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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  February 23, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11. new research suggests errors with drugs across the nhs in england could be linked to up to 22,000 deaths. today we are announcing an extra £75 million to help hospitals progress. at the moment only around a quarter have those systems in place. an armed officer who was at the florida school where 17 people were killed has resigned after it emerged he failed to intervene. a symbolic moment — royal bank of scotland returns to profit for the first time in a decade. mps are debating a bill which would introduce a national opt—out system for organ donation in england. and you can see the scene live in the house of commons. we'll bring you the latest updates. and we are due to hear what we have
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learned from operation century. last year, 18 people were convicted of abusing girls in newcastle. some of the victims were as young as m. snapchat loses £1 billion from its stock market value as one of its most influential users, kyliejenner, tweets she no longer uses the social media site. good morning, it's friday the 23rd of february. welcome to bbc newsroom live. for every five prescriptions handed out in england, an error is made, and the government's been warned these mistakes could be linked to hundreds and potentially thousands of deaths a year. the health secretary, jeremy hunt, has described the findings as "appalling". he cites the case of a 92—year—old woman whose vital medication was stopped after her chart
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was inadvertently swapped with another patient‘s. our health editor, hugh pym, has the details. the report covers mistakes made in the prescribing, dispensing and administering of medication in england. these could involve gps, pharmacists, care homes and hospitals. the research is one of the first exercises of its kind. it found that medication errors could cause around 1,700 deaths per year and perhaps contribute to up to 22,000 deaths. the cost to the nhs could be around £1.6 billion a year. it does note that the vast majority of prescriptions dispensed on the nhs are safe and mistakes do occur in all health care systems. the health and social care secretary jeremy hunt said it was a far bigger problem globally than has so far been recognised, causing appalling levels of harm and death. plans to tackle the problem include introducing electronic prescribing systems in hospitals designed
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to cut mistakes. the national pharmacy association said it welcomed the focus on reducing medication errors, but that a culture of learning, rather than blame, was needed. hugh pym, bbc news. speaking on the victoria derbyshire programme, health and social care secretaryjeremy programme, health and social care secretary jeremy hunt outlined programme, health and social care secretaryjeremy hunt outlined how further mistakes might be prevented. we know that if you move to electronic rather than paper based systems, you can limit around half of errors. how far argue with that? today we are announcing an extra £75 million to help hospitals progress. at the moment only around a quarter of hospitals have those systems in place. jeremy hunt has said there is no possibility that the government would back remaining in a customs union after brexit. it comes as leaders of the 27 remaining eu countries are meeting at a summit in brussels.
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yesterday the inner circle of top cabinet ministers held an away day at chequers — where ministers are believed to have made some progress towards an agreed position. key ministers who attended that meeting from both sides of the argument were presenting a united front when speaking to reporters this morning. i had a very good meeting with the rest of the cabinet subcommittee there. the prime minister is going to be making a speech shortly, but there was a very, very good atmosphere and we agreed on a way forward. it was a very positive meeting. we all got behind the prime minister and we've agreed the basis for her speech for next weekend. looking forward to it going ahead. a little sliver of opinion this morning. —— a little flavour. 0ur political correspondent iain watson is in westminster. do we know what was agreed?” do we know what was agreed? i think we will have to wait for the prime
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minister's speech, which i think will come around the end of xp the precise date has not been absolutely signed in blood yet but we will not have to long to wait. there have been various reports emerging from chequers but as far as i'm aware and terms of the atmosphere, it seems to have been very civilised. in terms of the substance, it looks as though the position which the prime minister will have is essentially to say that britain should have the freedom to divert from european regulations, but the approach we adopted is very similar to that set out ina adopted is very similar to that set out in a speech by david davis which effectively, many areas would be what's called mutual recognition, we would set our own rules and standards, but these would be at least at the same level as the european union, and if they mutually recognise our standards and vice versa, that should lead to at least if not frictionless trade, then very few impediments to trade. that seems to be the general approach that is being adopted. and also i've been
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told, and i think this is significant, although there is prudent to there was no sense that there was an appetite to divert for its own sake. and so, not to expect massive divergence. so in practice in many areas, we could actually see very similar rules apply in britain. as we're seeing applying now. and i think what was interesting about thatis, think what was interesting about that is, jacob rees—mogg, the leading light of the european research group, the group that is effectively sending this letter to the prime minister, telling her to stick to her guns, make sure we have a distinctive policy on leaving, he seemed to be quite satisfied with the idea that rules could be similar, but we would have the sovereign right to set them. the key thing is that the rules are made by us rather than the european union. if the rules are made by us then they become a matter of future election controversy, and one party can say it wants more rules and one party can say it wants fewer rules.
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if they are set by the eu, and we simply become a rule taker, then that would be the vassal state. what i'm hearing so far, and it's only gossip at this stage, is that the government is going to maintain independence of rule setting but may then want to copy some eu rules. as an independent state, that's a reasonable thing to do. so, jacob rees—mogg there, and what about labour in all this? a sense of whether their position the customs union might be starting to shift? that would be significant, of course, for a number of reasons. but primarily, although the government may have decided its approach at chequers, it also has to get agreement in the negotiations with the eu and that might be difficult. but it also has to get its views and position through parliament as well. coming up, we think now probably after easter, there is going to be a vote on the customs bill and it will be an attempt by some conservative rebels as well as some on the labour
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side to try and get that legislation amended to keep britain in a customs union with the european union after brexit, something which jeremy brexit, something whichjeremy hunt and the cabinet ministers have ruled out. there is a possibility the government will be defeated if the labour leadership told their mps to vote for that amendment. so we are expecting jeremy corbyn on monday to set out in his own speech labour's brexit position more clearly than before, and we expect him to harden up before, and we expect him to harden up his support for some kind of customs union beyond brexit, perhaps saying it would be something like a viable end point, but certainly moving enough to allow him to say to his mps, there is a bit of distance between us and the government, it is all right to back this amendment, which tory rebels are supported, in order to potentially, potentially high stress, inflict a defeat on the government. it would still be a very difficult vote, the government has
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only been defeated willie once on a meaningful vote, four votes in it, so meaningful vote, four votes in it, so it would be pretty close, but we could see some slight movement in the labour position, enough freedom forjeremy corbyn to say, actually, ican forjeremy corbyn to say, actually, i can back this amendment, supported by conservative rebels, and put theresa may in a very difficult position. thanks very much. let's stay with the whole issue of brexit. 0ur brussels reporter adam fleming joins us from the european summit. and britain is not a member today of the discussions? no, this isjust the discussions? no, this isjust the 27 remaining eu countries, their leaders having an informal meeting rather than technically a summit. brexit, the way i would put it is that it's not the theme tune but it is the background music, it sort of i’u ns is the background music, it sort of ru ns to is the background music, it sort of runs to as a little threat to everything being discussed today. we've just had resident macron,
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chancellor merkel and the italian minister talking about migration, but the bulk of the discussions will be about institutional matters and the future of the eu after brexit. they have got to approve a plan of what to do about the seeds of the uk members of the european parliament that will not exist any more after brexit, they will talk about the process for appointing a successor tojean—claude process for appointing a successor to jean—claude jonker, whose term process for appointing a successor tojean—claudejonker, whose term of office ends next year, and the big one is what to do about the next eu budget cycle, which will last for seven budget cycle, which will last for seve n years budget cycle, which will last for seven years starting from 2021, and will have a brexit shaped hole in it of about £12 billion a year. it raises lots of thorney questions, like, to the countries that pay in, pay in more? not many of them wanted. do the countries who are net recipients want to receive less? no, not many. but also, how do you tackle new, bigger problems like terrorism, security and migration with less money? and do you have new
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sources of money for the eu, for example, new eu wide taxes? that the start of that discussion today and that will go on for months and months and months and months!” that will go on for months and months and months and months! i was going to say as well, given the fact that believe this is the start of a look ahead to the european union's future, want to be no about the possible different ideas coming from different countries? the french president making much of his ideas for a president making much of his ideas fora grand president making much of his ideas for a grand vision of rebooting the eu and so on, but presumably there are some different takes on this? yes, president macron was the person who has set out in most detail what his ideas for the future of the eu are, both institutionally, what happens with the eurozone, and presidentjuncker as set out some other ideas, and there are intruding —— some intriguing technical battles going on, jean—claude juncker made —— some intriguing technical battles going on, jean—claudejuncker made a big play of his idea of combining
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the role of the european commission president and the european council president. that is not going to be discussed here today, because most of the leaders think it's a terrible idea. so it might sound quite geeky and technical but it's an interesting little battle going on behind the scenes. in terms of brexit, that's what we really want to hear about, let's be honest, there is a tiny mention of it in the agenda today, donald tusk is going to update some of the other leaders on the process they were going to follow to construct their blueprint for the phase two of the brexit talks, which will be about the shape of the future relationship with the uk. that is starting now and that will be what happens here in the next few weeks. it will culminate, the next time these leaders meet on the next time these leaders meet on the 22nd and 23rd of march, when they will adopt their big policy for what they want to see as a future relationship going forward. so that is their version of the chequers awayday, if you like. thank you very much. a fourth british tourist has died
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of injuries he suffered in a helicopter crash in the grand canyon nearly a fortnight ago. jonathan udall, who was in his 30s and from brighton, was on honeymoon with his wife, ellie milward, when the accident happened. his family has been told of his death. adina campbell reports. jon udall and ellie milward were on their honeymoon. she has now been left with critical injuries, while herfriends' online post, announcing mr udall‘s death, described him as strong and brave. the eurocopter ec130 crashed as it came into land in arizona's remote quartermaster canyon. witnesses say it spun around twice before hitting the ground and then bursting into flames. police say bad weather meant it was more than eight hours before the survivors could be flown to hospital. stuart hill, on the left, is pictured here along with his brotherjason, who also died at the scene. their parents said the brothers
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shared an incredible bond and would be deeply missed. jennifer barham remains in a critical condition in hospital in las vegas, as does the pilot, scott booth. experts say possible causes of the crash include a faulty tail rotor and gusty winds. but it may take many months to determine why the helicopter came down with such terrible consequences. adina campbell, bbc news. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: new research suggests errors with drugs across the nhs in england could be linked up to 20,000 deaths. an armed officer who was the florida school where 17 people were killed has resigned after it emerged he to intervene. a symbolic moment, royal bank of
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scotla nd a symbolic moment, royal bank of scotland returns to profit for the first time in a decade. and in sport, team gb's women are up against sweden in the semifinal of the carling at the winter olympics. these are live pictures from pyeongchang. it's on bbc one, started around ten minutes ago. the winner will take at least a silver medal. but no score as yet in the opening was not another 0lympic athlete from russia has tested positive for a banned substance. the bobsleigh pilot is one of 168 russians who were allowed to compete as neutrals despite the country being banned. and there was a first gold medal of the games, a former 0lympic athlete from russia in the figure skating. she beat her team—mate and favourite. i will be back with more on those stories just after half past. we will take you straight back to
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one of those headline stories. rbs has reported its first full—year profit since being bailed out by taxpayers at the height of the financial crisis. it made £2.2 billion last year, compared to a loss of £4 billion in the year before. it could now pave the way for the bank to be re—privatised, with the government selling off the stake it still owns. but it could be forced to do so at a loss. rbs‘s share price is still well below the price the government paid in 2008. our business presenter susannah streeter is here. it has taken them a decade but they've done ed. yes, and this really is a symbolic profits of £752 million but over the past ten years it has accumulated losses of an awful lot more than that. £58 billion. so you can see the turnaround the bank has had to do. there has been a huge restructuring programme going on. ten years ago,
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rbs was the biggest back in the world. it had a balance sheet of £2.2 trillion. absolutely huge. now it is only present in 12 countries, it is only present in 12 countries, it was in 38, and there is an awful lot of cost—cutting going on. ross mcewan, the boss, said today that is partly why it has managed to turn this around. but look what has happened to the share price, down around 5%. so the problem is, there isa around 5%. so the problem is, there is a big cloud on the horizon, and it's another potentially massive fine from the us, this is all linked back to the mis—selling of those risky mortgage assets in the lead up to the financial crisis. we were saying in our intro that potentially if they continue to rebuild, what about the whole issue of re—privatising the bank and taking a big chunk of national ownership away? at the moment the government still owns a 71% stake in the bank.
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but look at the share price now, it is well below the price the government really needs. before it can break even on the amount they spent on bailing out the bag. so even though last november the government said it intended to start this selling off of what it owns in rbs, it is likely that isn't to take a little longer than first predicted. ross mcewan said today it could be two to three years probably for that process to take place. so still it is not out of the woods yet. thanks very much for taking us through all that. an update, some breaking news from the prime minister's spokesman, all about brexit and where we are going with that. confirmation that the speech by the prime minister on the proposed future relationship with the european union will be next friday. we were expecting a speech next week in which the prime minister would set out the uk's
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position on brexit and how it may be put to the remaining 27 member states. as a result of that meeting yesterday with key members of the cabinet at chequers, there has been confirmation that speech will be on friday and one might assume therefore that the contents of the speech, the key points, have been crashed through at chequers and an agreement has been made that theresa may should go ahead and outline that future relationship with the eu in her speech next friday. it's emerged that an armed guard at the school in florida where 17 people were shot dead last week failed to confront the gunman. footage showed the guard rushing to the building when the six minutes of shooting began, but then remaining outside as students and others were being killed. charlotte gallagher has this report. it was chaos as pupils ran to escape the gunman indiscriminately shooting teachers and students with an assault rifle. the school's football
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coach, who was shot dead, has been hailed a hero for throwing himself in front of a child to protect them. now it has emerged that an armed police officer was at the high school but stood outside as the shooting took place. deputy scot peterson has resigned after being suspended. the area's sheriff said 0fficer peterson should have acted. scot peterson was absolutely on campus through this entire event. he was armed, he was in uniform. but what i saw was a deputy arrive at the west of building 12, take up a position, and he never went in. as the funerals take place of the 17 victims of the shootings, a fierce todayis victims of the shootings, a fierce today is raging about how to stop
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another school massacre. president trump has suggested arming teachers. i think trump has suggested arming teachers. ithinka trump has suggested arming teachers. i think a concealed permit for having teachers and letting people know that there are people in the building with guns. you won't have, in my opinion, you won't have these shootings, because these people are carrots, they are not going to walk into a school with 20% of the teachers have guns, maybe even 40%. what i would recommend doing is the people that do carry, we give them a bonus. his suggestion has been condemned by many teachers, who say the only way to stop shootings in schools is to have fewer guns, not more. charlotte gallagher, bbc news. for every five prescriptions and that in england and error is made and the government has been warned these mistakes could be linked to hundreds or thousands of deaths a year. jeremy hunt has described the findings as appalling. christopher
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stewart is the clinical editor of chemist and druggist. what do you make of these findings. very much surprised. 0ne make of these findings. very much surprised. one in five people could potentially be getting the wrong prescription. does that mean you are doubtful of the trustworthiness of these stats, or do you just think it is not being talked about enough? well, i'm not doubtful of it, but this is across hospitals, gps, pharmacists and care homes. so i'm only reflecting the experience from community pharmacists, who i think on the whole do not experience this many medicine errors. when it comes to errors, i do not how much you've looked at this report, but does it make sense to you that you can where errors might occur, for possible potential problem areas are? yes,
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well, it's very clear that the system might have bridges between the different groups, so it's important that all these different professionals collaborate so they can assure that less errors occur. do you have a sense of where you can community pharmacies can sometimes sikh community asian errors or potential areas where problems might arrive? —— can sometimes see. potential areas where problems might arrive? -- can sometimes see. one of the areas where we can help prevent errors is to have access to dedicated patient histories will stop at the moment they don't have that. if we had access to that, we could not only check the perception is accurate but make sure the medicine is accurate for a particular patient. a change like that to give you more access, could that to give you more access, could that be simply worked out?” that to give you more access, could that be simply worked out? i cannot attest to whether it is simple or not. it has been discussed within pharmacy for years. it's on the agenda. but whether it will come
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through is anyone's guess. it's says lido will be people like yourself who can feed ideas into how this could be improved. —— it sounds like there will be. snapchat lost one of its most of virtual users this week as well as £1 billion from its stock market value. kyliejenner tweeted to her 24 value. kyliejenner tweeted to her 2a million followers that she no longer uses snapchat after the new update. and the ups parent company shares dropped. 1 million people have signed a petition demanding snapchat change the cup back to how it was before the update. —— the app. this is fascinating, how many words did she write? 15 or something? you cannot underestimate how much influence people like kylie jenner have on social media platforms, whether it is snapchat, twitter or instagram or facebook. what they say and the trends they
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follow are followed by a huge generation of people. the changes snapchat made last year included things like separating friends from branded content and celebrities, so basically, if you follow kylie jenner, in the older, or updates would come into yourfeed. now you have to sweat left to see your friends and swipe right to see her content. users complained it was too complicated, too convoluted, and it doesn't make sense. she is not the only celebrity to have actually said she doesn't like it. another huge celebrity star, chrissie teigan, said she wasn't happy with the changes. but snapchat has said that it just needs changes. but snapchat has said that itjust needs time to bed in, people just need to get used to the change. i don't know whether they will now consider other people's and plates, considering it has white £1 billion of their share price. have they given ina of their share price. have they given in a reaction to that?”
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of their share price. have they given in a reaction to that? i think they had to brazen it out for now. 0ne they had to brazen it out for now. one of the co—founders of snapchat recently revealed his pay packet, which is $637.8 million. so i don't think it's hurting him too much. but i think rather than the money which is obviously important, i think the thing they will take into consideration is how influential celebrities like kyliejenner consideration is how influential celebrities like kylie jenner are with their core audience. we mustn't forget, other brands like instagram are wiping the floor with snapchat now. they are in this battle for fdr very similar platforms, but if it's easier to use instagram, that's where everyone is going to go.” thought it was interesting that she put out a further tweaked later, almost trying to claw back the likes stop yellow ——. almost trying to claw back the likes stop yellow --. she makes money from putting things on duck getting into bed with certain brands on certain
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platforms. maybe those grounds were not happy with how much backlash there was. she did put up a further twea ked there was. she did put up a further tweaked saying snapchat was her first love and she took it back. so she might be back on occasionally, but effectively it's a huge problem for snapchat thanks very much. headlines injust a for snapchat thanks very much. headlines in just a few miles. first, we're going to look at the weather. you will need lots of layers as we go into next week, turning significantly colder, and with that, snow around as well. as for the here and now, plenty of sunshine at the moment. a bit of cloud towards eastern areas, this was in cambridgeshire. we have cloud across the east but also, from any of us it's dry and sunny. but with the south—easterly wind, just starting to develop, it will feel colder than
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yesterday, my son to butchers around four to six celsius. into tonight, a lot of clear skies around, it will turn colder than last night, a widespread frost for many. a bit of cloud affecting the east. but for most of us, temperatures well below freezing, —3, “11, even lowerthan that. into the weekend, it will turn colder especially by sunday, when there will be a biting south—easterly wind. some hard frost and also some sunshine. bye—bye. this is bbc news. our latest headlines... errors in administering the correct drugs to patients in england could be a factor in more than 22,000 deaths a year. the health secretary announces more investment in online e—prescriptions to prevent mistakes. an armed officer who was assigned to protect the florida school, where 17 people were shot dead last week, has resigned after it emerged he failed to intervene and confront the gunman. royal bank of scotland returns to profit for the first time in a decade, marking a symbolic moment in its recovery. rbs is still settling
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huge fines over past misconduct and the mis—selling of risky mortgages. mps are debating changing the law on organ donation and introducing a national "opt out" system, meaning people would have to expressly say if they do not want their organs used after they die. let's cross to newcastle where a press conference about serious case review into sexual exploitation of vulnerable girls and women is taking place. 0ur correspondent fiona trott is in newcastle for us. let's go to the life press conference. we will be happy to take questions from those present. my colleagues
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andi from those present. my colleagues and i would like to pay tribute to all women and girls who have been subjected to sexual exploitation. we are profoundly and deeply sorry for the emotional and physical trauma they have suffered. no one can possibly begin to understand the devastating effects of sexual exploitation and less they have experienced at themselves. these women and girls have been brave beyond belief and without a doubt have made this city a safer place as a result of coming forward to tell their stories. it is important that their stories. it is important that their voices, above all else, are referred today. —— are her today. the report contains many of their experiences and their own words. i
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hope anyone who reads the report pays particular attention to what they have said. we are grateful for their ongoing cooperation. the decision to commission this report was taken in october 2015. at that time it became apparent the scale of sexual exploitation of women and girls in newcastle was on a greater scale than previously believed. the decision to commission the report was taken by the safeguarding boards for adults and children in recognition of the fact that vulnerable women as well as girls had been and where being sexually exploited. this is the first time a serious case review has been commissioned by both adults and children safeguarding boards. advice was also taken from leading counsel on the best model to use to improve
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our understanding of what had happened while still complying with our statutory obligations. a serious case review is about learning and improving our understanding... looking beyond... apologies, there are some sound issues that this press co nfe re nce are some sound issues that this press conference which makes it very difficult to hear what is being said. while we see if that gets fixed, let's go to our correspondent who has been following this. give us some context as to what we are hearing and the importance of it. you remember 0peration sanctuary was
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launched a few years ago looking into the sexual exploitation of vulnerable women and girls in newcastle upon tyne. six months ago, 18 people were jailed for sexual explication and drugs offences. the investigation uncovered a network of men, predominantly from pakistani, bangladeshi, indian grounds, where grooming vulnerable girls, taking them to houses and drugs, so the victims could not defend themselves. it happened for a number of years. the serious case review was launched to look into it. what did the police, cancel, - workers do? they have prevented ? they have prevented? this 150 could they have prevented? this 150 page report has been published just now. the report says newcastle is not a rochdale or rotherham, there was never any reluctance for people to speak out for fear of being
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politically incorrect and there was not a failure to address the problem but what was unique to newcastle was the sexual explication of vulnerable women, adults. no one understood what was happening, the perpetrators we re what was happening, the perpetrators were continually in my head, i was sectioned and detained and i went to the emergency department of hospital and said! the emergency department of hospital and said i was suicidal, i did that and said i was suicidal, i did that a few times but i lost control. the offer of the report, david spicer, says it is likely that extensive abuse of vulnerable adults takes place across the country unrecognised. he is calling on the government to address the issue as a matter of urgency. most of the perpetrators from newcastle were from pakistani, bangladeshi and indian backgrounds. the report calls on the government to research the
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cultural backgrounds of perpetrators, their motivations, so people can understand the problem better. david spicer spoke to one of the perpetrators in prison and he said this. he spoke in ada rocketry we about a lack of morals in british girls and did not go with muslim girls and did not go with muslim girls because they are are not many of them. he was not persuaded to discontinue his activities. following the publication of this 150 page report we had a response from the home office which says we have done more than any other government to tackle child abuse and it has been declared a national threat and we are investing millions of pounds to enable officers to actively seek out and bring offenders to justice and we will look carefully at the recommendation from the serious case review. that
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press co nfe re nce from the serious case review. that press conference carrying on now, we are hearing from the police, newcastle city council, who were involved in the review. the report itself gives us a snapshot of what has happened here in newcastle but it makes something very clear, it says this is something which is happening in towns and cities across the uk. the report says there should be an automatic assumption that it is happening on people's doorsteps, so agencies can look for it and only then can the problem be tackled properly. thank you very much. i know you will continue to listen to the press conference. should every adult in england be made a potential organ donor? mps will be considering this today when they debate a bill that could change they debate a bill that could change the system in england to presumed consent. wales already made are
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similar decision and unless families strongly object, organs will be donated. scotland is introducing a similar bill and northern ireland is retaining the current system. it has been a year since this family in caernarvonshire in south wales lost their father. absolutely devastating. it was like someone had ripped out my heart. scott duckworth was found unconscious in his home. in hospital, a ventilator was the only thing keeping him alive. it was then doctors asked joanna if she wanted to donate his organs. i was quite shocked, but i think that it was the easiest yes that i could have said. i didn't have any hesitation at all. even thouthoanna's husband had never given his permission for his organs to be donated, two years ago, welsh law changed and now presumes organ consent. so we recognised that there was an issue for our population, that the need and the demand for organs and organ transplants
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was outstripping the supply. the latest figures show that last year, more people in wales than anywhere else in the uk consented to having their organs donated. the overall consent rate for wales is 72% — that's compared to england, which is at 64%, and scotland, which is at 60%. but critics argue it has made very little impact. before the law changed, there were 101 deceased donors in welsh hospitals, compared to just 104 donors once the law changed. how has it helped you? it brings a lot of comfort, knowing that three families were able to have their loved ones for a lot longer than they thought that they were going to, children who may have lost their parents. his death wasn't in vain. and, to me, that means more than anything. scotland has already announced it's
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planning to follow wales. today in england, mps will debate the bill for the first time — a bill the government is backing. fiona lamdin, bbc news. the debate on that issue is taking place in the house of commons right now — if you want to watch that it is live on bbc parliament. last september, conditions at liverpool prison were described as the worst that inspectors had ever seen. a report said inmates were living in ‘squalid' conditions and there had been a rise in incidents of self—harm. the prison says it's investing in more specialist staff, but since the inspection, three prisoners have taken their own lives. jayne mccubbin has been to meet janet paine, whose son took his own life five days ago. on monday, tony paine took his own life at liverpool prison,
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a man and his mum told me had never harmed anyone but himself. he didn't deserve it. he was in crisis. he was desperate for help. he never got it. tony had struggled with schizophrenia since he was 19. in september, his behaviour became erratic. on three consecutive days he was taken to hospital in a crisis, first an overdose, next self harm, then he was found naked in the street by police. but on each occasion only was discharged by mersey care nhs trust. a week later he was jailed for affray after police found him throwing tiles off the roof of a house. it's so hard. two weeks ago, his mum received this letter. in it, he begged for help. he said he was self harming. and he had been assaulted. desperate. desperate when he said to me, "mum, you don't understand, you don't understand i'm
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going to end up dead in here." if he had got help, he would never have gone on the roof, he wouldn't have ended up in court, and he certainly wouldn't have ended up injail. and he certainly wouldn't be coming home in a body bag. mersey care told us while they couldn't comment on tony's death, they would cooperate with any review. the prison has passed condolences to his family and tell us they have invested in specialist staff to provide training in prisoner safety. but its latest inspection highlighted squalid conditions, an increase in violence, and abject failure to offer a safe environment. we all know it is a hole, and it's filthy, it's not just about that. they're treated like animals, locked up 23 hours a day. they need to get specialist care, they need that place knocking down. the chair of the prison officers association, who works here at walton, has told me that overnight there is only one mental health nurse on duty. that might rise to two during the day but it is to look
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after almost 1000 inmates, 60% of whom have complex mental health needs. he said that clearly isn't enough. he agreed with tony's mother, he should never have been in prison. hours before tony took his own life, a probation officer came here to the family home to approve him for a release on tag, into the care of his mum. she e—mailed her son to share the good news. i said, "you might be home for the end of the month, cheer up, love. love you, see you soon." that was the last thing i said to him. and i still don't know whether he got it. the way we eat and drink is almost as much of a factor in tooth erosion as what we consume, according to new research. scientists at king's college london found acidic food and drink can wear teeth down —
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especially if people snack continually. here's more from our health correspondent, catherine burns. sipping, swilling, and nibbling — researchers think one in six of us have habits like this, and they are bad news for your teeth. when it comes to dentist visits, the main worries tend to be fillings or gum disease, but this report says we should also be thinking about erosive tooth wear. it is when acid eats away at the teeth, making them chip or get shorter. if you tend to play with things in your mouth, or you if you tend to chop pieces of fruit up slowly and nibble on them over a few minutes as opposed to just eating them as a whole fruit, if you're doing these behaviours on a daily basis for years and years and years, you can cause serious damage to your teeth, and that serious damage can mean that your whole mouth needs to be rebuilt. treatment takes an average of more than 20 months at a cost of £4500 on the nhs and almost £14,000 privately. prevention is key.
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one part of that is cutting back on acidic food and drinks. some of the healthy choices we make might be good for us overall, but they can erode your teeth. this report mentions adding a slice of lemon or lime to your water, sugar—free soft drinks, drinking fruit teas, and snacking on fruit. take these grapes, for example. if you were to eat ten or 20 of them in one sitting, that would be one acid attack on your teeth. if you were to eat the same amount over a longer period of time, that would be a sustained attack. the advice is to be aware of overall eating patterns and to consider snacks that are less acidic and higher in calcium. catherine burns, bbc news. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first the headlines on bbc newsroom live. new research suggests errors with drugs across the nhs in england could be linked to up to 22,000 deaths. an armed officer who was at the florida school, where 17 people were killed,
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has resigned after it emerged he failed to intervene. mps are debating a bill which would introduce a national ‘opt—out‘ system for organ donation in england. in the business news... william hill has posted an annual loss after slashing the value of its australian business. the bookmaker reported a pre—tax loss of £74.6 million for last year, down from a profit of £181.3 million in 2016. it comes after the firm was hit by a £6.2 million fine by the gambling commission earlier this week for breaching anti—money—laundering and social responsibility regulations. reality tv star kylie jenner wiped $1.3bn — about £1 billion — off the market value of snap after tweeting that she no longer used its snapchat messaging app. snap's shares sank as much
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as 8% after msjenner — celebrity kim kardashian's half—sister — tweeted about snapchat‘s re—design to her 24.5 million twitter followers. msjenner‘s attack comes at a time when investors are already worried about the changes. good news at royal bank of scotland, which has returned to profit for the first time in a decade. the bank, which is 71% owned by the taxpayer, made an annual profit of £752 million in 2017 compared with a £6.95 billion loss the year before. but rbs still faces a potentially massive fine from the us department ofjustice over the sale of financial products linked to risky mortgages. now as you've been hearing, the royal bank of scotland has returned to profit for the first time since the financial crisis. this morning our economics editor kamal ahmed interviewed rbs chief executive ross mcewan about what this means for the bank.
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ten yea rs ten years of losses is very symbolic. not just for our collea g u es symbolic. not just for our colleagues at work but also for the uk who put a lot of money into the bank and we have been restructuring, taking losses through conduct and litigation issues, and finding this profit it shows how good the bank can be. not through all other issues, we still have one very large one, but the fundamental value of this business is starting show through. this year our income was up, costs down, our capital position, important for the stability of the bank, has also been up, soa stability of the bank, has also been up, so a good set of results but lots of work still to do. so what does the market makeover this and what the long—term implications? joining us now to talk all things rbs is independent banking analyst frances coppola. livestock about what this means,
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really, for just livestock about what this means, really, forjust when the government can really, forjust when the government ca n start really, forjust when the government can start selling off that 71% stake it still has. i had a feeling you we re it still has. i had a feeling you were going to ask about that because i think this is what it is all about, really. ithink i think this is what it is all about, really. i think this looks a little bit contrived because, as you mentioned in your news report, there is still this fine from the department ofjustice coming up and it could be very large indeed. equivalent fines for some us banks have been in double—digit billion dollars so rbs could face a lot of money and i am disturbed the fact they have run down their provisions against litigation and conduct charges and have not very much to cover that. they set aside around 3.2 billion. but some competitors have had to pay out a lot more than that. ross mcewan said he wasn't
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sure what their locations would be over the next year. is that why the share price has fallen today? over the next year. is that why the share price has fallen today7m over the next year. is that why the share price has fallen today? it is certainly part of it. although he said the income is up and costs down, income is not up as much as we would have liked and costs aren't down as much as we would like. there isa down as much as we would like. there is a net interest margin squeeze which will probably continue into 2019. it doesn't look as good as the headline profit figure suggests. they have a lot of restructuring, from 38 countries to e—fit rent in 12. -- from 38 countries to e—fit rent in 12. —— to a footprint in 12. when do you think it will be when the taxpayer gets their money back, or will they? i don't think the taxpayer will get all their money back. the government has made it clear they will sell the shares at a loss. the question is how big a loss. the question is how big a loss. it suggests the government
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might start selling the shares sooner might start selling the shares sooner rather than later but to the share price fell this morning, which is probably not what mr mcewan wanted. lets look at some other stories. one of the uk's oldest insurance companies is to be sold for £3.24 billion. edinburgh—based standard life assurance limited, which was founded in 1825 and has about 3,000 staff, is being purchased by phoenix group. its parent company standard life aberdeen sla said the move completed its move out of insurance to concentrate on investment and asset management. aianb is offering new services aimed at wealthier travellers as it seeks to compete in the luxury travel market. the site will offer a dedicated section for boutique hotels and more unusual locations such as tree houses and boats. and rightmove has reported some positive numbers, thanks to an increase in rentals and people buying homes.
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the online estate agent said underlying operating profit climbed 11% to £184.4 million, compared to £1662 million in 2016. it said it saw record customer numbers in 2017, up 2% to 20,427. let's look at the financial markets. we talked about the rbs share price. it is down just over four percent despite this like profit. this is how shares in william hill are looking. they are up even though it posted an annual loss and said it is writing down the value of its australian business. that is amid a local crackdown on gambling. the brecon beacons in south wales offers some of the most stunning views in the uk so it's perhaps not surprising visitor numbers have doubled over the past five years. however, all those extra footsteps have been having quite an impact on the pathways that crisscross the mountain range. now the national trust needs volunteers to help with repairs. we put tim muffett to work.
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with each step, the views get better. it's just a beautiful place. the path, more worn and eroded. there's some places where it's a bit loose. pen y fan in the brecon beacons in south wales. at 886 metres above sea level, it's the highest mountain in southern britain. but the path to the top has become a victim of its own success. in the last five years, it's doubled, the increase forfootfall, so we're in upwards of 350,000 visitors nowjust on this one path each year. rob reith helped create this pathway in 1986. i mean, the height of this path 30 years ago would have been right past my waist. with the constant walkers going up and down, they've worn the path out. becoming like a motorway.
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so rob and his team of volunteers are carrying out a huge repairjob. we're trying to build up the path. there was a gullyjust beginning to start and water would follow that gully, making it deeper and wider. so we are backfilling it in and building it back up again. a lot of people who come here aren't experienced walkers. so a good path for them that they feel confident on and don't get lost on is really helpful. it's not just footsteps that are the problem, but rain and snow. we're encouraging the rainwater to run down the culvers and side of the mountain rather than on the paths. it's very rewarding. it's a neverending job. get to the top, and it's so easy to see why so many people want to walk this route. the views are incredible. you can see right across mid—wales, to the south—west, parts of swansea bay, and right
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across to south—west england as well, parts of gloucestershire, somerset, and devon. this spring, a helicopter will airlift tonnes of gravel higher up the mountain so the whole path can be improved. rob and his volunteers have quite a task ahead. we've got over 70 kilometres on the central breacon beacons to look after, so... and we have done just over 15 kilometres. keep going! yes! the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel but first lets take a look at the weather. it is going to turn much colder so if you're going to the brecon beacons over the next few days you will want to take note of the forecast. lovely sunshine at the moment with blue skies, but of cloud. this is the isle of wight and
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this is from birmingham. more ice over the next few days. this is the satellite picture, some cloud here and there but good spells of sunshine and breaks in the cloud across western and northern parts. through the afternoon, not a great deal of change to the moment. some gaps in the cloud, some sunshine this afternoon. temperatures 4—6 so a bit chillier than yesterday. this evening tonight, we will continue with a bit of cloud in eastern areas, preventing temperatures from falling too far. elsewhere, a widespread frost expected into the start of the weekend. temperatures in the countryside will be lower than that. —6, minus seven. some frost to start the weekend but lots of sunshine for saturday but it will
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feel bitterly cold on sunday with developing south—easterly wind. plenty of dry weather. this is saturday. not much in the way of cloud, crisp blue skies for many of us. cloud, crisp blue skies for many of us. temperatures 5—6. a south—easterly wind will make a real difference, especially into sunday. the colder airfrom difference, especially into sunday. the colder air from siberia difference, especially into sunday. the colder airfrom siberia has been moving south and west across the uk so moving south and west across the uk so there will be a significant wind—chill. lots of sunshine on sunday, some cloud to the eastern side of scotland and eastern england. those are the temperatures on the thermometer but with the wind, this is what it feels like, -2' wind, this is what it feels like, —2, minus three. sunday is the first day of the converse
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siberia air. and next week bitterly cold with the likelihood of some snow which could cause some disruption. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at midday. warnings that the extensive abuse of vulnerable women across the uk is still going unrecognised and needs to be urgently addressed, the findings of operation sanctuary in newcastle. it has become apparent that the scale of sexual exploitation of women and girls in newcastle was on a greater scale than previously believed. new research suggests errors with drugs across the nhs in england could be linked to up to 22,000 deaths. an armed officer who was at the florida school where 17 people were killed has resigned after it emerged he failed to intervene. the prime minister will deliver a
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speech setting out britain's future relationship with european union. mps are debating a bill which would introduce a national opt—out system for organ donation in england. also coming up, the winter olympics, and it's the semifinal of the women's curling. we can show you the scene live in pyeongchang as great britain's women ta ke pyeongchang as great britain's women take on sweden for a place in the 0lympic final. snapchat loses £1 billion from its stock market value as influential social media user kyliejenner tweets she no longer uses the site. good morning, it's friday the 23rd of february.
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welcome to bbc newsroom live. the government's being warned that the full extent of the abuse of vulnerable women across the uk has not been fully recognised. a report just published following 0peration sanctuary in newcastle has found that while there were similarities to grooming networks in other cities, the exploitation of vulnerable adults was unique and needs to be addressed as a matter of urgency. let's go straight to our correspondent fiona trott in newcastle. today there has been an apology, the chairperson of the serious case review, which has produced this report today, has paid tribute to all the victims in newcastle. she said, we are profoundly sorry for what they have suffered. we've also heard from the author of the report,
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who has admitted that at the beginning it was difficult to take action against the perpetrators. he said because there was caution about whether the criminal process would be successful, good victims give evidence in court? would they be able to be strong enough? we know that one victim gave evidence four times and one victim has said that the experience was so harrowing that she was sectioned under the mental health act. this report says that newcastle was not a rochdale or a rather, there was never any concern about speaking out for fear of being politically incorrect and was not a failure to address the problem either. but what has been new unique to newcastle has been the sexual exploitation of adults. according to the report, that's one of the most significant issues that 0peration sanctuary has exposed. a city coming to terms with century.
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the report says sexual explication still exists and the police noted will stop its fly takeaway staff across this city are being trained on how to spot potential victims. today, a warning to all towns and cities across the uk, the safeguarding of vulnerable adults needs to be addressed as a matter of urgency. it was a specific feature of the newcastle experience that it wasn't just children who of the newcastle experience that it wasn'tjust children who were victims of sexual exploitation. i'd like the government to have a really good look at the learning that is now available about the use of adults with vulnerabilities. on the streets, victims were groomed by men mostly streets, victims were groomed by men m ostly fro m streets, victims were groomed by men mostly from pakistani, bangladeshi and indian backgrounds. they were given so many drugs or alcohol they couldn't defend themselves against sexual abuse. their experiences are included in the report. va nessa,
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vanessa, not her real name, was a victim of sexual exploitation. to protect her identity, we've used the voice of an actor. i see girls begging on the street and would be an older man with a suit who approaches them for sex. i see that all the time. the report says that sexual expedition still exists. charities on the ground say that 14—year—old girls are still being picked up by men in cars, are you doing enough? we stop it with the assistance of the public so that people who have seen that, the first question would be, did they report it to the police, did the tick the registration number or the details of who the people were, getting into the car? i'd like to think there are —— the recording it. the car? i'd like to think there are -- the recording it. did you know about that already? that particular case? that happening on the streets. i think it would be naive and wrong
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for me to suggest that because of 0peration sanctuary and at the point of this report is published, that this is stopped, and that we've solved the problem. we haven't, it continues, carries on. in most if not all towns and cities in the uk. and that's why did it was my report says all towns and cities should automatically assume sexual exploitation is happening on their doorstep, and only then can it be tackled properly. fiona trott, bbc news, newcastle. we can talk now to kevin murphy, from a charity which works to tackle child exploitation. good afternoon. it seems really striking, that final word on the report, the assumption we perhaps all need to make that these kind of situations are going on in our own communities. yes, we totally agree. you only have to look at what's happened recently in the national
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press with barry bennell being convicted of various offences in sport. and the cambridge graduate, with what has happened in parliament, these offences against women and children happening all the time and we must be more vigilant in reporting these abuses. and that surely be more determined to do something about it. do you think there is, as we have from much police officer, a role for the general public in this. certainly. safeguarding vulnerable people is everyone's responsibility. we get concerned when there is a big focus on safeguarding children, there are just as many vulnerable adults who need safeguarding and as a society we have to play an important part in it. you mentioned that i'm vulnerable adult and we had a lot in the report about vulnerable women. what should be under stand by that? what should be under stand by that? what kind of people should be keeping —— should we be keeping an eye out for? obviously we've not had time to diejust
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eye out for? obviously we've not had time to die just the full contents of the report. —— time to digest. but people with cognitive abilities, people who struggle through school, they struggle to make the transition into post—16 support and when you're at school, there is a wraparound support, they have to go to school, for instance, but when they move into college provision, there is not that much support, really. then there is a case of, where do these kids go? do they drift out of college, what happens when they turn 18? we know that a lot of children's services and services at 18. and we've seen multiple abuse, multiple victims, lives on with them well into their adult lives. so we need to be looking at the transition times. from a practical point of view, we are looking at those young people who they leave school and then they are perhaps floating free, they don't have contact with teachers or authority figures who might have an eye out for them,
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where practically can we be seeking to support people like that and watch out for them? we need better identification, to highlight their vulnerabilities. then many passing on to the relevant agencies, whether it's youth support, multi—agency teams, careers support, careers advice and guidance, unfortunately a lot of these teams have been diminished over the last years due to posterity. but we need to have these teams back on board to support these teams back on board to support these people. that is part of the problem, we haven't got enough targeted support for vulnerable young people making the transition to adult services, and theyjust get lost in the system. kevin murphy, thank you very much. for every five prescriptions handed out in england, an error is made, and the government's been warned these mistakes could be linked to hundreds and potentially thousands of deaths a year. the health secretary, jeremy hunt, has described the findings as "appalling". he cites the case of a 92—year—old woman whose vital medication was stopped after her chart was inadvertently swapped with another patient‘s.
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our health editor, hugh pym, has the details. the report covers mistakes made in the prescribing, dispensing and administering of medication in england. these could involve gps, pharmacists, care homes and hospitals. the research is one of the first exercises of its kind. it found that medication errors could cause around 1,700 deaths per year and perhaps contribute to up to 22,000 deaths. the cost to the nhs could be around £1.6 billion a year. it does note that the vast majority of prescriptions dispensed on the nhs are safe and mistakes do occur in all health care systems. the health and social care secretary jeremy hunt said it was a far bigger problem globally than has so far been recognised, causing appalling levels of harm and death. plans to tackle the problem include introducing electronic prescribing systems in hospitals designed to cut mistakes. the national pharmacy association
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said it welcomed the focus on reducing medication errors, but that a culture of learning, rather than blame, was needed. hugh pym, bbc news. speaking on the victoria derbyshire programme, health and social care secretaryjeremy hunt outlined how further mistakes might be prevented. we know that if you move to electronic rather than paper based prescription systems, you can limit around half of errors. —— you can eliminate. how far are you with that? today we are announcing an extra £75 million to help hospitals progress. at the moment around a quarter of hospitals have those systems in place. 0livier picard runs a chain of pharmacies and is a pharmacist himself. thank you very much forjoining us. clearly, the scale of this might surprise some people. that routinely
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m ista kes surprise some people. that routinely mistakes might be being made. thing to have your understand that there area to have your understand that there are a billion prescriptions being discounts —— been dispensing pharmacies each year and pharmacies make a pharmacies each year and pharmacies makea number of pharmacies each year and pharmacies make a number of interventions cover over 6.5 million every year. these m ista kes over 6.5 million every year. these mistakes range from all sorts but for example, in pharmacies, we see often prescriptions being prescribed for children, an antibiotic for example, with the wrong dose. i think it's important to understand that doctors prescribe, pharmacies will dispense. as part of this system, it's another safe mechanism in place so that patient safety is protected. so it sounds like you see yourselves as one of those checks and balances, an extra layer before the medication gets to those who need it. when you find mistakes, do you feel it's easy to report those,
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to feed it back and ireland has been an issue? i think it's important to understand that the pharmacist, when identifying a mistake, will generally contact the prescriber to check before the medication is given. i myself saw a prescription recently for an antidepressant was being prescribed for the patient on a repeat prescription but actually, what the doctor had prescribed was anti blood pressure medication. when i spoke to the patient about this he said, the doctor didn't say at the eye was supposed to have blood—pressure medication. by contacting the gp, the gp said, yes, i've made a mistake. the issue you have is, if you have the structure of blame when mistakes are made, thenit of blame when mistakes are made, then it can lead to the pharmacists and doctors not race —— not reporting these incidents. jeremy hunt is correct, that the picture might be bigger than it is because the culture we are in at the moment.
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soa the culture we are in at the moment. so a need for a more transparent and open environment, perhaps? you also mentioned that human error seems to be to blame quite often, people just genuinely making a mistake. we happily health secretary about this electronic prescribing system. do you think that might be the answer? it's an iconic prescribe it which will bring some extra layers of protection, but it could potentially bring other problems. currently in the community pharmacy and gp setting, there is already a large number of perceptions being prescribed at laconically. the hospitals, the other hand, are not yet in the position. investment is being made to help hospitals get in line with primary care. but, you know, arrows happen at all layers. —— errors happen. i provide training for the carers in care homes and
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when i ask a carer, where do you think the errors occur? they often say, oh, the gb has prescribed the wrong medication or the pharmacy has given the wrong information. but intact, it will get incidents in nursing homes, it is mostly the ca re rs nursing homes, it is mostly the carers giving the wrong medicine to the wrong patient at the wrong time. so electronic prescribing would not help in that respect. it probably will help with gps and policies and hospitals to communicate safely about prescriptions. thank you very much for talking to us. an armed officer who was at the florida school where 17 people were killed has resigned after it emerged he failed to intervene. footage showed him rushing to the building when the six minutes of shooting began, but then remaining outside as students and others were being killed. charlotte gallagher has this report. it was chaos as pupils ran to escape the gunman indiscriminately shooting teachers and students with an assault rifle. the school's football coach, who was shot dead, has been hailed a hero for throwing himself in front
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of a child to protect them. now it has emerged that an armed police officer was at the high school but stood outside as the shooting took place. deputy scot peterson has resigned after being suspended. the area's sheriff said peterson should have acted. scot peterson was absolutely on campus through this entire event. he was armed, he was in uniform. but what i saw was a deputy arrive at the west of building 12, take up a position, and he never went in. as the funerals take place of the 17 victims of the shootings, a fierce debate is raging about how to stop another school massacre. president trump has suggested arming teachers.
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i think a concealed permit for having teachers and letting people know that there are people in the building with guns, you won't have, in my opinion, you won't have these shootings, because these people are cowards, they're not going to walk into a school where 20% of the teachers have guns, maybe even 40%. what i would recommend doing is the people that do carry, we give them a bonus. his suggestion has been condemned by many teachers, who say the only way to stop shootings in schools is to have fewer guns, not more. charlotte gallagher, bbc news. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. a warning that the extensive abuse of vulnerable women across the uk needs address.
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new research suggests errors with drugs across the nhs in england could be linked up to 20,000 deaths. an armed officer who was the florida school where 17 people were killed has resigned after it emerged he to intervene. 0k, ok, let's get across all today's sports news. good afternoon. team gb's women are up against sweden in the semifinal of the curling at the winter olympics. these are live pictures from pyeongchang. great britain have just tied things up great britain have just tied things up at 3—3. they scored two points in the last end. the swedes have already beaten great britain earlier in the round—robin phase. they are the silver medallists from four years ago, but if britain do win, it'll be at least one better than the bronze they won in sochi. and the guaranteed medal would make it britain's most
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successful winter olympics. just a few metres away, korea and japan are playing their semifinal at the same time. korea took a three point lead in the first end. japan then came back with two in the next, but the hosts currently have the lead. and switzerland have already beaten canada to take the bronze in the men's medal match. canada were the defending champions and like their women's team miss out on any medal at all. another 0lympic athlete from russia has tested positive for a banned substance at pyeongchang. the russian bobsleigh federation has confirmed nadezhda sergeeva, who finished 12th in the two—woman bob, is under investigation. she is one of 168 russians allowed to compete as neutrals, despite the country being banned for a state sponsored doping programme. but an extremely significant gold medal overnight — a first for an olympic athlete
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from russia — a stunning gold in the women's singles figure skating for the 15—year—old alina zagitova, who had a world record score in her short programme before an impeccable routine in the free dance here. her training partner, the two—time reigning world champion yevgenia medvedeva though, clearly upset with her silver medal, as she was the favourite going into it, but a fanstic moment for young zagitova and of course a slice of 0lymnpic history for her. kjeld nuis from the netherlands has added the 1,000 metres speed skating title to the gold medal he won in the 1,500 metres. it's the first time the reigning world champion at this distance has claimed olympic gold. he was in the last pair to race, beating the time of norway's havard lorentzen byjust four hundredths of a second. and there was a brilliant final in the ski cross as canada continued their dominance of the event. first and second place for them — kelsey serwa and brittany phelan with gold and silver.
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that is all the spot for now, back with more in the next hour. thanks very much. ajury has been hearing evidence of the trial of two men accused of causing death by dangerous driving after a crash on the m1 last year. eight people travelling in the same minibus were killed. 0ur correspondent is at spreading crown court. what has been said? -- reading crown court. this accident happened on the m1 southbound near milton keynes on bank holiday weekend of august of last year. two lorries and a minibus were involved. the minibus was crushed between those two lorries. the driver of the minibus was taking his passengers, 11 of them, from nottingham to london, they were then going to go
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on to paris to go to disneyland. he died as well as seven of his passengers and four other passengers, including a five—year—old girl was seriously injured. the prosecution's case that the two defendants in this trial, a polish national and a 54—year—old man, the other lorry driver, david wagstaff, from stoke—on—trent, the prosecution says that those two men we re prosecution says that those two men were driving dangerously and that's what caused the deaths of the eight people and seriously injured the others. we have been hearing this morning from witnesses for the prosecution. the night manager of a logistics company that the polish driver was working for. he talked about how he had briefed the driver on the evening about the job he had to go and do, the delivery he had to do, and he told the court that he seemed fine that evening. he was
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asked by the lead prosecutor in the case, do you smell alcohol on him? he replied, no. we also heard a statement from a company director who had said it was the polish driver's second night shift, he had had a 12 hour break in between, and many had applied for his job, had a 12 hour break in between, and many had applied for hisjob, he said he had not had any health issues at all. both men deny eight ca ns issues at all. both men deny eight cans of causing death by dangerous driving, four codes of causing serious injury by dangerous driving, and there is also a drink—driving charge. the case here continues. thank you very much. theresa may will deliver a speech next friday on britain's future relationship with the eu. jeremy hunt has said there is no possibility that the government would back
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remaining in a customs union after brexit. it comes as leaders of the 27 remaining eu countries are meeting at a summit in brussels. yesterday the inner circle of top cabinet ministers held an away day at chequers — where ministers are believed to have made some progress towards an agreed position. i had a very good meeting with the rest of the cabinet subcommittee there. the prime minister is going to be making a speech shortly, but there was a very, very good atmosphere and we agreed on a way forward. it was a very positive meeting. we all got behind the prime minister and we've agreed the basis for her speech for next weekend. looking forward to it going ahead. 0ur political correspondent iain watson is in westminster. all sweetness and light ayes what could possibly go wrong? certainly, i was told it was a very convivial atmosphere. it was not in that sense atmosphere. it was not in that sense a different meeting despite differences that some of them may have had. it looks as though the way forward is basically a form of what's called mutual recognition,
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that britain and a large swathe of areas would essentially after brexit make up its own rules and regulations, but these would be of a sufficiently high standard that it could be recognised by the eu public nature of the roman and barriers to trade, and the european union intern would recognise our regulations too. this slight difficulty with that is that there was agreement despite all the speculation, agreement that cabinet itself as to endorse it on tuesday, but it only forms the basis of negotiation with the eu and they may well reject it, they may say this is what we call cherry picking. but we'll get a clearer idea of the government's vision when the prime minister sets out her speech on the future relationship she wants the uk to have with the eu exactly in a week. somewhere in britain, we are told, not on the continent, theresa may will set out that vision, her big speech, ahead of those important trade negotiations next friday. interesting, one thing i should say
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is, she will take some succour from this, don't forget she had a letter from more than 60, shall we say, very eurosceptic mps suggesting that she ought to be doing a whole range of things that represents a clean break with the european union, but the leader of the european research group, jacob rees—mogg, was saying today so long as we make our own doesn't matter that they may end up mirroring the rules that currently exist inside the eu. so an encouraging a few words from him to the prime minister. the key thing is that the rules are made by us rather than the european union. if the rules are made by us then they become a matter of future election controversy, and one party can say it wants more rules and one party can say it wants fewer rules. if they are set by the eu, and we simply become a rule taker, then that would be the vassal state. what i'm hearing so far, and it's only gossip at this stage, is that the government is going to maintain independence of rule setting but may then want to copy some eu rules. as an independent state, that's a reasonable thing to do. so, relatively encouraging, guarded
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welcome from jacob rees—mogg for what he knew was discussed at chequers, but the cabinet will discuss this again next week. but a thumbs down, former prime minister, tony blair making another exit intervention today, writing a new article, he will be speaking to the bbc later today, he says that from what he understood, the government was still wanting to have its cake and eat it and that wouldn't work. well, we will be hearing from tony blairand it well, we will be hearing from tony blair and it will remind us that there is a whole other political spectrum on this. where are labour now? has been quite a bit of not necessarily entirely singing harmoniously from the same hymn sheet. but what seems to be the case is thatjeremy corbyn is making a speech on monday ahead of the prime minister, getting his retaliation in first, if you like. he's expected to
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harden up labour's wording on the customs union. says it has always been an option to be a member of a customs union beyond brexit, he is likely to say this is now the viable end point of that process so in effect, he would harden up the labour position, but there is an immediate political position in doing so because the government has to get its trade and customs bill through parliament, there will be a vote on a lot of the detail and an amendment has gone down from conservative rebels effectively saying that the government should sign up to being in a customs union beyond brexit, something which as you were saying jeremy hunt and other numbers of the cabinet are dead set against. so there is the possibility of a government defeat if labour work to back that amendment and it looks as though jeremy corbyn's manoeuvring himself into position where the party a whole with perhaps just a few dissenters on the margin, they could sign up to those tory rebel demands
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and put a razor made under real pressure or possibly even deflect a defeat on her and effectively, parliament would say that britain was to have to be in a customs union beyond brexit, something which would undermine that strategy discussed only yesterday at chequers. thank you very much. the headlines in a moment, first let's get a look at the weather. things are likely to turn colder over the coming days. for much of the weekend, it should be largely dry with a good deal of sunshine. but at strengthening wind and it will feel bitterly cold at times. this afternoon, good deal of sunshine, but more cloud around in places. eastern parts of scotland down through north east england and into east anglia that we keep more cloud around this evening and overnight. not quite as cold as it was last night but further west, these blue colours showing the extent of how cold it's to get. as
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low as —4 or minus five. a cold and frosty start tomorrow. many will have a good deal of sunshine with some exceptions. northern ireland and perhaps the far south west of inward and fora and perhaps the far south west of inward and for a time eastern scotland. 0therwise, plenty of sunshine to be found, but add on the strength of the wind and highs of six celsius will feel subzero. that averages will drop away through the early pa rt averages will drop away through the early part of next week. bye—bye. this is bbc news. our latest headlines... warnings that the extensive abuse of vulnerable women across the uk
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is still going unrecognised. a report into 0peration sanctuary in newcastle says the exploitation of vulnerable adults needs to be urgently addressed. 75 million pounds will be invested in new computer systems to help nhs staff in england avoid mistakes when giving drugs to patients— after a report shows errors could be contributing to 22—thousand deaths a year. an armed officer who was assigned to protect the florida school, where 17 people were shot dead last week, has resigned after it emerged he failed to intervene and confront the gunman. theresa may will deliver a long—awaited speech setting out the government's brexit strategy next week — after her cabinet reached a consensus on the way forward at her country retreat, chequers, yesterday. a message from stephen fry — the presenter announces
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he is recovering from surgery for prostate cancer and said "it all seemed to go pretty well". new research has shown that growing replica tumours in the lab could help to personalise drug treatment for patients. we'll be speaking to the lead scientist of the study. rbs has reported its first full—year profit since being bailed out by taxpayers at the height of the financial crisis. rbs made £752 million in 2017, after losing nearly £7 billion the year before. it could now pave the way for the bank to be re—privatised, with the government selling off the stake it still owns. but it could be forced to do so at a loss. rbs's share price is still well below the price the government paid in 2008. ten years of losses, this is very symbolic. not just for our colleagues at work but also for the uk who put a lot of money into the bank and we have been restructuring, taking losses through conduct and litigation issues, and finding this profit shows how good the bank can be.
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not through all of the issues, we still have one very large one, but the fundamental value of this business is starting show through. this year our income was up, costs down, our capital position, important for the stability of the bank, has also been up, so a good set of results but lots of work still to do. a fourth british tourist has died of injuries he suffered in a helicopter crash in the grand canyon nearly a fortnight ago. jonathan udall, who was in his 30s and from brighton, was on honeymoon with his wife, ellie milward when the accident happened. his family has been told of his death. adina campbell reports. jon udall and ellie milward were on their honeymoon. she has now been left with critical injuries, while herfriends' online post, announcing mr udall‘s death, described him as strong and brave. the eurocopter ec130 crashed as it came into land in arizona's remote quartermaster canyon.
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witnesses say it spun around twice before hitting the ground and then bursting into flames. police say bad weather meant it was more than eight hours before the survivors could be flown to hospital. stuart hill, on the left, is pictured here along with his brotherjason, who also died at the scene. their parents said the brothers shared an incredible bond and would be deeply missed. jennifer barham remains in a critical condition in hospital in las vegas, as does the pilot, scott booth. experts say possible causes of the crash include a faulty tail rotor and gusty winds. but it may take many months to determine why the helicopter came down with such terrible consequences. adina campbell, bbc news. more now on the warning that mistakes made in the prescribing and the distribution of medicines could be linked to hundreds
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and maybe thousands of deaths every year. joining me in the studio is matthew syed, author of black box thinking, which takes a look at how we learn from serious failings, especially those in the world of health care and medicine. thanks very much for coming in. having looked at other industries where mistakes happen and how those are best turned round into something more positive is how you take this. the key question in driving progress is how you respond to things going wrong. do you get defensive or try to cover them up or do you try to openly and transparently try to learn from them and drive the process of change? in aviation, they have indestructible black boxes so any accident is analysed, the electronic data, how the pilot and
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co—pilot interacted, but they also analyse near misses so they are co nsta ntly learning analyse near misses so they are constantly learning lessons and making reforms to procedure and process , making reforms to procedure and process, ergonomic design, and i think it has had an incredible effect on the key metric, the accident rate, which last year was one accident for every 17 million take—offs. health care can learn from this. are there particular issues with health care because it issues with health care because it is potentially so dangerous to say, i made a mistake and someone nearly died, and there is an issue where there could be blame attached to the mistake, quite rightly possibly? that is the case, and it is something that aviation grappled with. it is certainly very easy when an error has happened, to blame the professional closest to the problem at the moment it occurred. that is a natural human as bonds with hindsight, not putting oneself in the shoes of the professional at the
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time the mistake happened and the complex demands on them. what aviation did is gave pilots immunity from prosecution if they spoke up early and quickly and made the process easy to do. you could report to five different bodies, the civil aviation authority, it your union, the airline. because they get this openness and professionals don't anticipate being punitively sanctioned for an honest mistake, you generate transparency. a lot of clinicians and health care fear being sued or struck off or put on trial for culpable homicide for com pletely trial for culpable homicide for completely honest mistakes and it drives covers up. if people have lost our relative they might feel aggrieved that just lost our relative they might feel aggrieved thatjust because the person has spoken out they may feel the need for some sort ofjustice to be served. it is a difficult balance
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and in aviation it doesn't mean there is carte blanche immunity. the high court can commandeer the evidence provided to the aviation investigation branch if it wants to but the courts take quite a rational view. they know if they keep commandeering the information it will jeopardise commandeering the information it willjeopardise openness. in particular the high court has to be aware and conscious of balancing these demands in a sensible way rather than going for the punitive approach as a knee jerk response. do you think the health service is mentally ready to make that sort of switch or do you think it is entrenched and will take a long time to become more transparent?” entrenched and will take a long time to become more transparent? i think there needs to be a big change in culture and professionals being much more confident of the sanctioning bodies and how that relationship will work but i'll so think there has been an important innovation introduced by this victory of state
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which is modelled on aviation where there are spaces which encourage whistle—blowing so you can put reforms in place and ensure things don't happen again. i think we are in the middle of a transformation in health care, the early days of it, but i hope it goes through because medical error is one of the biggest killers in the western world. maybe your next book is even more about health care! should every adult in england be made a potential organ donor? mps will be considering this today when they debate a bill that could change the system in england to presumed consent. wales already made a similar decision where unless families strongly object, it is assumed organs will be donated. scotland is introducing a similar bill and northern ireland is retaining the current system.
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it has been a year since this family in caernarvonshire in south wales lost their father. absolutely devastating. it was like someone had ripped out my heart. scott duckworth was found unconscious in his home. in hospital, a ventilator was the only thing keeping him alive. it was then doctors asked joanna if she wanted to donate his organs. i was quite shocked, but i think that it was the easiest yes that i could have said. i didn't have any hesitation at all. even thouthoanna's husband had never given his permission for his organs to be donated, two years ago, welsh law changed and now presumes organ consent. so we recognised that there was an issue for our population, that the need and the demand for organs and organ transplants was outstripping the supply. the latest figures show that last year, more people in wales than anywhere else in the uk consented to having their organs donated.
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the overall consent rate for wales is 72% — that's compared to england, which is at 64%, and scotland, which is at 60%. but critics argue it has made very little impact. before the law changed, there were 101 deceased donors in welsh hospitals, compared to just 104 donors once the law changed. how has it helped you? it brings a lot of comfort, knowing that three families were able to have their loved ones for a lot longer than they thought that they were going to, children who may have lost their parents. his death wasn't in vain. and, to me, that means more than anything. scotland has already announced it's planning to follow wales. today in england, mps will debate the bill for the first time — a bill the government is backing.
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fiona lamdin, bbc news. steven fry confirmed he is recovering from surgery for prostate cancer. the 60 rolled had his operation last month and said on his website he had surgery to remove the prostate and it seems to go pretty well. this is what he had to say. as far as we know it has all been got. are there are - chances of me are there are greater chances of me getting other kinds of cancer now? a p pa re ntly getting other kinds of cancer now? apparently not. if you get prostate cancer you don't necessarily find yourself susceptible to other kinds. but i will not know for sure until my psa levels are checked, but they should be zero because i have no prostate, so the specific antigen level should be zero but if there is anything left on the bed of the
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prostate, maybe it will spread and i erfiéftéiié. fiéffilé lft filliééfééfi’éfifi; q need radiotherapy and the will need radiotherapy and the damn thing will start again. but for the moment i am fit and well and happy andi moment i am fit and well and happy and i wanted to let you know because rumours had started to swell. goodness knows i am not the most important person in the world but if you are on television and do things in the public eye people exhibit interest. a newspaper called up and i thought before the gossip gets silly and in informed i might as well come clean. so there you are, stephen fry, my fight with cancer. of course it wasn't a fight, i just went to a surgeon and all the staff we re went to a surgeon and all the staff were wonderful, and ifeel my life was saved by this early intervention. i would urge men of a certain age to get your psa levels checked and then it is about discussing what the plan should be with your doctor. yes, i did go private. i am
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with your doctor. yes, i did go private. iam insured, my union, the screen private. iam insured, my union, the screen actors guild ensures me in america and over here. my surgeon works mostly for the nhs and does exactly the same procedure all the time for all kinds of men. 0ne exactly the same procedure all the time for all kinds of men. one in eight men will get prostate cancer at some time in their life. it has overta ken at some time in their life. it has overtaken breast cancer. it's not particularly important, it is not a rival match or anything. 0ne particularly important, it is not a rival match or anything. one in four if of african descent, that is the epidemiology of it. so it is worth checking your psa and going from there. it is not always necessary to haveit there. it is not always necessary to have it out like i did. the answer is to discuss it with your doctor. that's it, really. i don't want to
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take up any more of your time. thank you for listening and watching. get yourself checked. and follow your doctor's advice. in all these matters. 0therwise, doctor's advice. in all these matters. otherwise, i doctor's advice. in all these matters. 0therwise, iam bloody lucky to be surrounded by such wonderful people and have a wonderful people and have a wonderful team working with me and for me and lucky to have an immune system. it is the recovery which is system. it is the recoverywhittris phenomenalfrom an system. it is the recoverywhittris phenomenal from an operation. so phenomenalfrom an operation. here's hoping i have anotherfew yea rs left here's hoping i have anotherfew years left on the planet because i enjoy life at the moment and that is a marvellous thing to be able to say and i'd rather it didn't go away. did to your that news. a new study has shown that growing replica tumours in the lab could help to personalise drug treatment for each patient. the new technique involves growing "mini tumours" and error when it comes to selecting cancer treatments for some patients.
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with me—in'the studio is of cancer research in london who led the study. good of you to - in. tell us why you were led to try this and what was so you were led to try this and what was so important about doing it differently to how it is normally done. one of the things facing the clinic is to make a prediction as to whether the patient is going to respond to a specific anti—cancer treatment. doctors are currently kind of blind so they don't know what to expect so we base our treatment on statistics and clinical trials but we do not know if a specific patient will response to a specific patient will response to a specific treatment. 0ur specific patient will response to a specific treatment. our study shows if we isolate tumour cells from the biopsy andy carroll are many tumour in the lab we can actually work on this biopsy to make a prediction ——
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and we can grow a many tumour. how reliable where are the results when it came to treating the patients? very reliable. when we grew the mini tumour in the lab, when we got a tumour in the lab when we got a from the mini tumour, we response from the mini tumour, we got a sponsor on the patient. —— we got a sponsor on the patient. —— we got a sponsor on the patient. —— we got a response. we were able to highlight which patients would respond to treatment and which we could spare the toxicity of treatment if they did not respond. currently, the patient comes to a clinic and will have a ct scan
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before and after a couple of months of treatment and we will make an assessment whether things are working. in the entry and they will face side—effects. if we can anticipate this outcome and make a prediction then we can get into personalised medicine so we can tailor treatment according to the patient‘s needs. tailor treatment according to the patient's needs. when you talk about personalised medicine, how much does this shed light on what is played here? do we know why some people will respond well to a particular medication and someone who might be similar but will have no response? cancer is complex and it evolves over time so under the pressure of chemotherapy the cancer changes. by capturing the tissue we can understand what is going on and to is going to respond or not. there will be people at home having issues with cancer and will be pleased and encouraged to hear this. this is
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research you have been doing. when might people find this is being offered to them? we are going to start more new trials where we're licking at patients in a specific treatment according to what we see in the lab but on a positive note this kind of approach has been used in other settings, other diseases like cystic fibrosis, in other countries so we like cystic fibrosis, in other countries so we are like cystic fibrosis, in other countries so we are quite close to this becoming a reality. thank you. the un children's fund unicef is warning that almost three—quarters of a million rohingya children face huge risks for years to come. in a report to mark six months since the start of the crisis unicef says hundreds of thousands of children remain trapped in makeshift camps, denied education, and at risk of disease and violence. with the monsoon season coming, unicef doubts the camps will survive high winds and heavy rain. we are reaching now one of the worst points of the history of the rohingya. altogether, the children who are coming since august 2017, and the children who are there
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in the makeshift camps, the refugee camps, prior to august 2017, we are speaking about a bit even more than half a million children which are in a difficult situation in the camps in cox's bazaar. the family of the seriously ill toddler, alfie evans has been given permission to appeal against a high court ruling allowing doctors to switch off his life—support. alfie has brain damage from a progressive neurological condition and doctors say there's no hope of recovery. on tuesday a judge ruled in favour of his physicians but his parents want to take him to a hospital in italy for further treatment. two people are still being questioned after a suspected hit—and—run in coventry,
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which killed two young brothers. a man in his 50s, and a woman in her 40s, were arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving and drink—driving. a two—year—old boy was pronounced dead shortly after the incident — his six—year—old brother died in hospital soon after. warnings that the extensive abuse of vulnerable women across the uk is still going unrecognised, and needs to be urgently addressed — the findings of operation sanctuary in newcastle. new research suggests errors with drugs across the nhs in england could be linked to up to 22,000 deaths. an armed officer who was at the florida school where 17 people were killed has resigned after it emerged he failed to intervene. popular social media app snapchat lost one of it's most influential users this week — as well as £1 billion
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from its stock market value. the reality tv star kylie jenner tweeted to her 24 million followers that she no longer uses snapchat after the new update — and the apps parent company shares dropped by almost 8%. 1 million people have signed a petition demanding snapchat change 0ur correspondence told me it shows how influential people like kylie jenner r. the trends they follow are followed bya the trends they follow are followed by a huge generation of people so the changes that snapchat made last year included things like celebrating friends from branded content like celebrities. if you followed kylie jenner content like celebrities. if you followed kyliejenner her updates would come into yourfeed, but now you have to swipe left or right to stop users complained it was too complicated and didn't make sense. she is not the only celebrity to say
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she didn't like it. another celebrity star, chrissie keegan who is married to john celebrity star, chrissie keegan who is married tojohn legend, also said it. i do know whether snapchat will now consider other people's complaints considering it has wiped £1 billion from their share price. have they given any reaction? one of the co—founders recently revealed his pay packet, which is 637.8 million dollars. i don't think it is hurting him too much but i think the thing they will take into consideration is how influential celebrities like kyliejenner consideration is how influential celebrities like kylie jenner are with their core audience. 0ther brands like instagram are wiping the
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floor with snapchat now and they're ina floor with snapchat now and they're in a battle where they are very similar platforms but if it is easier to use on instagram then that where people will go. interesting as well that she put out a further twea ked well that she put out a further tweaked later to try to claw back the love. she may not have realised how much of an impact on a per tweets may have. she makes money from putting certain brands on some platforms and maybe certain brands weren't happy with how much backlash it received. so the phone may have rung at her house taking it back. effectively it is a huge problem for snapchat. an interesting development coming in on the issue of charities and the scandals recently about possible abuse of power and abusive
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relationships within the aid sector. a letter has been released signed by 22 charities including 0xfam and save the children, who have been at the centre of the controversy. it is an open letter from a the centre of the controversy. it is an open letterfrom a number of ngos. as organisations whose core aim is to help the most vulnerable people in the world, we must always confront abusive behaviour and the misuse of power. although this is only the action of a small minority people it is none the less an issue we will not allow to go unaddressed. it goes on. it is about the steps they envision taking. there can be no tolerance, they say, of up abuse of power or trust. and at times our sector has failed and we must and will do better. those charities signing up to the open letter looking at the whole issue of what
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they call abuse of power in aid organisations. it started out as a project to help protect some of the world's most endangered wildlife, but conservationists from the uk's chester zoo got more than they bargained for when they teamed up with national park rangers in nigeria, capturing some extraordinary footage of the country's most elusive species. helen briggs reports. caught on camera in the remote forests of nigeria's largest national park, red river hogs and nocturnal visitors like the golden cat and the genet cat. gashaka—gumti is home to some of africa's most endangered animals and conservationists are using hidden cameras to monitor them. then you go through a lot of camera trap images and it can be quite a tedious process — a leaf blowing in the wind, orjust macaque, macaque, macaque, and it's — you don't see a great deal, but then you will get a gem like a golden cat, the perfect shot, or you'll see a giant pangolin. you weren't sure they were in sight and there is is, in full detail. chester zoo researchers are working
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with local park rangers to help protect the wildlife. the park is the stronghold for a rare chimp found only in nigeria and neighbouring cameroon. with only a few thousand left in the wild, these images raise hopes that the great ape can escape extinction. helen briggs, bbc news. in a moment the news at one with jane hill. first let's take a look at the weather. next week sees the start of meteorological spring but winter is still digging its heels in and many of us got off to a cold and frosty start this morning. a good deal of sunshine and that will tend to keep through the weekend but if you add the strength of the wind it will feel bitterly cold despite some sunshine and by next week chance that some of us could see some significant snow. we have an area of
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high pressure over scandinavia not going anywhere at all, keeping things quite settled but feeding in the colder air all the way from the arctic. the wind has pushed more cloud across eastern areas to the afternoon and more cloud here this evening and overnight so not quite as cold as the nightjust gone. elsewhere, clear skies, temperatures getting down to freezing or below. a cold and frosty start to the weekend. but most will see a good deal of sunshine tomorrow. still some cloud in eastern parts of scotland, the north—east of england and northern ireland and the far south—west of england scene cloud at times but otherwise a good deal of sunshine. a brisk south—easterly wind so even though the firm on that or will read 4—6, it will feel closer to freezing. —— even though the firm
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temperatures ... temperatures getting temperatures getting down to freezing in rural spot as or lower. 0n freezing in rural spot as or lower. on sunday, cloud across eastern parts of scotland, north—east england, but it should be a brighter day with more on the way of sunshine across northern ireland. temperatures 4—7 but feeling quite cold, given the strength of the wind. some places will feel subzero exposed to the brisk easterly or south—easterly wind. the cold air keeps digging in as we go into the early pa rt keeps digging in as we go into the early part of next week and it is not going to warm up any time soon and infact not going to warm up any time soon and in fact it will get colder through monday and tuesday and an increasing chance of some snow, especially cos eastern areas. o'clock news. switch to two now if you want to see if gb can make a comeback. extensive abuse of vulnerable women
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is still going unrecognised across the uk, and needs to be urgently addressed. a serious case review following the sexual exploitation of women in newcastle warns that the scale of the problem still isn't acknowledged. it continues, it carries on, i would suggest, in most towns and cities in the uk. we'll have the latest on the warnings from newcastle. also this lunchtime... mistakes in prescribing or administering drugs in the nhs could cause 1700 deaths a year in england, according to a government report.
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the florida school shooting — an armed policeman on campus has resigned, after it emerged he didn't intervene on the day 17 people died. royal bank of scotland, largely owned by the taxpayer,
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