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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  February 20, 2018 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 2. as 7,000 people cancel regular donations to oxfam injust 10 days — after allegations of sexual misconduct by staff — this from the charity‘s chief executive: i am sorry, we are sorry, for the damage that oxfam has done, for the damage that oxfam has done, both to the people of haiti and to the wider efforts of aid and development. syrian government forces intensify their bombing of a rebel—held enclave near damascus, with 100 civilians — including 20 children — among those reported killed. brexit won't be a mad max style dystopia: the brexit secretary's reassuring message to european business leaders. what's up chook? kfc stays closed in many areas, as its chicken delivery problems continue. they're ‘operational issues‘ they say — there's no foul play.
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ican hear i can hear you all groaning. and you too. let's talk about elise christie. yes, all overfor her in young chang, she leaves another winter olympic games empty—handed. thanks 0lly, and susan has all the weather. good afternoon, this will cool you down, this is what is coming all the way from siberia, a biting easterly wind, this should make a difference to the way things also coming up... the pressure of dealing with debt when suffering from mental health problems. a charity says thousands of people are being pursued for money while in hospital. good afternoon. this is afternoon
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live. i am simon mccoy. the chief executive of oxfam has said sorry for the way he defended the charity after claims of sexual misconduct. mark goldring had accused people of "gunning" for the organisation, declaring that no—one had "murdered babies in their cots." appearing before mps, he revealed that there've been 26 new reports of misconduct since the haiti revelations emerged. the scandal has taken its toll on the charity, with 7000 people cancelling regular donations in ten days. here's our correspondent matt cole — and a warning — there is flash photography in his report. if there was any doubt if there was any that the senior 0xfam leaders were going to face a tough time, it was dispelled by the very first question. in your interview with the guardian published on saturday, you appear to be downplaying the scandal, using the parallel with the murder of babies in their cots, which many people regarded as grossly inappropriate, can i give you the opportunity to apologise? certainly, chairman, i do apologise.
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over and over, perhaps a dozen times in the hearing, the apologies kept coming. please allow me to begin by saying how sorry i am about what has happened. on behalf of the council of oxfam, we are ashamed of what has happened in haiti. in 2011, 0xfam sacked three staff and allowed four others to quit their roles in haiti, so why was it not reported to the authorities? 0xfam leaders, made a report that there was no existing press interest, it was not public, a report was made to press, that serious misconduct had happened, they did not describe that in explicit terms, they did not describe the sexual misconduct and the use of prostitutes. later came a tough question, why was one of the sacked men later rehired by oxfam? these men were predators. i quite agree, i am not excusing it. that is why we have now
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set up a database of accredited referees of oxfam. when was that started? when did you start that? we have just started that. only because you were found out. 0xfam now promises transparency, which brought an admission that new claims have come to light. across 0xfam great britain, we have had about 26 stories, reports, come to us, which were either new reports come out as a result of the stories, or earlier stories where people said, i did not necessarily report this at the time. the committee announced it will now investigate the whole sector amidst concerns 0xfam is not the only charity affected by abuse. it feels a little bit like a potential moment for you, but isn't the truth that this is a cross sector issue
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and if it had not been oxfam, it could have been a different organisation? if any good can come out of the horror of both haiti and the last couple of weeks, it is a more intensive commitment across the whole sector. 0xfam says it now has better safeguarding measures in place, but this was a bruising encounter, and will by no means have completed the organisation's difficult task of restoring its reputation. the united nations has demanded an immediate end to the targeting of civilians in syria, as government forces intensify their bombardment of eastern ghouta, the enclave held by rebels near damascus. activists say over 100 people have been killed in the last 2a hours. the upsurge in violence is part of a wider escalation of the civil war, as president bashar al—assad pushes to end the seven—year rebellion against him. viewers may find some images in this report from tom burridge disturbing.
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fear and chaos after an air strike and there is no warning when the next missile will hit. explosions. shouting. and this, the desperate scramble, the aftermath of trauma that the bombs bring. children trapped in the nightmare that is eastern ghouta, activists who support the rebels say the bombardment is as intense as it has ever been. you can hear the shouting of women and children through their homes. the missiles and mortars the missiles and dropping on us like rain. there is nowhere to hide
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from this nightmare. surrounded by syria's army, eastern ghouta has been under siege for five years. it's the last rebel held enclave and resident assad seems intent on taking it back. many other images of children in this hospital are too distressing to show. the united nations has demanded an end to the targeting of civilians. something syria denies. life goes on, in nearby in newbury and damascus. where the syrian government is firmly in control. this man says he just wants an end to the situation in any way possible. he says shelling day and night means people are too scared to send their children to school. but in eastern good to live often hang in the balance. after declaring victory
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over the so—called islamic state the syrian regime with help from russia and iran, is focused on rebel forces. and the west wants an enthusiastic backer of some rebel groups, seems unwilling or unable to respond. tonbridge, bbc news. the brexit secretary david davis has told business leaders in vienna that the uk doesn't want to undermine its neighbours when it leaves the eu. in the latest of a series of speeches by cabinet ministers, mr davis said the uk wanted to lead the way on rights and on standards — claiming britain wouldn't be plunged into a "mad max—style world borrowed from dystopian fiction." 0ur political correspondent iain watson reports. is this really some people's vision of life outside the eu, a world deregulated to the point of lawlessness, vehicles that almost certainly would not meet eu emissions and safety standards. the spectre was raised by david davis, but then he went
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to reassure business leaders that this meant nothing to him. we will continue the track record of meeting high standards after we leave the european union. now, i know that for one reason or another, there are some people who sought to question if these are really our intentions, they fear that brexit could lead to and anglo—saxon to an anglo—saxon race to the bottom, with britain plunged into mad max style world borrowing from disturbing world borrowing from dystopian fiction. these fears are based on nothing. his argument is that while we may have some different regulations of the brexit, to keep trade flowing, the eu and uk should recognise each other‘s high standards but in brussels, were finance ministers convinced? in this day and age you can't be selfish and go it alone, of course we trust david davis but
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we do not know who will come after him. david davis has made clear that britain could raise standards, not just maintain, on animal welfare and climate change, for instance, if we exceed eu minimum, could that be problems as well? that could see costs to adhere to it, that could interfere with competitiveness. that may be so. but it should not raise new trade barriers with the eu. the government vision of a post—"brexit" britain is becoming a little clearer, and on thursday, prime minister will take the cabinet away from westminster to the seclusion of a country retreat to try to resolve any outstanding disagreements and the "brexit" secretary david davis says she will keep them under lock and key until they do. we have been here before it suppose crunch meeting. we have been here before with a supposed crunch meeting. but no outcome. david davis is saying one thing,
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borisjohnson is saying another. that has not been resolved. i do not have confidence this prime minister can resolve that. ministers could not find a way forward in whitehall today, the prime minister will be looking for movement from some of them at this weeks cabinet meeting. vicki young is in vienna. it seemed afar vicki young is in vienna. it seemed a far cry from some of the people in the conservative party and in the cabinet over the years and decades, when they made the case believing the eu, saying we have to break away all this red tape is no good, it's stifling british competitiveness, really wasn't quite what david davis was saying today, actually praising some saying britain had helped shape andi some saying britain had helped shape and i think the message from him and theresa may when she made a security speech in munich at the weekend was about continued co—operation. they
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both say things will change but you are getting the impression things by not change too much. the question as well from david davis was saying to the eu partners, this is about trust, we are going to have to trust each other‘s different rules and regulations, the question is will the here and offer people in brussels to accept and crucially will cabinet ministers go along with that? vicki young. meanwhile adam fleming — whose is following the story from brussels for us — said european leaders suggested they are just negotiating trade deals as they normally would with any other country. eu finance minister swirl in brussels this morning for a regular meeting and i got the chance to ask them about the sort of thing david evans them about the sort of thing david eva ns told them about the sort of thing david evans told about that they were broadly welcoming, making two points, this isjust what broadly welcoming, making two points, this is just what the points, this isjust what the eu does anyway with international partners, saying if you follow the eu rules you will get good access to the eu markets. if you try to undercut the eu rules or do something less safely, be you wants you to do, you will get less access
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to the eu markets. the second big thing, the eu doesn't operate on speeches and warm words and pledges from politicians, they want things written down a very detailed and legally enforceable. that expanding the speech with detailed proposals about how this would work in practice and things like what authority would you have that checks both sides are playing by the same rules and have the same standards? how would you settle disputes between the sides and what punishments and sanctions will be available in the uk was in sticking to the rules? easier said than done. still a lot to talk about and i'll just introduce you to a bit of brussels jargon. this is group together as something cobbled level playing field or the lpf and i think we hear a lot about that in the next few months. adam fleming talking to my colleague a short time ago. many kentucky fried chicken outlets
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across the uk remain closed today —— because of a continuing lack of their key ingredient, chicken. the fast food chain, which has nearly 900 outlets, blames problems after switching to a new delivery firm dhl. it's encouraging staff to take leave while restaurants are closed. but the majority of outlets are franchises — which means many workers could be hit hard, as our correspondent sima kotecha reports. for chicken lovers and fast—food fans it is another day of sadness. hundreds of kfc stores closed across the country because of a shortage of britain's most popular bird meat. absolutely unbelievable, how can you run out of chicken in a kfc? this kfc in the centre of birmingham is open but it has a limited menu. it serves only chicken popcorn. the chain says almost 600 remain closed around the country and it is not clear when they will be back open. kfc says it has happened because it has changed distributors. it used to use south african owned company bidvest to transport chicken but recently changed to dhl, and that is why they say they have had some teething problems. we saw this coming weeks ago, people last week
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were earning money, working on a good product, providing good customer service and today they will struggle to put food on the table. then looking at the people working in the 900 kfc stores, they have been sent home with no pay. dhl says due to operational reasons a number of deliveries in recent days have been incomplete. they moved what looked like a relatively uncomplicated supply chain to a more complicated one and they do not seem to have pressure tested it at all. for any organisation to do that seems bizarre at best. customers have complained on social media. the chain says some staff will still be paid but many of its outlets are franchises, so it is likely they will make losses. fried chicken is not everybody‘s favoured but for those who love it, patience is wearing thin. kfc says more deliveries are being made each day but it expects disruption at some restaurants for the rest of the week.
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you are watching afternoon live, the headlines. the 0xfam chief executive apologises to mps of the sexual misconduct scandal in haiti and says 7000 regular donations have been cancelled in the last ten days. syrian government forces intensified their bombing of a rebel held enclave in damascus, activists said with an 100 people have died in the last 2a hours. david davis promises brexit will not result in a mad max style dystopia as he speaks to business leaders in dean. in a moment a plumber‘s legal battle for working rights reaches the supreme court. and in sport elise christie was disqualified in herfinal short track speed skating event at the winter olympics. judges rules she impeded two of her opponents in the
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1000 metre heat and she leaves south korea with no medals after failing in her other events as well. the same happened the last winter 0lympics. police and the fa are investigating events after wigan beat manchester city, sergio aguero claims he was battered by a supporter and its claimed man city fa ns supporter and its claimed man city fans threw missiles at police. dan biggar is back in the match against ireland at the weekend recovering from a shoulder problem ahead of schedule, williams and halfpenny or also included in the squad. more sport in about 15 minutes. the supreme court is considering an appeal that could have a major impact on this so—called gig economy. pimlico lumbers challenges a ruling that untitled one of its bombers to basic rights such as paid holiday even though he was first hired on a freelance basis. our correspondent gave us this update on the indications of the case from outside the court. it is being seen
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as important because of the way work is going nowadays. morejobs becoming self—employed, and estimate that nearly 3 million people are working as drivers, careers and suchlike as self—employed and not getting basic employment rights like all day pay but also the minimum wage and six day. arriving here this morning the boss of pimlico plumbers charlie mullins turned up in a mini convoy of two blue bentley is that he owns come but he was here to see the argument put that he once which is to say that his plumbers do quite well, some earning over £100,000 a year as self—employed. 0n the other side of it, gary smith, the plumber who worked for him for around six yea rs, who worked for him for around six years, he has won his case in the employment tribunal, the court of appeals, he's not an employee but should be regarded as a worker and that ring some of those rights, the arguments being gone over again
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today in the supreme court, will be watched closely by the likes of delivery, the takeaway delivery company which uses that model of self—employed people and goober, the right hailing app, and they have got some of their drivers and goober is appealing that to the supreme court later this year. mikel plumbers case likely to take about two wicks. —— uber. people being treated for serious mental health problems should have their debt charges and interest temporarily frozen, according to a charity. the money and mental health policy institute wants a ‘breathing space' of six weeks to be brought in. it says last year thousands of people were being pursued while in hospital for mental health problems. nina warhurst reports. you've got to pay this, you've got to pay this, when are you paying it, how are you paying it. lee suffers from bipolar disorder and mounted up
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thousands of pounds worth of debt. what would you say to people who say you have accrued debt and you should pay for it. it's hard enough to dig up pay for it. it's hard enough to dig up the phone to my mum and say i am struggling. there have been occasions when i have gone under the bed and stay there because it's the safest place. under the bed? under the bed. not under the duvet? under the bed. not under the duvet? under the bed. not under the duvet? under the bed. three instances it's got to a point where i thought, i don't think i can go on. there's been two of those instances it came very close. last year its spot 23,000 people were being chased for debt while being treated in hospitalfor the mental health, and a report todayis the mental health, and a report today is calling on government to give anyone who's in mental health crisis six weeks of breathing space meaning a freeze on interest and debt collection. the report outlines the different ways that oppression
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and anxiety can impact debt so we talked about people who lost their jobs and were two purely to pay their bills. 0thers jobs and were two purely to pay their bills. others who had been sectioned and came home to find court summons and there was even an example of somebody who dry to take their own life after visits from bailiffs. and the breathing space wouldn't make this debt disappear but it would offer some sense of control. all of the energy suppliers, banks and lenders that we spoke to said they are always keen to listen to customers who are struggling but campaigners say it's essential that changes become law. providers can often be very good people contact them but that isn't an option for many people who have an option for many people who have an acute dental illness, if you are being hospitalised in a way you are not functional. calling your lender might be something that is impossible for you to do when you are not thinking about it, you're not making the standard logical decision she may normally do. the
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father there... now lead's biggest financial headache is saving for his wedding, he says that might have happened sooner if he and given the space to take control of his debt. american students demanding action on gun control have taken their demonstrations to washington, following last week's florida school shooting in which 17 people were killed. the students want to see a turning point in the american debate about guns, after president trump promised to support efforts to improve background checks on gun ownership. ben ando reports. cassie bernall, 17. stephen curnow, 1a. as the names of the dead were read out, students lay down outside the white house to represent the 17 who were killed at marjory stoneman douglas school in florida last week. their message, said one survivor of the shooting, was simple — these demonstrations will go on until the lawmakers of the us congress do something about guns. he's going to see in our eyes that we're not going to back down, no matter what.
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we're not going to stop until this country changes. and president trump may be listening. a spokesman says he supports a bill aimed at strengthening background checks on those buying guns. it's something of a shift for a president who has had the backing of the nra, america's powerful national rifle association. it comes as 19—year—old nikolas cruz, a former student accused of the shootings, appeared in court. he bought his weapons, as many as ten, entirely legally, despite a record of mental health issues. enough is enough, enough is enough! these demonstrators may be too young to vote now but that changes with every passing day, and lawmakers know soon they'll be able to have their say at the ballot box, notjust on the streets. ben ando, bbc news. the bookmaker william hill has been fined 6.2 million pounds by the gambling commission forfailing to prevent money laundering. the commission said that "systemic" failures by senior management and ineffective social responsibility processes meant that
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ten customers were allowed to deposit large sums of money linked to criminal offences. the commission warned william hill may have to pay more if more money laundering comes to light. tim miller, from the gambling commission, says today's fine sends a message to the whole gambling industry. we know that in britain are around two and a half million people who are either problem gamblers are at risk from developing a problem so these are responsibilities of income they should take seriously. the decision shows when they don't take it seriously they should face robust and swift regulation, gambling is a fast changing area with technology making changes happening all the time, ithink making changes happening all the time, i think there are decisions which showed today the rules work, if someone doesn't comply with those rules they will face stiff regulatory action from us and i think importantly the decision today doesn't just send a think importantly the decision today doesn'tjust send a clear message to william hill about what we need to
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be doing, it sends a message to the entire gambling industry. new research shows that grey squirrels could have taken over from native red squirrels in the uk due to their problem—solving powers. a study tested both species of wild squirrel with two tasks to get hazelnuts. both were equally successful at the easy task, but more of the grey squirrels cracked the difficult one, which involved pushing and pulling levers. he rather liked the camera. let's have a look at the weather with susan powell. it's the camby for what. .. susan powell. it's the camby for what. . . the susan powell. it's the camby for what... the cam is the good bet. and that the camby for more calm, that's it in terms of weather front. clear skies? not entirely clear but high pressure. that's been a bit of cloud and drizzle, high pressure, get used to that, yawn, yawn, still high
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pressure, still here, still holding the fronts at bay. you are not coming our way but look what happens to the high, parks over scandinavia, followed this round like a pipeline, you can chase at all the way back to siberia. the clue is in the name, pretty cold this time of year and coming around the bottom of that, for us next week, it will be lovely, lovely cold air and a biting easterly wind. both fresh and you up. a bit of snow or not? or could even be small. a big area of high pressure, unless we get something developing under it, not a lot of precipitation tied in with that, mostly precipitation tied in with that, m ostly clou d precipitation tied in with that, mostly cloud and decent sunny spells but on into next week, we will be watching closely, greater chance at will be cold enough for sure. your task having gone yawn, yawn, fill that out into something about two minutes. let's look at what's going on outside today, a beautiful day in cornwall, faultless sky, a tiny cloud, you can't complain. actually
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for a good heart of the north and west, looking very pleasant. looking further east across east anglia more cloud and that is because we have got that little weak weather front that i showed you on the high—pressure chart. here is the front on the satellite witcher, you can see it's pushing cloud at the moment and more cloud across the midlands this afternoon, eastern areas most likely to get rain and drizzle out of that front in the coming hours. north and west more sunshine to come, pretty decent temperatures, 11—12d, feeling springlike. but i think is white next week is going to be all the more of a shock, it's going to be a change. 0vernight more of a shock, it's going to be a change. overnight to mind, still some cloud to the south, drizzly rain, the cloud keeping us warm like a blanket, a patchy frost, north and west, clear skies and light winds, temperatures down to —3 first thing wednesday. the clear skies setting
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us wednesday. the clear skies setting us upfor wednesday. the clear skies setting us up for the best of the sunshine as the day progresses. further east, still the remnants of the weather front in the form of cloud to produce a little bit of rain or drizzle on and off through wednesday across central parts of england. 0verall, fine story, settling down as the high—pressure ills, temperatures tomorrow already on the slide a little, down in single figures, highs of 8—9, a little taste of things to come. thursday things start to go, still holding the weather front of day in the atlantic, easterly wind beginning, and four degrees in norwich, adding the effect of the easterly wind, already feeling colder than most of us already feeling colder than most of us have got used to, if you touch thermals away, dig them out, after thursday, the high pressure starts to get to work, kicking up the easterly wind, feeding in cold air, particularly chilly nights. some decent sunshine hopefully for many of us by day. the outlook through
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the weekend, a lot of their weather but into next week, that change of type to some very cold weather, widespread frost, for some of us lingering all date next week and that will feel particularly role in the wind. time to find your thermals, simon exploration mark laughter. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: 0xfa m 0xfam reveals 700 people have stopped giving donations following the sexual misconduct scandal. the
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chief executive apologised to mps over the crisis. i am sorry, we are sorry, for the damage that 0xfam has done, both to the people of haiti and to the wider efforts of aid and development. britain will uphold rights and standards and not undercut the eu after brexit, david davis has said, saying the uk had no intention of becoming a ‘mad—max‘—style dystopia. another deadly day in syria. regime forces intensify their bombing of eastern ghouta, where100 civilians — including 20 children — are reported to have died. 0ver over half of kentucky fried chicken shops over the country remain closed following the delivery programmes which meant they ran out of chicken. kfc says they are gradually reopening over the next two days. sport now on afternoon live. the winter olympics painful to watch
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today's so goodness knows how elise christie feels. her entire careerfailed christie feels. her entire career failed —— christie feels. her entire careerfailed —— defined by earlier in south korea and russia before that four years ago. easy to forget how good she it is a short track speed skating. 0verall world champion last year, winning gold in the 1,500 metres and 1,000 metres but it has gone wrong again, a horrible inevitability about what has happened. she crashed in the 500 metre final, disqualified from the 1,500 metres semifinal. less chance saloon today, her 1,000 metre heat started, but she was badly injured. soft tissue damage and she was not right. she tried to give it a go. disqualified again. and after those three disqualifications in sochi, she seems to be jinxed when it comes to the olympics, but she has vowed to the olympics, but she has vowed to carry on.
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yes, we have a remarkable ability in this country to look on the bright side, so let's do that. we don't have to worry about winning any medals today! no, another lean dane, shall we put it that day? still a long way to go in south career with the bobsleigh and the curlers. we have always got the curlers! that goes on and on and it never stops, but a good day for the british men and women. britain have four medals on the board, a joint record, and one more would be a record. a round—up of the action from pyeongchang. but we have to start with elise christie. just three days after leaving the ice on a stretcher, elise christie was back, her 0lympic hopes online. away they go. christie goes down before they reach the very first corner! christie's bid for 1,000 metres gold got off to the worst
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possible start, but having been tripped, she earned a reprieve and the heat was rerun. clearly still troubled by an ankle injury, christie trailed her rivals. christian position to qualify! she fought back and presently to finish second and qualify for the quarterfinals. as she was carried away in discomfort, it would take another term for the worse, the judges spotting two it infringements and disqualifying the scot. so heartbreak for elise christie yet again. after failing to win a medal at the last 0lympics four years ago, history has repeated itself here in haiti. her dreams ending in bitter disappointment —— in pyeongchang. right now, a bit shell—shocked, i worked so hard to combat from this injury and 1,000 people would not have skated with my ankle the way it was. i can barely bend my knee. the only thing i can say is, i can
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promise britain i will fight back from this and i will come back from beijing. and hopefully, i can do britain proud then. for the skater and herteam, it was britain proud then. for the skater and her team, it was a huge blow. clearly, she is massively disappointed to come here as a double world champion. to go away with a fourth place ultimately. hugely disappointing. but that happens in sport. there is high jeopardy and the short track. there was better news for britain's curlers. the men produced their best performance of the competition so far, out stats linger colourfully dressed 2041 champions norway. and like the victorian —— victorious women, they close in on a second place. it was not to be for the ice dancers, finishing 11th in the free dancers, finishing 11th in the free dance vinyl. but given coombs was
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coming back from a life—threatening injury, it was a great result. don't forget to go to the bbc sport website to catch up on the action from the winter games. the football association and police are reviewing video footage following a pitch invasion at the end of wigan‘s 1—0 win against manchester city in the fa cup fifth round. two arrests were made outside the ground for affray. ten—man city were beaten by a late will grigg goal that ended their hopes of the quadruple. wigan, who are now in league one, also beat city in the 2013 cup final. they will play southampton in the quarterfinal. manchester city players were caught up in the pitch invasion and sergio aguero was involved in an altercation with one of the supporters. the striker claims he was spat at. some of the 5,000 city fans were also seen to be throwing missiles and advertising hoardings at police. wigan say they are also conducting a full investigation. dan biggar will start at fly—half for wales in their six nations match against ireland in dublin in saturday. wing liam williams and full—back leigh halfpenny also return after injury.
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biggar has made a quicker than expected comeback from a shoulder problem to start at number ten. he'll replace rhys patchell, who drops out of the match—day squad. halfpenny was a late withdrawal from the side that lost to england, while williams makes his first appearance of the championship. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. thank you very much. 0xfam revealed this morning it is investigating 26 new cases. . . of alleged sexual misconduct, reported to the charity since a scandal broke over its handling of a case in haiti. 0xfam's chief executive, mark goldring, apologised to mps today at an urgent session of the international development committee. i repeat 0xfam's broader apology and my personal apology. i am sorry, we are sorry for the damage 0xfam have done, both to the people of haiti, but also wider efforts for aid and development, by possibly undermining public support. so i wholeheartedly apologise for those comments and commit
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to work in that greater public interest so 0xfam can make a powerful role in the work we all believe in. 0xfam's international director, winnie byanyima, said some of its staff had let down the british public, but that the charity had vital work to do. some people entered our system who didn't share our values. they abused the trust of oxfam, the power of oxfam in their hands, the trust of the british public who contribute, and turned on the very people they were supposed to protect. it's true, and we are deeply sorry for that, but this lifeline that we give to people caught in conflict and in disasters, i know personally. i came to this country as a teenager, fleeing a brutal dictatorship in my country.
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i benefited from the generosity of british people. i think that lifeline, we must keep going, but we will clean up. absolutely. united nations... the united nations has demanded an immediate end to the targeting of civilians in syria, as government forces intensify their bombardment of eastern ghouta. almost 200 people and a number of children have been killed since the intensification of the bombardment on sunday. we can talk to the chair of the contemporary middle eastern studies at the london school of economics. joining me now from central london is professor fawaz gerges, we could face another aleppo. but is that a public anger of a few years ago over something like this?|j think ago over something like this?” think you're absolutely correct, simon. what the russians and the
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assad government are trying to do is repeat the aleppo model. the russian foreign ministerjust repeat the aleppo model. the russian foreign minister just said repeat the aleppo model. the russian foreign ministerjust said that. he said, ithink foreign ministerjust said that. he said, i think we can repeat the aleppo model. the strategy of both assad and russia is to force the rebels outside of ghouta, the soft belly of damascus. five miles away from the centre of damascus. the last urban centre controlled by the anti—assad rebels. my take on it is the countdown for ghouta has already begun and we don't see any kind of anger on the part of the international community because the international community because the international community because the international community no longer really pays much attention to syria. ghouta is very much involved in its operation against the kurds and there is hardly anyone there raising there is hardly anyone there raising the alarm bells about what is happening in ghouta now. turkey already warning the syrian
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government not help the fighting, thatis government not help the fighting, that is as far as that goes. in broader terms, professor, where are we with this? it is clear president assad believes he could be in the endgame. sadly, i think assad believes he could be in the endgame. sadly, ithink the assad believes he could be in the endgame. sadly, i think the assad regime is winning militarily. my ta ke regime is winning militarily. my take on it is that ghouta, where the battles taking place now, if the assad regime with the support of the russians and the russian air force, now has intensified its air strikes against ghouta in the past 48 hours. if ghouta. i think this is it. this is really the end of the rebels, their presence in a major urban area. that is why, it seems to me, assad along with iran and russia, is going for the kill. because the fall of ghouta really means the end of the major military activities in syria because the operational map
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has now been divided around the regional powers. so turkey, on the turkish—syrian border, iran fully with the assad regime. and russia has the upper hand and that is why assad thinks he can win militarily, andi assad thinks he can win militarily, and i think he is, for now. those three words, this is it. are we really that close to the end of this? maria terra leapt, buti really that close to the end of this? maria terra leapt, but i don't think syria will ever return to what used to be —— militarily. syria will be in turmoilfor a decade used to be —— militarily. syria will be in turmoil for a decade with political violence, terrorism. now the regional powers and the global powers are positioning themselves to divide the spoils among themselves. the russians and americans have already come to blows more than once. turkey is now trying to maximise its interests in syria. so even though assad might win militarily and control most of the urban centres, —— peace will never come to syria without a political
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settle m e nt come to syria without a political settlement that does not take into account the massive suffering of millions of syrians. 500,000 people had been killed, you have 5 million refugees, how can you go back to 2011? that is the assad strategy, to ta ke 2011? that is the assad strategy, to take syria back to 2011. we have talked about this over many years, hindsight is a wonderful thing, but when did the pendulum swing so violently when did the pendulum swing so viole ntly towards when did the pendulum swing so violently towards the assad regime? well, i think the russian intervention in syria two years ago was it. it was really basically, it is the most important, significant driver in shifting the balance of power in assad's favour. russian military intervention has allowed assad to go on the offensive and the fall of aleppo a year ago was really a major blow to the rebels. the fall of ghouta, if ghouta falls, this is going to be very bloody, you have 500,000 people and thousands of
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rebels. if ghouta, which is five miles away from the heart of damascus, balls, ithink miles away from the heart of damascus, balls, i think in a way, this would mean that russia has played at hand —— falls. in a very brutal and powerful way that allows assad to gain the upper hand militarily in syria. as ever, thank you very much. the home secretary, amber rudd, has confirmed that the government is in talks with the us about what to do with two men from london, suspected of being members of the so—called islamic state. alexanda kotey and el shafee elsheikh are suspected of being members of a gang of british men who murdered hostages. they were detained in syria last month, but there's no agreement yet on where they will stand trial. we're absolutely committed to making sure that they are tried, that the security of the country always comes first. these people should face the full force of the law, in terms of the terrible things that they have done. i can't be drawn on the individual circumstances
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of these two, but we're watching it carefully to make sure that they do face justice. police forces in the uk recorded nearly 65,000 child sex offences last year, an all—time high. the figures — obtained by the nspcc — reveal a sharp increase in crimes committed online, as well as rape and sexual assault. jon ironmonger reports. every eight minutes, police recorded a sexual offence against a child last year, and data from all police forces suggests the total number of offences has reached a record high, rising by 15% in 2017, compared to 2016. crimes ranged from grooming to serious sexual assaults. around a fifth were recorded against children under the age of ten. better police recording is likely to be a factor behind the figures and the nspcc says more children are finding the courage to speak out. that might be due to the fact that there's been a relatively large number of high—profile cases recently, but it's also testament
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to the good preventative work happening in schools and homes up and down the country, where children are having conversations about the signs of abuse with teachers. the research also reveals a dramatic increase in the number of online grooming offences, which account for a tenth of the total recorded, heaping more pressure on internet companies to grapple with the problem. jon ironmonger, bbc news. in a moment, the business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live. 0xfam's chief executive apologises to mps for the sexual misconduct scandal in haiti, and tells them 7,000 "regular" donations to oxfam have been cancelled in the last ten days. syrian government forces intensify their bombing of a rebel—held enclave near damascus. activists say more than 100 people have been killed in the last 24 hours. david davis promises brexit won't result in a mad—max style won't
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result in a mad—max style dystopia, as he speaks to european business leaders in vienna. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. bookmaker william hill has been hit with a £6.2 million fine for breaching anti—money—laundering and social responsibility regulations. the gambling commission said the company hadn't done enough to make its prevention measures effective, meaning ten customers could deposit money linked to criminal offences. it's the second largest fine ever handed out by the commission. the supreme court will consider an appeal today, that could have a major impact on what's known as the "gig economy". pimlico plumbers is challenging a ruling that entitled one of its plumbers to basic workers' rights, such as paid holiday, even though he was first hired on a freelance basis. gary smith began his fight when he wanted to reduce his hours following a heart attack. the court of appeal ruled in his favour a year ago, but the firm is challenging that decision.
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we have got numbers now today as well from warm—up. the huge us retailer which owns asda. in stores open a year or more, they rose for the quarter to the end of december by half a percent. this is the key christmas trading period. but that does mark a slowdown from the 1.1% rise reported in the third quarter. compared to tesco for the same period, that was 2.3%. and job cuts at asda already. yes, they announced 28 morejobs will go at head office on top of the 300 they announced back in september. the bigger picture now with warm—up. for more on this, let's talk to yogita limaye, our business correspondent in new york. let's talk about warm—up. the figures were good. doing well in
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terms of online sales. that seems to be the number disappointing a nalysts, be the number disappointing analysts, it is 8.5% down, so taking analysts, it is 8.5% down, so taking a beating. the e—commerce sales growth came at 23%. that might seem like a good number, but people were expecting a lot more. people were expecting a lot more. people were expecting between 40—50% e—commerce sales growth, so that seems to have been the number disappointing the most. as far as what the company say, the reason for that is in 2016, they acquired this american online retailer called jet .com. they say they have invested in that decision and reshuffling that division and in this quarter, that is why you have seen growth of only 23%. they have forecast in 2018, you will see
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e—commerce sales growth of about 40%. this is key. to get this right, given the competition from amazon. that is exactly right. they anticipated they need to grow in that space, which is what led to this acquisition in 2016. also, the pressure is growing because last year, you had amazon entering walmart‘s core business area, where they acquired whole foods. they have more than one —— 500 stores and what they will do with those stores. so you now have these two companies competing with each other notjust in the virtual and online space, but also, in the physical retail space. and that is happening in the uk as well. you look at the sales of asda up well. you look at the sales of asda up of the key trading period and the likes of budget retailers like
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little doing extremely well. it is very competitive in this sector. -- two. it is and walmart has admitted they have a lot of more work to do in the uk where they are lagging behind the likes of tesco and sainsbury‘s for example. but i think as far as the international market is concerned, their key areas and countries of focus, they are china and india, that is what they have said. in china, they have basically, they have sold an online retailing platform they opened in return for a sta ke platform they opened in return for a stake in that company. so they are hoping that partnership pays off of them. and the other market they are keen to focus on, a huge and massive market of 1.3 billion people is india. we will be watching that in new york. thank you very much for that update. something you don't often see on the
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menu atjamie 0liver restaurant, closure. yes, it is happening more and more. today, two of jamie 0liver‘s flagship london restaurants have gone into administration. 0ne flagship london restaurants have gone into administration. one in piccadilly will close a year after a major relaunch and the other at saint pauls, he bought back immediately as part of a prepacked arrangement where you can buy back valuable assets of a business before they go into administration. and it comes on top of those 12 out of 37 jamie's italian restaurants which closed last month. so it really is quite tricky for the chain at the moment. we heard thatjamie's italian restaurants had debts of around £71 million. the chef himself put £3 million into the business. it has to be said that other parts of his business as licensing arm and publishing arm are not doing badly. he is a canny businessman and it
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suggests perhaps we are changing the way we go out. you can get very good meals ordered in! certainly can. you have the likes of uber eats competing. that could be good for the restaurant business, picking up and delivering at home, but eat in restaurants are experiencing problems. by rittenberg chain announcing the closure of 20 stores and other chains finding it ha rd to stores and other chains finding it hard to recruit the staff —— the byron burgers chain. so not pretty for the restaurant business at the moment. checking in with the markets. ftse100 has been in negative territory for most of today. the figures did not meet expectations. minier bhp billiton is among the biggest fallers — its underlying profits rose by 25%, but just slightly missed the forecast, which partly explains
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the drop in the share price. hsbc profits more than doubled but also fell short of expectations they are highly expectant! more from you later! ina in a speech to the national farmers union conference, the environment secretary michael gove outlined his plans replaced the present system of subsidies with funding for issues such as conservation and animal warfare. payments amounting to £3 billion a year based on the amount of land they own. they travelled here from all over the uk and they have many questions for michael gove. is he going to do a betterjob in the agriculture sector than he did in education? brexit, what will go on in brexit?
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at the moment, farmers get paid around £3 billion a year in subsidies by the european union. take that away and half would go out of business. please give the of business—iw of business—iw of state, mr michael gove, a m from the environment secretary. . m, . let's make frerh the environment secretary. . m, . let's make the most of it. he believes the problem of rural broadband could be solved. unit for sort broadband and 4g coverage for all paid for by the money we no longer have to give the eu, that is what i believe by taking back control. that is not the limit of my ambition for rural britain and ourfarming of my ambition for rural britain and our farming sector. i of my ambition for rural britain and ourfarming sector. i have of my ambition for rural britain and our farming sector. i have argued before we should not compete on the basis of a race to the bottom, but occu py basis of a race to the bottom, but occupy the high ground of stronger environmental animal welfare and quality standards. mr gove also said post—brexit, more public money should be used to help farmers invest in new technology. this farming mastership is already using it to better housed animals and to grow crops. we always invest in technology,
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innovation in animal handling and animal welfare systems. crop production, innovation in different techniques in growing crops. we do it all the time as farmers but any helping hand would only produce more productivity. that does notjust more mean more yields, but more imports. there is another issue, who will leave the nfu through one of its most turbulent period since the second world war? by second world war? by the end of tomorrow, there could bea by the end of tomorrow, there could be a first woman president in the 110 year history of the national farmers union. the winner will be announced tomorrow afternoon. time for a look at the weather. here's susan powell. hello, there is plenty of fair weather for the british isles hello, there is plenty of fair weatherfor the british isles in the next few days. even in the next week, it is going to turn increasingly chilly. today, a
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weather front in the east. this cloud bringing patchy outbreaks of rain and drizzle. and more out of that this evening and overnight. the cloud helping to hold the temperatures. sunspots tipping the freezing but essentially a couple of degrees above. further north and west, clearer skies and lighter winds and lows of —2, minus three. the weather front is short lived in the east. high—pressure is going to be eroding it in the next 24 hours. you see the remnants on tuesday and by wednesday, it has practically gone, just a legacy of cloud, high—pressure dominating for the next ten days. more on the effects injusta next ten days. more on the effects injust a moment. wednesday, basically bringing a largely fine day, still some cloud left over from that weather front leading into england and wales will stop but most areas getting brightness, already feeling a little bit cooler than it has done today with highs of 78
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degrees. for thursday, the high—pressure very much doing its and holding these weather fronts at bay in the atlantic, bringing a lot of fine weather. some patchy cloud. the biggest change for thursday is the easterly wind strengthening. just 4 degrees in norwich on thursday and with the wind, it feels considerably colder. the wind really comes into play by the weekend and next week. the easterly remaining strong in london and cardiff on friday and saturday. sunny spells across the british isles thanks to this height. across scandinavia on saturday, a fine weekend but the air bleeding around the bottom of this height from siberia. particularly cold at the moment, really starting to push across the british isles on monday and tuesday. and my goodness, we will be let! next week, a lot of fine weather, some decent sunshine around, but widespread frost and the wind is especially raw.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at three... as 7,000 people cancel regular donations to oxfam injust 10 days — after allegations of sexual misconduct by staff — this from the charity‘s chief executive: i am sorry, we are sorry, for the damage that 0xfam has done, both to the people of haiti and to the wider efforts of aid and development. syrian government forces intensify their bombing of a rebel—held enclave near damascus, with 100 civilians — including 20 children — among those reported killed. brexit won't be a mad max style dystopia: the brexit secretary's reassuring message to european business leaders. a parliamentary report in to how royal bank of scotland allegedly mistreated small businesses is to be published coming up on afternoon live, we've
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got all the sport. its not good news. all over for elise christie, her 0lympicjinx continues, news. all over for elise christie, her 0lympic jinx continues, she's been disqualified in pyeongchang. thank you. and with the latest on the weather, here's susan powell. we have temperatures in double figures for some of us this afternoon, keeping some of the bright weather next week, are from siberia and a biting easterly wind coming in. more hamming up. thank you. also coming up — the pressure of dealing with debt when suffering from mental health problems. 0ne charity calls for a freeze on debts while treatment takes place. hello everyone, this is afternoon
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live, iam hello everyone, this is afternoon live, i am simon mccoy. the chief executive of oxfam has said sorry for the way he defended the charity after claims of sexual misconduct. mark goldring had accused people of "gunning" for the organisation, declaring that no—one had "murdered babies in their cots." appearing before mps, he revealed that there've been 26 new reports of misconduct since the haiti revelations emerged. the scandal has taken its toll on the charity, with 7 thousand people cancelling regular donations in ten days. here's our correspondent matt cole — and a warning — there is flash photography in his report. if there was any doubt that the senior 0xfam leaders were going to face a tough time, it was dispelled by the very first question. in your interview with the guardian published on saturday, you appear to be downplaying the scandal, using the parallel with the murder of babies in their cots, which many people regarded as grossly inappropriate, can i give you the opportunity to apologise? certainly, chairman, i do apologise. over and over, perhaps a dozen times in the hearing, the
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apologies kept coming. please allow me to begin by saying how sorry i am about what has happened. on behalf of the council of oxfam, we are ashamed of what has happened in haiti. in 2011, 0xfam sacked three staff and allowed four others to quit their roles in haiti, so why was it not reported to the authorities? 0xfam leaders made a report that there was no existing press interest, it was not public, that serious misconduct had happened, they did not describe that in explicit terms, they did not describe the sexual misconduct and the use of prostitutes. we know now that was not enough. later came a tough question, why was one of the sacked men later rehired by 0xfam?
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these men were predators. i quite agree, i am not excusing it. that is why we have now set up a database of accredited referees of oxfam. when was that started? when did you start that? we have just started that. only because you were found out. 0xfam now promises transparency, which brought an admission that new claims have come to light. across 0xfam great britain, we have had about 26 stories, reports, come to us, which were either new reports come out as a result of the stories, or earlier stories where people said, i did not necessarily report this at the time. the committee announced it will now investigate the whole sector amidst concerns 0xfam is not the only charity affected by abuse. it feels a little bit like a potential ratners moment for you, but isn't the truth that this is a cross sector issue and if it had not been oxfam, it could have been a different organisation?
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if any good can come out of the horror of both haiti and the last couple of weeks, it is a more intensive commitment across the whole sector. 0xfam says it now has better safeguarding measures in place, but this was a bruising encounter, and will by no means have completed the organisation's difficult task of restoring its reputation. the united nations has demanded an immediate end to the targeting of civilians in syria, as government forces intensify their bombardment of eastern ghouta, the enclave held by rebels near damascus. activists say over 100 people have been killed in the last 24 hours. the upsurge in violence is part of a wider escalation of the civil war, as president bashar al—assad pushes to end the seven—year rebellion against him. viewers may find some images in this report from tom burridge disturbing. fear and chaos after an air strike and there is no warning
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when the next missile will hit. explosions. shouting. and this, the desperate scramble, the aftermath of trauma that the bombs bring. children trapped in the nightmare that is eastern ghouta, activists who support the rebels say the bombardment is as intense as it has ever been. you can hear the shouting of women and children through their homes. the missiles and mortars dropping on us like rain. there is nowhere to hide from this nightmare. surrounded by syria's army, eastern ghouta has been under siege for five years. it's the last rebel held
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enclave and resident enclave and president assad seems intent on taking it back. many other images of children in this hospital are too distressing to show. the united nations has demanded an end to the targeting of civilians. something syria denies. life goes on, in nearby damascus. where the syrian government is firmly in control. this man says he just wants an end to the situation in any way possible. he says shelling day and night means people are too scared to send their children to school. but in eastern ghouta lives often hang in the balance. after declaring victory over the so—called islamic state the syrian regime with help from russia and iran, is focused on rebel forces. and the west, once an enthusiastic backer of some rebel groups, seems unwilling
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or unable to respond. tom burridge, bbc news. let's go to a root and our correspondent is there. this particular warming is the worst for some time, isn't it? 0urs let's go to beirut. people inside describe it asa to beirut. people inside describe it as a hell day, this is the worst the area has seen or witnessed in the past years, area has seen or witnessed in the past yea rs, we area has seen or witnessed in the past years, we have been talking to people on the ground, the number of deaths reached over 100 yesterday and have reached 70 today, the government and the force has targeted hospitals, seven hospitals are out of service now, degrees, the main bakery that provides food for the people there is reduced to
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rubble, also the streets connect inc towns to towns have been bombed, ambulances not able to move our rescue. we've been talking to some of the aid workers, the rescue workers, they said they are not able to pull the bodies from the ground, people are hiding in underground basements but it's also not safe cos the bombardment are still continuing. it's really a nightmare, a hell as they describe it. have inevitably come persons being drawn with what happened in a level? definitely, this is quite different from aleppo, it witnessed terrible situation, we solve the evacuation last year, people are so scared that they will face the same destiny and they will face the same destiny and they will be pushed out of their town but what we are seeing now with the intensifying shelling by government forces, only tells they are pushing towards the end and we
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might expect some ground operations soon by government forces. might expect some ground operations soon by government forcesm might expect some ground operations soon by government forces. it would appear the support that there was for the rebels has all but disappeared? well, the support of the opposition in general, disappeared, not only the rebels. the saudis have turned to the russians, the americans have handed over to the russians to find a solution and the russians are backing the government. the opposition, the fighters, mainly civilians, find themselves alone by the world and the un is not able to help and even if they issue state m e nts help and even if they issue statements condemning the situation, that's not going to stop are suffering, that's not going to stop the killing there. pretty much the same sentence you hear from everyone you talk to inside here, we are left alone to die. thank you. a controversial report into how
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royal bank of scotland allegedly mistreated small businesses has just been published by mps. it comes after they ordered the head of the financial conduct authority to publish the report earlier this month. 0r economics correspondent is here. you have it with you. how uncomfortable is this going to be for rbs? let me put it this way, this brown envelope has been for this brown envelope has been for this report has been sitting in the last six months, we haven't been able to publish it ourselves, the concern of the regulator is so electrified, if you like, they hadn't been prepared to put it out themselves. mps have asked andrew bailey the chief executive of the financial conduct authority to publish it repeatedly and here are fused but then it was leaked to mp5, they threatened to publish it, the chair of the treasury select committee said regulator if you don't publish it, we demand you handed over, unusual step and published it ourselves, that's what they've just done. let me give you a
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flavour why it's such an explosive report. it's because it says grg history did thousands of small business customers and there was widespread and systematic mistreatment and that wasn't just an isolated thing. it was the thing of an intentional and coordinated strategy that management was aware of what should have been aware of that allowed per practice to develop. so we are talking specifically about the treatment of small businesses here? that's right, going back to the crash, in the wake of the 2008 crashed, the bank had to shrink its loan book and that have thousands of small business customers who had taken out loans but weren't maintaining their repayments perfectly well. what happened subsequently a lot of them we re happened subsequently a lot of them were put into the global restructuring group, who said it was there to help businesses and turn their fortunes around but in fact, thatis their fortunes around but in fact, that is of helping them turn their fortu nes that is of helping them turn their fortunes around was burry much subservient to the purpose of making
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money and we know about huge fees that were levied on them, there is evidence in the report that suggests they were making up those fees and using those fees as leveraged to obtain stakes in their customer's businesses. how damaging could this be for them? very damaging, it's all ready been damaging with a bang, it's also damaging for the regulator because the regulator sat on this report since 2016. at the end of 2016 venues now published a report showing a leak of internal documents from the bank there was a summary of this report that was put out by the regulator. the summary referred to ina regulator. the summary referred to in a isolated examples of bad factors and neglected to mention what's here, but it was unintentional, coordinated strategy known about by management. andy, thank you. you are watching afternoon live, the headlines, the 0xfa m afternoon live, the headlines, the 0xfam chief executive apologises to mps for the sexual misconduct scandal in haiti and tells them 7000 regular donations to the charity had
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been cancelled in the last ten days. syrian government forces intensified the bombing of a rebel held enclave near damascus, activists said with than 100 people have died in the last 24 hours. david davis promises brexit will not result in a mad max style dystopia as he speaks to european business leaders in vienna. elise christie has been disqualified at herfinal short track elise christie has been disqualified at her final short track speed skating event at the winter 0lympics. judges ruled she impeded two of her opponents in her opening 1000 metre heat, she leaves south korea with no medals after failing in her other two events, the same happened at the last games in saatchi. police and the fa investigate events at full—time after wigan beat man city in the fa cup. sergio aguero claims he was verbally abused and spat that via supporter. city fans threw missiles are police. dan biggar is back in the wales 15 per the six nations match against ireland on saturday, the fly—half recovering from a shoulder problem. i'll be back with
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a full update on afternoon live in the next 15 minutes. the brexit secretary david davis has told business leaders in vienna that the uk doesn't want to undermine its neighbours when it leaves the eu. in the latest of a series of speeches by cabinet ministers, mr davis said the uk wanted to lead the way on rights and on standards — claiming britain wouldn't be plunged into a "mad max—style world borrowed from dystopian fiction." 0ur political correspondent iain watson reports. is this really some people's vision of life outside the eu, a world deregulated to the point of lawlessness, vehicles that almost certainly would not meet eu emissions and safety standards. the spectre was raised by david davis, but then he went to reassure business leaders that this meant nothing to him. we will continue the track record of meeting high standards after we leave the european union. now, i know that for
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one reason or another, there are some people who sought to question if these are really our intentions, they fear that brexit could lead to an anglo—saxon race to the bottom, with britain plunged into mad max style world borrowing from dystopian fiction. these fears are based on nothing. his argument is that while we may have some different regulations after brexit, to keep trade flowing, the eu and uk should recognise each other‘s high standards but in brussels, were finance ministers convinced? in this day and age you can't be selfish and go it alone, selfish and go it alone. of course we trust david davis but we do not know who will come after him. david davis has made clear that britain could raise standards, not
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just maintain them, on animal welfare and climate change, for instance, if we exceed eu minimum, could that be problematic as well? that could see costs to adhere to it, that could interfere with competitiveness. that may be so. but it should not raise new trade barriers with the eu. the government vision of a post—"brexit" britain is becoming a little clearer, and on thursday, prime minister will take the cabinet away from westminster to the seclusion of a country retreat to try to resolve any outstanding disagreements and the "brexit" secretary david davis says she will keep them under lock and key until they do. we have been here before with a supposed crunch meeting. but no outcome. david davis is saying one thing, borisjohnson is saying another. that has not been resolved. i do not have confidence this prime minister can resolve that. ministers could not find a way forward in whitehall today, the prime minister will be looking for movement from some of them at this week's cabinet meeting.
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bethany bell is in vienna, i don't know if they watch mad max there are but did they get what david davis was saying? i was talking to some of the people in the audience and they certainly saw this as a much more reassuring tone from david davis. this reassuring, we want to keep our same high standards, we want to keep things furry close when it comes to regulation. so certainly they see this as being very different from the rhetoric overhearing a year or so ago. the question some of them were asking themselves is if britain wa nts to were asking themselves is if britain wants to keep things so much the same, why do they want to lead the eu? and also, if they want to keep things the same when it comes to
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things the same when it comes to things like regulation, that may be very difficult file they are rejecting the single market and the customs union at the same time. yes, certainly, a softer tone which one man in particular it down to in his view, he thought written was now experiencing reality biting. but still not exactly clear as to what will happen down the line. bethany, we are going to have to leave it there, the snow is playing havoc with the signal but thank you. jeremy corbyn has vowed to take on the city of london if he becomes prime minister. speaking at a conference he called for the fundamental rethink of the finance sector and how its regulated. for a generation instead of serving finance, instead of serving industry, politicians have served finance. we've seen for a bad the productive economy, public services, people's lives being held hostage by
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a small number of too big to fail banks. and financial institutions, ice and pc no more. the next labour government will be the first in 40 yea rs government will be the first in 40 years to stand up for the real economy, manufacturing economy. we will take decisions and decisive action to make finance the servant of industry, not the masters of all. the rain finance doesn't stop at the gates of the city of london, the extra ct of gates of the city of london, the extract of logic has spread into all areas of life, with short—term performance and narrow shareholder value prioritised over long run growth and wider economic benefit. that was jeremy corbyn. many kentucky fried chicken outlets across the uk remain closed today because of a continuing lack of their key ingredient, chicken. the fast food chain, which has nearly 900 outlets, blames problems after switching to a new delivery firm dhl. it's encouraging staff to take leave while restaurants are closed. but the majority of outlets are franchises — which means many workers could be hit hard, as our correspondent sima kotecha reports. for chicken lovers and fast—food fans it is another day of sadness.
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hundreds of kfc stores closed across the country because of a shortage of britain's most popular bird meat. absolutely unbelievable, how can you run out of chicken in a kfc? this kfc in the centre of birmingham is open but it has a limited menu. it serves only chicken popcorn. the chain says almost 600 remain closed around the country and it is not clear when they will be back open. kfc says it has happened because it has changed distributors. it used to use south african owned company bidvest to transport chicken but recently changed to dhl, and that is why they say they have had some teething problems. we saw this coming weeks ago, people last week were earning money, working on a good product, providing good customer service and today they will struggle to put food on the table. then looking at the people working in the 900 kfc stores, they have been sent home with no pay. dhl says due to operational reasons
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a number of deliveries in recent days have been incomplete. they moved what looked like a relatively uncomplicated supply chain to a more complicated one and they do not seem to have pressure tested it at all. for any organisation to do that seems bizarre at best. customers have complained on social media. the chain says some staff will still be paid but many of its outlets are franchises, so it is likely they will make losses. fried chicken is not everybody‘s favoured but for those favourite but for those who love it, patience is wearing thin. kfc says more deliveries are being made each day but it expects disruption at some restaurants for the rest of the week. you are watching afternoon live. getting started in the world of work
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is hard enough but if you do with adversity like all health things get harder. 0ur adversity like all health things get harder. our next burst knows that all too well, kyle struggled with type one diabetes during gcse and a—level is undecided to set up business on his own. he now runs his own digital animation business with help from the princes trust and was nominated for an entrepreneur award, he can say, i'm not so good, in the south—west and he won that. he's now on the short list for the national princes trust awards of the year. that will be presented why prince charles next month. and it's a great pleasure to see you here, ijust wa nt to pleasure to see you here, ijust want to talk about when people say adversity, when you are doing your exams, life was difficult, type one diabetes, the trade, it can cause problems. it can kind of catch you out both ways, if you don't treat yourself you end up falling asleep and if you treat yourself with too much insulin you fall asleep forever. it's a really fine balance. a difficult education if you like,
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and then, what made you decide to go on your own? i found out through education you tend to do well at things that you are interested in andi things that you are interested in and i was very interested in tv and creating short films, animations and whatnot and i kind of left education thinking, what do i want to do next andi thinking, what do i want to do next and ijust thinking, what do i want to do next and i just wasn't thinking, what do i want to do next and ijust wasn't really thinking, what do i want to do next and i just wasn't really stimulated by what was going on in the universities face. and i wasjust kind ofjumping universities face. and i wasjust kind of jumping between jobs, universities face. and i wasjust kind ofjumping betweenjobs, kind of raise the money to start what i wanted, cooking pizzas at glastonbury, hence the name for a thought which is the name of my business. i was at an end and i wa nted business. i was at an end and i wanted to run a business but often or not you don't really know how to go about doing that and certainly when you live in the sticks, i'm from over combe in north devon, you know, on the coast, not any people even know where that is.” know, on the coast, not any people even know where that is. i think you are doing it a disservice but all
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right! in terms of that decision, any tv production costs money, for it you do. that is the question i asked myself, where can i find money? essentially i was looking around and going to a bank and asking for money is a big thing, certainly in education they don't teach you the basics of essentially how to live your life, the tax system, it got to the point i was naive, i thought i am going to run my own video production company, done and then i was like, oh no, this could catch me out, i could be fined a lot of money and i got stressed about it. to be honest. someone recommended the princes trust and you know, the support that they have for young people to take someone from a situation where you know they have a dream and they lay down the ground work to build a business, as i was going to go on to
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say. it's notjust the cash, it's the support. the support is brilliant, ian was my mentor, he literally, he certainly in a rural environment, you get tunnel vision running a business, you don't really you know, you don't have that many people around you to ask am i doing the right thing and to have that person, that support, to kind of sit down with someone, skype someone and ask, is this naive or not? and to have that support throughout the process was invaluable, really. you wa nt process was invaluable, really. you want in the south—west region, a big wheel, how is the business doing, how successful a re wheel, how is the business doing, how successful are you?” wheel, how is the business doing, how successful are you? i guess i've kind of gone from dealing with local family businesses in north devon to kind of dealing on a european level which you know, if i told myself a few years ago i'd be doing that i probably would have in pulling my jaw from the floor. but was quite, i'm happy with the way it's going
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now and it's growing right fast now. you've been nominated for a national award, how big a deal with that be? ididn't award, how big a deal with that be? i didn't know about that until a fewer hours ago, i was quite shocked. it is, i'm quite frankly stoked. i guess, shocked. it is, i'm quite frankly stoked. iguess, i shocked. it is, i'm quite frankly stoked. i guess, i can't... shocked. it is, i'm quite frankly stoked. iguess, i can't... if you wanted... if i won it i would be with, the opportunities it would open for the ability to be an ambassadorfor the open for the ability to be an ambassador for the trust, to open for the ability to be an ambassadorfor the trust, to be ambassador for the trust, to be able to say to young people, you can do that. it would be, you know, it would mean a lot to me, that's what i'm saying. do you know what i've got here? the national rinses trust and enterprise award winner is... kyle chivers! there you are. that is the press. is it real? it is. thank you so much. thank you to the trust,
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they've obviously been a driving force behind the business and quite frankly stoked. without them, you wouldn't be here, for sure. what wouldn't be here, for sure. what would you be doing? i certainly wouldn't be sitting in the bbc‘s studios talking to you. i would have founded a lot harder to realise my ambitions of working and running a media business which is incredibly rewarding. i wouldn't have all of the business relationships that i have managed to put together and work with over the years. this really m ea ns work with over the years. this really means a lot to me. many, many congratulations, much better than prince charles handing you an award, you've had it here live on the bbc. cheering applause that's good to do something nice and good for a change. thank you so much. we will see you again in march. time for a weather update. plenty of fair weather for the british isles in the next few days
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but turning increasingly chilly. a weather front in the east, this line of cloud bringing patchy at bricks of cloud bringing patchy at bricks of rain and drizzle, more to come from that this evening and overnight. —— patchy at bricks. sunspots dipping down to freezing, a couple of degrees above, further north and west tira skies, overnight lows of —2 minus three. the weather front a very short lived there in the east, high pressure all the file eroding it through the next 24 hours. the remnants on tuesday, buy wednesday do practically gone, a legacy of cloud, high—pressure dominating, for at least the next ten days. more and the effect that will have in a moment. wednesday, basically, a largely fine day, still some cloud left from the weather front feeding into england and wales, the odd spot of drizzle, was to areas with some brightness, feeling a little bit cooler than it has done with highs of 7—8d.
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thursday, high—pressure doing its job, holding the weather front at bay in the atlantic, bringing fine weather, there will be some patchy cloud around, perhaps the biggest change on thursday will be the easterly wind strengthening, four degrees in norwich on thursday, at the effect of the wind and it will feel considerably colder. the wind coming into play by the weekend and next week, notice the easterly remain strong for london and cardiff, friday and saturday, sunny spells widely across the british isles hangs to the high. across scandinavia, a fine weekend to come, they are coming our way feeding round the bottom of this high—pressure, coming from siberia, cold enough for any time of year but had to kill me at the moment, the cold are starting to push across the british isles on monday. my goodness, we will feel it. next week, a lot of fine weather, still some decent sunshine, widespread
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frost and that wind will be especially raw. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. 0xfam reveals 700 people have stopped giving regular donations to the charity following the sexual misconduct scandal. the charity's chief executive apologised to mps over the crisis. i am sorry, we are sorry, for the damage that 0xfam has done, both to the people of haiti and to the wider efforts of aid and development. mps have released a report by the financial regulator which says rbs mistreated thousands of small firms, hitting them with new fees and increased interest rates. britain will uphold rights and standards and not undercut the eu after brexit, david davis has promised, saying the uk had no intention of becoming a mad max—style dystopia. another deadly day in syria — regime forces intensify their bombing of eastern ghouta where100 civilians —
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including 20 children — are reported to have died. just over half of kentucky fried chicken shops across the country remain closed — following the dhl delivery problems which meant they ran out of chicken. kfc says they'll gradually reopen over the next two days. sport now on afternoon live with 0lly foster. we were talking about how there was concern if elise christie had more problems, and it has happened again, and she goes home empty—handed. when she crashed in the 500 metres final, her team said they were ready for this, they were going to spring into elise christie mould, and they had a
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psychologist to look after her. but then she was disqualified from the semifinal a few days ago, and hurt herself. nothing broken, but a lot of tissue damage. she made the start line for the 1000 metres today, she is world champion and that, but she was disqualified for impeding an opponent. put together the three disqualifications in sochi four yea rs disqualifications in sochi four years ago, you wonder what is going on behind—the—scenes at team gb to look after her and keep her chin up somehow. but she has vowed to carry on until beijing in four years. and there are no more medals for britain today? yes, another lean bay, the british
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tea m yes, another lean bay, the british team are stuck on four medals, but the jammes go on until sunday. there are always the curling team who are looking good for the semifinals. elise christie was back, her 0lympic hopes on the line. and she goes down before they reach the very first corner. her bid for 1000 metres gold got off to the worst start, but having been tripped up, she earned a reprieve. clearly still troubled by an ankle injury, she trailed her rivals in the rerun. she fought back impressively to finish second, and qualify for the quarterfinals. as she was carried away in discomfort, her native another turn for the
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worse, with thejudges her native another turn for the worse, with the judges spotting two infringements and disqualifying her. heartbreakfor infringements and disqualifying her. heartbreak for elise christie yet again. afterfailing to wind a medal at the last 0lympics four years ago, history has repeated itself. her dreams have ended in bitter disappointment. i'm a bit shell—shocked, i worked so hard to come back from this injury, i think 1000 people would not have competed with my ankle how it was. the only thing i can say is that i can promise britain i will fight back from this and we'll come back for beijing. hopefully i can do britain proud then. for elise christie and 13, it was a huge blow. clearly she is disappointed to come here as a double world champion and go away with a fourth place, ultimately, is hugely disappointing. that happens
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in sport, there is highjeopardy in the short track. he will pick up his three. better news for the curling tea m three. better news for the curling team as the men produced their best performance of the competition so far, it does linger colourfully dressed 2014 champions norway, and like the victorious women, they close in on a semifinal place. it was not to be for penny combs and nick buckland, finishing 11th in the free dance final, but didn't penny combs was returning from a career threatening injury, it was a respectable result. do not forget, the bbc‘s sport website, it has every winter sport you could hope to see. more a reaction to elise christie crashing out. team gb sitting not so pretty in 16th place. the football association and police are reviewing
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video footage of a pitch invasion at the end of wigan's 1—0 win against manchester city in the fa cup fifth round. two arrests were made outside the ground for a free. city were beaten by a late goal that ended the hopes of the quadruple. wigan are now in league 1, and also beat manchester city in the 2013 cup. double face southampton in the quarterfinals. some of the 5000 supporters were seen to be throwing missiles and advertising hoardings at police. the wigan —— say they are conducting a full investigation. street to the government responding
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to req u ests street to the government responding to requests for alfie dingley, a child whose parents wa nted dingley, a child whose parents wanted to allow him to use medical cannabis. you will know mr speaker, that the current situation is that cannabis is not recognised in the uk as having any medicinal benefits. it is therefore listed as a schedule one drug under the misuse of drugs regulations 2001. this means it is unlawful to produce, supply or possess raw cannabis unless it is for the purposes of research. products must be thoroughly tested in the uk to provide the necessary assurances of their efficacy,
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quality and safety. we do have a clear regime in place administered by the medicines and health care products regulatory agency to enable medicines including those containing controlled drugs such as cannabis to develop, license and be made available to patients in the uk. the home office will consider issuing a licence to enable trials of any new medicine under schedule one to the misuse of drugs regulations 2001, providing it complies with appropriate ethical approval is. cannabis —based products should be treated in the same way as other drugs, meaning they should go through the normal testing procedures applying to any other medicines. the current situation is that outside of research we would not issue licences for the personal consumption of cannabis because it is listed as a schedule one drug. however, we are aware of differing
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approaches in other countries, and continue to monitor the world health organization's committee on drug dependence, which is committed to reviewing the use of medicinal cannabis. i am also aware that the private members bill, before he sta rts private members bill, before he starts chuntering, the legislation for the use of cannabis for medical purposes, will give the hosts the opportunity to debate the wider policy. —— will give the house the opportunity to debate. we do not wa nt opportunity to debate. we do not want people to suffer unnecessarily, but we also want cannabis to be subject to the same regulatory framework as all other substances. all the medicines tested for their safety at prescribed for uk children. can i thank him for his determination at the beginning of his response to this urgent question
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about whether he will find a solution to this. i know that will also be welcomed by my right honourable friend the attorney general, alfie dingley's mp. iwould hope the home office will find a way to stop standing behind a 1966 scheduling of cannabis having no medicinal benefit whatsoever, there are soon to be 15 states of the european union have all found a way to license the medicinal use of cannabis. is he aware of the position of the republic of ireland, who have a legal framework —— similar towers, who have a legal framework —— similartowers, and who have a legal framework —— similar towers, and allowed medicinal cannabis to be used in situations such as alfie. 78% of people in the united kingdom think we should find a way of using
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cannabis —based medicines. most people instinctively understand the pain and symptom relief available from cannabis —based medicines. renewal from the review of 2016, commissioned by the parliamentary group for drug policy reform, but there is good, peer review medical evidence of the effectiveness of cannabis for conditions associated with multiple sclerosis, epilepsy and chemotherapy. failure of the government to move from its current position would sentence alfie back to the steroid —based treatment he was receiving before he went to the netherlands, which is likely to give him early psychosis and a premature death. it also means british citizens are being denied all the potential medical and symptomatic benefits that could come from a properly licensed, regulated and researched action programme. if we do not give licences to do the
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research, we do not get the product. where will not have to rely on the wisdom of crowds and illegally sourced and unreliable product, but on peer—reviewed evidence —based treatments produced to pharmaceutical standards, i urge my right honourable friend, who is very far from being cruel and heartless, to help the manufacturers of this drug that will save his life, or for his doctors and family to find a way through, to get a license to treat a month for him to instruct his officials to assist. indeed, it is an indication of just officials to assist. indeed, it is an indication ofjust how messed up our management of this issue is, it is the home office minister answering this and not a health minister. this is an open and shut case. can i thank him for that, i totally respect the position he is m,
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totally respect the position he is in, and! totally respect the position he is in, and i would like to savour the the minister of health is next to me in listening mode. can i give him my reassurances. he has made many representations to me on the half of alfie dingley and his family, that it is clear there are some special circumstances to the case, which need to be respected, i have undertaken to meet the family and i will do that as quickly as possible, andi will do that as quickly as possible, and i undertake to explore every option within the regulatory framework that exists. i know them well enough to know that he will understand the importance of proceeding on an evidence —based basis particularly when it concerns the safety of drugs and children. 0ur position has been established
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for a long time, supported by expert opinion, but we are aware that the position is shifting in other countries, and we monitor that. cannabis is an extremely complex substance and the who are clear looking at it from every angle in terms of getting an up—to—date review. we are monitoring it closely. however our current position is what it is, but as i have undertaken, i will explore every option to see whether we can find a solution to the extremely emotive case. we will leave that urgent question, and for the mother of alfie dingley, time is of the essence. she said that while her son was being treated abroad, the medication prescribed the paediatric neurologist saw that his seizures
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we re neurologist saw that his seizures were reducing in number, duration and severity, and at one point, while in the uk, alfie had 3000 seizures and 400 hospital visits. but while abroad he went 21 days without a single attack. it is very rear and aggressive form of epilepsy, only nine boys in the world have his condition, according to his mother. we could never imagine how well this treatment would work, she says. i'm his mother, i will try everything. we will keep you updated with any developments. police forces in the uk recorded nearly 65,000 child sex offences last year, an all time high. the figures obtained by the nspcc reveal a sharp increase in crimes committed online,
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as well as rape and sexual assault. jon ironmonger reports. every eight minutes, police recorded a sexual offence against a child last year and data from all police forces suggests the total number of offences has reached a record high, rising by 15% in 2017 compared to 2016. crimes ranged from grooming to serious sexual assaults. around a fifth were recorded against children under the age of ten. better police recording is likely to be a factor behind the figures and the nspcc says more children are finding the courage to speak out. that might be due to the fact that there's been a relatively large number of high—profile cases recently but it's also testament to the good preventative work happening in schools and homes up and down the country where children are having conversations about the signs of abuse with teachers. the research also reveals a dramatic increase in the number of online grooming offences which account for a tenth of the total recorded, keeping more pressure on internet companies to grapple with the problem. jon ironmonger, bbc news.
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ina in a moment, the business news, but first the headlines. 0xfam's chief executive apologises to mps for the sexual misconduct scandal, and tells them 700 regular donations to oxfam have been cancelled last ten days. syrian forces continue bombing... david davis promises brexit will not result in a mad max styled the soap —— dystopia as he speaks to european leaders. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. the treasury select committee has used its parliamentary
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privilege to publish a controversial report into the royal bank of scotland's mistreatment of small businesses. the committee's chair nicky morgan described the findings as disgraceful. she said the priority was not the health and strength of customers, but the generation of income for rbs, through made—up fees, high interest rates, and the acquisition of equity and property. the bookmaker william hill has been fined 6.2 million pounds by the gambling commission for failing to prevent money laundering. the commission said that "systemic" failures by senior management and ineffective social responsibility processes meant that ten customers were allowed to deposit large sums of money linked to criminal offences. the commission warned william hill may have to pay more if more money laundering comes to light. the supreme court is considering an appeal that could have a major impact on the so—called "gig economy".
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pimlico plumbers is challenging a ruling that entitled one of its plumbers, gary smith, to basic workers' rights, such as paid holiday , even though he was first hired on a freelance basis. 0ur correspondent simon gompertz gave us this update on the implications of the case from outside the court. you have been looking at calls regarding a specific type of debt relief. being in the red can be a struggle for many people, but imagine what that is like if you're facing serious mental health issues. despite their problems lots of people in this situation are still being sent e—mails, letters, being called up on the phone by councils, banks, and credit card companies. even had bailiffs arrive at their house. have we spoken about a scheme before that the government has, trying to give breathing space for people under this pressure. absolutely, it is designed to do that, to try to sort out their debt problems before they escalate, but if you are in hospital, or under a community care team, having a mental health crisis, you cannot participate in the scheme. it is not open to you, you cannot look into the breathing space. that is the reason why the money and mental health policy institute is calling
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for the scheme to be extended, and we can speak to katy evans, the head of research and policy at the institute. how widespread is this problem? it affects, we think, 23,000 people who are admitted to hospital for an mental health problem. that is too many people to be suffering. why can they not participate in this breathing space scheme? goux breathing space relies ona scheme? goux breathing space relies on a person being able to go and seek regulated debt advice as the government is designing it. that is a fantastic idea and we hope it will help people get support, but the people talking about experiencing mental health crisis at too unwell to get that support. they even struggle with brushing their teeth, sold expecting to go and attend a
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debt advice appointment isn't realistic. many people say -- debt companies say they are dealing with people on those issues sympathetically, but do you not think that is enough? when someone is experiencing a mental health crisis, it can be impossible to meet the phone call to the bank, council, credit card provider, to say that i need help. the scheme aims to make sure people do not need to make that call, and the help will always be available. many people will be surprised to hear it as local councils chasing people who are in debt. isn't there a joined up policy amongst a community care group supporting those in the community? sadly there is not. across the uk, we're hearing from more and more people about things like council
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tax. ok, katy evans, thank you for talking to me. you have been keeping an eye on what is happening at kfc. it should maybe be just is happening at kfc. it should maybe bejust kf is happening at kfc. it should maybe be just kf because they have run out of chicken! yes, out of 900 outlets that were close, 646 were not opened, compared to 575 yesterday. last week they said that they were swapping delivery providers. they had awarded the contract to dhl, which blamed operational issues for the supply disruption. any supply of the supply disruption. any supply of the crisis easing? this afternoon, at the uk headquarters of the company, a bbc producer was handed a statement saying we anticipate the number of closures will do just today, as the team works levels to try to clear the backlog. each day
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more deliveries are made, we expect the disruption to lesson by the end of the week. i have a tweet from the police in tower hamlets saying, please do not contact us about the kfc crisis. it is not a police matter this your favourite eatery is not supplying! perhaps they could beat kentucky fried coleslaw, but not checking, adages menu. new research shows that grey squirrels could have taken over from native red squirrels in the uk due to their problem—solving powers. a study tested both species of wild squirrel with two tasks to get hazelnuts. both were equally successful at the easy task, but more of the grey squirrels cracked the difficult one, which involved pushing and pulling levers. he also liked taking a cell—free.
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he also liked taking a cell—freem also shows that grey hair is good! time for a look at the weather. here's susan powell. is going to turn increasingly chilly. today we had a line of cloud bringing patchy outbreaks of rain and drizzle, with a little more to come out this evening and overnight. the cloud is helping hold up the temperatures, with spots dipping below freezing, but most of us at a few degrees above. we're looking at overnight lows of —2 —3. the weather front is short lived, and high
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pressure is going to be eroding it for the next 24 hours. by wednesday it is practically gone, with high pressure dominating. it will do so for at least ten days. wednesday it is largely drive. clare thirsty, the high pressure very much doing itsjob, holding the weather front side at the atlantic, bringing a lot of fine weather. there will be some patchy cloud around, and perhaps the biggest change will be the easterly wind strengthening. just 4 degrees on thursday. but it will feel colder in the winter. the wind will come into play as we get into the weekend and next week. the easterly wind will
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remain strong for saturday. across scandinavia by saturday, and then it will be a fine weekend to come for us. it will be cold enough at any time of year, but particularly at the moment, the cold air moving across the british isles, come monday and tuesday. next week, a lot of fine weather, they should still be some decent sunshine around, but widespread frost, with a raw wind. hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. today at four. as 7,000 people cancel regular donations to 0xfam in just ten days after allegations of sexual misconduct by staff — this from the charity‘s chief executive: i am sorry, we are sorry, for the damage that 0xfam has done, both to the people of haiti and to the wider efforts of aid and development. syrian government forces
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intensify their bombing of a rebel—held enclave near damascus, with 100 civilians, including 20 children, among those reported killed. a controversial report in to how royal bank of scotland allegedly mistreated small businesses is published by mps. brexit won't be a mad max style dystopia: the brexit secretary's reassuring message to european business leaders. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. disappointment again. speed skater disqualified for her third and final event as another winter olympics ends in disappointment. and the weather. sunshine and temperatures in double figures this afternoon, we will keep some of the bright weather into next
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week but this is what is coming our way, are from siberia and a biting easterly wind. also this hour an mp calls on the home office to reconsider their stance on the use of medical cannabis following the case of six—year—old alfie dingley whose parents say it would help treat his rare form of epilepsy. hello everyone — this is afternoon live. the chief executive of oxfam has said sorry for the way he defended the charity after claims of sexual misconduct. mark goldring had accused people of "gunning" for the organisation, declaring that no—one had "murdered babies in their cots." appearing before mps, he revealed that there've been 26 new reports of misconduct since the haiti revelations emerged. the scandal has taken its toll on the charity, with seven thousand people cancelling regular donations in ten days.
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here's our correspondent matt cole — and a warning — there is flash photography in his report. if there was any doubt that the senior 0xfam leaders were going to face a tough time, it was dispelled by the very first question. in your interview with the guardian published on saturday, you appear to be downplaying the scandal, using the parallel with the murder of babies in their cots, which many people regarded as grossly inappropriate, can i give you the opportunity to apologise? certainly, chairman, i do apologise. over and over, perhaps a dozen times in the hearing, the apologies kept coming. please allow me to begin by saying how sorry i am about what has happened. on behalf of the council of oxfam, we are ashamed of what has happened in haiti. in 2011, 0xfam sacked three staff and allowed four others to quit their roles in haiti, so why was it not reported
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to the authorities? 0xfam leaders made a report that there was no existing press interest, it was not public, that serious misconduct had happened, they did not describe that in explicit terms, they did not describe the sexual misconduct later came a tough question, why was one of the sacked men later rehired by 0xfam? these men were predators. i quite agree, i am not excusing it. that is why we have now set up a database of accredited referees of oxfam. when was that started? when did you start that? we have just started that. only because you were found out. oxfam now promises transparency, which brought an admission that new claims have come to light.
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across oxfam great britain, we have had about 26 stories, reports, come to us, which were either new reports come out as a result of the stories, or earlier stories where people said, i did not necessarily report this at the time. the committee announced it will now investigate the whole sector amidst concerns oxfam is not the only charity affected by abuse. it feels a little bit like a potential ratners moment for you, but isn't the truth that this is a cross sector issue and if it had not been oxfam, it could have been a different organisation? if any good can come out of the horror of both haiti and the last couple of weeks, it is a more intensive commitment across the whole sector. oxfam says it now has better safeguarding measures in place, but this was a bruising encounter, and will by no means have completed the organisation's difficult task
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of restoring its reputation. we arejust we are just getting used thatjudge has ruled that doctors can stop providing life—support treatment to 20—month—old alfie evans. the said continuing to provide treatment as unkind and unfairand continuing to provide treatment as unkind and unfair and inhumane. continuing to provide treatment as unkind and unfairand inhumane. as pa rents unkind and unfairand inhumane. as pa re nts ha d unkind and unfairand inhumane. as parents had disagreed and wanted to move alfie to a hospital in rome which would have hopefully long as life. thejudge has been analysing the dispute and has ruled that the
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hospital can stop providing life—support treatment to 21—month—old alfie evans. the pa rents 21—month—old alfie evans. the parents said they are trying to explore every avenue and have left no stone unturned. but news just coming in from the high court in liverpool, that doctors can stop providing life—support treatment. the united nations has demanded an immediate end to the targeting of civilians in syria, as government forces intensify their bombardment of eastern ghouta, the enclave held by rebels near damascus. activists say over 100 people have been killed in the last 24 hours. the upsurge in violence is part of a wider escalation of the civil war, as president bashar al—assad pushes to end the seven—year rebellion against him. viewers may find some images in this report from tom burridge disturbing. fear and chaos after an air strike and there is no warning when the next missile will hit.
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explosions shouting and this, the desperate scramble, the aftermath of trauma that the bombs bring. children trapped in the nightmare that is eastern ghouta, activists who support the rebels say the bombardment is as intense as it has ever been. you can hear the shouting of women and children through their homes. the missiles and mortars dropping on us like rain. there is nowhere to hide from this nightmare. surrounded by syria's army, eastern ghouta has been under siege for five years. it's the last rebel held enclave and president assad seems intent on taking it back.
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many other images of children in this hospital are too distressing to show. the united nations has demanded an end to the targeting of civilians. something syria denies. life goes on, in nearby damascus. where the syrian government is firmly in control. this man says he just wants an end to the situation in any way possible. he says shelling day and night means people are too scared to send their children to school. but in eastern ghouta lives often hang in the balance. after declaring victory over the so—called islamic state the syrian regime with help from russia and iran, is focused on rebel forces. and the west, once an enthusiastic backer of some rebel groups, seems unwilling
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or unable to respond. tom burridge, bbc news. the high court judge the high courtjudge has ruled that doctors can stop providing life—support treatment to 21—month—old alfie evans against his pa rents 21—month—old alfie evans against his parents wishes. 0ur correspondence is at the high court, tell us what hejudge has said. it is at the high court, tell us what he judge has said. it was a very emotional healing, both his parents in tears at point and alfie's mum had to leave the court where the judge delivered his ruling. he went through the medical evidence and most of the experts were saying that his condition is catastrophic and unreadable. the judge said at this point the best step for the hospital would be to withdraw life support and move alfie to palliative care
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which is against his parents‘ wishes. they wanted him to be transferred to a hospital in rome links to the vatican but the judge pointed out there was a real risk he could die travelling to the hospital and that would not be the right way forward. alfie suffers from a degenerative neurological disease but that has never been officially diagnosed so doctors are still do not really know exactly what is wrong with him. they say this condition will ultimately be fatal and at this point he is only being kept alive by a ventilator. thank you. we will take you now to the house of commons whether there is a statement about the political situation at stormont. a number of challenging decisions will have to be taken. ultimately that is the responsibility of good governance
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and public services. as the head of the northern ireland civil service has made clear that needs to be clarity about a budget for next year as soon as possible. i intend to ta ke as soon as possible. i intend to take steps to provide clarity on the budget and i will update the house as soon as i am in a position to do so. this is clearly not when i want to be but in the absence of an executive in northern ireland i have no other choice. longer term the government will not shirk its responsibility is to take whatever steps are necessary to provide certainty and stability for the people of northern ireland while maintaining our commitment to govern with rigorous impartiality in the interests of all the people of northern ireland. we will only do that once we are sure all other viable options designed to restore devolved government have been properly considered including my statutory obligation to call an assembly election. in the absence of devolution it is also right that we consider the issue of salaries for assembly members. at the end of last year recommendations were received
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bya year recommendations were received by a former clerk of the assembly that and the government will need to decide shortly on the next steps. i acknowledge the concern that while a numberof acknowledge the concern that while a number of assembly members continue to carry out functions, can't salaries are maintained while the assembly is not meeting. when the su of addressing the past of northern ireland, the government has manifesto commitments to consult on the breeze set out in the agreement and support the reform of inquests. i would much prefer to do this in the context of an agreement that sees the restoration of the devolved is akin to. but i am consciously government's responsibility is to make progress for victims and survivors and the people who suffered most during the troubles. we will proceed towards a full consultation as soon as possible for everyone can have their say. as he house will recognise this april marks the 20th anniversary of the
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historic belfast agreement which along with its success has been fundamental in helping northern ireland move forward from its violent past to a brighter and more secure future and this government support for the agreement remains steadfast as does our commitment to government for everyone and northern ireland. there's no doubt that northern ireland has taken huge strides forward in the last 20 years. in my short time as northern ireland secretary i have seen a place of wonderful talent and huge potential. any commemorations this year will look decidedly hollow of northern ireland are still has no functioning government of its own. everyone needs to continue striving to see devolved government restored and to build in northern ireland fit for the future. that remains the clear focus and determination of the government and i commend statement to the house. thank you, may i also thank the secretary of state and her
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predecessor to my underwriter to see backin predecessor to my underwriter to see back in his place in this house today. for all the efforts they both made alongside the irish government to try and facilitate agreement between the parties. we all know in this place is a difficult issues and i commend all of the parties in the talks especially the dup and sinn fein for the total engagement they have shown on behalf of their communities. i have to say i must also commend the secretary of state for the herculean optimism she continues to still hope for a deal to be done. and for the clear statement that she has rejecting the cause to accede to direct rule with immediate effect. optimism is a vital ingredient and northern ireland even when it is at its most difficult to summon so i will not criticise the government for remaining hopeful. but clarity and contingency planning and also been important features of the process so people know where they are in that process and what will follow if that is not progress. while those questions they fear many in northern
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ireland will belittle the wiser after the secretary of state's statement because she told us that it became possible in the recent talks to identify a basis for possible agreement to form an executive including on the difficult issue of language and culture. that issue of language and culture. that isa very issue of language and culture. that is a very optimistic statement and it isa is a very optimistic statement and it is a view that has been echoed by the irish government and sinn fein. but it is hotly disputed by the dup whose leader told us there was no prospect of these discussions leading to a deal. ambiguity is also played a very important part in the process but both accounts cannot be accurate and i hope that the secretary of state will accept that she has a duty to provide clarity to the people of northern ireland not just because they deserve to know what a screen on and the peace process but because some including some people in this house as using this period of confusion to advance
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their own agendas to undermine the good friday agreement which some see as an obstacle to brexit after damaging the concept of power—sharing which some have never supported. that is a reckless and dangerous game to play because we must never forget and this place the belfast agreement ended a conflict which led to 3500 lives being lost and nor should we forget especially those who are so quick to assert that the brexit referendum as to be respected that the belfast agreement itself was copper fastened with its own referendums. north and south and they too must be respected and protected so i welcome the confirmation that the government's support for the agreement remains steadfast and i would have struck to confirm that he/she sees in the good friday agreement as the only viable long term option for the peaceful governance of northern ireland are to confirm that the government believes its unique form of
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power—sharing is indispensable to the agreement. coming back to last week and the events and belfast a simple way for the government to clean up this confusion as to publish precisely where there was agreement and where the gaps remained, not to apportion blame but provide greater reassurance that progress has been made over the 13 months. though the secretary of state committed to providing further details and publishing some of those details? one area where she has offered a further clarity is on the possibility of a fresh election in northern ireland and she should know that the prospect of a new election will be met with clay seal enthusiasm and i would ask her to spell out why she thinks that this potential for fun advantage of another election, the fifth in three years, what would it achieve? well she does have the statutory duty to call one at some point, and she and her predecessor have resisted the temptation to date, we will also
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hear her say she is considering the budget and northern ireland and we understand and accept that and would not only that she consults properly with the parties so that we can ensure maximum acceptance and agreements with those budget allocations as part of that contingency planning. they hope she can commit to that as well. finally may i ask the secretary of state to consider what she would do to take forward some of the pressing issues facing northern ireland if her optimism is misplaced and a deal cannot be struck. it is notjust the issue of mla pay, vital questions on the treatment of victims of the troubles and historical institutional abuse need to be resolved not just with consultation but with the legislation. these people have been waiting for far too long. will she commits to looking at that in the absence of a deal? well she also commit to taking forward issues of human rights and social
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justice that have enjoyed naturally in other parts of the uk but are denied to our citizens and northern ireland? in particular can she confirmed that one area of discussion between the parties was on the issue of equal marriage and that agreement was reached to take matters forward through a private members bill instrument? in the absence of stormont, which he considered legislating to extend equal marriage rights to northern ireland? we believe that she should and we will support her if she does. to be clear that a labour government would legislate on this stormont could not. political problems are nothing new to northern ireland but the current impasse has left the people they are without and accountable government for almost 400 days. it is a profound crisis and the government is a profound duty to try and resolve it to serve the li preserve the good friday agreement and power—sharing. we will continue to support the government
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and on legislation whenever necessary but we will hold you to account to preserve the good friday agreement in its spirit and letter. we will we will pull away from that for the moment, the impassive storm at being discussed. interesting to note the appearance of james brokenshire her predecessor has been suffering ill—health but appeared and his presence was remarked upon by the shadow northern ireland secretary. we will return to that if there are any developing stories. looking ahead to what is happening later on nationwide because will be talking to many roads in birmingham. mary rhodes will be talking about the nationalfamily
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mary rhodes will be talking about the national family union conference and the after—effects of brexit. talking about farmers in england and wales and also the north... those are the two issues will be talking about on nationwide later. after months of wrangling, mps have released a report by the financial regulator which said a unit of rbs of mistreated thousands of small firms. 0ur economics editor andy verity explained why the treasury committee took the unusual step of releasing the report. the concern is so electrified that he had been prepared to put it out themselves. mps have asked for it to be published repeatedly and it has been refused but that was linked to mps and they threatened to publish
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it and the chair of the treasury select committee said if you do not publish it will demand that is handed over and publish it ourselves. that is what they have just done, a very unusual step. but me give you a flavour of wire to such an exclusive report. is because it says thousands of small businesses were mistreated and there was a widespread and systematic mistreatment and that was not just an isolated thing, it was the result of unintentional and coordinated strategy that management was aware should have been aware of that allowed that poor practice to develop. we are talking specifically about the treatment of small businesses? going back to the clash in the wake of the 2008 clash, the bank had to shrink its loan book and it has thousands of small business customers who are maintaining the payments and what happened subsequently were a lot of them were put into a global restructuring
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group which said it was there to help those businesses but in fact that purpose of helping them than the fortunes around was very much subservient to the purpose of making money and we know about huge fees levied on them, evidence that suggests they were making up those fees and using those fees as leveraged to obtain stakes and the customer‘ business. it is readily damaging for the bank and for the regulator because the regulator has sat on the report for two years and at the end of 2016 in report was published showing elite, internal, —— a leak of an eternal documents. the summary the first two examples of bad practice and neglected to mention it was unintentional coordinated strategy known about my management. the bookmaker william hill has
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been fined £6.2 million by the gambling commission for failing to prevent money laundering. the commission said that "systemic" failures by senior management and ineffective social responsibility processes meant that ten customers were allowed to deposit large sums of money linked to criminal offences. the commission warned william hill may have to pay more if more money laundering comes to light. tim miller, from the gambling commission, says today‘s fine sends a message to the whole gambling industry. we know that in britain there are roundabout 2.5 million people either problem gamblers or at risk of developing a problem. these are responsibilities gambling companies must take seriously. today shows where they do not they could face and robust regulation. gambling is clearly a fast changing area, with technology making changes, happening all the time. i think our decision shows today that the rules do work. if somebody does not comply with the rules, they will face stiff regulatory action from us. the decision today does notjust send a
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clear message to william hill but to the entire gambling industry. joining me now is dr carolyn downs who is a gambling expert from lancaster university. does it send a big message? the gambling industry in the uk made over £13 billion profit last year so it is not a of money to william hill. we have a previous fine last year of over 7 million to 888 four very similar reasons for not spotting problem gamblers are getting deeper into debt. in both cases there was an issue with gamblers were using money that was not theirs, they had stolen it. it isa not theirs, they had stolen it. it is a big issue and i am not sure it sends a big message, it sends a
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message that the gambling commission are doing theirjob but this has been going on for years. since regulatory changes in 2007. they are taking action now but they could be taking action now but they could be taking more action and i would not be surprised if we see more finds like this later this year. taking action is one thing but are they taking it seriously? the public health aspect of gambling.” taking it seriously? the public health aspect of gambling. i do not think they are. i really do think we have something of a public health crisis with problem gambling. you had the gentleman from the gambling commission seeing over 2 million people are either at risk for problem gamblers, and factor over 400,000 people with severe problems. 0nly 400,000 people with severe problems. only 8000 people were treated last yearfor problem only 8000 people were treated last year for problem gambling only 8000 people were treated last yearfor problem gambling because only 8000 people were treated last year for problem gambling because of funding, it is not treated on the nhs for example. we‘re light on money donated by the industry and
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gamble up to fund the treatment, thatis gamble up to fund the treatment, that is not enough treatment available and the social responsibility aspect is not acted upon. they put notices on slot machines and that is as far as it goes. what about the attitudes to money—laundering? is it wrong to have the impression that a lot of people perhaps will not care too much ready money comes from as long as they get it? i think that is exactly the case. there have been some reports from insiders saying that they do suspect sometimes that money is not legally theirs to gamble but they keep quiet because long as the money is coming and everything is good. sometimes other places are much more responsible and to report things but does not always the case that things are reported and that is why we are these big fines. thank you.
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i would hope the home office will find a way to cease standing behind a 1961 un scheduling of cannabis as having no medicinal benefits. there are soon to be states of the eu and states and america have licensed medicinal use of cannabis. is he aware of the position of the republic of ireland who with a legal framework similar drivers give power to license use of this medicine in cases such as alfie‘s? is currently
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flies in the face of the popular view in the united kingdom where 70% of people think we should find a way of people think we should find a way of using cannabis —based medicine. i urge my right honourable friend who is very farfrom urge my right honourable friend who is very far from being cruel and heartless to help the manufacturers of this drug that will save alfie‘s life for his doctors or family to find a way through to get a licensed to treat him and for him to instruct his officials to sew a cyst. indeed it is an indication ofjust how messed up our management of this issueisisit messed up our management of this issue is is it is the home office as a link this urgent question and not a link this urgent question and not a health minister. 0n health grounds and this is an open and shut case. time to look at the weather. this is this morning in northumberland, what more could you ask for, sunshine and
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snowdrops? sunshine, that‘s what! i like to build you up, and then let you down, because this is it. we have had sunshine and high building, then the high—pressure builds and bills from thursday to saturday. that will bring us lots of fine weather, but follow the isa buyers around all the way up the two siberia, and around the area of high pressure which goes on anticlockwise, we will bring this cold air, and temperatures will tail of. on monday and tuesday the difference between today and next tuesday will be marked. today we have had 11, 12, but next week we will have frost all day on tuesday and a brisk wind. also, this could
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even brings no, particularly to eastern areas on that breeze. we could also see whether feature bringing more significance no, so it could be a tricky forecast later on the period. right now, i am just like you, simon, just dull! i don‘t mean it! here is the cloud from the east, the weather front still has some drizzle coming out of it. overnight tonight, the weather front will mean that temperatures do not fall away sharply. for england and wales, temperatures hovering above freezing. clearer skies to the north and west means we could see minus two or —3 to get us into wednesday morning. plenty more frosty come because of the high—pressure and
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colder air coming our way. the weather front will basically be gone by tomorrow, but still cloud left behind, and across central and eastern areas, that could mean more rain and drizzle from time to time, particularly across the midlands. for the best of the sunshine, hopefully eastern areas, and should be brighter. already it is getting colder, 79 degrees, which is all right for february. thursday, the easterly wind creeps in, and will be a little colder for the likes of norwich. it will start to feel cold already across the southern half of the british isles. that is what will carry on friday, saturday, easterly wind nagging away, with temperatures coming down. frosty start and lingering cloud. a lot of fine weather and sunny spells, but it is next week we are looking out for the big change. there could be the risk
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of snow, but hopefully sunshine. do not pack their thermals away. it is going to be biting. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the parents of seriously ill alfie evans have lost their bid to prevent doctors from withdrawing life—support for their son. specialists at alder hey children‘s hospital had insisted that continuing treatment for the 21—month—old is ‘unkind, unfairand inhumane‘. 0xfam‘s reveals 700 people have stopped giving regular donations to the charity following the sexual misconduct scandal. iam i am sorry, we are sorry for the damage oxfam has done, both to the people of haiti, but the wider effo rts people of haiti, but the wider efforts to aid and development.
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another deadly day in syria — regime forces intensify their bombing of eastern ghouta where100 civilians — including 20 children — are reported to have died. mps have released a report by the financial regulator which says rbs mistreated thousands of small firms, hitting them with new fees and increased interest rates. sport now on afternoon live withjohn watson. if there was a gold medal for dashing hopes, elise christie would be doing well. yes, she crashed in the 500 metres final, she was ultimately disqualified after crashing in the 1500 metres semifinal, which led to herfinal event today, the 1000 metre heats. she finished second and it looked as if she was set to qualify but she deceived two penalties, which then saw her given a yellow card and
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disqualified. so, another winter games ends in disappointment for elise christie. she has vowed to carry on and return in four years. the rest of the brits, they are following suit? yes, another leading day, with the british team stuck on four medals at the moment, with the olympics going on until sunday. the curling team still stand a good chance of winning a medal, and david 0rnstein can round up the action. as elise christie was carried away
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in discomfort, her night would take another turn for the worst, with judges sporting two infringements and disqualifying her. heartbreak for elise christie again, after failing to wind a medal at the last olympics four years ago, history has repeated itself, with her dreams ending in bitter disappointment.” ama ending in bitter disappointment.” am a bit shell—shocked. i worked so ha rd to am a bit shell—shocked. i worked so hard to come back from this injury. 1000 people would not have skated with my ankle the way it was. i can barely bend my knee. the only thing ican barely bend my knee. the only thing i can say is i can promise britain i will fight back from this and will come back for beijing, and hope i
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can do britain proud then. for the skater and her team, it was a huge blow. clearly she is massively disappointed. to come here as double world champion and go away with a fourth place ultimately is hugely disappointing. but that happens in sport, there is highjeopardy and short track —— in short track, as everyone knows. there was better news for the curling team, as the men produced their best performance of the competition, a dazzling the 2014 champions norway, and like the women, they close in on a semi finals place. it was not to be for a sta nce finals place. it was not to be for a stance is penny combs and nick buckland, but given that she was returning from a career threatening injury, it was a respectable result. the football association and police
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are reviewing video footage following a pitch invasion at the end of wigan‘s 1—0 wind against manchester city. two arrests were made outside the ground for a free. ten man city macro were beaten by a late goal that ended their hopes of the quadruple. wigan will face southampton in the quarterfinals. a few manchester city players were caught up on the pitch invasion and sergio aguero was involved in an altercation with one of the supporters. the striker claimed he was spat on. some of the 5000 city fa ns were was spat on. some of the 5000 city fans were also seen to be throwing missiles and advertising hoardings at police. wigan say they are now conducting a full investigation. the england one—day opener alex hales has signed a new deal with nottinghamshire to play only limited overs matches until the end of the 20 19th overs matches until the end of the 2019th season. he overs matches until the end of the 20 19th season. he follows the path
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of england team—mate abdul rashid, who said he will only play white ball cricket for yorkshire in 2018. alex hales has played 50 81—day internationals for his country but his last test appearance was in 2016. i will back at around 5:30pm. now, to the newsrooms around the uk. farmers from across england and wales are meeting for the national farmers union confidence they are. we will find out in a moment. also to hull, my old friend peter lee. news of northern lincolnshire having the highest rates of school exclusions in the country. first, national farmers union, lots on the agenda, but i suspect brexit is
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fairly high? absolutely right, the nfu conference, two days in birmingham, it is a sell—out, and the theme of the conference is recipe for change. but the key ingredient is brexit. farmers desperate to know how the agricultural landscape will look once biopsy it the eu injust over a year. what happens with agriculture is not only important to people at the conference, but it is important to us, in fact anyone who eats. there is a lot of money involved, not only in export terms, but subsidies, £3 billion a year is given from the eu. no surprise that the star attraction that they wanted to hear was the environment secretary michael gove, and he largely had a warm welcome from the delegates. but they wanted some detail, they were desperate to know
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what they were going to receive and how things would look in terms of the export market. also, very basically about labour, because there is a lot of labour coming across from the eu, seasonal workers. so they wanted to know what michael gove had to say about how they were going to fear post brexit. we have already aligned the fact that the method of support, the majority of the subsidy is going to persist, not just to majority of the subsidy is going to persist, notjust to the end of the lifetime of the parliament, but for yea rs lifetime of the parliament, but for years to come, to provide farmers with the opportunity to change. the nfu can be a tough audience. did they like what they heard? largely it was a warm welcome but how many times have you heard on the programme, you have dealt with brexit everyday on afternoon live, it is detail, detail, detail, that is what everyone wants. take the issue of seasonal workers coming from the eu, there is some criticism
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that michael gove do not get enough detail about what would happen to the seasonal workers after we leave the seasonal workers after we leave the eu. he is referring back to the immigration department, which does not necessarily help, but he is saying the right things, he recognises the problem. the key thing for us today as when we see the command paper on future agricultural policy, that is what we need to see, the detail we are looking for. so, it is all in the detail. just a word on the subsidies, £3 billion a year, that farmers receive at the moment. michael gove said the 3 billion would then be scrapped once we leave the eu, and will not be replaced by the eu, and will not be replaced by the uk government. funding would only be given to farmers who signed up only be given to farmers who signed up and were fully committed to animal protection and welfare. animal protection is a big dealfor us here in the west midlands, so we will have —— farming is a big deal
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for us here, so we will have a look at that at 6pm. is it a big deal for you? yes, my most inspired area. we‘re talking about school inclusions, and your area is particularly badly hit. notjust here, it is the whole of the north—east of england, eight out of ten of the highest rates of school exclusions are in this part of the world. and exclusion can be anything from part a day to 45 days in a year. it happens when a cute —— pupil is threatening violence or affecting the learning of other pupils. but the figures are astonishing. 0fsted has spoken out, which is unusual that has to be said, they have written to headteachers saying they support school exclusions, but only as a last resort and they want to make sure schools are using exclusions proportionately. this is cathy kirby from 0fsted. proportionately. this is cathy kirby from ofsted. it is fair to say that
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schools are challenging, and i endorse the fact headteachers need to have exclusion as a sanction. i think the issue for me is, is that being used as well as it could be, and absolutely correctly for children? because the other thing in those areas is the educational attainment for children, which is, we as “— attainment for children, which is, we as “ experience attainment for children, which is, we as —— experience of the attainments for 16—year—olds, so we wa nt attainments for 16—year—olds, so we want children to be in school and learning, and not out of school and excluded from any reason unless it is necessary. is there much sympathy for the schools? ofsted are not blaming the schools, they say they must have that sanction, and schools need more help for troubled students. we have spoken to parents in scunthorpe, students. we have spoken to parents in scu nthorpe, and students. we have spoken to parents in scunthorpe, and the parents have very strong views, many of them saying today that many seem to be blaming parental control or lack of
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pretend —— parental control at home. it has to be said that scunthorpe has one of the highest rates of exclusion in the country. it is unusualfor exclusion in the country. it is unusual for 0fsted to talk out like this, and it is not a reputation that they particularly want. but as you know, some very bright and sassy people do eventually emerge from scunthorpe! they certainly do, and they end up marrying equally sassy people down south! he is talking about my wife before anyone gets any ideas! beta, thank you very much. and mary, thank you. if you would like to see more on any of those stories, you can access them on the bbc i player, and we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm.
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getting started in the world of work is difficult, but if you also have to deal with an adversity such as ill—health, things get harder. carl chivers struggled with type one diabetes during his gcse and a—level is but still managed to set up his own digital animation company with the help of the digital trust. earlier hejoined me the help of the digital trust. earlier he joined me to dock about the support they gave him, and i got to surprise him with an award naming him entrepreneur of the year.” to surprise him with an award naming him entrepreneur of the year. i have gone with dealing with local family businesses in north devon to dealing ona businesses in north devon to dealing on a european level, and if i had told myself a few years ago i would be doing that, i would be lifting my jaw off the floor. i am happy with the way it is going, and it is growing quite fast now. you have been nominated for a national award, how big a deal with that be?”
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been nominated for a national award, how big a deal with that be? i did not know about it until earlier today, but i am stoked about it. i cannot get my words out! and presumably if you won it?” cannot get my words out! and presumably if you won it? i would be over the moon, and the opportunities it would open, and the ability to be an ambassador for the trust and be able to say to young people, you can do it, it would mean a lot to me. do you know what i have got here? the national princess trust enterprise award winner is... you must be pulling my leg! there is the proof. many congratulations. is it real? keep yes, it is real! lowe thank you, and thanks to the trust. it was a big thrill to give that to him. he will be recognised at an event in
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the presence of the princess of —— princes trust, in the presence of the prince of wales. let us have a look at the headlines this afternoon. a high courtjudge has ruled that doctors at alder hey hospital in liverpool can stop providing life—support treatment to 21—month—old alfie evans, against his parents wishes. 0xfam‘s chief executive apologises kemp mps regarding the six abuse scandal —— sex abuse scandal in haiti. here are the business headlines. the treasury select committee has used its parliamentary privilege to
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publish a contravention will report in the royal bank of scotland‘s mistreatment of small businesses. nicky morgan described the findings as disgraceful. she said the priority was not the health and strength of customers but the up 77 interest bookmaker william hill has been hit with a £6.2 million fine for breaching anti—money—laundering and social responsibility regulations. the gambling commission said the company hadn‘t done enough to make its prevention measures effective, meaning 10 customers could deposit money linked to criminal offences. the supreme court is considering an appeal today,
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that could have a major impact on what‘s known as the "gig economy". pimlico plumbers is challenging a ruling that entitled one of its plumbers to basic workers‘ rights, such as paid holiday , even though he was first hired on a freelance basis. gary smith began his fight when he wanted to reduce his hours following a heart attack. the court of appeal ruled in his favour a year ago but the firm is challenging that decision. the markets have largely been falling today. befits a 100 has been in negative territory most of the day. bhp billiton is one of the biggest followers. intercontinental hotels group announced plans to go more upmarket to tap customers willing to pay top prices but disappointed investors by saying it would not be paying out dividends and said its focus on business customers had helped weathered the storm with the competition from online marketplace airbnb.
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what is going on with hsbc? investors are disappointed because profits did not meet expectations. most of the growth came from asia, with it has been focusing on building its business in general. we can speak to colin maclean. he is from svm global. what else accounts for the rise in profits at hsbc?m had some fines and other problems la st had some fines and other problems last year which it has put behind them now, but also seeing some growth in the far east, and it is strongly exposed to dollars in the us economy, so these have been good areas. what has happened to the rbs shower price following the publication of the report into the mistreatment of small businesses?m has been widely known, so not a lot today. rbs, although it has yet to
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report a profit since the crisis, has been a strong shower price performer over the last year. it may report a profit this week. and that may be important for the taxpayer? and it may not be far from paying dividends if it gets a resolution with us problems. walmart has put some figures out today, the owners of asda. it is looking good, 23% rise in e—commerce, but investors are not impressed. now, for walmart the most important thing to remember is that online sales are very small pa rt is that online sales are very small part of the group total, sort of a way behind what is happening elsewhere, and investors saw the growth slowing, and a lot more spent on promotions. so it doesn‘t look as if walmart has the secret competing
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with online retailers like amazon. in the uk, asda's with online retailers like amazon. in the uk, asda‘s sales rose by a quarter of percent by december, the key christmas period, but it did not compare well with the likes of tesco, who were up 2.3%. it is really tough out there in the grocery sector. yes, are all still suffering from the budget supermarkets. asda is struggling to turn the business around. thank you for talking us through the financial markets today. simon, let us look at the markets board. the ftse100, after spending most the time negative, it has ended flat. hsbc was down more than 4% earlier, but
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ending 3%. walmart showers, down by 10%, even though it had 23% rise in online sales. the dowjones has been negative for most of the day since opening. will anything happen to rbs after the mps releasing that report? as colin was saying, a lot of this had already been leaked and was expected, so it has not dramatically affected the shower price but it has been a good performer at that stock recently. thank you. three leading disabled campaigners have backed a petition that calls on the government to force all new large buildings to include facilities with extra space and equipment. award—winning paralympian, anne wafula strike, went to downing street today along with campaigner, lorna fillingham
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and mp nic dakin, to hand in the petition to the prime minister. the athlete says she was "completely robbed of her dignity" after a train company failed to provide a wheelchair accessible toilet, on a 3 hourjourney. she explained how better facilities would improve disabled people‘s lives when you have a better facility, when you have a betterfacility, the barriers are broken when you have a disability, you are able to go to the community and socialise, and give back to your community, but at the moment people with disabilities are struggling behind closed is. why should someone be disqualified from living a life just because they have a disability? that is it from us today, next is the bbc news at 5pm. now, the weather. is plenty of fair weather for the british isles in the next few days, even into next week. it is going to turn increasingly chilly. today we had a weather front in the east, this quote here bringing patchy outbreaks of rain and drizzle, with a little more to come this evening and overnight. the cloud is helping to hold temperatures up, with
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sunspots dip into freezing, but effectively... we‘re looking at overnight low temperatures of —2 or -3. overnight low temperatures of —2 or —3. the weather front is very short lived in the east because high pressure is going to be eroding it in the next 24 hours. by wednesday this is practically gone. high—pressure dominating, and it will do so for at least the next ten days. wednesday, basically a large fine day. still some cloud left over on the weather front leading into england and will, with the odd spot of drizzle. at most, some brightness and starting to feel a little cooler than today. for thursday, again the high—pressure is doing itsjob, holding the weather front at bay, and there will be some cloud around, but perhaps the biggest change will
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be the easterly winds starting to strengthen. just 4 degrees in norwich on thursday. with the wind it will feel considerably colder. the wind will come into play by the weekend and next week. the easterly wind remained strong for london and cardiff thursday and friday. sunny spells across the british isles, thanks to this. a fine weekend to come, with this weather front coming from siberia. the cold air is really starting to push across the british isles come monday and tuesday. we will feel it. next week, a lot of fine weather which should give us some decent sunshine around, but widespread frost and the wind will be especially raw. today at 5 — oxfam loses thousands of financial donors — in the light of allegations of sexual misconduct. the claims relate to staff working in haiti seven years ago —
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now the charity‘s head in the uk has apologised for seeming to downplay the seriousness of what happened. i am sorry, we are sorry for the damage oxfam have done, both to the people of haiti but also wider efforts for aid and development, by possibly undermining public support. we‘ll have the latest on the parliamentary session — and we‘ll be talking to one of the mps — highly critical of the charity‘s handling of the crisis. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. syrian government forces intensify their bombing of a rebel—held enclave near damascus — with 100 civilians — including 20 children —
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