpayers that we can give every young person access to an education that suits skills and aspirations. one which opens up possibilities for the future and helps them into a rewarding career. almost 30 years ago, when i was in charge of that local education authority, an incoming conservative prime minister guy who like me went to a state school, said that the great task of the coming decade should be to make the coming decade should be to make the whole of this country are genuinely classless society. 18 months ago, when i became prime minister, i spoke of my desire to make britain a great meritocracy. today our ambition for the britain
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we will build outside be you must be just as great and it must be matched with a determination to turn that ambition into reality. because, by voting to leave the eu in 2016, millions of people across this country are not just millions of people across this country are notjust choosing to leave the european union and they we re leave the european union and they were sending a clear message about how society and economy works, or rather does not work in too many communities. if we are truly to make good on the instruction of the referendum, we need to reconnect eve ryo ne referendum, we need to reconnect everyone in our society to a sense of fairness and opportunity. we need to make britain a country where eve ryo ne to make britain a country where everyone can go as far as their pa nts everyone can go as far as their pants will take them and no one is held back by their background or class. —— as their cabinets. education is the key to opening up opportunities for everyone. the vision of britain we will build is about social and economic reform. that is by we aren't that is that is
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why we are building an education system to give people the skills they need to go as far as their hard work will take them it is why we support the market economy and back entrepreneurs and wealth creators but stepping on businesses do not play by the rules. it is why we are making the uk the very best place in the world to start and grow a hi—tech business while also making sure that new technologies work for eve ryo ne sure that new technologies work for everyone in society. if we get it right that we can build country that truly works for everyone, a country where your background is not define your future and class distinctions area thing your future and class distinctions are a thing of the past. where a boy from a working—class home can become a high court judge from a working—class home can become a high courtjudge thanks to a great state education and where rebel from a private school can start the softwa re a private school can start the software business with thanks to a first—class technical education. —— a girlfrom a first—class technical education. —— a girl from a private school. that is my vision of a society where
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good, rewarding work is available for everyone, and economy with the skills that needs to succeed. britain, as the great meritocracy, a country that respects hard work, rewards effort and industry, where a happy and fulfilled life is in everyone's rasp. thank you. we are staying with this. we are expecting questions to be given to the prime minister. i will take a few questions from the media. do i see tom from sky? prime minister, the education secretary up till a couple of weeks ago has said what is needed here is action rather than a review. in that speech eu said there needs to be action as well. why can't you commit to reducing interest rates on debts now and reinstating maintenance grants? we have already
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taken action. we have raised the threshold, the point at which people start to pay back, and we took action to freeze the level of fees. this is about more than just the finances. yes, it is looking at thoseissues finances. yes, it is looking at those issues of finance and funding but it is also looking at how we can ensure that the whole system provides an education that is right for every young person. so, for those for whom university is right, the structure is there for them to be able to go to university but also for those who want to pursue other avenues that those other avenues are available as well. the review will bea available as well. the review will be a year—long review. it will cover a lot of ground in that year. but we need to make sure we get this right because what we are doing here is building a system for the future. thank you. laura... you say you are standing by the principle that students and taxpayers should both contribute but are you willing to
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say that potentially tax payers should contribute more towards students education? if not, went to this reviewjust be looking at moving money around in a system that you yourself says would become too expensive? it is important that both stu d e nts expensive? it is important that both students and taxpayers contribute it is important that students contribute. if you think about it, as the secretary of state said at the weekend but you have to agree groups of people, those who go to university and benefit from it and those who do not. we think those who benefit from going to university should contribute to that. what the review will do is to look at that, ensuring the system is fair to stu d e nts ensuring the system is fair to students and taxpayers, and ensuring that it students and taxpayers, and ensuring thatitis students and taxpayers, and ensuring that it is a system that is genuinely open to people from whatever their background. but, as i say, it is notjust about the issues of finance, it is also about making sure that the system we have for post—18 education provides for every
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aspect of that education and provides young people with the route thatis provides young people with the route that is right for them. sadly, for too long in this country, it is the case that an academic education through university has been seen as the route for everyone. for many it is absolutely right to go down that route. for those whom it is not the right route, we need to make sure there is equal opportunity and equal value given to the technical education route that we want them to have. now i think the derby telegraph is here. derby has been made an education opportunity area, as you are well aware. one of the main reasons behind that is social mobility factors and the fact that youngsters cannot access, as has been mentioned, a university. i am concerned, going back to the question asked by sky, what happened to the youngsters in an education
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opportunity area which is finite and the review will not be completed and enacted. i'm concerned at what happens to be youngsters in between, the youngsters who are there waiting to go to university now.|j the youngsters who are there waiting to go to university now. i would encourage all those who are thinking of going to university, for whom thatis of going to university, for whom that is the right thing to do, to make that application, to go to university and make sure you get that education. of course, what we have done as we have already taken steps in relation to the financing system for university education but there are other things we have been doing as well. we created the opportunity area and that is a recognition by the government there are certain parts of the country where we need to put in extra effort in order to ensure we are genuinely seeing the quality of education that young people deserve but also seeing young people deserve but also seeing young people deserve but also seeing young people able to make the most of that and see the opportunities available to them. i was interested in talking to mandy about what derby
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couege in talking to mandy about what derby college here does and how it works with the schools locally but also how it is working with employers locally, to ensure there is a range of opportunities available for young people here today. so, the review will be looking at the future system but there are many things we have done today to improve the opportunities for young people here. there is more for us to do and we will do it. i think the times higher education supplement is here. simon... in the last couple of years we have virtually reached tony blair 's 296 we have virtually reached tony blair 's 2% participation target for higher education. some rapidly developing countries in the world like south korea and canada have more than 50%. why are you signalling that you think too many people are going to university question what do you think should be the ideal target for how many people should go to university? that is the wrong way of doing it. it is not about having a target, it is about
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saying that for every young person, what i say is, for too long, i think we see young people... i was talking toa group we see young people... i was talking to a group of sixth form students in southall this morning was one point they made to me, for example, as they made to me, for example, as they have gone through school, university has been talked about all the time that thing they should be doing. they only heard about apprenticeships towards the tail end of 2013, which is too late that it is about ensuring that the routes are available, opportunities are available, but also young people are able to make the choice that suits them in suits their needs. are you concerned the increase in tuition fees has also seen a huge increase in vice chancellor pay? one for the audience, that one. can i ask, are you concerned about the proposed melrose takeover of gkn and
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potential break—up of the british engineering giant? first of all, on theissue engineering giant? first of all, on the issue of vice chancellors pay, i think one of the points i make, that has also been made, we should be concerned when we see vice chancellors sitting on remuneration committees which are determining their pay. on the gkn melrose issue, we are watching this, monitoring this, with careful to the secretary of state for business, greg clark, has spoken to both of the companies involved. as i said in the house of commons when i was asked about this, we will always act in the national interest. i will take one last question. there have been a number of concerning allegations made about labour leaderjeremy of concerning allegations made about labour leader jeremy corbyn over the past week, including one by the czech spy who claimed he was on their payroll during the cold war. do you believe he needs to answer questions over this and do you agree
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with your defence secretary and other ministers that mr corbyn should give permission for the file held on him to be released as soon as possible so the public can know the truth? i think it is for individual members of parliament to be accountable for actions in the past but also i think, where there are allegations of this sort remembers the parliament should be prepared to be open and transparent. thank you. so, the prime minister announcing a much heralded review of higher education and tuition fees. so, we have just higher education and tuition fees. so, we havejust had higher education and tuition fees. so, we have just had from higher education and tuition fees. so, we havejust had from liverpool crown court, the sentencing of the paedophile barry bennell. he has been sentenced to 31 years. some of his victims in court to face him as that sentencing took place. as he worked for manchester city and crewe
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alexandra, he carried out 50 counts of child sexual abuse against 12 boys aged between eight to 15. this is all happening between 1979 and 1991. just before he was sentenced, one of his victims by gary clift, who was abused by bennell hundreds of times, confronted him in the dock and asked him simply, why? another victim said, bennell looked, and took the any childhood he had. another victim remained impassive —— he remained impassive and staring at the floor as further victim state m e nts the floor as further victim statements were read. several victims had appeared through video link. one statement from abused at the age of 12 saying, i did not want ido the age of 12 saying, i did not want i do not ask it, that monster decided it was fun to use me as a toy. barry bennell, sentence for 31 yea rs toy. barry bennell, sentence for 31 years injailat
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toy. barry bennell, sentence for 31 years in jail at liverpool crown court. the latest from our correspondent when we return in a couple of moments. first, we will catch up the weather forecast. it is a misty, murky and mild monday for this picture behind me comes from a weather watcher in east sussex, showing the extent of mist and fog we had a rant this morning which is slowly breaking up and lifting. this afternoon they could be the brightest spell, particularly in the west of the country after the mild start this week, things will turn colder and drier over the next few days let's take a look at what is happening here and now. we have this frontal system across the country got a warm front in the east and the cold front in the west. between the two an area of mild air. the yellow is with us at the moment and the blue colours will take over later in the week. the areas most likely to see the rain are on the east coast of england when the band of rain sweeps in from the north and west.
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both bands of rain will edgeways from the south and east. most of us will be frost free tonight. clearer skies and a fresh start to the day. what about shoes their question it looks like we'll keep that front which will bring us some rain in the south—east of england and east anglia. for the rest of the country not a bad day tomorrow. they should be some brightness returning to scotla nd be some brightness returning to scotland and northern ireland is well that at temperatures up around ten, 12 degrees in most places but cooler around the east coast. we should see colder conditions working in as we head towards the middle of the week was heading into tuesday night and early wednesday morning, we could see temperatures dip close to freezing, perhaps below freezing. not quite as cold in england and wales where there will be low cloud, mist and fog. wednesday starts off largely dry and finds of the belt below cloud of mist and fog patches particularly across parts of england and wales which will slowly break up
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and wales which will slowly break up a bit during the day. a lot of dry weather. not wall—to—wall sunshine but there will be brighter spells. the notice that temperatures not as mild as recent days. towards the end of the week high pressure will dominate our weather. keeping things largely dry, we'll startjaw in his daily winter around a area of high pressure. here is the outlook over the next couple of days, a lot of dry pressure that temperatures starting to dip down. goodbye for now. “— starting to dip down. goodbye for now. —— high pressure but temperatures. hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy.
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today at 3: barry bennell is sentenced to 31 yea rs barry bennell is sentenced to 31 years injailfor abusing barry bennell is sentenced to 31 years in jail for abusing 12 barry bennell is sentenced to 31 years injailfor abusing 12 young footballers. some of his victims tell him face—to—face what effect his crimes have had on them. the prime minister launches a review of university tuition fees in england, admitting it's "one of the most expensive systems in the world". to give them the skills they need to succeed, we need an education and training system which is more flexible and more diverse than it is today. a man thought to be one of britain's most prolific paedophiles, matthew falder, has been jailed for 32 years after admitting 137 offences. oxfam reveals that three of the men accused of sexual misconduct in haiti, physically threatened witnesses during a 2011 investigation. also coming up, the sport. the latest from jeong jang? that's right. it came down to the
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wire for the women's curling team, who beat switzerland. it was a dead heat at the bobsleigh. also coming up, the weather. it isa also coming up, the weather. it is a fairly cloudy, murky day. mild out there. but we are sad to see those temperatures dropping later this week. details in half an hour. the big winner at the baftas — ladies in black. the colour on the red carpet as the stars came out in support of the #metoo movement. but for the best actress a need to address the dress issue. i have a little trouble with compliance. hello everyone. this is afternoon
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live. i'm simon mccoy. former football coach barry bennell has been sentenced to 31 years in prison for a historic sexual assaults committed on 12 young boys in his care. committed on 12 young boys in his ca re. let's committed on 12 young boys in his care. let's go to liverpool crown court. danny savage has been covering this case. yes, in the last few minutes the sentencing hearing finished. it was in two parts between midday and one o'clock this afternoon. we heard the victim impact statements from the 12 men this case centred on. they talked of how barry bennell‘s abuse of them as a child had led to the long—term effects in their lives, psychological problems, some of them contemplating suicide. one man only told his parents two years ago that he was abused as a boy. his father
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said, "i'm sorry, i should he was abused as a boy. his father said, "i'm sorry, ishould have he was abused as a boy. his father said, "i'm sorry, i should have been a better dad." that broke the victim's hard, he said. what we have had this afternoon is the judge delivering his sentencing thoughts and sending barry bennell down for 31 yea rs. and sending barry bennell down for 31 years. this is a man who has already served several prison sentences, one in the us and two in the uk. he spent ten and a half yea rs of the uk. he spent ten and a half years of his life in prison are ready for similar offences. he will now go to prison for 31 years body could get that within half of that. it isa could get that within half of that. it is a very long sentence for some serious crimes. thejudge it is a very long sentence for some serious crimes. the judge said to him, "to those boys you appeared as a god. in reality you were the develin carded. you have stolen their childhood and their innocence." he said that barry bennell was sheer evil. other comments while that, "you couldn't have cared comments while that, "you couldn't have ca red less comments while that, "you couldn't have cared less as you got your
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sexual gratification. the risk of detection did not concern you. if the boys tried to resist you, you convinced them their football careers would suffer. " that is the feeling you got from listening to the men's account. there were boys at the time. barry bennell was very controlling, exploiting them and telling them that if they didn't do what he wanted them to do, and keep quiet about it, it will affect their football careers. they were dreaming ofa football careers. they were dreaming of a world in football. those dreams turned into a nightmare because these were just sample charges. the 50 charges for samples of what could have been many hundreds of actual individual cases of abuse that barry bennell carried out on these dozen boys that he has been sentenced for today. here at liverpool crown court we are likely to hear in the next half an hour from some of those victims. they will give their thoughts on seeing their abuser jailed for more than three decades. danny savage at liverpool crown
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court. a little later we will be returning because we are awaiting some of those witnesses, who had faced barry bennell face—to—face some of those witnesses, who had faced barry bennellface—to—face in court. we are expecting to hear from them outside court. the prime minister has set out plans for a year long review of higher education, saying it should be flexible enough to ensure everone "gets the education that suits them". theresa may said the review would focus on four areas, ensuring access for everyone, the funding system, incentivising choice, and how to get the right skills for the country. and she said it was only fair that students themselves should make a contribution towards their degree. our education correspondent, elaine dunkley, was watching that speech closely, and joins me now. was there anything new in what she had to say? there was nothing new. they will be looking at this issue for more than a year and coming up with suggestions. graduates are leaving university with £50,000 worth of debt. student loans, they
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are paying back 6.1%. before they have even left university, they have racked up £5,000 in interest charges. maintenance grants were scrapped and replaced with loans. this government believes if you go to university you should contribute something. but also admits that getting a university education in england is one of the most expensive in the world. theresa may hasjust said education should be an opportunity for everybody and promised a review looking at a variety of issues. the competitive market between universities which the system of variable tuition fees envisaged have simply not emerged. all but a handful of universities charge the maximum possible fees for undergraduate courses. three—year courses remain the norm. the level of fees charged do not relate to the cost and quality of the course. we now have more than the most expensive systems of university tuition in the world. we have already begun to take action to address some of these concerns. we
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scrapped the increasing fees that was due this year. we have increased the amount graduates can earn before they start repaying their fees, to £25,000. the review will now look at the whole question of how students and graduates contribute to the cost of their studies, and graduates contribute to the cost of theirstudies, including and graduates contribute to the cost of their studies, including the level, terms and duration of their contribution. our goal is a funding system that provides value for money for graduates and taxpayers, so the principle that students and taxpayers should contribute to the cost of their studies is an important one. i believe, as do most people, including students, that those who benefit directly from higher education should contribute directly towards the cost of it. that is only fair. one of the key issues that has been floated around today is this idea of variable tuition fees. those courses that are cheaper to deliver where you have less likelihood of getting a well—paid job at the end, should
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be cheaper. art and social science, for example. this has caused critics to say that that just means poorer students will go for cheaper courses, which will be valued as less in the labour market, they will be paid less, and relatively speaking the poorest of students will end speaking the poorest of students willend up speaking the poorest of students will end up paying more money for their education. labour said what they would do is bring back the maintenance grants. jeremy corbyn was also very popular with younger vote rs was also very popular with younger voters when he said they would scrap tuition fees altogether. there is no suggestion the government would follow that approach of scrapping tuition fees. the government will be conducting this review for a year. we're not sure what will come out of it. one thing that is key is that they look at a range of measures. elaine, thank you. in a moment we will talk to angela rayner from the labour party. first, mark smith. vice—chancellor of lancaster university. a review, is that the way forward? it looks as though with
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the political situation in review is necessary. there are a lot of issues a review can deal with. while stability is something that we would really like, given the politically charged nature of the funding of higher education, i think a review is one way of looking at it. there are many questions which the review can deal with. we heard about the level of the fee. one thing that needs to be very carefully remembered is that in the reforms that happened in 2012, won the £9,000 fees were developed, it was effectively a change whereby universities thereby had to look after themselves. capital grants we re after themselves. capital grants were scrapped at the same time, and they helped universities to run. that £9,000 was meant to be a cap. not a target. that is right. it was originally meant to be a cap. if you
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look at the latest data, if you take all of the courses across the english sector and look at what they are running out, the sector as a whole runs at a very small surplus of between 1% and 2% on its home undergraduate teaching. so therefore, the £9,000 fee is about covering the cost. so although it was originally envisaged at that time, because of the other costs lumped onto universities to find that tuition fee, it is just about sustainable. what has gone wrong here? was tony blair wrong to say that 50% of the population should go to university? was the longest universities started paying vice—chancellor is like yourself £250,000 a year? where having problems, growing? £250,000 a year? where having problems, growing ?|j £250,000 a year? where having problems, growing? ithink were £250,000 a year? where having problems, growing? i think were the key problems have come in is not understanding the level that needed to be paid, because it is so exposed now as a feed, i think it is
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therefore clear in students' mind what they are paying. if you go back, historically, £9,000 was not a high level for a unit of resorts. you have to change through inflation. in the past, going back to the 805, there were higher units of resource. lower levels came in and buildings began to fall into disrepair. more resorts did need to be kicked back. at the moment, engli5h universities are in a pretty good state. if you look at their buildings, if you look at their programmes and the resources they are offering 5tudents, programmes and the resources they are offering students, they are world class. if that is the sort of system we want, we need to keep the level of resource at that level. it has become much more exposed. the split between the taxpayer and student, the fact that student borrows the money upfront and has a strange repayment system on that the
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current system, means the taxpayer subsidy is not seen until 30 years down the line. that is a difficult thing to explain to anybody. would you welcome the return of maintenance grants? would it make the system fairer? absolutely. one of the things the prime minister highlighted i5 of the things the prime minister highlighted is because of the change from the ground to a loan, the thing thatis from the ground to a loan, the thing that is most perverse in this system is the students from the poorest backgrounds come out with the largest debt. that cannot be right. one other point which has not been mentioned. one of the big changes that happened during the 2012 reform5 i5 that happened during the 2012 reform5 is the very significant change and falling away of part—time mature students from higher education. that is linked to the fee 5y5tem. education. that is linked to the fee system. i very much hope that this review will get to grips with what has caused that change try to addre55 has caused that change try to address it. some people may raise an eyebrow at the idea you should pay le55 eyebrow at the idea you should pay less for certain cour5e5, perhaps in
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the arts, and also you should pay according to which university you go to. i wonder how you work out some on's career prospects if they get an a rt5 on's career prospects if they get an arts degree at oxford and a science degree at a former technical college, where you strike the balance? what should happen there? one of the things that has been floated in the press leading up to todayi5 floated in the press leading up to today is variable fees. they have looked at three elements that make up looked at three elements that make up the fee. the cost of because, what benefit it has to society and what benefit it has to society and what economic benefit it has to the individual. that is a very difficult to present a balanced. it will be student by student dependent. so the danger here is they will reduce things to a few crude metrics, which don't really communicate the real value of that course. i will be very interested to see how the review gets to grips with what is a tricky i55ue. mark smith, thank you. joining me now is labour mp angela rayner, shadow secretary for education. your reaction to what there5a may
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has announced ? your reaction to what there5a may has announced? good afternoon. today i saw has announced? good afternoon. today isawa has announced? good afternoon. today i saw a prime minister announce that the conservative party has managed a cri5i5 the conservative party has managed a crisis situation in education for the past eight years. they have cut funding to further education, adult learning, triple—dip tuition fees, removed maintenance allowance and support for and they hiked up intere5t support for and they hiked up interest rates on those loans. they have created this mess and kick the can down the road and said they would have a review. it is not good enough. the government hasn't tripled tuition fees. the universities themselves decide where they set that level. where the prime minister suggests there needs to be a balance between... do you agree with that? there5a may 5aid tuition fees didn't ri5e last year. that was because of the labour party. we won
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the vote in the house of commons because we felt it was unsustainable that the conservatives had allowed tuition fees to rise to the levels they have. i believe students to contribute to student finance. they do that when they go into the jobs market and everybody contributes to that. any people of my age, 37 and above, they had the opportunity to go to university without being hiked with thousands of pounds of debt. this must stop. our economy needs tho5e this must stop. our economy needs those skills for the future. if you build an economy that works and makes sure that everybody gets tho5e opportunities, the taxes will come in. it is for corporations to pay theirfair in. it is for corporations to pay their fair share in. it is for corporations to pay theirfair share as well. in. it is for corporations to pay their fair share as well. they make ma55ive profits on the backs of the workers who are skilled. so we have 5aid workers who are skilled. so we have said that corporations should pay more. and at the moment the conservatives have reduced corporation tax. we will put that one into funding a truly lifelong learning, national education service we re learning, national education service were students are not leaving
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university with £57,000 worth of debt. free at the cost of delivery. at what cost, totally? 9.5 billion for the reversal of tuition fees, to make sure students don't have to pay at any more. that is how much the student loa n5 company at any more. that is how much the student loans company gets at the moment. 1.7 on maintenance grants. we will put money back into adult education. we have said we will deliver and make sure the packages are there. we have said we will pay for that by reversing the per verse corporation tax cuts that this government has given. you are the shadow education secretary. how you pay for it is something you will have to face it ever you are in government and these decisions have to be taken. but in terms of higher education in england over 18 ‘s, to be taken. but in terms of higher education in england over 18 '5, you would scrap every fee? we have said we would scrap upfront tuition fees because we think that is the correct thing to do. we would directly
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funded. we would give to universities the money they currently get through the student loan5 currently get through the student loa n5 company, currently get through the student loan5 company, so we can make sure that students are not worrying about the debt they are racking up, they are not worry about intere5t the debt they are racking up, they are not worry about interest rates, and that they are concentrating on their studies. that's the right thing to do. at what level do you set maintenance grants? we said we would set them at the level that is required. we used the figures off when they were taken away in the first place. that is where we came up first place. that is where we came up with1.7 first place. that is where we came up with 1.7 billion. we would make sure students are given the funds they currently need. student numbers are dropping off a significant rate5 because they cannot continuing education. unfortunately, there5a may has had absolutely nothing to say on that today. she talked about further education and technical training, and once again there was nothing 5aid training, and once again there was nothing said about the devastating cuts that have happened in that area. if you want to talk about
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social mobility, the loss of sure start centres, the crisis in children's services and the cuts to our schools is making it impossible for many people to even consider going on to further and higher education because funding in the early yea r5 i5 education because funding in the early years is not there either. education because funding in the early years is not there eitherlj wonder if you find yourself in a 5lightly difficult position in terms of credibility. you regretjeremy corbyn saying, i will deal with those already burdened with student debt? a promise that is now clearly not the case. he never actually said that. he said he wanted to look at this issue of student debt. the problem is, this government has racked up student debt to an astronomical level. we cannot continue at the level we are out. every single year this government rights between £6 billion and £7 billion. it is treasury trickery and we need to stop it. we need to put the economy first, get the skilled workers we need going forward. we have a crisis in our nhs because we
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don't have the nurses and the doctors coming through. we have a crisis in our schools because we don't have the teachers coming through. and we have a crisis in the likes of engineering because we don't have the skills for our economy. yet the government announcements of a review would not deal with those issues we face today. angela rayner, thank you. thank you. you are watching afternoon light. a paedophile, described as one of britain's worst offenders, has been jailed for 32 years for sexual offences against children. matthew falder pleaded guilty to 137 charges, including encouraging the rape of a minor — and blackmailing his victims into sending him obscene footage of themselves carrying out degrading acts. the operation to catch falder included law enforcement agencies across the world. us homeland security described him as "the worst child exploitation offender" it had ever seen on the internet. sima kotecha reports from birmingham. so, what is it i've done? what is it i'm supposed to have done? dr matthew falder being arrested at his workplace last year.
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the 29 year old spent years posing as a female artist online to trick his victims into sending him naked pictures of themselves. sounds like the rap sheet from hell! distributing indecent images of children. he then researched their profiles on social media and used that information to blackmail them into sending him more images. he even installed secret cameras in people's home. falder contacted more than 300 people worldwide, offering them money in exchange for photos. his youngest victim was just 13. one of his victims told us she can no longer trust anybody. i didn't want stay at home because he knew where i lived. i couldn't concentrate on anything. i couldn't talk to my family. i felt like i was ashamed of what i was doing. i didn't want to go out onto the street because he might be there. i didn't feel safe anywhere. last year, he pleaded guilty to 137 charges, including encouraging
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the rape of a child and possessing a paedophile manual. you've got a victim — you might have ad e—mail contact, that's it. so, it's a really tricky starting point. and what you've then got is people like him, who are using all the tools in the tool box that are available to him to stay hidden. falder was under surveillance for several months during a four—year investigation. the cambridge graduate was then identified by the national crime agency. for the first time, it worked with partner agencies across the world, such as the fbi, the australian federal police and europol, to find the man who was behind the messages. there were contacts made with people in slovenia, australia, there were victims in the united states and there were victims all over england and wales and scotland. and we then had to try and piece together information across many different police forces. falder lived in these block of flats.
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he worked at birmingham university. now, officers say his motivation was power and control. he wanted his victims to feel embarrassed and humiliated, and he was confident he could outwit the authorities. he reached out to vulnerable people seeking work on websites such as gumtree, with the intention of manipulating them. he used names such as 666devil and evil mind on the dark net to communicate with other paedophiles. on the dark net, he wrote about one of his victims, saying, "to be honest, i'm thinking that based on how in love and mentally struggling she seems to be, then i should be able to get some good nudes from her willingly. i'm not sure if i care if she lives or dies, to be honest". in court, the paedophile showed no remorse. thejudge told him, "you wanted to assume total control over your victims. you were cruel and manipulative." britons are eating more than half
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as many calories than they admit to, according to figures from the national office for statistics. comparing a biological test to measure calorie intake with what people said on questionnaires, they found that the average person in britain is exceeding official health recommendations by the equivalent of a cheeseburger a day. the data comes as public health england prepares to launch a new calorie—counting campaign, in order to try to tackle the obesity crisis. the chairman of the national obesity forum, tam fry, joins me now. if that is right, a cheeseburger a day, service mean nothing? they are full of holes. basically you're cheeseburger is the difference between what the department of health says you are entitled to in
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allowa nce health says you are entitled to in allowance on a daily basis, and what they would now want you to eat on a daily basis. the differences such that it will not work, in my view. are we talking about people who, if they were asked what they had to eat, they would forget some of the things, the chocolate bar that would throw these figures into complete chaos anyway? absolutely. unless you ate processed food, which is god the clear calorie count on it, unless you did your own cooking, which is sadly in disarray at the moment, you don't have a hope in hell, unless you have a permanent calculator every minute of every day and you just put in the figures. even then you probably would get it wrong. the figures for men and women are similarly hoedt, are they? yes, the figures were changed about six yea rs the figures were changed about six years ago. it was seen that men and women were consuming less than they
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should for the current obesity problem. so the department of health opted —— increased it. women went and 500 calories more, as did men. that was probably too much. we have to bring it back down. but not to the extent they are trying to do it now. the department of health is not happy with you for saying this? no, they are not at all happy. it is a ruff and ready calculation. they don't want to be reminded of how rough and ready it is. at best it is informed opinion, at worst, fingering the wind. most people will say we'd lead busy lives, i know what i eat every day, i know if it is too much because the scale sta nley is too much because the scale stanley at the end of the week. really this is nanny state going mad? it is, i'm afraid, a panic measure from the nanny state. the department of health is absolutely determined to bring the calories down on a daily basis because they know if you eat those calories and
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you don't burn them off, they stay with you. that has been happening sequentially year after year after year. now they are saying, bring it all down to 1600 calories a day, instead of what we said you could have in an attempt to do that. you have in an attempt to do that. you have the odd one e—mail from the department of health already. you will get another one.|j department of health already. you will get another one. i sure will! thank you very much. it's emerged that three of the oxfam employees accused of sexual misconduct in haiti physically threatened witnesses during a 2011 investigation. the charity has published an internal report which said more it's emerged that three of the oxfam employees accused of sexual but despite the warnings, several men linked to the alleged abuse did subsequently take up roles at other charitable organisations. conservative mp pauline latham sits on the house of commons committee that will question the head of oxfam and seniorfigures that will question the head of oxfam and senior figures from the aid of charity sector. what will you be asking the charity heads when you question them? i think we are all going to want to talk to him about
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what procedures have been put in place and how on earth this happened, that they could carry on and not be prosecuted. that is the fundamental thing. men who abuse women should be prosecuted. i'mjust wondering your reaction so far to what you have read, what you have seen what you have read, what you have seen about what has been alleged?m is shocking. two years ago i raised it with the secretary of state international development. i asked her to set up register for people who had been abusing women, and international register, so that we could keep track of these people because it did seem even then that men, and it is predominantly men, we re men, and it is predominantly men, were able to leave one charity and go to another without anybody saying anything. i don't know if they have references. but if they did, what is the value of a reference in this day and age if you can get away with that. but many of them left with out
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any process completed to investigate. if they can do that, they can get away with murder. i think we need this international register. if you have been accused, and you have been found out as a perpetrator of sexual abuse of women and young girls, you should no longer be able to operate in this sector because they are very often the most vulnerable people in the world who have been through shocking, shocking things. and they need help. they do not need this. perhaps we need to be slightly more careful with our language. in terms of the reports suggesting intimidation of witnesses in 2011... sorry, i can't hear you. the report that says there was intimidation of witnesses. what action needs to be taken there? witnesses. what action needs to be ta ken there? these witnesses. what action needs to be taken there? these people are not the sort of people anybody should be
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employing. that is why we need the international register. clearly oxfa m international register. clearly oxfam have not got the right procedures in place. it is probably the same with many other charities as well. obviously the vast majority of people working in the aid sector are good, trustworthy people doing it for the right reasons. but you have got these bad apples who really need finding out and getting rid of, so that women and girls, particularly women and girls, maybe some boys as well, need to know that they are safe. if they come through a traumatic fleeing their country or their village, they need to know the aid agencies who were there to help will actually help them and that they won't be having to beg for food and have to give the six as a reward. —— sex. reward. -- sex. the message to dfid is what? i think penny mordaunt has been very strong. she has only been in thejob a few weeks. it is difficult to get
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a few weeks. it is difficult to get a grip of everything but she has got a grip of everything but she has got a grip of this and calling for a much stronger measures she says charities who do have perpetrator is within their ranks will no longer get money from dfid. that is absolutely right. i do applaud her for the measures she has taken. and actually priti patel before her had tried to do this. the trouble was there were civil servants who thought it was too difficult to do and they put it in the too difficult to do box and left it there. thank you. we are hearing from liverpool crown court. no fens is long enough for that man. he didn't show any remorgues or said sorry to anyone. i will leave it to the rest of the quys will leave it to the rest of the guys because those guys up there will speak to you, i am proud i did speak out. and if i hadn't have done we won't be stood here today. i am just proud i did it. thank you any
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way. that was andy woodward, one of the first you may remember to go on the victoria derbyshire programme, to, to tell what had happened to him and starting that whole process, which ended today in liverpool crown court with a sentence of 31 years for barry bennell for various sexual assault charges. if anything happens we will take you back there. let us move on to the united states. stu d e nts students survivors announced plans for a national march on washington to urge congress to take action on gun control. pupils led protests over the weekend where survivor emma gonzalez singled out the president. there has been one tweet i would like to call attention to. so many signs that the florida shooter was
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mentally disturbed. even expelled for bad behaviour, neighbours and classmates knew he was a big problem, we reported it. time and time again. since he was in middle school. it was no surprise to anyone who knew him, to hear that he was the shooter. those talking about how we should have not ostracised him, you didn't know this kid. ok, we did. we know that they are claiming that there are mental health issues and i am not a psychologist but we need to pay attention to the fact that isn't just a mental health issue, he wouldn't have harmed that many stu d e nts wouldn't have harmed that many students with a knife. let us go to our correspondent who joins me from washington. this national school walk out. is there growing support for it? it is incredibly powerful stuff when you watch things like that, there is a
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lot of activity among students, fanning out from that school of course. we are expecting some sort of action at the white house today with students there, there is the national or a walk planned in washington, next month, we don't know how many people will attend that obviously, but that is gathering momentum too. of course all this going on while florida is still grieving, we have two more funerals there today. let me tell you that 15—year—old luke hoya will be buried today and elena petty. there is some legislative movement, a bit of cross partisan bipartisan effort to improve the background checks on people who want to buy gun, it is modest to be honest. it's a law that say, let's make the law work as it should do at the moment. president trump says he supports
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that, we have been here before with something as modest as that and it has run into the sand. i wouldn't hold your breath on that. any sup fort for gun control would be surprising from it seems many of those in government, in the united states. yes, this bill they are lending their support to at the moment, it really does just ensure that the current law is enforced, so it doesn't really go beyond the legislation, the statute book as it stands, it says the current law isn't being properly enforced, let us make sure it happens. you are meant to report certain individuals, who are convicted of certain crimes, to this register so they can't pass a background check, that hases in some case, not in others. there was a shooting before charisma where a church shooting where a man shouldn't have been allowed to buy a gun because of a conviction he had,
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and was able to do so, because the background check didn't throw up that conviction, because it hadn't been reported to the register, so, it is very small steps at this stage, talk of banning assault weapons, talk of these bump stocks that turn semi automatic weapons into automama tick rifle, that will be harder to do. thank you very much. —— automatic. time for the sport. we go over to holly. there has been drama in the bobsleigh. think about when we are watching these high speed events it can appear very very close, sometimes just a fraction of a second in it but when do we ever see a dead heat? take a look at this. canada's team clocked a team of ebskedét% after ebskedét%
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;: ier feu as ebskedét% ;: zer feu as the g; there. making l g; there. making it a dead german pair there. making it a dead heat. that means they are going to have to share the title, which is the first time that that has happened in 20 year, what a race though and you can see want it meant to them. especially with the germans who thought they would miss out on the gold. it was an incredible race. a nail biter. it warms your hearts. lots of brits in play. women's curlers as well. we have a medal. not quite just yet. just like a well thrown stone it is both the men and women's curlers who are slowly edging towards the semifinals, so after the men had their victim over denmark it came down to the women and again, a nail biter there. a to psy—tu rvy and again, a nail biter there. a topsy—turvy match, both teams found themselves on top throughout, but in themselves on top throughout, but in the end it came down to a battle of the end it came down to a battle of the skips. eve muirhead keeping
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herself cool under pressure again, with two stones in this tent to put britain on tom top. that puts them injoint fourth place britain on tom top. that puts them in joint fourth place in the standings. but we will have more sta rldjngs. but mfllhaalejiidle in the of so crossed. coupleiof day:sfi'fifigers—crossedy: “55” barry children, now we are when we were children. new we are e when we were children. new we an; e we when we were ehileren. new we ere e we did when we were ehileren. new we ere e we 55.75.33; . in . , _ efter yeu bennelt;nowweere in é.— efter yeu bennelt;nowweere in he ifany more " prison due to us. if any more survivors wish to cop forward and unlock the suffering, —— come forward. please do so, the hurt is not yours to carry, it is his.
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i would like to say a heartfelt thank you to my wife emma. all my family, friends, staffordshire police, who i work for, cheshire police, who i work for, cheshire police for the investigation, and support, also to all the survives who have now come forward, who are very brave and special people. thank you. my name is makingy fallon. we welcome the sentence that the judge has handed ff: —— welcome the sentence that the judge has handed j; —— micky. it -~~~uzd i; ’211 ‘aa—ij-j—z ,—i~;~4 ll that. has -~~~uzd i; ’211 ‘aa—ij-j—z ,—i~;~4 ll that i has put through our lives. also the distress he has put us through every day of this trial. today marks an month milestone. we can now move on o today marks an month milestone. we can now move on o with our live, safe in the knowledge that our abuser is locked away and can no longer cause us any harm. today, we
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looked evil in the face. and we smiled because barry bennell, we have won. today, we hand our shame and our guilt, and our sadness back to you. it should never have been ours in first place. tomorrow we go united injustice with a first place. tomorrow we go united in justice with a growing army of survivors. through organisations like the offside trust we will make to make sure children are safe in sport. the sentence sends a sure children are safe in sport. the sentence sends a message sure children are safe in sport. the sentence sends a message to those who abuse children and those who cover it up. the world has changed. truth, now has a voice. and it will be accountable and punished accordingly, thankfully the judicial system has acknowledged his crimes and the sentence recognises his
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unrelenting depravety. the police, cps, jury and now the judge, have all recognised the truth. we thank them for that. throughout this trial, bennell has shown not one ounce of remorse, not one shred of decency, he is calculated, devious and scheming, he was then and he is now. he he has finally been held to account for his horrific crimes against children. to anyone else suffering in silence we say please tell someone, anyone. it lot be the first day of the rest of your life. and every person that speaks out, makes it more difficult for predators to succeed in the future. we will now continue to focus on supporting survivors through the work of the offside trust and making sure that the outpouring of support and solidarity of the last few days materialises into practical steps to try and
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prevent this happening again. people hold positions of trust, sports coach, teachers or km/h give, they have a responsibility to safeguard the children in their care. the abuse of that trust is a crime, against one of the most fundamental tennents of society, the protection of innocent children. finally i would like to say the public and the media for your sensitivity and for the overwhelming kindness and support we have received from every corner of the world. this is a testament to the belief that love will always conquer evil. thank you. chris unsworth the last of those to speak there. a moment when the victims of barry bennell say they can now move on. he was described barry bennell as the devil incarnate
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by thejudge. he barry bennell as the devil incarnate by the judge. he was convicted of abusing 12 boys aged the between eight and 15, between 1979 and 1991 and jailed today, for 31 years. a message there from chris unsworth to any of those watching who may have themselves been victims of barry bennell who have no come forward. he said come forward, tell your story, and you will this then be able to get on with your lives. more reaction from liverpool crown court later. a among the things considered is how much students will pay for tuition. fees are a max ofjust over £9,000. matt cole has been working with the reality check team. talk us through the current landscape. yes, the current system for england arrived in 2012. you might remember the rioting round weapons of mass destruction that accompanied it.
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universities were allowed to charge up universities were allowed to charge up to £9,000 a year and pretty much all did for every subject. if we look at this graph, apart from a blip in 2011, you will see as the graph goes up there a blip after 2011, the fees didn't ever actually stop the ever increasing numberses of applicants applying for university. you can see other blips in 1998 when the fees came in and in 20002006 when they trebled. people continued to apply. this is despite the fees being an international high for public universities. another graph for you, look at the comparison to other nations. including public universities in the united states. there we go. higher than public universities in the united states, higher than germany where it is free. students in england if we flip through, they pay more than those in
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northern ireland, than in wales, where there are top ups and then in scotland, of course in scotland cosh stu d e nts scotland, of course in scotland cosh students don't pay anything at all. if, as your first grand prix students don't pay anything at all. if, as yourfirst grand prix graph pointed out student numbers are going up. where is the problem, what is the argument for cutting fees if it seems to be successful, if you like? counter intuitively, if you cut fees, well it may not help the poorest, is the argument that is put, because of the way the fees are paid back. so cutting the fees would probably help the most well—off and people who end up on really big sarries. so for instance students with wealthy parents who pay off their fees straightaway so no interest is accrued, if the fees are cut they would be paying off a smaller lump sum, so they will have done well as i say, people who end up done well as i say, people who end up on top money. for the vast majority they pay their fees back over 30 year, most never completely do that, so if the fees were cut to
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say give them an average debt of £40,000. they would never pay it off. it doesn't matter whether they are paying 40,000 or 50,000. they pay back nine % of their monthly earnings, and therefore it is a fixed amount they pay every month. they will pay a that for many years but they will never pay it off. taking a lump sum off, it won't make any difference to them. of course, cutting the fees would create a question, which is that you would still need to find alternative funding for universities and that might be general taxation. so the system as fair as it can be?|j system as fair as it can be?” depends what you are trying to do. there is a smaller percentage of people from poorer backgrounds who go to university than the the percentage of middle class people. if you want to do something about that there are changes you might wa nt to that there are changes you might want to look at so the government could alter the maintenance system. all students receive a
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non—means—tested all students receive a non—mea ns—tested loan to all students receive a non—means—tested loan to cover their living costs, poorer students may be eligible for extra money to top it up, that means they face the prospect of racking up more debt. or the government could look for example at the repayment threshold. the point you earn enough to start repaying. this is going up in april but the highest you raise it mean people may never have to pay anything back at all. that could help people from the poorer end of the scale. perhaps you could look at reducing the interest payments. 6.1%, maths would tell you if you reduce the payment you would end up owing less and able to pay it off and be debt free with a bit more disposable income perhaps. changing the system depends on your primary aim. is it you want more people to go to university, is it you want to find more money for universities or you want to reduce the burden the taxpayer? until you want to do, you can't decide how you are going to do
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it. thanening you very much matt cole. the family of a young british boy who's been refused a licence to take cannabis to control his epilepsy, has vowed to fight against the ruling. six—year—old alfie dingley from warwickshire has a condition that causes him to have up to 30 violent seizures every day. his parents say treating him with cannabis oil dramatically reduces the symptoms. but the home office has ruled the treatment will remain illegal in the uk. alfie's mother, hannah, says the government#'s decision is astonishing. we haven't gone to you know, somewhere to buy, we have used a company who have, who make medical cannabis, they have a licence in the eu, they have the only certification for a company eu, they have the only certification fora company in eu, they have the only certification for a company in the eu, they are a pharmaceutical great oil. this is tested, this is safe, and also what i would say is my son from eight
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months old has been injected with drugs, with steroids, they are not safe for children. there is no clinical data to say that is safe. you can see the impacts as you just said... my son will die or have psychosis if we carry on the way we were, this product we are using is safe, it is made by a medical company, it is available in 11 eu countries, soon to be 14. we need to catch up. medical cannabis has a value and for my son, who is unique, iam not value and for my son, who is unique, i am not opening up the not gates, he is unique, i am asking for some compassion. ina compassion. in a moments the business new, first let us bring you the headlines here on afternoon live. no, that is dominated by barry bennell, the convicted paedophile has been sentenced to 30 years for abusing 12
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young footballer, the judge described him as the devil incarnate. the prime minister announces a review of university tuition fees admitting it is one of the most expensive in the world. a man thought to be one of britain's most prolific paedophiles macthe 2 has been jailed prolific paedophiles macthe 2 has beenjailed for 31 years. a government report says that carillion's investors were ‘fleeing for the hills‘ as it headed for disaster two parliamentary committees have been looking at why the construction company collapsed with a loss of 1,000 jobs. nearly 270 staff at meat supplier russel hume have lost their jobs after the firm fell into administration. production at the derby—based firm was halted last month and products recalled when the food standards agency launched a food hygiene investigation. chains including pub giant wetherspoons had taken russell hume products off their menus. fast—food chain kentucky fried chicken has had to close a number
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of their uk outlets after running out of a key ingredient — chicken. last week, kfc switched its delivery contract to dhl, which blamed "operational issues" for the supply disruption.the closures affected areas including london and the south east, the midlands, the north east and wales. some belief it is reasonable to ask female an cans whether they are pregnant, a third think it is reasonable to find out about their plans, whether they plan to get pregnant once they get the job. this is an issue and... it is illegal isn't it? the ehrc are hoping to
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implement some sort of policies to stop this happening. joining us is their chief executive. joining us is their chief executive. joining me now to discuss the findings is rebecca hilsenrath, chief executive of the equality and human rights commission. you want a stake in the ground, what does that mean? i think what we are looking at today, is evidence that people are breaking the law. these attitudes are anti—diluefian and we need to ensure that employers understand the law and are aware of it and practise it. we conducted research a couple of years ago, indicating that over three—quarters of employees who were pregnant suffered some form of negative or discriminatory behaviour and in fact 1196 discriminatory behaviour and in fact 11% ended up losing theirjobs. we have launched an initiative working forward which is about sharing good practise, and improving conditions for women in the workplace. we would like to see more women joining us. from a business perspective, small
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to medium businesses in particular, pregnant, maternity leave can be financially crippling, what do you wa nt financially crippling, what do you want the government and banks to do to help the businesses, so they can employ best practises when it comes to maternity. i think we are hoping to maternity. i think we are hoping to be able to improve good practise through our initiative, but i think it is also important to notice that small employers maybe eligible for leaf. they get some costs back from the government. businesses say they wa nt the government. businesses say they want more women onboard. they make a valuable contribution to businesses and there is a cost, of maternity and there is a cost, of maternity and pregnancy discrimination, £250 million loss per year to bids through loss of valued talent, recruitment, induck union and reputational loss. acas took 14,000 calls on maternity and pregnancy
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discrimination, that is up 10% on the year before. we are looking at nearly five million women in the working place who have small children, and that is three—quarters of women, mothers in that situation, a third of the workforce are pa rents, a third of the workforce are parents, this is a key problem that we need to address to retain talent. what about paternity? lots of different models the europe. the nordic model is often quoted. this idea that paternity and maternity need to be equal to give women more rights when they come back to work. absolutely. britain is not generous in relation to its paternity maternity, the amount it pay, nordic countries are leading here, it is a cultural change, we have called for use it or lose it pattern the i leave, to encourage fathers to play their part, and to release the burden for women, and that of course will release the burden for the workplace, because they will be
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looking at female workers and knowing that actually it mayjust as well be their partners who step in to ta ke well be their partners who step in to take the time off. 0k, to take the time off. ok, thank you forjoining us. now the markets. a bit ofa now the markets. a bit of a pause. a rather pregnant pause! see what i did there? they are not coming. so the foots sip 100 in negative territory at the moment. had a positive start to the day. asian markets did well but they slightly dipped but only by 0. 1 asian markets did well but they slightly dipped but only by 0.1%. the makers of durex and dettol dropped. that is as well we lost that picture by the time you started talking about them. we will have more from you later. thank you. three billboards outside ebbing, missouri was the big winner
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at the baftas last night — taking awards in five categories. the drama — about a woman's struggle to getjustice for her murdered daughter — was named best film, and its star, frances mcdormand, won best actress. most of the guests attending the event wore black in support of the time's up and me too campaigns against sexual harassment. our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba was there. black dresses on the red carpet — all part of the ongoing time's up campaign, aimed at fair treatment for women. it wasn't just stars. two of the original dagenham girls — whose 1968 strike action at ford led to the equal pay act — were there too. well, we thought it would end by now. we thought everybody would have got their rights but, unfortunately, it hasn't happened, has it? somewhat appropriate, then, that the night's big winner — three billboards outside ebbing, missouri — focuses on a woman, played by frances mcdormand, who won best actress, looking for justice. i have a little trouble with compliance. laughter applause but i want you to know that i stand in full solidarity with my sisters tonight in black.
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power to the people. the movie — which won a total of five baftas, including best film — has struck a chord with audiences around the world. hey there, mildred, you didn't happen to pay a visit to the dentist today, did you? no. huh? muffled speech: i said no. lei/l>/m._,e!7,ee ,, 73,7, 7 yeu have a singelec- for the shape of water, another female—focused film, starring sally hawkins as a woman in love with a mysterious water creature. and the winner of the rising star award was britain's daniel kaluuya. he paid tribute to one particular woman. i'd like to thank my mum.
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mum, you're the reason why i started, you're the reason why i'm here, you're the reason why i keep going, and this is yours. for the past three years, the baftas and the oscars haven't agreed on best picture, but this 2018 oscar race is the most open in years. and with voting starting on the other side of the atlantic on tuesday, many will be saying that three billboards‘ strong showing tonight might, just might, give it the edge at the academy awards in march. lizo mzimba, bbc news. ftse100 in negative territory at the moment. had a positive start to the moment. had a positive start to the day. asian markets did well but they slightly dipped but only by 0.1 %. the makers of durex and dettol dropped. that is as well we lost that picture by the time you started talking about them. we will have more from you later. thank you. now the weather. it is a pretty grey and cloudy afternoon out there, there are a few brighter spells, particularly in western parts of the country. heading on there this afternoon we will keep cloud, it will stay mild too and there are
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some outbreaks of rain. we have rain in eastern counties too at the moment. through this evening the next band of rain works in northern ireland, scotland and pushing further south in england and wales. so with that rain round tonight, for most it will be a frost—free start to tuesday morning. with clearer skies to the north—west there could bea skies to the north—west there could be a touch of frost here. we will keep that front across eastern england. so rain for east anglia, but for the rest of the country a lot of dry weather. there there will be more sunshine compared to monday. noa be more sunshine compared to monday. no a bad day. temperaturesjust about reaching double figure, a bit cooler on the east coast, then things are going to turn colder towards the end of the week, where they should stay largely dry. bye for now. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. barry bennell is sentenced to 31 years injailfor abusing 12 young footballers. victims commissioner reaction. we can now move on with their lives
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saving the knowledge that our abuser can no longer cause us any harm. today we looked evil in the and we a man thought to be one of britain‘s matthew falder, has been jailed for 32 years after admitting 137 offences. oxfam reveals that three of the men accused of sexual misconduct in haiti physically threatened witnesses during a 2011 investigation. coming up on afternoon live... we have all the sport and the latest from pyeongchang. a dead heat in the bobsleigh. it is the first time an olympic title has been shared in 20 yea rs. olympic title has been shared in 20 years. all that and more coming up later. we also have the weather
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coming up. not as cold as their yet. we have some mild weather and some cloud around but don‘t befall because we are going to see some colder weather developing later on in the week. details on half an hour. the big winner at the baftas. women in black. the stars came out in support of the me to movement.” have a little trouble with compliance. the former football coach barry bennell has been jailed for 30 years for abusing 12 young footballers he coached between 1979 and 1991.
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-- 31 —— 31 years. bennell, who‘s 64, worked at manchester city and crewe alexandra. thejudge described him as the devil incarnate. bennell shook his head as the judge sentenced him and there was clapping from the public gallery. demi —— danny savage is there. today was divided into two parts. at midday we had comments from some of the victims in this case about how the abuse from barry bennell had damaged their lives since they were boys and they have been young boys dreaming ofa they have been young boys dreaming of a future in football and barry bennell turned that dream into a nightmare by repeatedly abusing them and then threatening them with ruining any hope of their future and then threatening them with ruining any hope of theirfuture in football if they told anyone. that
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was what we heard before lunch. at 2:15pm, thejudge was what we heard before lunch. at 2:15pm, the judge began was what we heard before lunch. at 2:15pm, thejudge began his sentencing, sending barry bennell to prison for 30 years. during that sentencing hearing, he told barry bennell that the grooming process started in the same way with grooming the parents first to convince them to trust him, to put their sons in his care. then he went on to abuse them from there. the judge said, "you couldn‘t have cared less as you got your sexual gratification. he had damning words that are barry bennell. after he had been sent down, some of the victims who have waived their anonymity came out here and talked about what they thought about the sentence passed today. the offences happened when we were children. now we are men. we did not forget we came after you bennell and now you are imprisoned due to us. if any more survivors wish to come forward
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and unlock the suffering, please do so. the hurt is not yours to carry. it is his. as survivors of barry bennell's crimes and cruelty, we welcome the sentence that the judge has handed down today. it reflects the severity and seriousness of the crimes he has committed as well as the pain and distress that he has put us through all of our lives. and also the distress he has put us through every day of this trial. but today marks an important milestone. we can now move on with our lives safe in the knowledge that our abuser is locked away and can no longer cause us any harm. today we looked evil in the face and we smiled because barry bennell, we have won. today, we hand our shame and our guilt and our sadness back to you. it should never have been ours to carry in the first place.
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the sentence today sends a message to those who abuse children and those who cover it up. the world has changed. truth now has a voice and you will be held accountable and punished accordingly. thankfully, the judicial system has acknowledged his crimes and the sentence recognises his unrelenting depravity. the police, cps, jury and now the judge have all recognised the truth. we thank them for that. throughout this trial, bennell has shown not one of remorse, not one shred of decency. he is calculated, devious and scheming. he was then and he is now but he has finally been held to account for his horrific crimes against children. to anyone else suffering in silence we say, please tell someone. anyone.
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it will be the first day of the rest of your life. and every person that speaks out makes it more difficult for predators to succeed in the future. we will now continue to focus on supporting survivors through the work of the offside trust. making sure that the outpouring of support and solidarity of the last few days materialises into practical steps to try and prevent this happening again. people hold positions of trust. with our sports coaches, teachers, they have a responsibility to safeguard the children in their care. the abuse of that trust is a crime against one of the most fundamental tenants of society — the protection of innocent, vulnerable children. finally, i‘d like to say to the public and the media for all your sensitivity in the last few weeks and days and for the overwhelming kindness and support we have received from every corner of the world.
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this is a testament to the belief that love will always conquer evil. a total sentence of 31 years for barry bennell. he could potentially be able to apply for parole after half of that but he will be 79 years old. he is not in very good health and is currently being fed through a chewbacca. there is every chance he will not survive to get the point where he be released on parole. —— currently being fed through a tube. cheshire police said barry bennell was remorseless for what he had done and was a predatory
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paedophile. going forward, we have the victims happy about what happened today and the fact they can effectively move on although they will never get over what happened to them. they still have nightmares and this still affects their lives all these years on. the judge said today there was no reason for the victims not to pursue civil claims against the football clubs involved in this trial. these boys and men, the 12 of them were in the youth setup at crewe alexander and manchester city. there is the potential of the civil action in the future as well. we probably haven‘t heard the last of these proceedings relating to barry bennell. the prime minister has set out plans for a year long review of higher education in england — saying it should be flexible enough to ensure everone ‘gets the education that suits them.‘ theresa may said the review would focus on four areas — ensuring access for everyone, the funding system, incentivising choice, and how to get the right skills for the country. and she said, it was only fair that
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students themselves should make a contribution towards their degree. a prime minister who have free university education discusses student debt and the courses they plan to make. one mentioned theoretical physics. oh, gosh! which is the reaction of many students and pa rents is the reaction of many students and parents about the higher cost of education in england. they say their system needs to be looked at again. as theresa may explained, this review will look at post—18 education whether universities technical or you vocational training. making university truly accessible to all people from every background is not made easier by funding system which leads students from the lowest income households
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bearing the highest levels of debt. with many graduates left questioning the return they get for their investment. for those young people who do not go on to academic study, the roots into further technical and vocational training today are hard to navigate. the standards across the sector are two very done the funding available to support them is patchy. suited their system of student funding would be reviewed. our goal is a funding system which provides value for money for graduates and taxpayers so the principle that students as well as taxpayers should contribute to the cost of their studies is an important one. currently english universities are free to charge just over £9,000 a year depending on the course. however, onlya over £9,000 a year depending on the course. however, only a handful charge less than the maximum. graduates in england leave university with debts of up to £50,000 because interest rates on student loans stand at 6.1%. in
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scotla nd student loans stand at 6.1%. in scotland there is free university tuition for scottish tunes. with labour promising to scrap tuition fees altogether in england, there is political pressure on the conservative government to tackle the issue. you have to be fed to the student and taxpayer. we have to reform further education and the work it does. we have to make sure disadvantaged students get to the best universities and get good jobs at the end of it. the government will consider the reintroduction of maintenance grants but there is dispute amongst students about the policy trade—offs involved. dispute amongst students about the policy trade-offs involved. when i apply to university, i knew i was going to get into debt of up to £50,000. students like me who come from working—class backgrounds are going to have to take out more loa ns. going to have to take out more loans. i'll read disappointed if they cut it to six grand at the expense of losing bursaries for underprivileged backgrounds. one of the key values is helping people to
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help themselves. the government is keen to show it has a policy agenda beyond brexit. they say they should not be picking up the bill for university places but they don‘t wa nt to university places but they don‘t want to look like a pale imitation of what labour is offering. cranking up of what labour is offering. cranking up fees was meant to create the market theresa may now wants to see. she is in search of the silver bullet which will give lower fees but not meet escalating costs for the government. there isn‘t a silver bullet. there are choices to be made and she is drunk to put those off before brexit. number ten are stressing this review will look at vocational education also. our education correspondent elaine dunkley was watching the speech closely and joins me now. this was an aspirational speech
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representative of her maiden speech when she first became a minister when she first became a minister when she first became a minister when she talked about education being an opportunity for everyone and those from the poorest backgrounds being able to succeed. it was along those lines of a fairer society, a fairer britain. if you put it into the context of what we are talking about, graduates are leaving university with £50,000 of debt. there is a high interest rate on student loans of 6.1% and in 2016, the maintenance grants was scrapped. whilst the government says if you benefit from an education you should contribute, there —— they are accepting it is one of the most expensive in the world. the issue of the variation, how would that work? the education secretary has said tuition fees will be dictated to by the subject. if your course was
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cheaper to deliver and the prospects of you getting a higher paid job at the end was less common you would pay less that course. the arts and social sciences would be cheaper to do than science. doing a degree in english would be cheaper than doing a degree in engineering. that is a complex way ofjudging the value of an education. what critics are saying are poorer students may feel they have to take cheaper courses which are valued less by society and you end up getting paid less. in the long—running, you end up paying more than those students who are more well off. they say it might be better to look at things like maintenance grants or reducing the interest rates on student loans. review was announced. how wide—ranging is it going to be?m would look at vocational courses. a cleric have the students who don‘t necessarily want to go to university. —— a clearer path. the
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country is facing a shortage of teachers and nurses and the nursing bursary has been scrapped. what is the government going to do about that? the number of part—time stu d e nts that? the number of part—time students has fallen and the number of mature students. labour have said they will bring back maintenance gra nts they will bring back maintenance grants and jeremy corbyn was popular with the younger vote when he talked about scrapping tuition fees. there was no suggestion this government is going to scrap tuition fees. they have said there was a record number of stu d e nts have said there was a record number of students from disadvantaged backgrounds now going to university and from april you won‘t play back student loans until you are earning at least £25,000. thank you. a paedophile, described as one of britain‘s worst offenders, has been jailed for 32 years for sexual offences against children. matthew falder pleaded guilty to 137 charges, including encouraging the rape of a minor — and blackmailing his victims into sending him obscene footage of themselves carrying out degrading acts. the operation to catch falder included law enforcement agencies across the world. us homeland security described him as "the worst child exploitation offender" it had ever seen
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on the internet. sima kotecha reports from birmingham. what was that i have done? doctor matthew falder being arrested at his workplace last year. the 29—year—old spent years posing as a female artist online to check his victims into sending him naked pictures of themselves. distributing indecent images of children. he researched their profiles and used it to blackmailing them into sending him or images. he installed secret cameras and people‘s hems. he contacted more than 300 people worldwide offering them money in exchange for photos. his youngest victim was 13. one of his victims told us she can no longer trust anybody. i didn't want to stay at
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home because he knew where i lived. i couldn‘t concentrate on anything, talk to my family. i felt ashamed of what i was doing. i didn‘t want to go out on the street because he might be there and i didn‘t feel safe anywhere. last year he pleaded guilty to 137 charges including encouraging the rape of a child and possessing a paedophile manual. you have a fixed amount you might have an e—mail contact. it is a really tricky starting point and then what you have got is people like him who are using all the tools in the tool box that are available to him to stay hidden. matthew falder was under surveillance during a four—year investigation. the cambridge graduate was identified by the national crime agency. the first time that worked with partner agencies across the world such the fbi, the australian federal police and euro poll to find the man behind the messages. there were contacts
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with people in slovenia, australia, the us and there were victims all over england, wales and scotland. we then had to piece together information across many different police forces. matthew falder lived in these block of flats and worked at birmingham university. officers said his motivation was power and control. he wanted his victims to field powered —— embarrassed and humiliated and he was confident he could outwit the authorities. he reached out to vulnerable people seeking work on websites with the intention of manipulating them. he used names such as 666 devil and evil mind on the .net to communicate with other paedophiles. on the dark net he spoke about one of his victims saying, to be honest, i am thinking based on how we love and mentally struggling she used to be, then i should be able to get some
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good moves from her willingly. i don‘t care if she lives or dies, to be honest. in court the paedophile showed no remorse and thejudge be honest. in court the paedophile showed no remorse and the judge told him, you wanted to assume total control over your victims and you will crawl and manipulative. —— worth crawl and manipulative. barry bonallack is sentenced to 31 years in jail bonallack is sentenced to 31 years injailfor abusing bonallack is sentenced to 31 years in jail for abusing footballers in his care. —— barry bennell. the university tuition fees are the most expensive in the world. matthew falder has beenjailed expensive in the world. matthew falder has been jailed after admitting 130 paedophile offences. england have got a —— great britain have a win over canada in the
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curling. a dead heat in the cold temperatures. canada and germany shared the gold medal after a remarkable race. england defender casey stone world join phil neville after ending a playing career in which she captained a country and the olympic team in 2012. i will have more on those stories after 4:30pm. it‘s emerged that three of the oxfam employees accused of sexual misconduct in haiti physically threatened witnesses during a 2011 investigation. the charity has published an internal report which said more needed to be done to prevent problem staff working for other charities. but despite the warnings, several men linked to the alleged abuse did subsequently take up roles at other charitable organisations. for more than half a century, oxfam
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has been helping those in need including these people of conflict in nigeria in the 19605. their reputation has been put at risk by the behaviour of some staff in haiti in 2011. a report shows one was dismissed and three resigned fee using prostitutes on oxfam presences. two more were dismissed for bullying and intimidation. one of whom downloaded pornography and another man was sacked first failing to protect staff. what‘s mps want now is for offenders like bees to be placed on a public register.” now is for offenders like bees to be placed on a public register. i don't think these reports should be secret and now it is out in the open, we can do something significant about it and that is what i will be asking them to do, to have a central register so we the world and so we know that anybody we give money to, any charity, has got the right procedures in place and that the
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children and women are absolutely safe. the report into events in matthew falder says three of the man physically threatened witnesses during the investigation, something that shocked the prime minister. —— the report into events in haiti.” understand there have been further revelations today which showed there was critical —— physical intimidation of witnesses. this is the problem we see which means all too often people don‘t feel able to come forward to report that action that happened to them, the behaviour they have been on the receiving of. oxfa m they have been on the receiving of. oxfam shops have been a familiar sight for years on the prime minister‘s spokesman said this morning are still had a long way to go to restore public trust. president trump has signalled he‘ll support a bipartisan effort to improve a national system of background checks for gun purchases in the wake of the florida school shooting.
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it comes after student survivors of the attack announced plans for a national march on washington to urge congress to take action on gun control. more now on the news that the prime minister has been setting out what she says is a wide—ranging review of education for students after the age of 18. in a speech in derby, she acknowledged that the cost of getting a university degree in england was a cause of serious concern for people. joining me now is sir peter lampl, chairman of the sutton trust which is a foundation that improves social mobility in the uk through research and policy advocacy. isa is a review that will go for at least a year, is that the way to solve this? i would rather solve it more quickly and say six months but i guess that is the way these things work. there are some pressing issues. first of all the levels of debt that our kids are coming out with over £50,000, is the highest in
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the world of any major country. the next highest is the us at 20 5000. we are totally out of line with other countries. the other thing which is a real scandal is that kids from low—income backgrounds end up with higher debt than rich kids. they have to borrow money for maintenance loans. there are some really pressing problems. this whole funding situation is in crisis. the faster, the better. the word, crisis, in what way is this a crisis? bill having to go to university and they are looking at coming out with 50,000 plus of debt.
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they have to earn a certain level before they start paying. are lots of them will pay back 100% and there isa of them will pay back 100% and there is a psychological factor of having 55 thousand pounds worth of debt. what about charging for individual courses? you will find low moderate income kids with the cheaper courses. we don‘t see any mileage in that. what we are proposing is
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tuition fees that are means tested. kids earning under £25,000 will pay nothing and kids earning at the top end will pay even more. this is what happens in the us. we have a programme where we send british kids to the top american universities. are you talking about them or their pa rents ? are you talking about them or their parents? their parents. every major university means tests the kids based on parental income. they get free places. every private american university means tests the kids based on parental income. we should be doing that as well. does punishing the parents help that?
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will not punishing parents. we getting the parents to contribute. there is this smutty secret that pa rents there is this smutty secret that parents pay this. we know parents from well—off backgrounds pay off their loans anyway. we think parents should be contributing after the age of 18 to their kid‘s education. you have a kid from a council estate paying 9000 as well as the rest and it makes no sense. it is unfair. thank you very much for your time. letters have a look at the weather.
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that looks like australia to me. this is australia. we have some stormy weather which made landfall in western australia and it brought record—breaking amounts of rain. they have had some really wet weather and it is still lingering around heading southwards. we could be having more news about flooding in western australia. for new zealand, we have this massive cloud here and this is tropical cyclone skeeter. it has been shifting south and over the next day or so, it will head towards the south island of new zealand. it will bring some very strong winds and heavy rainfall and we are likely to see some coastal inundation. we have the combination of some strong onshore winds, heavy
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rainfall, large swells and high tides. they are bracing for some severe weather. that is unusual, is it? they do get cyclones that drift this way but this one is particularly strong. it is a well—developed storm and has been around for ten days or so now. closer to home, it is my old buffer how much longer? not much longer. it is about to get quite a bit colder. out there today, it is mild and we have a lot of cloud around but there area have a lot of cloud around but there are a few glimmers of sunshine. this picture was spotted by one of our weather watchers in stirling. further east, we have more in the way of cloud. after that mild start, things are going to turn colder. it isa things are going to turn colder. it is a step back into winter and things will become dry and sunny but the chance of some snow showers later on in the week. at the moment,
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we have mild air and a cold front approaching from the north—west. both of these weather fronts bringing some outbreaks of rain and into this evening, we will continue to see rain down east coast of england. we see that next batch of rain moving into the west of scotla nd rain moving into the west of scotland and into northern ireland. we have zoomed into in more detail. six o‘clock, heading home from work, scotla nd six o‘clock, heading home from work, scotland towards northumbria and we have some patchy outbreaks of rain. the east coast, patchy rain also. the east coast, patchy rain also. the rain in the north west moves southwards and eastwards. by the tummy gets a tuesday morning, there will be rain across the southern eastern parts of england. most of us are looking frost free. through the day tomorrow, there are areas that will see the cloud and rain in the
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east. for much of the country, not a bad day. sunshine returns to scotland, northern ireland and wales. temperatures could reach double figures in cornwall. all change through the middle part of the week. it will be clear and there will be some fog developing overnight as temperatures fall close to freezing, particularly for scotla nd to freezing, particularly for scotland and northern ireland. there could be a sharp frost. not as golf england and wales. wednesday could bea dry england and wales. wednesday could be a dry day. we start off with fog and low cloud. some spells of sunshine breaking through but those temperatures will be back in singh offered us by the time we get to wednesday. looking further ahead into thursday, we will draw in the women‘s in an easterly direction. the blue colours return to the map as we look towards the end of this coming week. high pressure in charge and there is a lot of dry weather on
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the cards. here is the outlook for thursday and friday. you will notice the temperatures are really starting to drop down and we could see a fuse snow showers in the forecast also. former football coach barry bennell has been sentenced to 31 years injail — for abusing 12 young footballers who he‘d coached between 1979 and 1991. several of his victims faced him at liverpool crown court to tell him what effect his crimes had had on them. no sentences is long enough for that man. and right to the death he didn‘t show any remorse, or said sorry to anyone, but i‘m just proud idid speak sorry to anyone, but i‘m just proud i did speak out, and if i hadn‘t have done, we all wouldn‘t be stood hire today, i am proud have done, we all wouldn‘t be stood hire today, iam proud i have done, we all wouldn‘t be stood hire today, i am proud i did have done, we all wouldn‘t be stood hire today, iam proud i did it. iam proud i did it. theresa may has been setting out a year—long a review of university tuition fees in england. she admitted we have "one of the most expensive systems" in the world and said the current system of charging maximum annual
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fees had not resulted in the "competitive" market she‘d hoped for. one of britain‘s most prolific paedophiles has been jailed for 32 years. matthew falder — a university researcher — admitted 137 offences including encouraging the rape of a child. his conviction was the result of a joint operation involving several agencies. oxfam reveals that three of the men accused of sexual misconduct in haiti physically threatened witnesses during a 2011 investigation. the charity has published the internal report — saying it wants to be as transparent as possible. sport now and bobsleigh drama. sometimes there is a hundredth of a second in it. sometimes a thousandth ofa second in it. sometimes a thousandth of a second, that is pretty excruciating. sometimes there is nothing to separate two teams in this case, and that is what happened
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in the two man bobsleigh at the winter olympics, this is the final pair, canada‘s team. they are clocking a time of 3 minutes 16.86 seconds, that is the exact same time as the german pair. everybody realising that the dead heat means they get to share the olympic title. it is the first time that has happened in 20 year, i wonder if they share the party. great britain were hoping to be in the mix but it turned out they, after being seventh overnight finished in 12th place. other brits in action. ho rub the women‘s curlers doing? other brits in action. ho rub the women's curlers doing? they are doing very well. mainly because of an important win today. we are getting to the stage where it‘s a must win match. that is what the women had today. they had a record of three wins three defeats before playing switzerland. it came down do a battle of the skips. eve muirhead once again keeping her cool under
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pressure. this is the vital final stone known as the hammer of course, to give the two that her team needed foran to give the two that her team needed for an 8—7 win. that puts themselves injoint fourth place for an 8—7 win. that puts themselves in joint fourth place in the standings. they need to stay in the four. it is going to be tough because japan and an a four. it is going to be tough becausejapan and an a are four. it is going to be tough because japan and an a are next. the men had an important match on day ten, there has been a developing story about a potential doping violence, with more on that, here is our sports correspondent. the first ever bronze medal in mixed doubles curling. from delight to a doping controversy. barely a week after celebrating a bronze medal alongside his wife, this man could now be stripped of it but his is a case with far broader implications. olympic athletes from russia. he is russian, his country is banned from these games because of guess what, a huge doping scandal. olympic
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organisers allowed him and 160 other russians to compete as neutrals, now, though, it is an all—too familiar story. it was a very good pre—games testing where for example the russian athletes were tested to a significant level, more than others. but when an athlete is caught for doping it is very disappointing but it shows that the system works. the decision to allow russian athletes to compete here as neutrals attracted criticism before the games so attracted criticism before the games so this positive tests raises uncomfortable questions for the olympic authorities, at the opening ceremony they had to parade under a neutral flag. the loch ceremony they had to parade under a neutralflag. the loch are considering will lifting the ban, after this scandal can they? —— olympic committee. it is, you don't wa nt olympic committee. it is, you don't want any positive tests in any
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olympics but from an athlete they told be clean you were told they would be clean it is hard to you were told they would be clean it is hard - to take. away from the is hard news to take. away from the controversy in the curling there was encouraging news for the men‘s team. victory over denmark boosting their hopes of the semifinals. on the snow though aimee fuller‘s hopes came to a painful end. the event is called big air but in in case not quite enough. she later posted this photo, bruised but thankfully no worse. but there was redemption for rowan cheshire. she missed the last games after a horrible crash, but four yea rs after a horrible crash, but four years on, booked her place in the halfpipe final, some weight o —— wait but finally worth it. more on the website of course. casey so intoe ended her playing career but willjoin phil neville‘s back room team. she won 130 caps for her country, she was captain of great britain at the 2012 olympics, she
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will begin her newjob at the she believes cup next month. in rugby league england have appointed wayne bennett on a two—year deal. there is no guarantee he will lead england into the 2021 tournament. that is all the sport for now. much more in the next hour. now on afternoon live — let‘s go nationwide — and see what‘s happening around the country — in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. joining me from cambridge is janine machin, where school children from milton keynes have won a competition to have their sculptures blasted into space on a nasa rocket. and in southampton, sally taylor brings us the story ofjim o‘reilly, the "dancing man", who uses his own dance moves as he directs
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cars on and off ferries between southampton and the isle of wight. cup churs in space. we have sent weird things into space, would you believe it, even the ashes of one of the original star trek actors went up the original star trek actors went up there. now we are sending cows, they are not real, they are about they are not real, they are about the size of a sugar cube, they have been made by children in milton keynes who won this chance in a competition, the whole idea behind it is to show these children what zero gravity looks like, our science correspondent has been talking to them today. it is fair to say they are over the moon about it. . them today. it is fair to say they are over the moon about it. ” them today. it is fair to say they are over the moon about it. . i feel really special because you know, yes, so really special because you know, yes, so once really special because you know, yes, so once in a lifetime opportunity. it is. space, incredible. how about you?” opportunity. it is. space, incredible. how about you? i feel very positive about my cow, now. now. because my first try it was
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like, mmm, and then i‘m not going to get it but i did so i am happy. they are not going into space, they won‘t feel zero gravity, or will they? are not going into space, they won‘t feelzero gravity, or will they? no, iam sure feelzero gravity, or will they? no, i am sure they would like to go up there. the competition is by a company in milton keynes. they make the cameras that go on space rover, they want to test their new kit. the mini cow also go with it. the cameras will film the cows floating round in space and that footage and in fact the sculptures will be sent back to earth some time in the late summer. back to earth some time in the late summer. the school says this project has as you might imagine taken over everything but like most primary schools that i were doing a project on earth and space. of course, in our part of the world, it is already heavily involved in space technology, but you might be wondering why cows? milton keynes has become famous for its cows, back in 78 has become famous for its cows, back in78a has become famous for its cows, back in 78 a canadian artist created six concrete cows and they are part of
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the town now, they have been kidnapped. health to ransom, placed in compromising position, they have been vandalised, repainted several time, we hope the space cows won‘t be subject to any of that. aminute —— among the team we started a come p9p —— among the team we started a come pep foirtion a song. i have return of of the space cow—boys i think i‘m ona of of the space cow—boys i think i‘m on a winner. what do you think? you need to get out more. that is your team, is it. it is not often we see you ina team, is it. it is not often we see you in a gallantry. these are the people who make sure we get on time. we have the director and nick and amy on autocue and you can‘t see andy and dj behind the scenes but as is the case with you, massive team behind the scenes. if that is what you think fine. thank you very much. more from janine at 6.30 on bbc one
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if you are in the region‘s. sam alla rdycely. if you are in the region‘s. sam allardycely. jim o‘reilly. if you get on a ferry from southampton to the isle of wights. it can be stressful. not always. oh yes it can be be stressful. imagine, dull day, february the worst month but dancing manjim is bringing sunshine into customers‘ lives. he works for the ferry company. imagine you are in the queue. suddenly this guy, this worker, strikes a pose, you can‘t help yourself, you are just smiling. he is like a human glitterball. have a look at this. he has nicked all my moves! how did that start? well it is interesting, he was, he looks after the cars and
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the lorries, in fact, jim used to work in the back office, then they unleashed him on an unsuspecting public, now he is throwing the moves and making shapes and they are loving it. i have to say simon, he has two dodgy knee, a new hip and he has two dodgy knee, a new hip and he has lost three stone. i mean, there is hope for us all, isn‘t there simon. this is what he has to say about what he does.” simon. this is what he has to say about what he does. i started working here, it didn't seem to be enough rapport between the customers and the staff, so i started throwing and the staff, so i started throwing a few exaggerated hand gesture, one afternoon i had what can only be described as an out—of—body experience and went for it on the dance floor, as if i was on the dance floor, as if i was on the dance floor, as if i was on the dance floor, when i hear music i am transported back to the '70s, dance floor, when i hear music i am transported back to the 705, 805, out there dancing, a disco kid at heart i think. he loves chic by the
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way. people can vote for him, visit the website. he says doesn‘t matter whether he wins, he is happy to make people mile. i think there is an opportunity here, you could just strike thatjohn travolta pose and think of how many viewers you would make happy. if i was on a quayside miles from the studio? if i dance, i do dance like that sally, but, well, you will find out one day. show us, please! something will happen. sally, south today, 6.30 if you are watching in that area and janine thank you, and your huge team at awe —— as well. thank you all. if you would like to see more on those stories you can access them
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via the bbc iplayer and we go nationwide every afternoon at 4.30 here on afternoon live. comparing a biological test to measure calorie intake with what people said they found that the average person in britain is exceeding official health recommendation by the equivalent of an cheese burger a day. the data comes as public health england plans to announce a new campaign to tackle the obesity crisis. now the business news. first our headlines here. the formerfootball coach barry bennell is sentenced to 31 yea rs coach barry bennell is sentenced to 31 years injailfor coach barry bennell is sentenced to 31 years in jail for abusing coach barry bennell is sentenced to 31 years injailfor abusing young footballers in his care. the prime minister announces a review of university tuition fees in england, admitting it is one of the most expensive in the world. a man thought to be one of britain‘s most
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prolific paedophiles nick faldo —— matthew falder has been jailed for 32 years. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. a government report says that carillion‘s investors were ‘fleeing for the hills‘ as it headed for disaster two parliamentary committees have been looking at why the construction company collapsed with a loss of 1,000 jobs. nearly 270 staff at meat supplier russel hume have lost their jobs after the firm fell into administration. production at the derby—based firm was halted last month and products recalled when the food standards agency launched a food hygiene investigation. chains including pub giant wetherspoons had taken russell hume products off their menus. kfc has closed 750 of its 900 uk outlets after delivery problems meant they ran out of a key ingredient...chicken! last week, the fried chicken chain switched its delivery contract to dhl, which blamed "operational issues" for the supply disruption. the food retailer said that it was unclear when the delivery problems would be rectified. it added that workers are being encouraged to take holiday but would not be forced to do so. that is a problem for kfc, no
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chicken. it is a staggering amount of out lets that have been closed. out of the 900 it was something like 750 that have been, so a lot of unhappy customers. now, reck kit bank of england kaiser, makers of brands we all know, having some problems. not a great day for them. they own dettol, durex, nurofen and they basically have had a bit of troubling day, they announced they missed a sales forecast byjust a bit, but their shares price went down 7%, that is because they have
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had a troubling 12 month, they had a failed product launch and missed a few reve nu e failed product launch and missed a few revenue target, so investors aren‘t filled with confidence about them. carillion, there is a blame game goingen o, mps saying there is a disconnect about what directors have told them about the company finses and what investors have been saying. there is a parliamentary hearing on thursday from kpmg, they said today, that the disconnect like you said and lots of investors anticipated this trouble and got out of the company quickly, so there are lots of questions about whether the management knew they needed a financial provision, they issued a profits warning lastjuly. so grey clouds round that. we can can talk a bit more about all of this with our guests who a senior investment investor. thank you forjoining us.
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let us start with carillion, it is not been a great day for them. it is merging the there is a lot of grey about who knew what, what does that do to the sector? it makes it under a lot of uncertainty, whether it is infrastructure in the uk, we all know we need more, but how is that going to get financed? how are the contracts going to be laid out? this will, create much more uncertainty, we saw recently, questions about how a new labour government or prospective labour government would deal with contracts and that would bring a cloud how investors would approach any private sector investment in infrastructure in the uk. 0k. let investment in infrastructure in the uk. ok. let us move on the reckitt one of the biggest fallers. it is a remarkable fall. it it is a consumer brand, we have seen inflation tip up, do you think that is taking its toll on that business? yes, looking
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at the results it is interesting to gauge how the uk consumer is doing and with revenue targets not being met, this is a worry, we see inflation, especially in terms of the input costs for this company rising, and then, the company not being able to pass on the costs to the consumer, which means profits suffer. getting inflation under control is something that the uk economy has to really worry about, and i think later on when we hear from the governor of the bank of england mark carney we will look to see what his thoughts are on the inflation picture. i am going to ask you an impact question, the markets seem a you an impact question, the markets seem a bit odd. we have had gains from the asian market, seem to open well in queue up, now they have slipped into negative territory, people were saying the calm has been restored last week, we saw green, what is going on? we know that we had a big fall at the beginning of the month in markets as more worries
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about the state of euphoria in equity markets was released a bit, but we will go through a period of ups and downs as market digests all the new information in terms of higher inflation, higher bond yields, interest ratings going up, that will keep investors nervous going forward. thank you. so markets generally? it is because the us is closed today. so the us brings volume to the markets so it doesn‘t, it looks worse. it‘s president‘s day and it is the lunar new year in asia. so, it doesn‘t look as bad as it looks on there. tomorrow, i suspect we will see lots of groans. we will —— greens. we will hold you to that. three billboards outside ebbing, missouri was the big winner
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at the baftas last night — taking awards in five categories. the drama —about a woman‘s struggle to getjustice for her murdered daughter — was named best film, and its star, frances mcdormand, won best actress. most of the guests attending the event wore black in support of the time‘s up and me too campaigns against sexual harassment. our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba was there. black dresses on the red carpet — all part of the ongoing time‘s up campaign, aimed at fair treatment for women. it wasn‘t just stars. two of the original dagenham girls — whose1968 strike action at ford led to the equal pay act — were there too. well, we thought it would end by now. we thought everybody would have got their rights but, unfortunately, it hasn‘t happened, has it? somewhat appropriate, then, that the night‘s big winner — three billboards outside ebbing, missouri — focuses on a woman, played by frances mcdormand, who won best actress, looking for justice.
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i have a little trouble with compliance. laughter applause but i want you to know that i stand in full solidarity with my sisters tonight in black. power to the people. the movie — which won a total of five baftas, including best film — has struck a chord with audiences around the world. hey there, mildred, you didn't happen to pay a visit to the dentist today, did you? no. huh? muffled speech: i said no. best actor went to gary oldman, who played winston churchill in world war ii drama darkest hour. he thanked his female co—stars. i love you, kristin. i love you, lily. you have a singular vision and a huge heart, and they were never more on display than in this beautiful film. and best director was won by guillermo del toro for the shape of water, another female—focused film, starring sally hawkins as a woman in love with a mysterious water creature. and the winner of the rising star award was britain‘s daniel kaluuya. he paid tribute to one particular woman. i‘d like to thank my mum.
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mum, you‘re the reason why i started, you‘re the reason why i‘m here, you‘re the reason why i keep going, and this is yours. for the past three years, the baftas and the oscars haven‘t agreed on best picture, but this 2018 oscar race is the most open in years. and with voting starting on the other side of the atlantic on tuesday, many will be saying that three billboards‘ strong showing tonight might, just might, give it the edge at the academy awards in march. lizo mzimba, bbc news. now, take a look at these striking images of thousands of starlings swooping over blackpool beach over the weekend. the mass movement is known as a murmuration — with flocks of birds swirling through the skies together
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before settling into their roost for the night. the numbers swell in winter when they are joined by migratory starlings from scandinavia. they seem to understand each other because they are all doing the same thing. that is it from your afternoon live team. huw edwards is up afternoon live team. huw edwards is up next. it is is a misty murky and mild monday out there, this picture behind me comes from one of our weather watchers in east sussex showing the extent of the mist and fog this morning which is slowly breaking up and lifting a bit, and through this afternoon there could be the odd brighter spell in the west, after the mild start this week, things are going to turn colder and also drier, in fact over the next few days, let us look at what is happening. we have this
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frontal system, the warm front in the east, cold in the west. between the east, cold in the west. between the two fronts we have this area of mild air, so the yellow colours with us at the moment but the blue will ta ke us at the moment but the blue will take over later on in the week. so the areas likely to see the rain this afterround the east coast and this afterround the east coast and this band of rain sweeps in from the north—west. both bands of rain early on start to edge away to the south and east, most are going to be frost—free once again, and east, most are going to be frost—free oi tuesday‘s weather? we north—west. tuesday‘s weather? we will keep the front that will bring rain, butfor will keep the front that will bring rain, but for the rest of the country not a bad day tomorrow, should be brightness returning to scotland, northern ireland too. with temperatures up about 10—12 degrees. a bit cooler round the east coast. we will continues to see cold erconditions in the middle of the week. —— colder conditions. wednesday morning we could see some
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mist and fog developing as temperatures fall close to freeze, perhaps below freezing. scotland, northern ireland too. not as cold for england and wales where we have a bit more in the way of low cloud, mist and fog. so wednesday starts off largely dry and fine. there will be low cloud, mist and fog patches in england and wales, that will slowly tend to break up a bit through the day, so a lot of dry weather, won‘t be wall—to—wall sunshine but brighter spells, you will notice temperatures not as mild as recent day, we are back in to high single figure, then high pressure that dominates. keeping things dry, it will draw in easterly winds from that area of high pressure, here is the outlook over the next couple of day, you will notice a lot of dry weather but temperatures starting to dip down. bye for now. today at 5 — the university researcher from birmingham described as the worst child sex offender ever discovered online. matthew falder
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admitted 137 offences. police say he used the so—called dark web to try to evade the authorities. it‘s a really tricky starting point. and then what you‘ve got is people like him, who are using all the tools in the tool box that are available to him to stay hidden. some of falder‘s victims attempted suicide. we‘ll have the latest from birmingham crown court. the other main stories on bbc news at five... theresa may sets out a major review of university education in england after concerns over the cost of a degree, but she rules out scrapping tuition fees. i believe, as do most people, including students, that those who benefit directly from higher education should contribute directly to the cost of it.
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