Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 24, 2018 7:00am-8:00am GMT

7:00 am
these type of people kind of generally get overlooked by the everyday phone vendors. and so what we are doing is understanding the technology that we can integrate into our products that really makes their lives better. and next week on the show, we'll be bringing you all of the latest news and releases from nwc in barcelona. that is all from the shortcut of click this week, the full episode is up on iplayer. don't forget, we live on twitter @bbcclick and on facebook, too. thanks for watching and we will see you soon. hello, this is breakfast with rachel burden and jon kay. leaping into the record books — medal number five seals team
7:01 am
gb‘s most successful winter olympics ever. billy morgan bagged bronze in the big air snowboard event with the jump of his life. and coming until econ test thinking, i'm shooting for a medal, you are ready for it. but ijust didn't. and great britain could win, medal number six today, the women's curling team, playjapan for the bronze medal, later this morning. almost here this morning, taking a stand. big companies cut ties with 5555 e5 25355555 541155 313
7:02 am
nra, after last week's mass the nra, after last week's mass shooting at a florida school. fresh revelations of misconduct by aid workers — uk charity plan international admits to six cases of sexual abuse and exploitation of children by its staff and associates. as britain braces itself for an arctic blast, we'll be getting some top tips on how walkers can stay safe in the snow. and philip avery has the weather. and i morning. y has the weather. and i morning. dry 5 the weather. and i morning. dry and 5 weather. and i morning. dry and bright 1er. sunny weekend in store for all part of the british - a little bit of the british isles. a little bit on the chilly side. it's next week when things get much colder and we could well see a real of winter. more details for you in just a few minutes. see you then, thank you. good morning. first, our main story. team gb is celebrating its best ever winter olympics, after bill); morgan wen bmnze , . . ,.. the medal is team gb‘s fifth in pyeongchang, taking them past the four won in 1924 and 2014. the women's curling team faces japan in a bronze medal
7:03 am
match later this morning. at the age of 28, morgan was the oldest snowboarder competing in the final, and fell on his firstjump, but came back with two good runs to finish less than one point from silver. who is in pyeongchang. great celebrations i would imagine for everyone in team gb today? that's right. great news for team gb. billie with a that's right. great news for team gb. billie - with a record gb. billie morgan with a record fifth medal of these games. taking britain passed the four they won in chamonix in 192a, and in sochi in chamonix in 1924, and in sochi in 2014. it has also meant that britain chamonix in 1924, and in sochi in 2014. it their.so meant that britain chamonix in 1924, and in sochi in 2014. it their targetant that britain
7:04 am
chamonix in 1924, and in sochi in 2014. it their target from at britain chamonix in 1924, and in sochi in 2014. it their target from the ritain has met their target from the funding body. billy morgan fell on his training runs and his first run in competition, but then nailed his next two to win a bronze medal. it really is a fantastic story for billy morgan. three years older than anyone else in the field. you'll make i meant to anyone else in the field. you'll makei meant to snowboarding at the make a mea nttesnowboerdingatthei of make a mea nt'ta'anawbearding'atthei of 15. years had trouble with age of 15. years had trouble with his knees. he had a background in gymnastics and ease gymnastics and skateboarding. ease cause a real surprise here. some people thought he could have got a medal, but he was up against tough opponents. it takes britain into uncharted territory and it could get uncharted territory and it coutd get better for the women's curling even better for the women's curling team, who fight for a bronze medal later - david, team, who fight for a bronze medal later- david, many thanks. and we'll be speaking to the man himself, from pyeongchang, just after 8:30am. a number of us companies have cut ties with the national
7:05 am
rifle association — as consumers call for a boycott of firms linked to the powerful gun lobby. they include the car rental companies hertz and enterprise holdings, both of which have stopped offering discounts for members of the association, in the wake of the florida school shooting. amidst the grieving, the mood has been different this time. within hours of the gunman killing 17 people, anger overflowed onto the streets. on the hugely powerful gun lobby. and they include some of the most familiar corporate names. the car rental companies hertz and enterprise, which also owns alamo international. which also owns alamo and national. they're ending discounts offered to members of the gun lobby group from next month.
7:06 am
met life insurance and the software company symantec are taking similar action. there has been no word in response from the nra. it is unclear whether these actions will hurt an organisation that boasts 5 million members. during the week, its chief executive hit out at the protesters. their goal is to eliminate the second amendment and our firearms freedoms. so they can eradicate all individual freedoms. donald trump says he is open to new ideas but the one he seems to like best is giving guns to teachers. it's concealed. so this crazy man who walked in wouldn't even know who it is that has it. that's good. that's not bad, that's good. and a teacher would have shot the hell out of him before he knew what happened. the debate over what to do next will be highly charged and intensely political. one of the uk's biggest children's aid charities has confirmed there have been six cases of child sexual abuse by staff and volunteers in the last two years.
7:07 am
plan international says five of them were criminal cases and reported to the local authorities in the countries involved. adina campbell reports. this time, plan international uk, which works in more than 50 whilih. flgfiéi in marathafi. 59“ " " 5" to improve children's countries to improve children's rights and promote equality for rights and promote egualityfor in its latest online blog, it girls. in its latest online blog, it has confirmed six cases of sexual abuse and exploitation of children between july 2016 and june last year. one involved a member of staff. the others were i volunteers staff. the others were by volunteers oi’ staff. the others were by volunteers or associates. plan international says the staff member was not from the uk and was dismissed without reference. and ended the contracts with the other volunteers and
7:08 am
involved. the charity organisations involved. the charity also says there were nine cases of sexual misconduct and harassment by staff against other adults which led to seven dismissals. in the past, plan international uk has received of pounds of funding from millions of pounds of funding from the government. it's the latest major charity to admit cases of sexual misconduct and follows investigations into aid organisations including oxfam and save the children. in an open letter, the three charities and many others have now promised a - of others have now promised a series of urgent and immediate measures to protect the vulnerable. ina in a plea a former senior adviser to donald trump has admitted charges of conspiracy and lying to investigators, who are examining russian political interference in the 2016 presidential election.
7:09 am
in a plea deal, rick gates admitted conspiracy to defraud the government and making false statements. he's become the third associate of the president to agree to co—operate with a special investigation, in return britain is set for its coldest february week in five years, as freezing air, dubbed the beast from the east, arrives from russia. the cold snap will affect the whole of the uk from sunday night, with temperatures expected to drop simonjones reports. the gritters are gearing up as britain braces itself for a big freeze. the so—called beast from the east is sweeping in from siberia. the met office, in conjunction with nhs england, has issued a level three cold weather alert for the whole of the country, the second most serious level. that means there is a 99919 icy conditions or heavy snow, between now and thursday. covering most of eastern in britain.
7:10 am
it is certainly not the first snow we will have this winter. but what makes this cold snap different is it is expected to affect the whole of the uk. temperatures could fall as low as —8, but it will feel much chillier because of the wind. there could be increased pressure on already stretched nhs services and councils are providing extra emergency beds for rough sleepers. housing association. the main aim is always to get people off the street and to stop people from dying in the cold weather. and, to date, we have been pretty successful. next thursday is the meteorological start of spring. but that appears to be on hold as winter continues to bite. a uk ticket holder has won nearly £78 million in the euromillions draw after sharing the jackpot with a winner from spain. the jackpot has been growing
7:11 am
since the turn of the year and was the third biggest in the draw‘s history. someone someone is going to be celebrating this morning. for a humanitarian ceasefire in syria has been postponed until later today. there's been deadlock since thursday following objections from russia. syrian government forces have waged afierce aircampaign on the rebel—held enclave of eastern ghouta, near damascus. 462 people have been killed there this week, at least 99 of them children. barrel bombs and shell fire have rained down on the area, witnesses described yesterday's bombing was the most intense so far. the syrian government has denied targetting civilians,
7:12 am
and insists it is trying to liberate the eastern ghouta from what it calls "terrorists". we'rejoined now by tim eaton, from the international relations think—tank chatham house. thank you forjoining us. let's about this un resolution. deadlock since thursday. why no agreement so far? essentially disagreement over when this will come into force. russian tactics have been m we} at the moment, negotiators are this. at the moment, negotiators are trying to reduce the time as much as possible and there will be a vote on that later today. a suspicion among some members of the security council is that russia is playing for time here to help the syrian government? certainly. that would seem to fit the pattern of previous such
7:13 am
attempts and we have seen on many occasions where really they should be things they should be able to sort out relatively quickly and it has allowed the syrian regime forces more time to make military advances the ground. we've also seen with on the ground. we've also seen with such discussions or versus asian facilities and ceasefires that even when the of been agreed they haven't necessarily been respected. the ability for civilians to leave the area haven't really come into force. it's a difficult situation. we're used to seeing deadlock and poverty within the un in different parts of diplomacy, but this time it seems rather more serious. france is saying that if the un can't agree on this, it threatens the future —— reputation of the representation —— reputation of the un. we were having the same kind of
7:14 am
conversations regarding aleppo. we saw then the un was unable to push things through, was unable to put sufficient leveraged over member states such as russia to implement states such as russiato implement so states such as russiato implement so unfortunately this agreements, so unfortunately this fits a pattern and it's not new. and there's little to see that it's going to change this time round. could change things? what could get an agreement today or tomorrow?|j think an agreement today or tomorrow?” think there will be an agreement over the time of the implementation of this deal, but really it's also important to look at the option for rebel groups and civilians within eastern ghouta. for civilians, there are few choices. it's almost impossible for them to leave. if they are able to leave following some kind of evacuation deal, they face an uncertain future. in the past, we've seen people being conscripted into government forces. seen them discriminated against the it's a challenge. for
7:15 am
the armed groups, a series of big companies cut ties with america's powerful gun lobby the national rifle association after last week's mass shooting at a florida school. a fifth medal seals the record for team gb‘s most successful winter olympics ever. a sign that spring is usually on its way. these are the snowdrops at the nuttery wood here's philip with a look at this morning's weather.
7:16 am
a lovely start to the weekend. it is called back. in some parts of sussex, we are beginning to tap into high—pressure dominating our weather for the next few days. high—pressure means it is lovely and there usually means it is lovely and there is sunshine. there are some cloud to is sunshine. there aresomecloudte pennines. a lot of dry weather the pennines. a lot of dry weather on offer. if you have a - this on offer. if you have a plan, this is the weather for you. this is on offer. if you have a plan, this is the weatherfor you. this is not the cold weather yet. with clear skies, temperatures dipping t ' t” t’."% somewhere t ' tt" tt.tt% somewhere in the overnight. somewhere in the countryside could well be down to minus single figures. in major towns and cities, we are subzero. for sunday, glorious start. again, if
7:17 am
you want to be out and about, get a ¥§e £5222ij -. .— nae nae- .— -,-- - ‘ layers ¥§e £5222ij -. .— nae nae- .— -,-- - ‘layers on. we ¥§e £5222ij -. .— nae nae- .— -,-- - ‘ layers on. we are seeing the few layers on. we are seeing the other side of winter. it is the cold. year is winter on its way. we beginning to indicate the first are beginning to indicate the first signs of snow showers wanting to get in on unnoticeable north—easterly wind. are the in on unnoticeable north—easterly wind. - are the temperatures are wind. there are the temperatures are expected to see on your thermometers. adding in the wind strength, this is what it will feel like. a completely different beast from what you felt over the weekend. if you are stepping out, you will really need to cover up. the big area of high—pressure ageggf high—gressure dominating to ggeggf high—gressure dominating to settle - weather, trying to settle the weather, doing so trying to settle the weather, doing so this weekend, but as soon as we bring in this really cold air from
7:18 am
siberia across the north sea, it sta rts siberia across the north sea, it starts becoming very unstable. that's where the snow showers come from and there will be snow showers are plenty through monday night, tuesday and into wednesday. in just one damning tweet this week, reality tv star kylie jenner wiped a billion pounds off the value of snapchat, saying she no longer used the image sharing service. snapchat has recently undergone a redesign and it's facing intense competition from instagram — which is owned by facebook — for celebrity users. so what does this say about the popularity of social media and the way we use it? it's a question we've been putting to some college students. snapchat is literally just for messaging friends. instagram is for, like, keeping up with people, keeping up with their feed and everything and making sure i'm up to date with everything.
7:19 am
and all your cousins. i was on it for, like, a month and then ijust gave up completely because my mum wanted to add me on it, this picture just explains what you're thinking or what you're wanting to say. whereas with words you won't always get it right. i don't like snapchat because the new update is so bad. it has clumped everything together and you don't know where to find certain things. it's not as nice and fluid to use as it used to be. i don't really like the new update. it's just confusing. i stopped using snapchat ages ago. it'sjust complicated, annoying, don't like it. for me, it's not a popularity thing. it's more, what is
7:20 am
easier for me to use? just show my friends; i'm only really bothered whether they like it or not. so i suppose it is trying to please your friends. and entertainment reporter lucy ford. good morning. thank you forjoining this morning. it's probably us this morning. it's probably will worth explaining what snapchat is and why it has become so popular? obviously i am completely out of the demographic that uses snapchat. it's demographic'that'uses‘a’napchat. it‘s popular with teams and took 25 very popular with teams and took 25 is. it is like an instant messaging service where you can send video and you photographs to your friends and you could put funny filters on them. could put funnyrfilters on them ears and dog faeces, flower
7:21 am
rabbit ears and dog faeces, flower garlands, that sort of thing. i is garlands, that sort of thing. it is a great and fun entertaining app and there are lots of brands on there, doing cute and entertaining content. it is the one where you get khartoum faces superimposed on your face, which everyone has done over christmas. kylie jenner which everyone has done over christmas. kyliejenner says on twitter, anybody else using this? i'm not. the share price dropped it shows the power of dramatically. it shows the power of celebrity. all of a sudden, her 104 million followers on think million followers on instagram think that they will not use it. the power of these influences. she's one of main of of these influences. she's one of main - of snapchat. she the main users of snapchat. she helped build it up. she was a main
7:22 am
influence. i think it has to do quite a lot to compete with something like instagram. you probably know this already, but it is analytic. instagram will show you how followers is analytic. instagram will show you how - followers you have and is analytic. instagram will show you how- followers you have and the how many followers you have and the brands. it will show who is looking at pictures and looking at these posts. it is a quantifiable way of seeing who's looking at things. up until earlier this month, snapchat did not have that with brands. the only recently put that in. they can copy each other. it's not difficult for these networks to take the best ideas from each other. ragbag of these companies are desperate not to be the next friends reunited on
7:23 am
myspace. the dominance from facebook has been so assured for so long, but even their usage is dropping off, amongst the young. do particularly amongst the young. do you think any of these companies last the long—term ? good question. these platforms are still relatively new. they are becoming like the big tv broadcasters almost. they do not have first mover advantage. for example, myspace was out there and they were one of the first social networks. the next—generation. there is an advantage in being first, but also an advantage in coming to the game slightly later. now the dominance is so established. they
7:24 am
are in the news the whole time. they are in the news the whole time. they are making headlines everyday. it shows how much a part of everyday life they will become. facebook is 1 billion users. snapchat has nearly 2 billion. and will be very difficult for people to move over. they might, but we might find it is like radio stations and tv channels. they might not be leading the field any more, but i can't really see them disappearing completely. interesting times. we will probably be back here next year talking about another new arrival. hang around because we will talk about the future later. the immediate future here is not great. with forecasts suggesting next week could be the coldest in the uk for five years, fell walkers are being urged to make sure they have the right skills and equipment before heading for the hills. there were a record number of mountain rescue call—outs
7:25 am
in the lake district last year, and with more snow likely, experts say winter skills training could be life—saving. peter marshall has been to find out more. a day on the winter fells can begin with sheer beauty. and in moments, it can turn brutal. wind howls. that is why this group has taken to the slopes of helvellyn in one of the coldest weeks of the year. the idea of today is to learn the basic snow craft that will help keep us alive in bad weather conditions. and i think i'm in pretty good hands. the leader of the expedition today has reached the summit of everest. so helvellyn should be something of a walk in the park. typically the wind will come in, it will be scouring the snow off the side. mountaineer zach poulton has also led expeditions in antarctica and greenland.
7:26 am
he is a fell top assessor for the national park. is every day from december to april, he scales helvellyn to provide is every day from december to april, he scales helvellyn to provide every day from december to april, he scales helvellyn to provide weather updates and safety advice for walkers. as the snow gets deeper, it's time to attach crampons — spiked boot attachments. i always challenge people, can you stop, take your bag off, get your crampons out, get them on and walk away in two minutes? and it's worth thinking about, can you do it in the worst—case scenario? and that is 100 mph winds buffeting you, knocking you over. well, i'm trying out my crampons. i have to say, it took me more than two minutes to get them on. we are still on the quite low slopes, but i'm pleased we've got an expert here. i said earlier on that helvellyn should be a walk in the park. well, i think i was wrong. last year saw the highest number of mountain rescue incidents on record in the lake district.
7:27 am
543 in total. 17 people died. over 300 needed medical attention. in these conditions, ice axe skills can save lives. and you're pushing with that shoulder and you are really kind of levering it in. to either slow you down and carve your way down or to stop you dead. the risk is on the spectrum from very safe to very unsafe. as long as people are making conscious decisions about the kit they are taking, the route they're taking and the risks they are exposing themselves to, i think the problem comes where people are not aware of the risk and they're making unconscious decisions and putting themselves at risk, and then putting other people at risk in terms of solving that problem. eventually, we make it. that last ascent was pretty exciting. i think it was the bit we saw from the bottom that we felt was intimidating earlier on. but with the right instructors and the right equipment, it was all right. just gradually step—by—step we made it. there will be more on that story
7:28 am
on monday evening on bbc inside out in the north west at 7.30, and on the bbc iplayer. stay with us, headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and rachel burden. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news.
7:29 am
team gb is celebrating its best ever winter olympics, after billy morgan won bronze in the men's snowboard big air. the medal is team gb‘s fifth in pyeongchang, taking them past the four won in 1924 and 2014. the women's curling team faces japan in a bronze medal match later this morning. at the age of 28, morgan was the oldest snowboarder competing in the final, and fell on his firstjump, but came back with two good runs to finish less than one a number of us companies have cut ties with the national rifle association — as consumers call for a boycott of firms linked to the powerful gun lobby. discounts for members of the association. the nra is yet to respond to the move, which comes in the wake one of the uk's biggest children's aid charities has confirmed
7:30 am
there have been six cases of child sexual abuse by staff and volunteers in the last two years. plan international says five of them were criminal cases and reported to the local authorities in the countries involved. the charity works in more than 50 countries to improve children's rights and promote equality for girls. a former senior adviser to donald trump has admitted charges of conspiracy and lying to investigators, who are examining and making false statements. he's become the third associate of the president to agree to co—operate with a special investigation, in return for more serious charges against him being dropped. britain is set for the coldest february week in five years as freezing air arrives from russia. with temperatures expected to drop to minus—eight in some areas.
7:31 am
the met office has issued an amber cold weather alert, which warns of increased health risks to vulnerable and elderly people. and if you are struggling to that cold weather you can take some inspiration from this. nearly a thousand men in belarus ran shirt—less through the streets of the capital in sub—zero temperatures yesterday, as part of the country's ‘day of the defender of the fatherland'. participants in the ‘real man race' can choose between a one athletics federation at the finish line. maybe that should be in the winter
7:32 am
olympics! that tongan athlete is made i that. best ever winter made for that. best ever winter olympics for team gb thanks to that man behind you, billy morgan. he only started snowboarding aged 14. he had a knee injury as well and then took bronze medal. the sports director dan hunt said last march that this would be the start of it. that he would i for skiing what he that he would do for skiing what he did for cycling. and so important to have those recognised names. in terms of funding, more people getting involved. and already a
7:33 am
massive uptake in people contacting ski centres after lizzie yarnold last week. 500 applying. last week we will wear why the uk we will wear wondering why the uk ta kes we will wear wondering why the uk takes part but this will change this. lets then relive, this historic night for great britain at the winter olympics in pyeongchang. billy morgan, winning the medal, that secured great britain their highest medal tally, in winter olympic history. paul frostick was watching. the penultimate day of action in pyeongchang and a chance for the big jumpers to show off their skills. an imposing 49 metre ramp for british hope billy morgan in the big airfinals. complex tricks and a clean landing required to impress the judges. morgan onlyjust qualified for the final. but on his second of three attempts he looked every bit the part. and he holds it up, yes! it was huge! and he put the nose grab on it. the hardest grab. yes, billy! that left one last chance to secure a spot in the medal positions.
7:34 am
billy morgan, yes! yes! billy morgan with the double grab triple 14. that is massive! 85.5. long and nervous wait. canada's max parrot was his biggest threat to walking away with bronze. but on his finaljump it all went wrong. an injury in december nearly ruled him out of these games. but the oldest man in the final helped great britain come home with a fifth medal to ensure their best performance at a winter olympics. iam sure i am sure it will hit me later. if you come in thinking i'm shooting
7:35 am
for a medal, but no. two weeks ago with a knee injury you would never have thought it? i thought i would be thrilled to make the finals. so happy days. congratulations. most of ere—e; 95:5; choose between skiing us choose between skiing and snowboarding but this lady does ester ledecka has become the first athlete in history to win gold medals in two unrelated events at the winter games. the 22—year—old czech, claimed a shock win in the skiing, super g last saturday, and followed that up with victory today in the women's snowboarding parallel giant slalom. great britain's women will battle it out for curling a bronze medal, later today, after being beaten, in their semi—final against sweden yesterday. sweden built a huge lead, at the end of the seventh end, scoring with three stones, as muirhead's effort, failed to find its target. gb reduced that deficit to 8—5, but sweden added two more, in the ninth to secure their place in the final. back to the winter games shortly.
7:36 am
away from the winter games, attention will turn once agin to the six nations and the 3rd round of matches taking place this afternoon. last night france recorded their first win of the tournament last night, beating bottom—of—the—table italy, 34—17. the match was played, in the stade velodrome in marseille — the first time france have hosted a six nations match outside paris. italy started strongly, but eventually fell to the french pressure. this evening, scotland will hope to ruin england's hopes of the grand slam at murrayfield, as the sides compete for the calcutta cup. scotland's last victory in this contest, came in 2008, and they haven't scored a try at home to england, since 2004. but england flanker chris robshaw says they aren't expecting an easy game. complacency is a horrible thing, that journalists put on
7:37 am
complacency is a horrible thing, thatjournalists put on the players, is quite an insult to everyone it is quite an insult to everyone whether the players or the people on the side. as players you are hugely respectful of each other. we know that this is a massive challenge. and we are excited to go there, a great place to go and play rugby. they're one of the best teams in the world, their record is fantastic. they come here as massive favourites in my opinion. so they are a quality side with quality players throughout. it is a big challenge for us. for us to stop them. ireland are still hoping they can do the grand slam and they welcome wales to dublin today. and they're boosted by the news that their talisman johnny sexton is fit to play. he was grand, he's just getting a bit older and needed longer to warm up. he came into the tail end of the session. he was fine and finished
7:38 am
the session. in the championship we had protests with balls being thrown onto the pitch. the home side did go on to win however. with whole moving out of the relegation zone. and finally... if you can't find your snowboard, you could always find a friend! yesterday we had team gb‘s latest olympic medallist, snowboarder billy morgan showing off his scooter skills around the olympic village, and today we've got another boarder who's found an alternative mode of transport! this is norwegian snowboarder stale sandbech riding down the mountain on fellow rider tyler nicholson's back! just as well he did not tried the
7:39 am
big airlike just as well he did not tried the big air like that! that could be a new sport. billy morgan is your great friend. have you heard from not right now he is in all the media. and obviously they take you off for drug testing so you cannot get hold of him. i've - one word answers. of him. i've had one word answers.
7:40 am
what was the one word! just banks. i just wrote a message to congratulate him. you did not tell him that you had missed it! you have competed in the winter olympics yourself and you know with these events the tiniest thing can go wrong and it is a bit ofa thing can go wrong and it is a bit of a lottery. you need to have luck on your site as well as the skill. it is an amazing experience. i think he is now 28. i'm 29. i retired last year. so it is very much a young man's sport. and that is why! so much work in that. he has been working on these for a long time. he pioneered the quad cork, the first time anyone has ever been spinning
7:41 am
for times upside down. thejump here was not enough for him to do that. all the snowboarders - in a so all the snowboarders are in a tight competition because they can only do that triple. so it was harderfor billy to podium. but he has proved himself. a couple of amazing runs and there he is in disbelief. that is what came across in the clip, hejust disbelief. that is what came across in the clip, he just looked stunned int-he clipr hejust looked'stunned have taken a medal. he is so to have taken a medal. he is so critical about his snowboarding. he a lwa ys critical about his snowboarding. he always asks for reassurance, he will never blow his own trumpet. he will not fully understand what he has done. and he had that knee injury as well, still suffering from that. he said he would be just to said he would be surprised just to get into the final. he also had a bad injury in training. he did not look all that good. but he just put a bit of wood between his teeth and
7:42 am
got on with it! and now he will have a bit of a role as cheerleader for the sport. how is he going to encourage other young people to get into this sport? he started in southampton at the dry slopes. i think you have been there yourself. i think it encourages young kids to realise they could be there. was he an acrobat to start with? into gymnastics. and absolutely, into gymnastics. and are so many absolutely, into gymnastics. and are so many pathways for there are so many pathways for now to get into the sport. people now to get into the sport. gymnastics is a very good foundation. not just for snowboarding but for all sports. when - get that strength and when you get that strength and aerial awareness when you're young then you can branch off into all these different sports. snowboarding is well because these different sports. snowboarding is well - because you spend is well suited because you spend of your time upside down. it is most of your time upside down. it is incredible. go along to your local
7:43 am
ski centre. get on your trampoline. but next week we may not - be but next week we may not even be able to go to a dry snow slope! that is not the case this weekend, everything in due course. because this weekend is not too cold. ijust wa nt to this weekend is not too cold. ijust want to give you straightaway the sense of how cold things are this weekend. look at these temperatures. for, five, 7 degrees. plenty of sunshine. and in dublin for the six nations, great conditions there and similar prospect in edinburgh later in the day as - having had in the day as well. having had such a sunny day in many areas underneath
7:44 am
there was clear skies, the temperatures really are going to fall away again. you will have heard a of fall away again. you will have heard a . of chat about it turning cold a lot of chat about it turning cold but this weekend there are some cold nights around. but a lot of sunshine. and if you have a plan for the weekend i think that the weather will help you. but not warm, five, 6 degrees or so on sunday. - it is will help you. but not warm, five, 6 degre we >r so on sunday. - it is will help you. but not warm, five, 6 degre we get) on sunday. - it is will help you. but not warm, five, 6 degre we get to n sunday. - it is will help you. but not warm, five, 6 degre we get to mandate - it is will help you. but not warm, five, 6 degre we get to mandate that it is will help you. but not warm, five, 6 degre we get to mandate that we 5 will help you. but not warm, five, 6 degre we get to mandate that we start when we get to mandate that we start to see the first signs of the snow showers. you just get the sense of it beginning to work in. those are the snow showers heading towards the british isles. initially an issue for the east but everyone seemed temperatures dipping away at this because the wind is picking stage. because the wind is picking up stage. because the wind is picking up and the first shot of that cold aircoming infrom up and the first shot of that cold air coming in from siberia. up and the first shot of that cold air coming infrom siberia. as a consequence, nothing like this at
7:45 am
the weekend. —5, —6 it will feel like as we bring in - cold the weekend. —5, —6 it will feel like as we bring in. cold air like as we bring in that cold air and add on that wind as well. and monday night, tuesday, wednesday, snowboarders will love it. there the snowboarders will love it. there will be significant snowfall as this cold air comes in all the way from siberia right across northern and central parts of europe and into the british isles. if you want the heat you have to go to north africa or the mediterranean you have to go to north africa or the - mediterranean or across the eastern mediterranean or across to the caribbean. and once we do get into next week it will be very much colder. this is where all the headlines will be made. bitterly cold in the wind, significant snow cold in the wind, significantsnew for the high ground in the east and for the high ground in the east initially the snow fall total is beginning to mount up. driving conditions with the frost, ice and snow becoming pretty treacherous. but that is next week. .
7:46 am
for now thank you very much for top we're back with the for top headlines at 0800. now it's time for newswatch. hello and welcome to newswatch with me samira ahmed. focused on badly performing brits? certain newspaperfront pages made a lot of allegations aboutjeremy corbyn and a czech spy. did the bbc make too little? find: as kfc'stores ac‘rossthebflt did bbc news go clucking mad with its coverage? first, for the past week many of our national newspapers have featured headlines such as "corbyn the collaborator" and "corbyn urged to reveal his stasi file." allegations that the labour leader had questionable
7:47 am
contacts with a czech diplomat and agent in the 1980s emerged from files held by the czech security service archive. covering it of lies and smears. but not all newswatch viewers were so dismissive of the claims. this anonymous telephone caller thought they were at least worthy of an airing on the bbc. and the russia investigation ad nauseam for months and months and months on end but there's nothing on bbc news even though it's featured very prominently in the newspapers and i'm a bit staggered and a bit flabbergasted by this. although there were some mentions of the story on bbc news it didn't feature on the main television bulletins until a brief mention on tuesday, and then gained more prominence throughout the week. by wednesday on the daily politics andrew neil tackled the subject to much claim. in what way? well, the defence secretary has chosen his own words. i mean, the point for me
7:48 am
about this debacle is that... has he betrayed his country? jeremy corbyn is a grave danger to this country, i believe, but that's because... has he betrayed his country? would mean for our economy and our society if he were elected. people have all sorts of ideas. but your defence secretary, our defence secretary, the defence secretary of this government, of our government, has said the leader of her majesty's opposition has betrayed his country. in what way has he betrayed his country? although the claims lacked evidence and were firmly denied, some newswatch viewers thought it was too little too late from bbc news. lynette smith asked on monday: why have you not even passed comment? admittedly they are only allegations but you are quick enough to cover showbiz stars when years . were laid at their door. and barbara stevens had the same question. surely this is a matter of public interest. " well, we put that to bbc news and they told us: "bbc news
7:49 am
has covered this story and jeremy corbyn's response in a range of our output. the bbc correspondent in prague interviewed both the director of the czech secret service archive and the former agent who made the original allegations." here a couple of weeks ago by pascal freeman who describes himself as an incredulous licence fee payer. can you please tell me why regional news is not broadcast in high definition in this day and age? my mobile phone can record video in 4k resolution. it seems very antiquated that the bbc cannot afford the technology so that broadcasts are not interrupted with the message bbc one hd cannot yet show programmes from your area. as a middle—aged person i thought test card interruptions we tried to find out an answer for mr freeman and bbc news told us: "upgrading the 15 regional versions of bbc one across england
7:50 am
and the channel islands to full hd is a priority. however, this would cost the equivalent of a third of the annual editorial budget for regional tv bulletins, so we have to balance our plans with the best interests of the licence fee payer." now, the winter olympics come to an end this weekend and for the next four years most of us will probably forget what the difference is between the skeleton and the luge and exactly how russian competitors there are not competing for russia. but for the past fortnight the games have occupied a lot of airtime on bbc one and two, online and also on bbc news with much focused some of which was pretty poor. let's look at examples from the news at ten and breakfast. it's heartbreak for elise christie yet again. after failing to win a'medat' " "”"" " history has repeated itself here in pyeongchang. morning from pendle ski club
7:51 am
in lancashire where we have been up all night cheering on the local hero dave ryding who started on the dry slopes here, and as you can tell they are so proud he came in the top ten in ninth, so well done to dave. clarke goes fourth! yarnold wins gold again! laura deas has won bronze as well! the bbc‘s commentary team seen celebrating lizzy yarnold's skeleton gold, about which more very shortly. but it was the extent of the coverage on bbc news that exercised a number of viewers like tim elliott. "why is the bbc so interested in the winter olympics? of privileged people taking part in sports that have not been heard of in the uk." clive wilce had this to say. "i have enjoyed the winter olympics of coverage that has been given to elise christie's speed skating races. i lost count of the number of times i heard the story
7:52 am
of her disqualification, over and over again." for others, it was not the quantity of the coverage but its focus on british competitors which rankled. coverage of the winter olympics. "i've heard at least one reporter refer to gb as we. in the falklands war the bbc referred to the british." - h- , .a the winter olympics is pretty poor. they are far more interested in the british athletes rather than the world's best." and alan dawson agreed. "the winter olympics just shows british media, the bbc particularly, just cheer leads losers. oh, but isn't he or she brave?" well, let's discuss those issues with stephen mawhinney, the bbc‘s head of sportsjournalism. he joins us from salford. thank you for coming on newswatch. we know that some audiences don't care about sport. samira, perhaps you won't be
7:53 am
surprised to hear me say i don't think so. obviously it was up to every programme editor of each news programme to decide whether they covered the winter olympics and how much they gave to it. but i'm not surprised that many of them chose to give it extensive coverage because there was some spectacular sport, there has been some really compelling human stories, some wider issues at stake as well in terms of some of the politics and diplomacy that was going on around the games. and, of course, we know that there is huge audience interest in this. in fact, on the television coverage alone more than 30 million people have tuned in through the games, that's more than many of the other major sporting events that we cover, for instance, wimbledon or the six nations. so there is no doubt there has been a wide audience interest, although of course i appreciate some viewers and listeners are not going to be as engaged in sporting stories. this story of building up the athletes' journey is another issue more generally that viewers raised. a lot of focus on british competitors who ended up crashing out, like elise christie, wouldn't it have been better sports journalism to focus on the events themselves and the winners?
7:54 am
so, we absolutely did focus on the events and the winners and i can come onto that. butjust to deal with elise christie. hers was an absolutely compelling human drama, there's no question about it. she went into the sochi olympics as the favourite in the short track speed skating and ended up having a really dramatic but disastrous time and she ended up being disqualified, or crashing out of each of those. and then had to deal with a huge amount of abuse including death threats, and thought about walking away from the sport. but she decided to continue, became a multiple world champion, came again into these olympics as the favourite, and yet unbelievably again went through a series in each of her three events where she was either pushed out, disqualified, or injured before her final race where she attempted to compete, fell over again, seemed to have qualified, but then got disqualified again. by any standards, it was an extraordinary human drama and kind of news story around britain's favourite athlete going into the games. we had specific complaints
7:55 am
about seeing the bbc commentary team celebrating british skeleton medal success, also using the word ‘we'. isn't the bbc supposed to be impartial? obviously we do understand the importance of being impartial and across our news coverage you would have seen that. of course, in our live sporting coverage, there is no question these are moments of huge drama, huge passion, many of our pundits are obviously former olympians themselves and they have close closeness to all of the athletes that are out there and their performances, and sport is partly about passion, is partly about that kind of excitement that we get wrapped up in and we want to share that, encompass it and embrace that with our audience. many of our audience really appreciate that from us. it's certainly true to say that with the summer olympics too newswatch viewers have said they feel bbc news coverage of these events is too much about british competitors regardless of outcome, when it should be about the top stories of who won. do you accept that bbc news coverage
7:56 am
needs to be rethought about whether you have got that balance right? as i say, it is absolutely a balance and always done on a case—by—case basis for every single programme, every news programme, and you know, i make no apology for the fact that there has been a focus on team gb. there is no doubt there is huge audience interest for that, all of the evidence suggests that. don't forget that team gb are funded by public money through uk sport, so we literally have a stake in both seeing that as well as holding them to account in terms of their performance. stephen mawhinney, thank you so much. no problem. finally, monday brought the bizarre news that the fast—food outlet kfc, which used to be known as kentucky fried chicken, had run out of chicken. john kay reported on the story for the news at six. 0h! no! when you've been promised kfc as a half—term treat but there is no chicken. the company says it is working flat out to rectify the problem. but for some that is little consolation.
7:57 am
so, was there something of an overreaction, not just from customers, but from the bbc too? a twitter user describing himself as giacomo g casanova, thought so. "let me get this straight, you're endlessly histrionic re uk's child obesity problem, then devote a lengthy slot to a supply issue that shuts kfc stores. who cares? featuring unhappy kids and closing with one wailing as though it were some national tragedy." and that's all from us. thank you for all of your comments this week. if you want to share your opinions on bbc news and current affairs, or even appear on the programme, you can call on 0370 010 6676, or e—mail newswatch@bbc. co. uk. you can find us on twitter @newswatchbbc. do have a look at our website. the address for that is bbc.co.uk/newswatch. that's all from us, i will be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye.
7:58 am
hello, this is breakfast with rachel burden and jon kay. leaping into the record books — medal number five seals team gb‘s most successful winter olympics ever. billy morgan bagged bronze in the big air snowboard event with the jump of his life. i guess if you come into the contest thinking, i am shooting for a medal, you are ready for it, and great britain could win medal number 6 today. the women's curling team play japan for the bronze medal later this morning. good morning, it's saturday the 24th of february. also this morning... taking a stand. big companies cut ties with america's powerful gun lobby
7:59 am
8:00 am
8:01 am
8:02 am

28 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on