Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 23, 2018 6:00am-8:31am GMT

6:00 am
hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. alarming new research links mistakes in patient medication to tens of thousands of deaths a year. as many as one in five drugs may be given out in error across england. the health secretary, jeremy hunt, calls the situation "appalling" and "totally preventable". good morning, it's friday the 23rd of february. also this morning: the armed officer whose job it was to protect the florida high school where a gunman shot dead 17 people has resigned after it emerged he failed to intervene. why it's notjust what we eat, but when and how we eat it — new research reveals how snacking on certain food and drinks damages our teeth. workers in the uk are doing billions of pounds worth of free overtime every year, but why, and how do we compare to other countries?
6:01 am
good morning! and i'm curling in perth this morning on the ice where most of the british team train. they will today try to sweep their way into the gold medal match at the winter olympics, as eve muirhead and her team take on against sweden in the semifinals. and nick has the weather. good morning. it is a cold and frosty start this morning. high pressure in control, plenty of dry weather for the weekend, increasing sunshine and blue sky but if you think it is called yet, do have not seen anything yet! wait until next week! yourfull seen anything yet! wait until next week! your full forecast is coming up. good morning. first, our main story — for every five prescriptions handed out in england, an error is made, and the government's warned these mistakes could be linked to hundreds and potentially thousands of deaths a year. the health and social care secretary, jeremy hunt,
6:02 am
has described the findings as "appalling". he cites the case of a 92—year—old woman whose vital medication was stopped after her chart was inadvertently swapped. here's our health editor hugh pym. the report covers mistakes made in the prescribing, dispensing and administering of medication in england. these could involve gps, pharmacist, care homes and hospitals. researchers are to be one of the first exercises of its kind. it found that medication errors could cause around 1700 per year and perhaps contribute up to 22,000 deaths. the cost to the nhs could be around £1.6 billion a year. it does note that the vast majority of prescriptions dispensed on the nhs are safe and mistakes do occur in all healthcare systems. the health and social care secretary jeremy hunt said it was a far bigger problem globally and it has so far been recognised. causing appalling levels of ha rm been recognised. causing appalling levels of harm and death. plans to
6:03 am
tackle the problem include introducing electronic prescribing systems in hospitals designed to cut mistakes. the national pharmacy association said it welcomed the focus on reducing medication errors but that a culture of learning rather than blame was needed. hugh pym, bbc news. an armed officer who was at the florida school where 17 people were killed has resigned after it emerged he failed to intervene. scott peterson was facing suspension after an investigation revealed he remained outside the building and did not confront the gunman. let's get more from our north america correspondent, peter bowes. what is happening in terms of what has emerged about what this man did? this has emerged from the sheriff of the county and he has been looking at surveillance video and he refers to this deputy, this police officer, who was working, he was in uniform, he was armed, he was on the compass
6:04 am
as the shooting happened and apparently, he got to the building where the shooting took place around 90 seconds of the first shots being fired and then he didn't go inside. in fact, he stayed outside for about four minutes, the actual shooting lasted about six minutes. it is still something of a mystery as to why he didn't essentially do his job. and go in and confront the shooter and in fact the sheriff was asked what he would have liked to have seen, the deputy do, and is set to start, to have gone inside, to have addressed the shooter, and to have addressed the shooter, and to have shot him dead. now, as to why he didn't do that, the officer has not spoken to himself yet we don't know his side of the story but we know that he was initially suspended without pay, pending further investigation, but he actually chose to resign from hisjob. now clearly, these are some people will put the whole debate about ones in schools and perhaps arming of teachers in
6:05 am
the new perspective because here was someone the new perspective because here was someone actually on the campus trained to use a gun. peter, thank you. theresa may is understood to have agreed with senior ministers a position on britain's future relationship with the eu during talks at chequers yesterday. downing street has given few details, but some of those present have suggested that everyone was happy with the outcome. 0ne told the bbc that "there has been an outbreak of unity for now". number ten says the prime minister will set out "the way forward" next week after a discussion by the full cabinet. a fourth british tourist has died of injuries he suffered in a helicopter crash in the grand canyon nearly a fortnight ago. jonathan udall, who was in his 30s and from brighton, was on honeymoon with his wife, ellie milward when the accident happened. his family has been told of his death. adina campbell reports. group two and ellie milward were on
6:06 am
their honeymoon, she has been left with critical injuries while her friends online post, announcing his death, described him as strong and brave. the helicopter crashed as it came into land at arizona ‘s promote quartermaster canyon. witnesses say it spun around twice before hitting the ground and then bursting into flames. police said bad weather meant it was more than eight hours before the survivors could be flown to hospital. stuart hill on the left is picked up here, along with his brotherjason. who also died at the scene. their parents say the brothers shared an incredible bond and would be deeply missed. jennifer ba ra and would be deeply missed. jennifer bara remains in a critical condition in hospital in las vegas, as does the pilot scott bruce. experts say possible causes of the crash include a faulty tail rotor and gusty winds. but it may take many months to
6:07 am
determine why the helicopter came down with such terrible consequences. two people are still being questioned after a suspected hit and run in coventry which killed two young brothers. a man in his 50s and a woman in her 40s were arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving and drink driving. a 2—year—old boy was pronounced dead shortly after the incident, the death of his 6—year—old brother was confirmed a couple of hours later. the family of the seriously ill boy alfie evans has been given permission to appeal against a high court ruling allowing doctors to switch off his life support. alfie has an undiagnosed brain disorder and doctors say there's no hope of recovery. on tuesday, a judge ruled in favour of his physicians, but his parents want to take him to a hospital in italy for further treatment. the way we eat and drink is almost as much of a factor in tooth erosion as what we consume, according to new research. scientists at king's college london found acidic food and drink can wear teeth down, especially if people sip or nibble.
6:08 am
here's more from our health correspondent catherine burns. sitting, swilling, and nibbling — researchers think one in six of us have habits like this and they are bad news for your teeth. when it comes to dentist visit, the main worries tend to be feeling sore gum disease but this report says we should also be thinking about erosive tooth wear. it is when acid eats away at the teeth, making bencic get shorter. if you tend to play with things in your mouth or you chop fruit up slowly and schiphol on them over a few minutes as opposed to eat in as a whole fruit, if you do this for years and he is ona fruit, if you do this for years and he is on a daily basis you can cause serious damage to your teeth and that serious damage can mean your whole mouth needs to be rebuilt. treatment takes an average of more
6:09 am
than 20 months at a cost of £4500 on the nhs and almost 14,000 privately. prevention is key. 0ne the nhs and almost 14,000 privately. prevention is key. one part of it is cutting back on ascitic food and drink. some of the healthy choices we make might be good to us several that they can erode your teeth. this report mentions adding of lemon lime to your water, sugar free soft drink, drinking fruit teas and snacking on fruit. take these great example. if were a to eat 10 or 20 of them in one sitting it would be one of the better on your teeth. if you were to eat the same in mt over a longer period it would be a sustained attack. the advice is to be aware of the overall eating patterns and to consider snacks that are patterns and to consider snacks that a re less patterns and to consider snacks that are less acidic and higher in chelsea. —— calcium. it started out as a project to help protect some of the world's most endangered wildlife, but conservationists at chester zoo got more than they bargained for when they teamed up with national park rangers in nigeria.
6:10 am
in the course of the research, they managed to capture some extraordinary footage of the country's rare and most elusive species, as helen briggs reports. caught on camera in the road forests of nigeria's largest national park, red river hogs and nocturnal visitors like the nocturnal cats. this is home to some of africa's most endangered animals and conservationists are using hidden cameras to monitor them. then you go through a lot of camera trap images and it can be quite a tedious process. a leaf blowing in the wind, orjust noises. you don't see a great deal, and then you will get something like a golden cat. a perfect shot. 0r you'll see a giant pangolin. you don't know what's in shot, but there they are in full detail.
6:11 am
chester zoo is working with the local rangers to help protect the wildlife. the park is the stronghold for a rare chimpanzee found only in nigeria and neighbouring cameroon. with only a few thousand left the wild, these images raise hopes that the great ape can escape extinction. let's take a look at today's papers. morning, then. let's look at the front pages. if i do the... good, the guardian. now, justin forsyth has resigned as his role from unicef, the lead story in the guardian, in the wake of accusations of inappropriate behaviour towards female staff while he was chief executive of save the children. he said he is not resigning because of the mistakes made at the charity but because of mistakes the damage aide organisation and humanitarian and of course all of this in light of the
6:12 am
reports of abuse by workers for 0xfa m reports of abuse by workers for 0xfam in recent weeks —— aid. the picture you are seeing their —— there is oft are newbould who was found dead, lying in the home of a person she was staying with —— tara newbould. this is after a verdict about her death, 37 injuries and no murder charge. 0n the front page of the daily mail, plastic straws band, a lot of talk about the plastic straws particularly being a real issue, michael gove says the ban will happen within months, environmental damage they say by the straws specifically in immense. you remember those blue planet pictures with the turtle with a straw in its nose. horrific. the times, 0xfam banned from work in haiti. a beautiful photo of an owl. that's in
6:13 am
dorset. it spends winter around the south coast before returning north in the spring to breed. marvellous. the front page of the daily mirror, this is max, we will meet his mum a little later on. mps voting today on whether to change the law on organ donation. this is about whether or not you have to give your consent. we will look at some of the issues attached to that but maxjohnson is one of those who has benefited from a heart transplant. we will talk to his mum later on about the torturous time and the lack of donors. we often talk about the rise of celebrity and the power of celebrities have in terms of someone might weara celebrities have in terms of someone might wear a cycling and an item of clothing can sell out within minutes but now, celebrities are having supposedly an impact on the share price of a company? this is fascinating, we know the power of social media when it comes to
6:14 am
politicians whether president trump likes to use it but one of the first times it has had such a devastating effect on the company and this is on the front page of all of the papers, it is where you get the kardashians ages but the four sisters on top of the pages, but kyliejenner tweeted saying does anyone else not open snapchat anymore? 0r saying does anyone else not open snapchat anymore? or is it me? this is so sad. it is in response of a redesign of snapchat. remind me of the difference of instagram and snapchat? snapchat the picture disappears, it is a time limit. instagram the pictures stay on? yes. there was a huge soaring value of the company but a suggestion from someone the company but a suggestion from someone who has barely 22 million followers, a simple tweet has knocked about $1 billion off the value of the company. it is stunning. it is directly attributable to the comment? because they have been a redesign of the site and how the website works and
6:15 am
the application, a lot of people say they do not like the changes to this is the manifestation of that, the evidence that if a big user like kyliejenner has evidence that if a big user like kylie jenner has decided evidence that if a big user like kyliejenner has decided that she no longer wants to use it, it could speu longer wants to use it, it could spell the end of the site but nonetheless in the same set of figures to find out that their owner pay packet last year of £638 million. even though there has been a slump in the value of the shares asa a slump in the value of the shares as a result of the tweet, he still walked away, evan speigel, the third highest pay—out, 638 million dollars. not a bad payday. this hairstyle is all the rage. early 805. this hairstyle is all the rage. early 80s. it is back. the telegraph says it is an extreme new trend featuring closely shaven back and sides with a messy mop on the top. short back and sides with a bit on
6:16 am
the top. it is a combination of mine and yours, is it? mine is a bit short at the moment. this one is permed. 0k. it has been described to the bbc as a curly perm teased with short back and sides. the story is that schools are not happy with them. you should be a news journalist with hair like that.|j have journalist with hair like that.” have nothing on those fellows. that's a lot on top. how is your hair this evening? charlie just needs a bit of wind. it is picking up. the weather... it is best i
6:17 am
carry on. up. the weather... it is best i carry on. this up. the weather... it is best i carry on. this is up. the weather... it is best i carry on. this is what up. the weather... it is best i carry on. this is what we up. the weather... it is best i carry on. this is what we are expecting. before it turns italy called next week, this weekend, increasing sunshine. it will be felt, but becomes more of an issue through the it will be bitterly cold. some snow next week. we will get to that in a moment. this is the big picture. get used to this. high pressure to the north. it is not changing. a flow of airfrom the north. it is not changing. a flow of air from the east north. it is not changing. a flow of airfrom the east into the uk. it is dragging cloud from the north sea into england after a frosty start. -7 in into england after a frosty start. —7 in 0xfordshire. a few showers near the coast. cloud towards northern ireland. most places are dry. sunny spells. temperatures at
6:18 am
around 4—6. feeling more cold in that breeze. tonight. some areas of cloud. lengthy clear spells. that breeze. tonight. some areas of cloud. lengthy clearspells. dry overnight. all about the temperature dipping away. widespread frost taking hold. northern ireland, just above freezing. elsewhere, especially the countryside, —7 going into tomorrow morning. taking us into tomorrow morning. taking us into the weekend. increasing amount of sunshine, as i suggested earlier. patchy cloud. northern ireland, the far south—west of england. most of us far south—west of england. most of us have long sunny spells. tomorrow, temperatures are very similar. sunday, it will be barely a cloud in the sky. a gorgeous day if you like blue skies and sunshine. a crisp day after a frosty start. temperatures nudging down a bit more on sunday. factor in the strengthening breeze and it will feel below freezing.
6:19 am
surround next week it will feel like it is below freezing just about he uk. -- it is below freezing just about he uk. —— throughout the. this is the visual representation of the breezes in the uk. next week, it is even more cold. italy cold, especially in the windbitterly cold. there will be some disruption because of the snow. a hard frost. icy conditions. serious winter weather next week. for the short—term, just enjoy the sunshine. it could cause disruption? i know that yesterday you said we will have to keep an eye on it. if this is normal... i mean, we are going into
6:20 am
metre —— meteorological spring. normal... i mean, we are going into metre —— meteorological springm is very unusual for the start of march. some temperatures will not get above freezing in the uk. widely across the uk it will be hovering close to freezing for a top temperature. snow showers could be possible. it could be in minus double figures during the day. during the day? absolutely. absolutely. bitterly, bitterly cold. minus double digits? with windchill. temperatures should be 8—9 degrees. this is considerably below average.
6:21 am
snow is coming. mainly in the east. not out of the question it could fall in the form of showers just about anywhere. thank you. you have been warned. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: should every adult in england be made a potential organ donor? that's the question mps will be considering today when they debate a bill which could change the system in england to so—called "presumed consent." wales has already made a similar decision where, unless families strongly object, it's assumed organs will be donated. fiona lamdin reports. it has been a year since this family in south wales lost their father. absolutely devastated. it is just like someone ripped up my heart. scott was found unconscious in his home. in hospital, a ventilator was the only thing keeping alive. it was
6:22 am
then doctors asked juana if he wa nted then doctors asked juana if he wanted to donate his organs. translation: i was quite shocked, but it was the easiest, yes. i did not have any hesitation at all. even though her husband had never given his permission for his organs to be donated, two years ago, welsh law changed, and now presumes organ concerned. we recognise there was an issue for our population. —— consent. the need and demand for organ transplants was outstripping the supply. the latest figures show that last year, more people in wales than anywhere else in the uk consented to having their organs donated. the overall consent rate for wales is 72%, compared to england, at 64%, in scotland, at 60%. but critics argue it has made very little impact. before the law
6:23 am
changed, there were 101 deceased donors in welsh hospitals compared to just donors in welsh hospitals compared tojust 104 donors in welsh hospitals compared tojust104 donors once donors in welsh hospitals compared to just 104 donors once the law changed. how has it helped are you? translation: it brings a lot of comfort knowing that three families we re comfort knowing that three families were able to have their loved ones for a lot longer than they thought that they were going to. umm... children who may have lost their pa rents. children who may have lost their parents. his death was not in vain. and to me, that means more than anything. scotland has already announced it is planning to follow wales. today in england, mps will debate the bill or the first time, a bill that government is backing. —— for the first time. fiona lamdin, bbc news. we'll have more on this after seven when we'll hear two different experiences of what it's like waiting for an organ transplant. we will speak to emma whose son
6:24 am
needed a heart transplant. 106 days before he got one. they thought he would die. we'll have more on that. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. we are at an ice rink with all the walk about the olympics. they all know eve here. this is where the men and women train. scotland invented curling. this is one of 22 rinks around the country here in perth. and this is one of the sisters of two of the men who could not make the finals sadly. she is an up—and—coming star. she will teach me how to curl. more from perth
6:25 am
later on. let's see how this stone gets on. a work in progress. time to gets on. a work in progress. time to get the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are waking up this morning, with me flat on the ice. not that bad! good morning from bbc london news. london's mayor, sadiq khan, is facing opposition by many outer london boroughs over his plans to build 600,000 new homes in 10 years. city hall says its an answer to the housing crisis. but some boroughs say the plans will mean uncontrolled development which could threaten green spaces, and mean that family homes are knocked down and replaced by blocks of flats. we have got playing fields and green spaces which are under threat already. so, additional pressure of small site development, local inflow, without the ability to strategically planned, it is going to put pressure on all of our other
6:26 am
remaining local green spaces and playing fields. plan. a petition has been launched to protect grade i listed gardens in cobham from proposed motorway extension works. painshill park trustees say the m25 and a3 developments could mean areas of the 18th century gardens are lost forever. highways england saying an upgrade would reduce journey times and help reduce traffic. the expansion of night overground services in north london begins from this evening. the extended service will now serve canonbury and highbury and islington stations. it means the night overground will link with the victoria line night—tube for the first time. let's have a look at the travel situation now. a good service on all lions with some exceptions. —— lines. tfl rail has severe delays due to engineering work. on the trains, southern gatwick express and thameslink have delays of up
6:27 am
to ten mins londonbound. and greater anglia have delays of up to half an hour between romford and liverpool street. on the roads, the a13 is slow westbound from dagenham to barking. expect the usual delays. chelsea embankment is closed westbound for roadworks from chelsea bridge to battersea bridge. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. a cold and frosty start. last night, —4, minus five degrees. a similar looking data yesterday. there should be more sunshine through the morning. —— day to. especially in western areas. more cloud in eastern areas coming in on the bitterly cold easterly wind. it will will feel more cold. windchill factors in. highs of only five celsius. overnight tonight, very cold. hard frost. saturday, a
6:28 am
pretty looking day. a lot of blue sky and sunshine. the easterly wind will be stronger. bitterly cold. sunday, between one and four celsius with the air coming from siberia. the met office has now issued a weather warning with snow showers on monday and tuesday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to the breakfast sofa. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with. charlie stagtand nags ' f f f " 'w' * it is 6:28 p.m.. —— am. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning... he was in crisis? he was desperate for half. he never got it. —— help.
6:29 am
tony paine was jailed after a mental health crisis. on monday, he took his own life. his mother tells breakfast he never stood a chance in prison. also this morning, this is molly. she's the first dog to be nominated for an nhs unsung hero award. she'll be here just after 8:00. owner of a lonely heart. and after 9:00, it's not so lonely for rock band yes. steve howe and geoff downes will be here ahead of their 50th anniversary tour. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. for every five prescriptions handed out in england and there is made and the government has been warned these m ista kes the government has been warned these mistakes could be linked to hundreds and potentially thousands of deaths and potentially thousands of deaths a year. the health secretary, jeremy hunt,
6:30 am
calls the situation "appalling" and he cites the case over 92—year—old woman whose vital medication was stopped after her child was inadvertently swapped. the armed officer whose job it was to protect the florida high school where a gunman shot dead 17 people has resigned after it emerged he failed to intervene. scott peterson was facing suspension after an investigation revealed he remained outside the building and did not confront the gunman. it isn't known whether criminal charges will be brought. what i saw was a deputy arrive at the west side building 12 take up a position and he never went in. was he there when the shooter was still inside the building? yes, he was. what should he have done? went in. addressed the killer. killed the killer. a fourth british tourist has died of injuries he suffered in a helicopter crash in the grand canyon nearly a fortnight ago.
6:31 am
jonathan udall, who was in his 30s and from brighton, was on honeymoon with his wife, ellie milward. she and another british woman, as well as the helicopter‘s pilot, remain in a critical condition in hospital. theresa may is understood to have agreed with senior ministers a position on britain's future relationship with the eu during talks at chequers yesterday. downing street has given few details, but some of those present have suggested that everyone was happy with the outcome. one told the bbc that "there has been an outbreak of unity for now". number ten says the prime minister will set out "the way forward" next week after a discussion by the full cabinet. two people are still being questioned after a suspected hit and run in coventry which killed two young brothers. a man in his 50s and a woman in her 40s were arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving and drink driving. a 2—year—old boy was pronounced dead shortly after the incident, the death of his 6—year—old brother was confirmed a couple of hours later. the family of the seriously ill boy alfie evans has been given permission to appeal against a high court ruling allowing doctors to switch
6:32 am
off his life support. alfie has an undiagnosed brain disorder and doctors say there's no hope of recovery. on tuesday, a judge ruled in favour of his physicians, but his parents want to take him to a hospital in italy for further treatment. the way we eat and drink is almost as much of a factor when it comes to tooth erosion as what we consume. this is according to new research. it was found acidic food and drink and where teeth down, especially if people snack continually over the day. it is because if you eat whole fruit in wonder it is one acid attack on your teeth but if you eat segments over the day, it is a sustained attack. those are the main stories. britain's women curlers are in action in the semi—finals at the winter olympics today. for details on that and the rest of this morning's sport, mike is at a curling training centre in perth. this looks like a good one. this
6:33 am
looks good, mike. good morning. come on! come on! some great rushing to try to get this red stone towards the house in the middle, it isn't quite going to carry but as you can see at the moment in this particular end, well done! the red is in the house so the redwood score one point there. but that is why it is called bowling on the ice or chess on the eyes and it is such an exciting day because here in perth they know the british team, they are friends and family of the team, this is the eve muirhead and the men's team mostly train, perth, one of 22 cooling centres around the uk, they will be cheering on the brits today at 11 o'clock to try to get into the gold medal match. they are in the semifinals. if they can get in, they will be guaranteed britain's fifth medal at the winter games and it would be history making, record—breaking, the best ever olympics. having knocked out the
6:34 am
defending champions canada a few days ago, this time they take on sweden in the semifinal and if eve muirhead and her team can win, they will be going the gold on sunday. we had a really close game against sweden, we beat them in the european final and we always have close games when it comes to play—off games. final and we always have close games when it comes to play—off gamesm isa when it comes to play—off gamesm is a new part of the competition and we will go away and regroup and try to come out as strong as we can. in the women's ski cross overnight, britain's emily sarsfield got through her first heat on final‘s day, thanks in part to that big crash for one of her opponents. but sadly, she was knocked out in the next race. still, a great achievement from emily, given she's had no funding and worked three jobs just to compete at an olympics. to eventually get here after kind of like a set of multiple knee surgeries and whatever else it might
6:35 am
be and working three jobs in the summer be and working three jobs in the summerand be and working three jobs in the summer and stuff but it is huge to be stood there on the landing today and the big thing for me was to have fun and ski cross is such a cool sport, i wanted to put it on the map andi sport, i wanted to put it on the map and i hope i have a little bit. and there was a brilliant final in the ski cross as canada continued their dominance of the event. first and second place for them — kelsey serwa and brittany phelan with gold and silver. 15—year—old alina zagitova won olympic athletes from russia's first gold medal in the women's single figure skating. her compatriot evgenia medvedeva thought she'd beaten her and was left in tears as she fell just short. as you know, we like to make sure you're across everything that's going on in pyeongchang. this is rather lovely. well, team gb snowboarder billy morgan's daily commute from the olympic village to the slopes is pretty impressive. here he is on a scooter making his way from his apartment
6:36 am
to the athletes‘ bus. impressive stuff — so much so that his fellow snowboarder jamie nicholls decided to film and edit it so we could all marvel at billy's skills. he goes in the final of the big air at one o'clock uk time tomorrow. with balance like that, he's sure to win gold! football briefly, oh dear, salty‘s european dream is over i'm afraid, they crashed out of the europe league last night after a 3—1 aggregate defeat against st petersburg. and henriquesside had led 1—0 in the first leg but conceded three goals in a disappointing performance at home. arsenal survived a real scare. leading 3—0 from the first leg against ostersunds fk of sweden, they conceded two goals in the first half. but to the relief of the emirates' crowd, sead kolasniac finally secured the 4—2 win on aggregate, and they're now through to the last 16. now, back to the curling in perth
6:37 am
and let's see how it is done because this is a rising star the great britain, merely smith said. but for billie smedts. her brother is in the team. i was trying to concentrate on the sport but i was advised —— admiring your skills. can you show me how you should send the stone on its way using the back foot as your anchor, the sliding 40s forward and watch this. poetry in motion, curling in motion. it cannot go beyond the blue line and there goes the stone, releasing itjust before the stone, releasing itjust before the blue line, and you get a bit of curl, you hope to get it around at the end towards the house. happy with that one? it is talk to you. how was that? fine. how much practices that take? quite a lot.
6:38 am
let's talk about your brothers, we felt them because they were beaten by the ridiculous switzerland stone scored five. how are they feeling?” have spoken to them a bit, they are gutted but happy that they have had a good time out there. they have enjoyed themselves. scotland have really helped britain windmills over the years in curling since it was reintroduced in 1998 so what are the chances of eve muirhead's side today? are lost to sweden in the round robin but seems to the big occasion i feel. the girls have a good chance if they go out there and give it their all, that is all you can ask for. i think they will be fine, if you give a good game should have a really good chance of a medal and a good team. what has done the curling in scotland with 22 centres indeed de darrou now. how much are they an inspiration for the likes of you? they have been a massive inspiration, they are really strong, eve ryo ne inspiration, they are really strong, everyone admires them, watches them,
6:39 am
and it makes them want to play they have had a big impact on the sport. it is one of those sports with the new fiat come around, every four years , we new fiat come around, every four years, we all want to do it whether in the kitchen using a cake tin, it is ridiculous, but in england there is ridiculous, but in england there is only one brink, there is one in wales, and in scotland 22. do we need more drinks. can you show me, a com plete need more drinks. can you show me, a complete novice, how to deliver the perfect stone? you have to get it into the house at the end, what would be your technique was to block off the red. you need to put your right foot in the faq if you are right—handed. right foot in the faq if you are right-handed. so take the... group of? it is the sliding bits that is the most. you have to lift your hips a little bit. then kind of pull yourself back to the momentum is with you and push out with the stone, stone first. i am way short
6:40 am
of the blue line but i will send it down. the hardest thing isjudging whether it has enough power, doesn't it? that may not be long enough. i am sure eve muirhead's team will do am sure eve muirhead's team will do a cave. actually, if you look at the end it is not done too badly although it is off the end. too much power, you see! too much porridge! let's hope these's team will do better. thank you, we will look forward to a more curling a little later on. keep practising. the meeting at chequers is over, and the talk coming out of the brexit subcommittee is that there is broad agreement on the uk's future relationship with the european union. so what does that mean exactly? well the details won't be revealed publicly until next week but kathryn simpson is an associate professor of politics from manchester metropolitan university and is here to tell us what we might expect. we will interviewjeremy hunt in about one hour. he was not part of
6:41 am
the meeting, at this away day at chequers. who was there and why were the ones they're there and the ones who weren't there not? this comes back on the confidence that the may has had since the munich security conference speech last saturday and it was the very much kinder focus a clear vision and mandate and vision really for brexit so the focus has been on the three brexit ministers, david davis, liam fox and boris johnson, but also trying to reunite the cabinet which has been so discussed openly about how divided they are. reading between the lines then, the once there were the troublemakers she had had problems with? you could put it that way in some respects but really what it is is the focus was very much on brexit and actually having the main kind of organisations and departments there who are dealing with brexit to actually have a clear vision on doubling forward ahead of next week's speech that the prime
6:42 am
minister will give on her vision for brexit. one of the significance is going to chequers is it's a place in theory they can have conversations slightly out of the spotlight. they don't have the shots of ministers walking in and out of downing street and people shouting questions at them. it is slightly removed possibly a different kind of talk and we look at words coming out, apparently, seniorfigures describing it to the bbc as an outbreak of unity for now. really what theresa may wants to bring is showing leadership on the back of kind of one of the best speeches she has perhaps given in the last saturday, in her munich security conference, but she wants to unite the cabinet and we are looking on the cabinet and we are looking on the door of a gear until we leave the door of a gear until we leave the european union at march 2019 and we have had mixed messages over the last couple of months and we really do need now to see the unity in government among the main brexit departments and also really what the vision is coming forward. the phrase
6:43 am
an outbreak of unity for now, i take that as quite threatening. sinister, really. we will give her a little bit of leeway for now. for now. there is constant debate about how disunited the cabinet is and whether we will have a general election in the next couple of months but i think theresa may is wanting to get on with thejob think theresa may is wanting to get on with the job as she often says and also really trying to move forward with brexit negotiations as we move into phase two and we are trying to underpin some of the key issues, trade, security operations. the pattern of what has happened thus far, previously we had stayed of unity and then when you get individual ministers, jeremy hunt is one of them, individually they are asked in some detail about what they think and once you get past the cliches of brexit means brexit, we have been clear, things always do start looking a little different, don't they? they have, so far, and i
6:44 am
think it was one of the issues and one of the reasons perhaps why we had the cheque is away day was because to get away and get people on message and stick to the message going away into phase two. —— chequers. one of the most difficult pa rt chequers. one of the most difficult part of negotiations actually. we knew in december we had a dig blip around the irish border which has beenin around the irish border which has been in some respects revolved but as we try really to get to grips with what the future relationship with what the future relationship with the eu is going to look like, that kind of winnie to have a real clear message. thank you very much. it is coming up to quarter to seven. very cold, but blue skies. it will become very cold. a cold wind this
6:45 am
weekend. dry and sunny weather to come. next week it will be more cold. significant windchill. some will get some snow. more on that soon. will get some snow. more on that soon. the setup today. cold wind coming from the east not the atlantic. it is fairly settled. some areas of cloud. clear spells to be widespread frost. —7 in oxfordshire. a few showers near coastal counties. cloud around northern ireland and western scotland alike yesterday. breezy. most places will be dry. broken cloud. sunny spells. tonight, patchy cloud here and there. lengthy spells allowing temperatures to fall away. widespread and hard frost to
6:46 am
come tonight and into the weekend. northern ireland, enough cloud and breeze to keep temperatures above freezing for many of us here. saturday, most waking up to a frosty and sunny start. patchy cloud in northern ireland and the south—west of england, north—east scotland. lengthy sunny spells elsewhere. a dry day to be similar temperatures. 3-6 dry day to be similar temperatures. 3—6 degrees. ——a dry day. strengthening. barely a cloud in the sky on sunday. wrap up and have a walk and it will be a glorious day. temperatures are nudging down a bit on sunday. factoring in the wind, feeling closer to or below freezing on sunday. that is a trend continuing into next week. below freezing throughout next week. what about this for a chart? some people
6:47 am
are calling this the "beast from the east." cold air from are calling this the "beast from the east." cold airfrom siberia into the uk. by wednesday, temperatures will be freezing. colder than that with the windchill. the increasing chance of seeing some snow, initially in the east of the uk. possible just about anywhere through the week. more detail about that later. hard frost overnight. —5, —6. with snow cover, it could be even more cold. we have escaped a lot of the prolonged cold that winter can offer, but it looks like throughout next week, it is looking very cold across the uk. keep watching for more details about all of that. thanks very much, nick! see you later! uk workers are doing billions of pounds of unpaid overtime. ben's looking at why. you would think that if you stayed
6:48 am
back, you would be paid more! yes, morning, everyone. £31 billion. that's how much free overtime employers are getting out of us each year, according to a new study by the tuc. it's worked out that in effect, the average person has been working for free so far this year, up until today. according to the tuc‘s analysis of official data we did two billion hours of unpaid work in 2017. if we'd been paid for it, that would equate to £6,265 per person each year. and we can see who is doing what. the figures show company chief executives are doing the least unpaid overtime, with around 25% of them working extra for free. if we jump to the second highest, that's general managers, those working in finance, marketing, sales, pr and hr, for example. 45% of all managers do unpaid overtime. and finally, the highest, we have heard about the pressures faced by teachers, figures show a staggering 53% of all teachers and educational professionals are working overtime and not being paid for it. so, do we need to look again at our
6:49 am
working culture? i'm joined now by professor cary cooper, an expert in workplace health. it is nice to see you. good morning. good morning. it is a fascinating subject. are we working for free? are you surprised? it has been going ona are you surprised? it has been going on a long time, starting before the recession in the thatcher era. fewer people doing more work and feeling less secure. it is the culture of the organisations have created, the long—hours culture. they feel it means productive. many studies show if you work long hours consistently, you get ill. this is important. people are turning up to work... you come early and stay late and send e—mails that night and that is a problem. the work day, when you measure long hours, people do not take into account the mobile phone
6:50 am
and what you do at night, on weekends. it is work and we are not getting paid for it. it is notjust a health issue, ben, it is a productivity issues. france and germany have less hours. germany has 35. but they have better productivity. who is to blame? managers? you have to be at your desk, stay until 830. do people think that they have to stay and they will look great? it is both. everyone thinks that long hours are productive. it is not. theyjust feel insecure. they think that if they show face time, come early, come even if they have the flu. they think that they will not be made
6:51 am
redundant later on and they will look highly committed. it is a mixture of both. but experiments in sweden, they did it in goethenberg. 30 hours against 40 hours. they were more productive and had less sickness days at 30 hours. we have an issue of hours in terms of using more flexible hours. more and more people giving a service —based economy want to work in a flexible manner. say you go into work and work really productively for four hours and go home. your boss wouldn't like it. they are not looking at the bottom line, they are looking at the bottom line, they are looking at the bottom line, they are looking at face time. that is not healthy for the economy. most people wa nt healthy for the economy. most people want service. it could affect
6:52 am
productivity. many managers want face time, they want people there to manage them there. we have to change that attitude with managers. manage them there. we have to change that attitude with managersm manage them there. we have to change that attitude with managers. it is nice to see you. many people are talking. kate says you should be able to go off early if you have something. it is about people bending over backwards to be indispensable. thank you. the brecon beacons in south wales offers some of the most stunning views in the uk, so it's perhaps not surprising visitor numbers have doubled over the past five years. it is very cold this morning, of course! however, all those extra footsteps have been having quite an impact on the pathways that criss—cross the mountain range. now the national trust needs volunteers to help with repairs. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is there for us. people are worried about the pathways. it encompasses 500 square miles. at their heart is the mountain range which you can see. it
6:53 am
is incredibly cold. this pathway leads to the highest peak. you can see some work going on into the downsides of the huge popularity. the number of visitors has rocketed coming to see these views. there is a consequence. with each step, the views get better. it is just with each step, the views get better. it isjust a beautiful place. the path, more war and eroded. —— worn. pen y fan in the brecon beacons in south wales. at 880 metres above sea level, it is the highest mountain in southern britain. but the path to the top has become a victim of its own success. in the last five years it has doubled, in upwards of 350,000 visitors now just on doubled, in upwards of 350,000 visitors nowjust on this one path
6:54 am
each year. rob reith helped create this partly in 1986. the height of this partly in 1986. the height of this path 30 years ago would have been a waste. they have worn it out like motorway. so, rob and his team of volu nteers like motorway. so, rob and his team of volunteers are carrying out a huge repairjob. we are trying to build up the path. there was a gully beginning to start and water would follow the gully, making it deeper and wider. so we are feeling it in. —— filling. a lot of people coming here are not experienced walkers. we do not want them to get lost. here are not experienced walkers. we do not want them to get lostm here are not experienced walkers. we do not want them to get lost. it is not just footsteps that are the problem, but rain and snow. we encourage them to bring water so that it will run down the side of the mountain rather than on the
6:55 am
paths. it is very rewarding. get to the top and it is easy to see why so many people want to walk this route. the views are incredible. you can see all the way across mid wales and parts of gloucestershire, somerset, and devon. this spring, a helicopter will airlift tons of gravel high rocky mountain city hall path can be improved. —— higherup rocky mountain city hall path can be improved. —— higher up the mountain so improved. —— higher up the mountain so the whole path can be. we have 70 kilometres to look after and we have donejust over 15 kilometres to look after and we have done just over 15 kilometres. yeah, some of the team are here this morning. joe, tell me, what will happen if this work is not done? you risk erosion. so many people walk up
6:56 am
each year and it has a big impact. it is fantastic to have them come here. we have support for this work so here. we have support for this work so it is critical we do it. carry on. if you want to volunteer, go to the national trust website and register their peak and notjust turn up. but you will be welcome. —— there. there are many sites across northern ireland and wales. volu nteers northern ireland and wales. volunteers are always very, very welcome to be a lot of hard work to be done. you can see why people come here. —— welcome. get warm and have some soup. soup and chocolate. i feel like get warm and have some soup. soup and chocolate. ifeel like some chocolate. good morning from bbc london news. london's mayor, sadiq khan, is facing opposition by many outer london boroughs over his plans to build 600,000 new homes in 10 years. city hall says its an answer to the housing crisis. but some boroughs say the plans will mean uncontrolled development which could threaten green spaces,
6:57 am
and mean that family homes are knocked down and replaced by blocks of flats. we've got playing fields and green spaces which are under threat already. so, additional pressure of small site development, local infill, without the ability to strategically plan, is going to put pressure on all of our other remaining local green spaces and playing fields. a petition has been launched to protect grade i listed gardens in cobham from proposed motorway extension works. painshill park trustees say the m25 and a3 developments could mean areas of the 18th century gardens are lost forever. highways england saying an upgrade would reduce journey times and help reduce traffic. the expansion of night overground services in north london begins from this evening. the extended service will now serve canonbury and highbury and islington stations. it means the night overground will link with the victoria line night—tube for the first time. let's have a look at the travel
6:58 am
situation now. on the tube, there is a good service on all lines. and tfl rail is also suspended due to over running engineering work. on the trains, southern gatwick express and thameslink have delays of up to ten minutes londonbound. and greater anglia have delays of up to half an hour between romford and liverpool street. on the roads, the a13 is slow westbound from dagenham to barking. expect the usual delays. chelsea embankment is closed westbound for roadworks from chelsea bridge to battersea bridge. let's have a check on the weather now. hello. good morning. it's a cold and a frosty start to today. we saw last night temperatures dip
6:59 am
as low as —4 and —5 degrees. a similar looking day to yesterday. there should be more sunshine through the morning. especially in western areas. more cloud in eastern areas coming in on the bitterly cold easterly wind. it will will feel colder. windchill factored in, highs of only five celsius. overnight tonight, very cold. another widespread hard frost into tomorrow morning. so, saturday, a very pretty looking day. lots of blue sky and sunshine around. but the easterly wind will be stronger. it will feel bitterly cold on sunday. between one and four celsius with the air coming from siberia. the met office has now issued a weather warning with snow showers on monday and tuesday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
7:00 am
hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. alarming new research links mistakes in patient medication to tens of thousands of deaths every year. as many as one in five drugs may be given out in error across england. the health secretary, jeremy hunt, calls the situation "appalling" and "totally preventable". good morning, it's friday the 23rd of february. also this morning: the armed officer who was at the florida high school where 17 were shot dead has resigned for failing to intervene. his sheriff said it was a failure of duty. wembley in law enforcement arise at an active shooter, we go in and address the target. that is what should have been done.
7:01 am
a fourth british tourist has died following the helicopter crash in the grand canyon. jonathan udall was on honeymoon. his wife remains in a critical condition. why it's notjust what we eat, but when and how we eat it — how snacking on certain food and drinks damages our teeth. the owner of british airways has results out this morning. i'm upa i'm up a curling centre in the olympic park at the pyeongchang olympics where eve muirhead and that curling team again there quest for a medal in the semifinals later on this morning. more at 730. and nick has the weather. with high pressure in control, lots of dry and increasingly sunny weather over the next few days. a frosty start this morning but you are —— if you think it is cold now,
7:02 am
wait until next week. winter is about to roll back into life. —— roar back. good morning. first, our main story. for every five prescriptions handed out in england, an error is made, and the government's been warned these mistakes could be linked to hundreds and potentially thousands of deaths a year. the health secretaryjeremy hunt has described the findings as "appalling". he cites the case of a 92—year—old woman whose vital medication was stopped after her chart was inadvertently swapped. our health editor hugh pym has the details. the report covers mistakes made in the prescribing, dispensing and administering of medication in england. these could involve gps, pharmacists, care homes and hospitals. the research is one of the first exercises of its kind. it found that medication errors could cause around 1,700 deaths per year and perhaps contribute to up to 22,000 deaths. the cost to the nhs could be around £1.6 billion a year. it does note that the vast majority of prescriptions dispensed on the nhs are safe and mistakes do occur in all healthcare systems. the health and social care secretary
7:03 am
jeremy hunt said it was a far bigger problem globally than has so far been recognised, causing appalling levels of harm and death. plans to tackle the problem include introducing electronic prescribing systems in hospitals designed to cut mistakes. the national pharmacy association said it welcomed the focus on reducing medication errors, but that a culture of learning, rather than blame, was needed. hugh pym, bbc news. an armed officer who was at the florida school where 17 people were killed has resigned after it emerged he failed to intervene. scott peterson was facing suspension after an investigation revealed he remained outside the building and did not confront the gunman. earlier we spoke to peter bowes. this has emerged from the sheriff of broward county, and he has been looking at surveillance video and he refers to this deputy,
7:04 am
this police officer, who was working, he was in uniform, he was armed, he was on the compass as the shooting happened —— he was armed, he was on the campus as the shooting happened and apparently, he got to the building where the shooting took place around 90 seconds of the first shots being fired and then, he didn't go inside. in fact, he stayed outside for about four minutes — the actual shooting lasted about six minutes. it is still something of a mystery as to why he didn't essentially do hisjob and go in and confront the shooter and in fact, seen the deputy do, and he said just that — to have gone inside, to have addressed the shooter, and to have shot him dead. now, as to why he didn't do that, the officer has not spoken to himself yet so we don't know his side of the story but we know that he was initially suspended without pay pending further investigation, but he actually chose to resign from hisjob. now, clearly, there are some people will put the whole debate about guns
7:05 am
in schools and perhaps the arming of teachers in a new perspective because here was someone actually on the campus trained to use a gun. peter, thank you. it is five minutes past seven. rbs has just released their latest results. ben has the details. really significant news this morning because this is the first profit from the bank in about 10 years since it was bailed out at the height of the financial crisis, the first pre—tax full—year profit for the bank reported profits of £2.2 billion, compared to a loss of £4 billion, compared to a loss of £4 billion this time last year and it has been such a difficult slog for rbs since the financial crisis, you may remember in 2008 they racked up massive losses of £24 billion, the biggest corporate loss in uk history. so they have been trying to
7:06 am
put things right since and it has taken them a long time, they have been struggling and faced all kinds of problems, payments, claims of getting into risky mortgages in the united states, all sorts of legal issues but they are finally out, i have been speaking to them this morning and they told me it is a symbolic moment and i've put in the past behind them. there is not yet dividends if are an investor, you won't get a dividend but the timeline is creeping closer. they are keen to point out they are no longer a bad bank, you'll remember that phrase to describe a lot of the banks of the height of the gfc so they have been cutting costs and trying to keep it on an even keel but the big question is whether the government can sell the stake that we as taxpayers own in the bank, we are still owned 21% of it, but they are still owned 21% of it, but they are keen to stop selling it back to private hands but of course they may end up doing that at a loss,
7:07 am
remember, the government bought shares at 500 and 2p just over £5, are currently trading at £2 78 so if they did sell, they would sell at a loss. of nearly 50%. it is interesting with lloyds, snapchat we we re interesting with lloyds, snapchat we were talking about that. the power of celebrity perhaps it comes to snapchat‘s share price. of celebrity perhaps it comes to snapchat's share price. this is fascinating. snapchat is a social network site where you can send pictures and the pictures disappear, popular with young people and celebrities and so much so we have had a tweet overnight from one of the kardashian family, you will see it there, so this is the tweet alone, 56,000 retweets, that was enough to knock $1 billion off the value of snapchat. because there has been a lot of changes to how the site works, people do not like it,
7:08 am
so site works, people do not like it, so suggesting someone so influential in social media circles will stop using it is enough to what the money off. she has been attributed solely the knocking this off the share price? yes, a lot of users don't like it so someone with a lot of influence suggesting she is no longer using it means it could affect other people to do the same and it has been an to knock $1 billion of its value. the power! the fourth british tourist has died of injuries from a crash in the grand canyon. the man was on his honeymoon at the time that the crash happened. jon udall and ellie milward were on their honeymoon. she has now been left with critical injuries, while herfriends‘ online post, announcing mr udall‘s death, described him as strong and brave. the eurocopter ec130 crashed as it came into land in arizona's remote quartermaster canyon. witnesses say it spun around twice before hitting the ground and then
7:09 am
bursting into flames. police say bad weather meant it was more than eight hours before the survivors could be flown to hospital. stuart hill, on the left, is pictured here along with his brotherjason, who also died at the scene. their parents say the brothers shared an incredible bond and would be deeply missed. jennifer barham remains in a critical condition in hospital in las vegas, as does the pilot, scott booth. experts say possible causes of the crash include a faulty tail rotor and gusty winds. but it may take many months to determine why the helicopter came down with such terrible consequences. adina campbell, bbc news. two people are still being questioned after a suspected hit and run in coventry which killed two young brothers. a man in his 50s and a woman in her 40s were arrested
7:10 am
on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving and drink driving. a 2—year—old boy was pronounced dead shortly after the incident. the death of his 6—year—old brother was confirmed a couple of hours later. the family of the seriously ill boy alfie evans has been given permission to appeal against a high court ruling allowing doctors to switch off his life—support. alfie has an undiagnosed brain disorder and doctors say there's no hope of recovery. on tuesday, a judge ruled in favour of his physicians, but his parents want to take him to a hospital in italy for further treatment. the way we eat and drink is almost as much of a factor in tooth erosion as what we consume, according to new research. scientists at king's college london found acidic food and drink can wear teeth down, especially if people snack continually. here's more from our health correspondent, catherine burns.
7:11 am
—— those are the main stories. should every adult in england be made a potential organ donor? that's the question mps will be considering today when they debate a bill which could change the system in england to so—called ‘presumed consent‘. wales has already made a similar decision where, unless families strongly object, it's assumed organs will be donated. scotland is introducing similar rules, while northern ireland is keeping the current system. fiona lamdin reports. it has been a year since this family in south wales lost their father. translation: absolutely devastated. absolutely devastated. it isjust like someone ripped up my heart. scott duckworth was found unconscious in his home. in hospital, a ventilator was the only thing keeping alive. —— in hospital, a ventilator was the only thing keeping him alive. it was then doctors asked joanna if he wanted to donate his organs. i was quite shocked, but it was the easiest, yes.
7:12 am
i did not have any hesitation at all. even thouthoanna's husband had never given his permission for his organs to be donated, two years ago, welsh law changed, and now presumes organ consent. so we recognised that there was an issue for our population, that the need and the demand for organs and organ transplants was outstripping the supply. the latest figures show that last year, more people in wales than anywhere else in the uk consented to having their organs donated. the overall consent rate for wales is 72%, compared to england at 64%, and scotland, at 60%. but critics argue it has made very little impact. before the law changed, there were 101 deceased donors in welsh hospitals, compared tojust 104 donors once the law changed. how has it helped are you?
7:13 am
—— how has it helped you? it brings a lot of comfort, knowing that three families were able to have their loved ones for a lot longer than they thought that they were going to. children who may have lost their parents. his death was not in vain. and to me, that means more than anything. scotland has already announced it is planning to follow wales. today in england, mps will debate the bill for the first time, a bill that government is backing. fiona lamdin, bbc news. listening to that story with us, jim lynskey, who is waiting for a heart transplant, and emma johnson, who has been campaigning to get the organ donation rules changed to an opt—out system after her son needed a heart transplant.
7:14 am
very good morning to you. jim, welcomed by the way. i know you are a little nervous in this situation but tell us a little bit, first of all people see that you are awaiting a heart transplant and have various paraphernalia with you. explain your situation. this is a left ventricle assisted device it is quite a rare sort of heart pump it is keeping me alive until i can receive a donor heart. it is something you where all of the time keeping your heart going? overnight as well, there is no getting away from it u nfortu nately no getting away from it unfortunately but it is the sort of state that the organ donation system is in at the moment. three people are thought to be dying per day. i am thankful i can live with this and not be that unfortunate. what are you living with? from the age of 80 had succession of cardiac arrest?” had succession of cardiac arrest?” had to at age eight and a further one at 17. and then i got no money
7:15 am
which unfortunately attacked my heart. because you had, was at viral meningitis? yes, i got it with my twin sister when i was born, grace kellaway arms guard but u nfortu nately kellaway arms guard but unfortunately this has happened now. i have to remain positive and hopefully with this opt out system coming into place today, fingers crossed. how long have you been waiting?” have been waiting three years, which doesn't sound like ages, but for someone so young doesn't sound like ages, but for someone so young with the blood types i have, my height, etc, it is unusual i have not been able to access a heart. do you know what, three years sounds like ages to me. not even in a funny way. 22. a seventh of your life. what have you
7:16 am
been told in terms of how long you will have to wait? it is awful, you have to wait for someone to diem is difficult. it is a fragile subject to promote. i try to promote it with a social media account i have called saveninelives. it is not which scheme are we operating, can we opt out, etc, it is about talk about it with your loved ones. could it bea about it with your loved ones. could it be a soft opt—out system? families can reject consent, which is frustrating for patients like myself. it is not whether you are or are not an organ donor, it is have you had that conversation. tell us about your son, max, you had that conversation. tell us about yourson, max, emma. you had a long wait for max for a donor. tell us
7:17 am
long wait for max for a donor. tell us about how this opt in or consent process could have benefited. he went on the urgent heart transplant list mid january of last year after he was diagnosed with violated cardiomyopathy with his heart becoming too big, unable to pump blood properly. —— dialated. he also had the same type of mechanical pump he is describing. it acted as a bridge to transplant to try to keep him relatively safe under the circumstances until an organ donor could be found. so we went on the list in mid—january and then we... the wait had begun and we waited and we waited and we prayed and we
7:18 am
hoped. and finally we got the call on the second of august that a donor had been found. umm, so, it was a long time to wait because max was in a very precarious situation. he was up a very precarious situation. he was up and down between the high—intensity units, the intensive ca re high—intensity units, the intensive care unit, so the hardest thing about waiting for an organ was not knowing where or if one would come in time. so i believe that if the law can change to an opt—out, that it will almost act as a catalyst for a change of culture just asjim said. i hope it raises awareness so more people talk about what their wishes would be should the worst happened to a loved one. yes, emma, can you share a few things? we saw a lovely picture of max. and people will be asking how is he now? the other thing people will be curious about is your relationship and what
7:19 am
people can tell us about the donor. it isa people can tell us about the donor. it is a good news story in some way. people have had a bereavement and do something extraordinary. we found out who our donor family were in mid—october. you are allowed to write a thank you letter and pass it the transplant co—ordinator. you can put first names, but not full names. so we had done that. it took us a long time to write the letter because there are just not the words in the english language which can express just how grateful and indebted we felt. we knew that there was a family out there who had made that brave decision to donate. and then, umm, the little girl's name
7:20 am
was keira and herfamily got in touch because of the mirror campaign and they put two and two together to work out who we were. we are now in touch with our donor family and are building a lovely bond. and we are just overawed by their courage and humanity towards others. and even now they continue to help others because they are setting up a charity called inspired by keira to encourage organ donation. my husband and i, we feel as if we have almost gained a spiritual daughter with keira. we feel like we have gotten to know her. we know there are similarities between keira and max in their personalities. and max is just thriving. he is adjusting to medication and certain minor side effects, but, umm, all in all, he is
7:21 am
doing really. he is loving life. —— brilliantly. he is free from all of the machinery like drips and machine battery packs. he was almost like a bionic boy with all the stuff he had to shuffle around with. just getting from his bed to the play room was a major achievement. so, to see him back at school... after easter he will be going back full—time. and he has just been signed off from his physiotherapy. he gave a presentation at his school about his story. i tell you what, presentation at his school about his story. itell you what, it is presentation at his school about his story. i tell you what, it is so moving going through that. thank you for that. this is your story as
7:22 am
well. you were nodding all the way through. it is important to emphasise, the donor family, through. it is important to emphasise, the donorfamily, that relationship, how much it means for both families. yes. it remains very private in the beginning stage. but it isa private in the beginning stage. but it is a beautiful thing when you can meet your donorfamily. it is a beautiful thing when you can meet your donor family. it is quite rare but it is amazing if you get to do so. i think it is amazing that such a young girl, keira, you know, was able to donate and save another young boy's life. and i think it is easy to forget that infants are involved in organ donation. and, you know, there is no age, no ethnicity, that this does not apply to. i think eve ryo ne that this does not apply to. i think everyone watching this today does need to have the chat if they can with their loved ones and hopefully save more lives like we have heard
7:23 am
today. and keira actually saved four lives. people don't know how many. you mentioned your campaign, nine lives. people think one person saves another. at she saved so many. lives. people think one person saves another. at she saved so manym lives. people think one person saves another. at she saved so many. it is remarkable. thank you for your time, emma andjim. we wish you all of remarkable. thank you for your time, emma and jim. we wish you all of the best. keep in touch when things change with your circumstances. thank you for having me. than oe, thank you very much. -- thank you. here's nick with a look at this morning's weather. the picture behind me indicates we are expecting a lot of sunshine. some cloud today, but increasing sunshine on the weekend to be a cold wind, but getting more colds next week. next
7:24 am
week, snow showers as it turns bitterly cold. more about that in a moment. the big picture. high pressure is close by. influencing the uk. fairly settled. it is an easterly flow. cold and getting colder. widespread frost this morning. sunny spells possible. along the coast you could get some light showers. cloud in northern ireland and western parts of scotland. many places will have broken cloud, sunny spells, enough ofa broken cloud, sunny spells, enough of a breeze to make it feel colder than this. 3—6. tonight, patchy cloud floating around. lengthy clear spells. again, temperatures will do away with widespread frost developing into the more morning. the low today is —7. some spots the same tomorrow morning. cloud and a breeze holding at or above freezing
7:25 am
for many of us here. tomorrow, more in the way of sunshine. patchy cloud, more towards northern ireland and the far south—west of england to be many places having lengthy sunny spells for saturday. —— england. temperatures feeling more cold than these numbers suggest. another hard frost for sunday morning. even more sunshine on sunday. the wind arrows are still coming in from the east and south—east. on sunday, the actual temperature will do away a degree or so, but when you factor in the wind, it will feel closer to or even below freezing. and that trend very much continues into next week. the air is coming from the arctic, siberia, chilly, feeling even more cold late on sunday and through next week. all of the blues spreading through europe and the uk. snow showers developing as well. next week is looking very cold. for a
7:26 am
time, temperatures not getting much above freezing by date. the wind making it feel colder. —— day. showers with snow developing on monday and tuesday, especially in the east of the uk. frost as well. the winter weather is roaring back. can we make this official, can you say "we need to get thermals out?" "we need to get thermals out." it is official. it is very, very cold. mine haven't come off! time to get the news, travel, and weather, the all—important the news, travel, and weather, the all—importa nt weather, wherever you are waking up this morning. good morning from bbc
7:27 am
london's mayor, sadiq khan, is facing opposition by many outer london boroughs over his plans to build 600,000 new homes in 10 years. city hall says its an answer to the housing crisis. but some boroughs say the plans will mean uncontrolled development which could threaten green spaces, and mean that family homes are knocked down and replaced by blocks of flats. we have got playing fields and green spaces which are under threat already. so, additional pressure of small site development, local inflow, without the ability to strategically planned, it is going to put pressure on all of our other remaining local green spaces and playing fields. a petition has been launched to protect grade i listed gardens in cobham from proposed motorway extension works. painshill park trustees say the m25 and a3 developments could mean areas of the 18th century gardens are lost forever. highways england saying an upgrade would reduce journey times and help reduce traffic. the expansion of night overground
7:28 am
services in north london begins from this evening. the extended service will now serve canonbury and highbury and islington stations. it means the night overground will link with the victoria line night—tube for the first time. let's have a look at the travel situation now. a good service on all lines with some exceptions. tfl rail has severe delays due to engineering work. on the trains, southern gatwick express and thameslink have delays of up to ten mins londonbound. and greater anglia have delays of up to half an hour between romford and liverpool street. on the roads, the a13 is slow westbound from dagenham to barking. expect the usual delays. chelsea embankment is closed westbound for roadworks from chelsea bridge to battersea bridge. let's have a check on the weather now. hello.
7:29 am
good morning. it's a cold and a frosty start to today. we saw last night temperatures dip as low as —4 and —5 degrees. a very similar looking day to yesterday. there should be more sunshine around through the morning. especially in western areas. more cloud in eastern areas coming in on the bitterly cold easterly wind. it will be brisker and feel colder. a lot of windchill to factor in, highs of only five celsius. overnight tonight, very cold. another widespread hard frost into tomorrow morning. again, lows of —4 in rural spots. so, saturday, a very pretty looking day. lots of blue sky and sunshine around. but the easterly wind is going to be stronger. it will feel bitterly cold over the weekend. on sunday, between one and four
7:30 am
celsius with the air coming from siberia. a quick heads up, the met office has now issued a weather warning with snow showers on monday and tuesday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. gps, pharmacists, hospitals and care homes may be making millions prescription errors a year and the government's been warned these mistakes could be linked to hundreds and potentially thousands of deaths in england. the health secretary, jeremy hunt, has described the findings as "appalling". he cites the case of a 92—year—old woman whose vital medication was stopped after her chart was inadvertently swapped. an armed officer who was at the florida school, where 17 people were killed, has resigned after it emerged he failed to intervene. scott peterson was facing suspension after an investigation revealed he remained outside
7:31 am
the building and did not confront the gunman. it's not yet known whether criminal charges will be brought. rbs has reported its full profit after being bailed out at that height of the crisis 10 years ago, making £2.2 billion last year have two loss of 4 billion year before. the bank could now be reprivatised after the government selling off the sta ke after the government selling off the stake it owns but the share prices still well below the price the government paid in 2008. a fourth british tourist has died of injuries he suffered in a helicopter crash in the grand canyon nearly a fortnight ago. jonathan udall, who was in his 30s and from brighton, was on honeymoon with his wife, ellie milward. she and another british woman, as well as the helicopter‘s pilot,
7:32 am
remain in a critical condition in hospital. theresa may is understood to have agreed with senior ministers, a position on britain's future relationship with the eu during talks at chequers yesterday. downing street has given few details but some of those present have suggested that everyone was happy with the outcome. one told the bbc that "there has been an outbreak of unity for now". number ten says the prime minister will set out "the way forward" next week after a discussion by the full cabinet. the way we eat and drink is almost as much of a factor in tooth erosion as what we consume, according to new research. scientists at king's college london found acidic food and drink can wear teeth down — especially if people snack continually over the day. that's because if you eat fruit whole, in one go, it's one acid attack on your teeth — but if you eat it slowly it's a sustained attack. nick will have the weather. there will be some snow on the way. it will be very cold. we will keep you updated in a few minutes.
7:33 am
festival, looking at curling today because it is that point in winter olympics where britain's curlers are in action. the semifinals are later today, about 11 am this morning. mike is at a curling training centre in perth. just been doing quite well. i take it back to the curling brush, you are not just it back to the curling brush, you are notjust there to sweep? it back to the curling brush, you are not just there to sweep?” it back to the curling brush, you are notjust there to sweep? i can doa are notjust there to sweep? i can do a bit of both, look at me multi— skilling. it is perfection! into the house, knocks the yellow one out of the way, a brilliant delivery and it would score the red team one point. we are playing at one of the main curling rinks in scotland, 22 rinks in scotland, we are excited because the british team led by eve muirhead trains along with a man is here and so trains along with a man is here and so today around 11 am they will be off the ice glued to the tv hoping
7:34 am
that eve and her team can make history getting into the gold medal match which would guarantee them a gold or silver medal, it would be their first gold or silver medal, it would be theirfirst medal, making it the best ever olympic games so no pressure, eve and your team but let's hope they can do it. they face canada who beat them 8—6 in one of their round—robin matches but eve muirhead's team really do rise to the occasion and the pressure. all hopes will be that they can beat sweden in the semifinal and then gold on sunday. we had a really close game against sweden, we beat them in the european final and we always have close games when it comes to play—off games. it is a new part of the competition and we will go away and regroup and try to come out as strong as we can. if you imagine the excitement and detention. —— we canjoin kat at
7:35 am
if you imagine the excitement and detention. —— we can join kat at the venue. detention. —— we can join kat at the venue. i am, detention. —— we can join kat at the venue. iam, at detention. —— we can join kat at the venue. i am, at the olympic curling venue venue. i am, at the olympic curling venue here in the park in pyeongchang, much warmer than up in the mountains but i have been over the mountains but i have been over the last few days but this is the place to be if you are a team gb winter sports fan, eve muirhead and the girls coming for a fifth medal of these games for team gb which would make the most successful games the team has ever had. the update you on that later, we are looking forward to that in 2.5 hours but let us bring you up—to—date with some of the other headlines. in the women's ski cross overnight, britain's emily sarsfield got through her first heat on final‘s day, thanks in part to that big crash for one of her opponents. she is competing at her first
7:36 am
olympic games after 12 years of trying. to eventually get here after kind of like a set of multiple knee surgeries and whatever else it might be and working three jobs in the summer and stuff, but it is huge to be stood there on the landing today and the big thing for me was to have fun and ski cross is such a cool sport, i wanted to put it on the map and i hope i have a little bit. it isa it is a very cool sport, my favourite to watch. and there was a brilliant final in the ski cross as canada continued their dominance of the event. first and second place for them — kelsey serwa and brittany phelan with gold and silver. 15—year—old alina zagitova won olympic athletes from russia's first gold medal in the women's single figure skating. her compatriot evgenia medvedeva thought she'd beaten her and was left in tears as she fell just short. she beat the favourite. she thought
7:37 am
she had done enough but itjust was not enough. a great figure skating competition, though, robin cousins was telling me earlier the best it has seen in any games ever that we have enjoyed the action. it is all eyes on the ice at the curling centre, 2.5 hours to go into eve muirhead and the girls take to the ice, the curling countdown is on with us! i am sure it is on as well in perth. it is, very much so, not just the semifinal well in perth. it is, very much so, notjust the semifinal by well in perth. it is, very much so, not just the semifinal by the critical stage of this game is well and guess who's turn it is to go to the end and delivered the next stone? mind. afriend the end and delivered the next stone? mind. a friend here will sweep for me. as i go, i have one of my shoes, the slippy site, let me tell you about the history, curling disappeared from the winter olympics for many years between 1924 and indeed 1998 when it came back. we
7:38 am
are not sure why disappeared but imagine if it had not, all of those metals that scotland would have won the great britain. let's deliver this crucial redstone. there we are, a challenge getting down with one slippy issue. but reform shoe. the anchor goes in here and my friend will sweep for me. ready? ready! ready in the house for this momentous... and winning stone, not quite the technique to fall onto your tummy outlook, straight for the house, come on. you can do it. putting the cat among the pigeons there. interesting end, we could say. let's hope when it comes to great britain but we can do that to sweden with the final stone today.
7:39 am
mike, it doesn't matter about the technique, it is all about the result. you are marvellous! i think he threw at hoping to the best, if you chuck it really hard. interesting technique, not one we've seen so interesting technique, not one we've seen so far in the winter olympics. effective, it is effective. hejust fell over! oh, dear. i cannot! sorry. we knew it would happen. we knew it would happen. he is shuffling his way to the side. more on that later. he has actuallyjust fallen over again. 11 am i believe the semifinal of the curling takes place. and nick will keep us updated on the weather, we will talk about this a lot, it will get cold in the coming days. nickel update us in about seven or eight minutes. but before nick will update us. as we've been hearing,
7:40 am
1,700 deaths every year could be linked to mistakes made with medication given to patients in england. the health secretary has described the figures as "appalling". welljeremy hunt joins us from our london newsroom. i think we can agree with you that these figures are appalling. thank is looking to us. can you give us a little more detail as to what is happening? the impact of this, i know you have written today in the daily telegraph and woken the case ofa daily telegraph and woken the case of a 92—year—old mother whose medication had, her child was inadvertently swapped with another and it led to catastrophic results, can you tell us more detail, please? good morning. this is an important report by the universities of sheffield manchester and york that collaborated on it. they are very clear that the nhs rates when it comes to medication are no worse than in the united states or other eu countries. in fact the world
7:41 am
health organization says we are a leader in trying to tackle these. but despite that, we are seeing 4—5 deaths every single day because of errors in prescription or dispensing or the monitoring of medication. and it is very important to say this isn't about blaming. this all nurses or pharmacist who worked incredibly ha rd or pharmacist who worked incredibly hard under a huge amount of pressure but it is about having the culture we have the checks in place to stop this happening —— blaming doctors all nurses. one thing we are announcing today is decriminalising dispensing errors because if you are a pharmacist, one way to make sure a pharmacist doesn't want to be open about the dispensing error is if it isa criminal about the dispensing error is if it is a criminal act and we need people to be open about what is coming wrong the big and put the checks in place. decriminalising something, why do wejust place. decriminalising something, why do we just try to stop it from happening in the first place? exactly, one of the ways we can do this is with proper id systems so
7:42 am
the problem with doing prescriptions ona the problem with doing prescriptions on a paper based system is happening in too much of the nhs —— it systems. on a it system you can have electronic warning that comes up and says maybe if you have a pregnant mother this type of medicine could be dangerous. you can do that with electronic systems so we said today will make £75 million available to help hospitals move to e—prescirbing systems and we want to have pharmacist in the system because of these happen in primary care and they tend to happen with older patients, often with dementia who have a number of things wrong with them so they are taking out a cocktail of medicines which sometimes don't agree with each other and if you can have a pharmacist working inside agp pro is, they can go through the patients that are on multiple medicine and try to iron out where some of the problems maybe. but with a couple of
7:43 am
questions, £75 million in systems in computer systems, how many hospitals will it supposedly ease the load off, and the pharmacist, how much will it cost? we want to move to full e—systems, it will be a ca ta lyst full e—systems, it will be a catalyst because most hospitals will have an ite investment program a nyway have an ite investment program anyway so you want to urge them to have a priority because of the incident and we have budgeted for 2000 pharmacist to be in gp surgeries so 2000 pharmacist to be in gp surgeries so one surgeries so one pharmacist will cover approximately four gp surges which we think could make a difference and i think it is important to say this isn't just about deaths, there is also the awful harm that happens, i met a patient a few weeks ago who should've had her dosage reduced for her medicine and it didn't happen and she stayed on steroids i think
7:44 am
the eight years, the result is that for the rest of her life she will have to be fed through it up. there is appalling human misery when we get this wrong but it is important for people at home to note that the nhs is leading the way in tackling this, it is a problem all over the world and we want to blaze a trail in schools in this out and in fact we are having fantastic support from doctors, nurses, pharmacist, who all agree that this is something that is long overdue for us to tackle. do you know i think something else that people will be screaming at their tv screens this morning, they will be thinking a couple of days ago i heard the nhs in england has nearly 100,000 jobs unfilled. and we co nsta ntly 100,000 jobs unfilled. and we constantly hear about funding pressures that the nhs is facing and doctors and nurses are facing, and it is inevitable, isn't it, even they get off the reassurance that people want to hear, the sticks will happen unless it is properly funded and properly staffed. we have 43,000
7:45 am
more clinicians in the nhs and when i became health secretary and went —— we are massively increasing the number of doctors and nurses were trained and we need more staff and to put more funding and as we deal with pressures of an ageing population but if you talk to doctors and pharmacists, they say that yes, those are real pressures. also, the problem is that when we make a mistake we have to worry that we are going to be criminalised and lose ourjob and we cannot do the thing that we really want to do which is to understand why the mistake was made, to be open and transparent about it and to learn from it so it doesn't happen again and getting the culture right and damejudi and getting the culture right and dame judi moore, and getting the culture right and damejudi moore, who runs the university hospital birmingham has dunmore than most trust in reducing medication error, she tweeted this morning that getting the culture right so that doctors and nurses and pharmacist are able to learn when things go wrong, that is one of the absolutely critical things. brexit. we have been following the
7:46 am
wager at chequers. —— away day. why we re wager at chequers. —— away day. why were you not there? i have to go to committees to do with health and pensioners in spain. this goes to the full cabinet on tuesday with all members able to discuss it. it sounds like good progress was made to bite a unified cabinet‘s can you be comfortable saying that? we are unified on the big issues. there are details that need to be worked through. the country wants us to work through that. the big call theresa may made was by voting to leave the eu, the people of this country said they want full control of laws and borders, not to be paying huge sums of money to the eu every year. there has always been
7:47 am
unity about that. now we need to get this right for individual sectors like the automotive sector, the agricultural sector. that is the point of the discussions. the foreign secretary was at this cabinet meeting and has said the uk's weekly gross contribution to the nhs will rise at the end of the post—brexit transition period. do you agree? to the eu? to the nhs. it will rise to £438 million after the transition period. do you remember £350 million on the buses?” transition period. do you remember £350 million on the buses? i think, you know, we will have a brexit dividend because, uh, the net contribution to the eu is £100 million per week. i would argue we look at the pressures of the nhs and social care system as one of the
7:48 am
first ports of call, but that is obviously a decision for the prime minister and the chancellor. £438 million, do you agree with the foreign secretary? that is the gross figure. we have contributions we make the farmers, research, other things we need to support people with. i think the net figure is a more realistic figure to look at. but, umm, you know, in ten years' time we will have 1 million more over 755 in this country. we wanted to have the highest standard of healthcare and every old person to be treated with dignity. thinking about how we find that is on the mind of everyone. jeremy hunt, health secretary, thank you so much. a look at the weather. we have all of the details. good morning. a frosty start. —7 in rural 0xfordshire. thi5 frosty start. —7 in rural
7:49 am
0xfordshire. this is a picture from berkshire this morning. holes in the cloud with 5un5hine. weekend weather, blue skies. very chilly. it will feel cold in the wind on the weekend. cold air heading into the uk. snow is increasingly po55ible. the big picture for friday. high pressure is close by. influencing u5 with an easterly flow. the atlantic weather systems. not worrying about tho5e weather systems. not worrying about those for a while ago the weather is coming from the east. light showers affecting eastern england for today. cloud to northern ireland, western scotland, cornwall, and devon. many places being blue skies. good sunny spell5 coming through on a mainly dry day. the breeze i5 fre5hening up compared to recent days. highs of 3-6 compared to recent days. highs of 3—6 degrees. tonight, patchy cloud. some of that will fade away leaving
7:50 am
increasingly clear whether overnight. you can see land. under clear skies, temperatures dipping away. widespread fro5t. cold in the countryside. —6, —7. cloud and breeze in northern ireland to keep u5 above freezing. the start of the weekend. saturday. patchy cloud. some in northern ireland, western scotland, the north—east of england. but many places will have a lot of blue sky on saturday. fine and dry but chilly in the wind. a similar picture on sunday. more of us will have cloud free skies on sunday. gorgeous weather with a blue sky and a crisp and frosty start. a south—westerly in the west of the uk impact in the feel of the weather. the temperature is actually lower. but with the wind, it will feel like it is just below freezing. it will 5tay it is just below freezing. it will stay that way throughout next week
7:51 am
with windchill factor is becoming very significant. you may have heard about the "beast from the east." blue arrows coming from siberia. the wind from the east will be very cold. the increasing chance of seeing snow. the met office has i55ued seeing snow. the met office has issued the first yellow weather warning for snow affecting eastern pa rt warning for snow affecting eastern part of the uk starting late on monday into tuesday. anyone could 5ee monday into tuesday. anyone could see it next week. a hard frost overnight a5 see it next week. a hard frost overnight as well. the winter weather is roaring back next week. thank you very much. we will speak to you later. british airways have just made an announcement. i have had time to look through them. iag which owns
7:52 am
british airways, iberia, they give u5a british airways, iberia, they give us a sense of how airlines are doing. there is a lot to contend with for airlines. la5t doing. there is a lot to contend with for airlines. last year some went bu5t with for airlines. last year some went bust and there are cheaper rivals between the uk and the us, the transatlantic route. there have been technical problems at ba. and also, check—in chao5 been technical problems at ba. and also, check—in chaos and uncertainty around brexit. what does it mean? let's speak to the boss, willie wal5h. he's chief executive of international airlines group that own5 ba and iberia. good morning. good morning. we will talk first of all about these re5ults. talk first of all about these results. a good set of figures. you made that clear in your statement to be you noted prices for tickets are going up. people have to pay more. is that down to falling competition? berlin has gone under and you can charge more? it is a good set of re5ults. charge more? it is a good set of results. we did not say prices are going up. that is misunderstood. we 5aid going up. that is misunderstood. we said we expect unit revenue to
7:53 am
improve. prices actually came down in 2017. unit revenue is a combination of the average fare but also the seat factor, how many 5eat5 we feel on aircraft. we were filling more last year. that was driving the overall performance of the business. it is on the back of reduced fares in 2017. let's talk about some of thei55ue5 in 2017. let's talk about some of the issues that affected you as an airline this year. the massive it failure caused by a powerfailure. you said it cost you £75 million of compensation and putting that right. it also cost you many angry customers. it did. we apologise in the past. we learned many lessons. we had shared tho5e le55on5 the past. we learned many lessons. we had shared tho5e lessons with other companies. no airline wants to 5ee other companies. no airline wants to see that. but we have overcome that.
7:54 am
the performance of the airline has been quite strong in 2017 and we expect that to improve significantly. we are investing a lot of money in services. we are pleased to see customer satisfaction 5co re5 pleased to see customer satisfaction scores are responding to that. we are seeing a good improvement in the response we get from customers. whenever we speak to the bosses of their alliance, brexit, a whenever we speak to the bosses of theiralliance, brexit, a big whenever we speak to the bosses of their alliance, brexit, a big issue for all firms, but it is important for all firms, but it is important for you because you fly to europe. —— airlines. how have things changed for you? i am very pleased with the word5 for you? i am very pleased with the words spoken both on the eu side and the side of the uk in terms of the uk continuing to be connected to europe. i have always felt that would be the baseline, if you like. iam would be the baseline, if you like. i am confident a comprehensive deal will be agreed between the two. uk
7:55 am
customers and consumers have benefited significantly and will continue to benefit from good competition and open access to all markets. one of the big things that will determine how well you can do is heathrow. there have been so many debates over the expansion, the extra runway. yesterday you said the chances of it being finished on time and on budget are close to zero. what do you need to see happen? it is the biggest airport in the country and nearly the world. how do we keep that top spot? one of the biggest in the world. it is the most expensive. to expand heathrow, it needs to be done with greater efficiency. we have to consider the uk in efficiency. we have to consider the ukina efficiency. we have to consider the uk in a post— brexit environment. we need good efficient structure. we need better infrastructure. quality could improve, but prices through heathrow are completely
7:56 am
unacceptable. we need to see a more competitive situation, not less. we support the expansion at heathrow if it can be done at a reasonable cost with no increase in the charges to customers as a result of that expansion. ok, it is good to talk to you. thank you for explaining all of that. we will talk again as the negotiations continued. thank you. that is it from me. i will have more after 8am. it looks like he was on the back of a plane. time to get the news, travel, and weather, wherever you are. good morning from bbc london news. london's mayor, sadiq khan, is facing opposition by many outer london boroughs over his plans to build 600,000 new homes in 10 years. detectives investigating two murders in camden have arrested and 18—year—old man. police say both
7:57 am
murders are being treated as linked. london's mayor, sadiq khan, is facing opposition by many outer london boroughs over his plans to build 600,000 new homes in 10 years. city hall says its an answer to the housing crisis. but some boroughs say the plans will mean uncontrolled development which could threaten green spaces, and mean that family homes are knocked down and replaced by blocks of flats. we've got playing fields and green spaces which are under threat already. so, additional pressure of small site development, local infill, without the ability to strategically plan, is going to put pressure on all of our other remaining local green spaces and playing fields. the expansion of night overground services in north london begins from this evening. the extended service will now serve canonbury and highbury and islington stations. it means the night overground will link with the victoria line night—tube for the first time. let's have a look at
7:58 am
the travel situation now. on the tube, there is a good service on all lines. except the jubilee line. and tfl rail is also suspended due to over running engineering work. on the trains, southern gatwick express and thameslink have delays of up to ten minutes londonbound. and greater anglia have delays of up to half an hour between romford and liverpool street. on the roads. let's have a check on the weather now. hello. good morning. it's a cold and a frosty start to today. we saw last night temperatures dip as low as —4 and —5 degrees celcius. a very similar looking day to yesterday. there should be more sunshine around through the morning. especially in western areas. that will last the longest
7:59 am
through the day. more cloud in eastern areas coming in on the bitterly cold easterly wind. it will be brisker and feel colder. a lot of windchill to factor in, highs of only five celsius. overnight tonight, very cold. another widespread hard frost into tomorrow morning. again, lows of —4 in rural spots. so, saturday, a very pretty looking day. lots of blue sky and sunshine around. but the easterly wind is going to be stronger. it will feel bitterly cold over the weekend. on sunday, between one and four celsius with the air coming all the way from siberia. a quick heads up, the met office has now issued a weather warning with snow showers on monday and tuesday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty.
8:00 am
the health secretary tells bbc brea kfast the health secretary tells bbc breakfast that four or five people a day are dying because of mistakes with their prescriptions. jeremy hunt calls the situation appalling and totally preventable, and says theissueis and totally preventable, and says the issue is linked to hundreds more deaths across england. good morning it's friday 23rd february. also this morning, the armed officer who was at the florida high school where 17 were shot dead, has resigned for failing to intervene — his sheriff said it was a failure of duty. when we in law enforcement arrived at an active shooter, we go in and address the target and that is what should have been done. a fourth british tourist has died
8:01 am
following the helicopter crash in the grand canyon, jonathan udall was on honeymoon, his wife remains in a critical condition. why it's notjust what we eat, but when and how we eat it how snacking on certain food and drinks damages our teeth. banking giant rbs reports its first full—year profit in 10 years since being bailed out by taxpayers during the financial crisis. i'll have the details shortly. iamat i am at the curling centre, eve muirhead and the great britain female curling team are going in their semifinal in two hours' time, trying to win a fifth medal of the games in team gb. and the weather forecast. good morning, this weekend, plenty of sunshine, if it is warmer weather that you want, you can whistle(!) frosty this morning, cold, and getting colder next week and some of us will cease no. —— and some of us will see snow.
8:02 am
the health secretary has told this programme that four to five people are dying every day in england due to mistakes over their prescriptions. jeremy hunt says the level of ha rm revealled prescriptions. jeremy hunt says the level of harm revealled by a report commmissioned by the government is "appalling" and its important that the nhs learns from its mistakes. we are seeing fourto the nhs learns from its mistakes. we are seeing four to five deaths every single day because of errors in dispensing or prescription or the monitoring of medications and it is very important to say this is not about blaming doctors or nurses or pharmacists, worked incredibly under huge pressure, but it is about having a culture where we have checks in place to stop this happening, and where we are able to learn from mistakes. an armed officer who was at the florida school, where 17 people were killed, has resigned after it emerged he failed to intervene. scot peterson was facing suspension after an investigation revealed he remained outside the building and did not confront the gunman. our north america correspondent peter bowes told us how the officer was found out. this has emerged from the sheriff
8:03 am
of broward county, and he has been looking at surveillance video and he refers to this deputy, this police officer, who was working, he was in uniform, he was armed, he was on the campus as the shooting happened and apparently, he got to the building where the shooting was taking place around 90 seconds of the first shots being fired and then, he didn't go inside. in fact, he stayed outside for about four minutes, the actual shooting lasted about six minutes. it is still something of a mystery as to why he didn't essentially do his job and go in and confront the shooter. in fact, the sheriff was asked what he would have liked to have seen the deputy do, and he said just that, to have gone inside, to have addressed the shooter, and to have shot him dead. now, as to why he didn't do that, well, the officer has not spoken for himself yet so we don't know his side of the story
8:04 am
but we know that he was initially suspended without pay pending further investigation, but he actually chose to resign from hisjob. now, clearly, there are some people will put the whole debate about guns in schools and perhaps the arming of teachers in a new perspective because here was someone actually on the campus trained to use a gun. rbs has figures out this morning, ben has been looking through them. first time rbs has reported full—year profit in ten years. this goes back to the financial crisis when it had such a tough time, big turnaround from them in 2008, racked up turnaround from them in 2008, racked upa turnaround from them in 2008, racked up a loss of £24 billion, it is loss in uk corporate history. ten years on, back on an even keel, symbolic moment this morning, putting the past behind us, if you are an
8:05 am
investor you will not yet get a dividend, but it has managed to get rid of the bad bit of the bank which had all the debts in it, that is quite a moment to draw a line under, they have been tried to cut costs and turn around fortunes. dynamic as is this over, still facing a lot of litigation particularly in the united states for being involved in risky mortgages and a big scandal related to how it dealt with some small firms. —— i don't think this is just small firms. —— i don't think this isjust quite small firms. —— i don't think this is just quite over. we as taxpayers own 71% of rbs, the question is whether it is in a position to be sold back. the government bought shares at just over sold back. the government bought shares atjust over £5, they are trading at £2.78, so it would be at a loss. half the price. another share price that has taken a bit of a knock, snapchat. this is fascinating! this shows the power of social media, this is a tweet from
8:06 am
one of the reality stars in the family of kim kardashian, 57,000 people tweeting that, that knocked $1 billion from the value of snapchat! for the uninitiated, knocked $1 billion from the value of snapchat! forthe uninitiated, it knocked $1 billion from the value of snapchat! for the uninitiated, it is a smartphone app that allows you to send pictures to each other, pictures that disappear, they have changed the app and a lot of people don't like it. suggesting that somebody so influential in the world of social media not using it, does not bode well. $1 billion knocked off. could you have predicted this? it shows how the world is changing. the influence these people have, like it or not, you can knock $1 billion off the value of a company overnight, pity powerful, if you ask me! a fourth british tourist has died
8:07 am
of injuries he suffered in a helicopter crash in the grand canyon nearly a fortnight ago. jonathan udall, who was in his 305 and from brighton, was on honeymoon with his wife, ellie milward when the accident happened. his family has been told of his death. adina campbell reports. jon udall and ellie milward were on their honeymoon. she has now been left with critical injuries, while herfriends‘ online post, announcing mr udall‘s death, described him as strong and brave. the eurocopter ec130 crashed as it came into land in arizona's remote quartermaster canyon. witnesses say it spun around twice before hitting the ground and then bursting into flames. police say bad weather meant it was more than eight hours before the survivors could be flown to hospital. stuart hill, on the left, is pictured here along with his brotherjason, who also died at the scene. their parents say the brothers shared an incredible bond and would be deeply missed. jennifer barham remains in a critical condition in hospital in las vegas,
8:08 am
as does the pilot, scott booth. experts say possible causes of the crash include a faulty tail rotor and gusty winds. but it may take many months to determine why the helicopter came down with such terrible consequences. adina campbell, bbc news. two people are still being questioned after a suspected hit—and—run in coventry, which killed two young brothers. a man in his 505, and a woman in her 405, were arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving and drink driving. a two—year—old boy was pronounced dead shortly after the incident, the death of his six—year—old brother was confirmed a couple of hours later. the way we eat and drink is almost as much of a factor in tooth erosion as what we consume, according to new research. scientists at king's college london found acidic
8:09 am
food and drink can wear teeth down especially if people snack continually. here's more from our health correspondent, catherine burns. sipping, swilling, and nibbling, researchers think one in six of us have habits like this, and they are bad news for your teeth. when it comes to dentist visits, the main worries tend to be fillings or gum disease, but this report says we should also be thinking about erosive tooth wear. it is when acid eats away at the teeth, making them chip or get shorter. if you tend to play with things in your mouth, or you if you tend to chop pieces of fruit up slowly and nibble on them over a few minutes as opposed to just eating them as a whole fruit, if you're doing these behaviours on a daily basis for years and years and years, you can cause serious damage to your teeth, and that serious damage can mean that your whole mouth needs to be rebuilt. treatment takes an average of more than 20 months at a cost of £4500 on the nhs and almost £14,000 privately.
8:10 am
prevention is key. one part of that is cutting back on acidic food and drinks. some of the healthy choices we make might be good for us overall, but they can erode your teeth. this report mentions adding a slice of lemon or lime to your water, sugar—free soft drinks, drinking fruit teas, and snacking on fruit. take these grapes, for example. if you were to eat ten or 20 of them in one sitting, that would be one acid attack on your teeth. if you were to eat the same amount over a longer period of time, that would be a sustained attack. the advice is to be aware of overall eating patterns and to consider snacks that are less acidic and higher in calcium. catherine burns, bbc news. last september, conditions at liverpool prison were described as the worst inspectors had ever seen. a report said inmates were living in "squalid" conditions and there was a rise in incidents of self—harm. the prison says it's investing
8:11 am
in more specialist staff, but since the inspection, three prisoners have taken their own lives. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has been to meet janet paine, whose son tony was found dead in his cell earlier this week. on monday, tony took his own life at liverpool prison, a man his mother told me had never harmed anyone but himself. he didn't deserve to be there. he was in crisis. he was desperate for help and he never got it tony paine s troubled with schizophrenia since he was 19. on three consecutive days you was taken to hospital in a crisis, first an overdose, next, self harm, then found naked in the street by police. on each occasion he was discharged by mersey care nhs trust. a week
8:12 am
later he was jailed for afraid, after he was found throwing tiles off the roof of a house. two weeks ago, his mother received this letter, in it he begged for help, saying that he was self harming and he had been assaulted. desperate, desperate, and that is when he said, you don't understand, you don't understand, i'm going to drop dead in here. if he had got help he would never have gone up on the roof, he would not have gone to court, he would not have gone to court, he would not have been injail, and he would not have been injail, and he would not have been injail, and he would not now be in a body bag. mersey care told us while they couldn't comment on tony's death, they would co—operate with any review. the prison has passed condolences to his family and have said they have invested in specialists after provide training for prison safety officers. but it has highlighted an abject failure to offer a safe environment. it is a
8:13 am
hole, it is filthy, but it is not just about that, it is the way they are treated, locked up 23 hours a day, treated like animals. they need to get specialist care, they need that place knocking down. the chair of the prison officers association who works here at walton has told me that overnight there is only one mental health nurse on duty, that might rise to two during the day but thatis might rise to two during the day but that is to look after almost 1000 inmates. 60% of whom have complex mental health needs. that clearly is not enough. he agreed with tony's mother, he should never have been imprisoned. hours before tony took his own life, a probation officer came to the family home, to approve him for release on tag, into the ca re of him for release on tag, into the care of his mother. she e—mailed her son to share the good news. he might be home for the end of the month, cheer up, love, love you, see you soon, that is what i said. and i still don't know whether he got it. janet paine speaking
8:14 am
to jayne mccubbin. and jayne is here now. this is so raw, he died on monday, and so many questions that she wants answered, even and so many questions that she wants answered , even as and so many questions that she wants answered, even as she is in shock from what happened. desperate for a nswe rs , from what happened. desperate for answers, there will be an independent ombudsman investigation, there will be an inquest, and she wa nts to there will be an inquest, and she wants to know whether her son was filed. with the mental health care that he did or did not receive. we cannot call that now but we know this, we know that the hospital trust looking after him has seen a dramatic reduction in the number of beds per patient in the last ten yea rs, beds per patient in the last ten years, it has gone from 27 beds in patient beds per patient to 47. we know that this is a problem across the country, increasingly difficult for people to access in patient care, we know that there has been
8:15 am
17% budget cuts in hmp liverpool in the last nine years, and we know that on average that is 22% in with the prisons and we know because the national audit office has told us that since those cuts there has been an increase in self harm, suicide, violence in prisons. the government is addressing this, desperately trying to recruit 2500 more prison officers by this summer. in liverpool, 90 more prison officers than last year all receiving specialist mental health training. to ny‘s specialist mental health training. tony's mother is afraid that while all of this is going on, more people will be wrongly imprisoned instead of putting to hospital and there will be more death. let's find out what is happening with the weather, it is going to get much colder? yes, looking closer at next week where temperatures by day will not be getting much above freezing if at all across a large pa rt freezing if at all across a large part of the uk. we will get to that
8:16 am
ina part of the uk. we will get to that in a moment. ijust want to talk about the weekend, there will be plenty of sunshine around, lots of blue skies with a cold wind but ever colder next week and a threat of smoke i guarantee i think for some of us there will be some snow next week probably starting monday into tuesday in the form of snow showers in the east. the reason why, high—pressure close by, sadly saddled at the moment, around this area of high pressure our weather is coming from the east and it will turn ever colder and bring in those snow showers next week. a lot of dry weather for friday and the weekend, one or two light showers are affecting eastern parts of england today, maybe scotland, cloud in northern ireland, western scotland, eastern england into the far south—west compared with elsewhere. elsewhere, large breaks in the cloud and good sunny spells. around three to6 and good sunny spells. around three to 6 degrees for the temperature so everyday this week temperatures have been coming down a little bit and the
8:17 am
process continues into the weekend. we started today, rural oxfordshire, -7' we started today, rural oxfordshire, —7, widespread frost, there will be again tonight and every night for the next week at least we are expecting frost and those temperatures going into tomorrow morning, lower in the countryside as ever, parts of northern ireland staying above freezing, more cloud and breeze here. tomorrow, a frosty start but are largely sunny start, some cloud brushing north—east scotla nd some cloud brushing north—east scotland and into northern ireland perhaps the far south—west of england but these are the exceptions, otherwise mainly sunni, three to 6 degrees. through the weekend, sunday as well, the breezes with us so that does make it feel colder even though there will be plenty of sunshine around and probably by sunday even more. but when you look at the temperatures for sunday they come down a little bit, another degree also shaved off them but in the wind it will feel widely as if it is at or below freezing, the wind—chill becoming more important through the weekend and very significant into next week as well, talk in the papers about the beast from the east, what does
8:18 am
that mean? it just the beast from the east, what does that mean? itjust means the weather coming from the east, all of the blues across europe into monday, the arrows indicating where that is coming from, back to the arctic and siberia, so what we expect next week is very cold weather, bitter wind, wind chill into minus double figures in some spots, and snow showers across eastern part in italy, hard frost at night as well. we are going into march next week but no sign of spring next week. that is how it is looking, back to you. nick, can you give us some more detail about the kind of temperatures... sorry, we have a dog in the studio! dog walkers across the country will have to decide whether or not to have codes on their dogs. absolutely, and your caps, some people put their cats out that night but you want to think about keeping in when it is bitterly cold. wednesday next week looks at the cold est wednesday next week looks at the coldest day where widely temperatures by day will be hovering
8:19 am
close to freezing, maybe a degree also either side of freezing, but this is the important factor, it is the wind coming in from the east and, for some, the wind—chill factor will make it feel like it is minus double figures. even if you have a furry coat, that has got an impact and of course we have some snow to content with as well so we are ramping up the possibility of disruption next week, so pretty serious winter weather. we have been talking about it for a few days, it is on the cards next week. molly, have you got it? years down! what does that mean?! pay attention? yes, paying attention! let's introduce you properly! molly is rather special, nominated foran award? molly is rather special, nominated for an award? yes, unsung hero, nominated for special mention, she is the first animal ever nominated. what has she been nominated for, what has she done? she is a pets as
8:20 am
therapy dog, she comes to the ward where i work. i work for kent and medway nhs and social care partnership trust and we are one of the largest providers in england for mental health. how does this work in practice? it is the beginning of the day, molly arrives, what happens? she comes to work with me when i work a shift and also on my days off and she greets the patients, i work with dementia patients, specialise in dementia, and theyjust love her. the patients we get come into hospital, very anxious, sometimes it is their first hospital, very anxious, sometimes it is theirfirst time hospital, very anxious, sometimes it is their first time in hospital, very anxious, sometimes it is theirfirst time in a hospital, very anxious, sometimes it is their first time in a hospital, away from their families, and to see a friendly dog is so reassuring, and if they have got communication problems they just/ the if they have got communication problems theyjust/ the dog, they play games with the dog, and it ta kes play games with the dog, and it takes away their anxiety. a lot of the concern when it comes to
8:21 am
dementia patients is around engagement, isn't it, how much interaction they are having not only with the people around them but the world itself, and there is a danger, that so many families worry about, that so many families worry about, that their loved one is isolated and remained isolated, so molly helps at least have them interact with something? yes, because a lot of people have had dogs, they are used to having dogs, or used to cats and dogs, and having a dog, a friendly, smiling face, you don't need to talk toa dog, smiling face, you don't need to talk to a dog, you canjust/ it. how was molly bought into this in terms of, did you have to go through a temperament checked or anything? we have always had a therapy dog at work, the gentleman retired and i thought, i think molly could do this. she did a temperament and health check and was assessed by a vet and she passed, and then i started bringing her in on my days off and the patient‘s loved her, so sometimes now she will stay for the
8:22 am
whole shift, and she gets to see everyone. so, you mentioned the tangible difference you can see in people... absolutely. describe that a bit more for us? there have been studies in blood pressure and i have seen studies in blood pressure and i have seen this happen, you can have a patient that is anxious and agitated and you cannot get their blood pressure, they will sit and stroke molly and they will calm down and you can get their blood pressure taken and it just you can get their blood pressure taken and itjust shows that they are so taken and itjust shows that they are so much more calm. how does it affect molly? one of the things i was concerned about are the kid bits and treats, because look at that adorable face! if you look —— it she looks at you like that... we encourage the patience to treat her with her own tweets but sometimes she does get the odd biscuit! anecdotally i suppose people have known for years and years the benefits of pet ownership, a dog or other pets, but it feels like there
8:23 am
isa other pets, but it feels like there is a new thinking about, within health care... i think so, and the rcn are bringing in guidelines... royal college of nursing? yes, to try and formalise it, they are looking at it at the moment to try to get more people to bring their dogs into the workplace. but they have to be the right temperament? molly is enjoying sitting here... you cannot resist! you cannot resist! you do not want them jumping up and running around, they have to be quite calm. molly is having that impact! molly should be here every day i think! she is lovely! thank you so much for bringing molly in and good luck with all the work you are doing. who is she looking at over their? that is my husband! that is where the attention is! congratulations on the nomination. we have a one in three chance of
8:24 am
winning, we will find out tonight. good luck! thank you very much. business live will be coming up on brea kfast, business live will be coming up on breakfast, but here on breakfast it is looking beautiful, but called in the brecon beacons this morning and tim islam to find out the effects of rising visitor numbers on the environment. morning, tim. it is so called this morning but fresh and bracing, we are embracing the positives because this is such a popular spot. the brecon beacons national park, some 500 square miles but their heart is the brecon beacons mountain range and that is where we are this morning. visitor numbers here have rocketed, many, many people use this path, numbers have doubled over the last five yea rs have doubled over the last five years but there is a consequence and you can see the repair work being done here this morning, urgent repair work because much farther up the path it is a road it, there is quite a lot of damage as well. let's have a quick chat tojoe, what are
8:25 am
you doing this morning, how important is it you get this work done and get volunteers involved? this work is essential, we are carrying out critical repair work to the pats to cater for thousands more people who come here, which is fantastic, and this work cost a significant amount of time and money every year so significant amount of time and money every year so we are significant amount of time and money every year so we are looking to boost that this year with this appeal and ask for support, really. you need people to come along and help you do this work? there are tonnes of gravel, some will be airlifted by helicopter later this spring and you need people to help lay it and fix the bad? we have hundreds of volunteers helping each year, we have an airlift in the spring so we are looking to repair about 600 metres of pass, it all need people's support and input to do that. if you don't do the work, what will happen? when we look back 30 years, we have been doing this for 30 years, these pats were 40
8:26 am
metres wide, two metres deep, it was a huge mess, so we metres wide, two metres deep, it was a huge mess, so we are metres wide, two metres deep, it was a huge mess, so we are keen to protect the landscape and continue to allow people to enjoy visiting it. even on a day like this! huh, you do great work you, what do you do? just a bit of drainage work to keep water off the path, that is what we are trying to do. 350,000 people are visiting now every year? it is great to see people coming up here, the impact is quite significant so we are trying to work on that. you can rearm, doing a cracking job. volunteers are needed, if you are interested in taking part in register on the national trust website. we will have more details on this later, but first the news, weather and travel where you are. good morning, cold start this
8:27 am
morning, widespread frost, temperatures down to —5, minus six degrees, but for today, for most of us, dry and there will be good spells of sunshine once again. this is the way it looks through this morning, bit of cloud affecting eastern areas, maybe the odd shower in lincolnshire, north yorkshire, otherwise, dry start, after the frost, bit of sunshine, maximum temperature is four to 6 degrees, lower than it was yesterday, and it will continue to get colder. a bit of cloud, clear spells, dry nights to come, and as you can see by the
8:28 am
blue of the map, widespread frost once again into the start of the weekend, temperatures down to —5, minus six degrees. frost to start off the weekend, more frost on saturday night, lots of sunshine but it will start to feel bitterly cold. saturday's forecast, lots of dry and sunny weather but we start to pick up sunny weather but we start to pick up the south—easterly wind, and that is what will make a difference over the next few days, temperatures on the next few days, temperatures on the thermometer may be five to 7 degrees. but it will feel colder than that, even in the sunshine. going into sunday, really cold out, come on all the way from siberia, making more of an influence, going into sunday, it will feel much colder, south—easterly wind a little bit stronger. more sunshine, bit of cloud into the north sea and the east of scotland, but by day, those temperatures at best three or 4
8:29 am
degrees, factor in the strength of the wind, again, it will feel well below freezing. into next week, bitterly cold weather will continue, ha rd bitterly cold weather will continue, hard frost, snow and destruction is likely. —— —— disruption. profits surge for the owner of british airwaves. that is the top story. —— british airways. iag profits are up by nearly a fifth, but investors were expecting more, shares have started in the red in early trade. also in the programme: the parent company behind snapchat saw over a billion dollars wiped off its market value when kyliejenner tweeted
8:30 am
that she was "soo over" the app. can it recover? we'll get an expert view.

36 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on