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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 24, 2018 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast with rachel burden and jon kay. leaping into the record books — medal number five seals team gb's most successful winter olympics ever. billy morgan bagged bronze in the big air snowboard event with the jump of his life. it was a pretty crazy experience landing like that. ifell on my firstjump and it's best to out of three, is i had to learn —— land the next two. i wasn't expecting it but i managed to land, so yes, over the moon. and great britain could win medal number six today. the women's curling team play japan for the bronze medal later this morning. good morning, it's saturday the 24th of february. also this morning... taking a stand. big companies cut ties with america's powerful gun lobby the national rifle association after last week's mass shooting
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at a florida school. fresh revelations of misconduct by aid workers — uk charity plan international admits to six cases of sexual abuse and exploitation of children by its staff and associates. as we brace ourselves for an arctic blast, we will be getting some top tips on how walkers can stay safe in the snow. and phil has tips for all of us. good morning, a dry, bright, sunny weekend for all of the british isles, a little on the chilly side. it's next week where things get much, much colder and we could see a real return of winter. more details injusta real return of winter. more details injust a few real return of winter. more details in just a few minutes. good morning. first, our main story. team gb is celebrating its best ever winter olympics, after billy morgan won bronze in the men's snowboard big air. the medal is team gb‘s fifth in pyeongchang,
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taking them past the four won in 1924 and 2014. and it's not over yet. there could be more. the women's curling team faces japan in a bronze medal match later this morning. at the age of 28, morgan was the oldest snowboarder competing in the final and fell on his firstjump, but came back with two great runs to finish less than one point from silver. he spoke to breakfast in the last half—hour. he spoke to breakfast in the last half-hour. we are all out here doing oui’ half-hour. we are all out here doing our best, trying to represent our country as best as we can and we have done really well, especially a—fi from a nation which has no coming from a nation which has no snow. we are pushing. boundaries snow. we are pushing the boundaries of what sport can do and the lottery funding that we have got has given us funding that we have got has given usa funding that we have got has given us a lot of opportunities and hopefully we can keep going. let's speak to our sports correspondent david ornstein who is in pyeongchang. it was great to speak
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to billy a few minutes ago at the sensation he got when he landed on his feet and he knew he'd done a good run, when he knew what that meant not just for him good run, when he knew what that meant notjust for him but for the whole team that. that's right, and it was all the more remarkable because he had fallen on all four of his training runs and his first running competition but then when it mattered most, the dujon c needed to score on, he nailed and he got that bronze medal. he came through a field of, on paper anyway, some far superior athletes, but many of them fell and he took that bronze medal. quite some history there as the first british male to ever win a medal in snowboarding and five british medals makes it a record for the team. it makes the doubled investment from sochi for this game
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is very justified, some investment from sochi for this game is veryjustified, some may say that's quite right, others will say it's clearly a good thing. it could get even better with the curling today. a number of us companies have cut ties with the national a boycott of firms linked to the powerful gun lobby. they include the car rental companies hertz and enterprise holdings, both of which have stopped offering discounts for members of the association, in the wake of the florida school shooting. our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. the aftermath to a school shooting that could prompt change in america. amidst the grieving, the mood has been different this time. within hours of the gunman killing 17 people, anger overflowed onto the streets. never again!
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now it is social media where pressure is being exerted on the hugely powerful gun lobby. under the hashtag boycott nra, activists are targeting firms that offer special benefits to members of the national rifle association. and they include some of the most familiar corporate names. the car rental companies hertz and enterprise, which also owns alamo and national. they're ending discounts offered to members of the gun lobby group from next month. met life insurance and the software company symantec are taking similar action. there has been no word in response from the nra. it is unclear whether these actions will hurt an organisation that boasts 5 million members. during the week, its chief executive hit out at the protesters. their goal is to eliminate the second amendment and our firearms freedoms. so they can eradicate all individual freedoms. donald trump says he is open to new ideas but the one he seems to like best is giving guns to teachers. it's concealed. so this crazy man who walked in wouldn't even know
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who it is that has it. that's good. that's not bad, that's good. and a teacher would have shot the hell out of him before he knew what happened. the debate over what to do next will be highly charged and intensely political. one of the uk's biggest children's aid charities has confirmed there have been six cases of child sexual abuse by staff and volunteers in the last two years. plan international says five of them were criminal cases and reported to the local authorities in the countries involved. adina campbell reports. another charity mired in sexual misconduct making the front pages. this time, plan international uk, which works in more than 50 countries to improve children's rights and promote equality for girls. in its latest online blog, it has confirmed six cases of sexual abuse and exploitation of children between july 2016 and june last year. one involved a member of staff.
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the others were by volunteers or associates. plan international says the staff member was not from the uk and was dismissed without a reference. and it ended the contracts with the other volunteers and organisations involved. the charity also says there were nine cases of sexual misconduct and harassment by staff against other adults which led to seven dismissals. in the past, plan international uk has received millions of pounds of funding from the government. it is the latest major charity to admit cases of sexual misconduct and follows investigations into aid organisations including oxfam and save the children. in an open letter, the three charities and many others have now promised a series of urgent and immediate measures to protect the vulnerable. a former senior adviser
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to donald trump has admitted charges of conspiracy and lying to investigators, who are examining russian political interference in the 2016 presidential election. in a plea deal, rick gates admitted conspiracy to defraud the government and making false statements. he's become the third associate of the president to agree to co—operate with a special investigation, in return for more serious charges against him being dropped. before you throw your lottery ticket away, check it, double—check it, triple check it. because someone out there in the uk has won nearly £78 million after last night's euro millions draw. they haven't got in touch with us yet, sadly. i haven't checked my numbers, actually. i need to do that. i might not be here in ten minutes time.
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they need to share the jackpot with somebody in spain but they still get £78 million. the jackpot has been growing since the beginning of the year and was the beginning of the year and was the second visit in the drawer‘s history. although as i was saying to you, i think that money would send you, i think that money would send you doolally. yes, but what a way to go! it is 9:09am and you were watching bbc brea kfast. campaigners in london say the authorities need to take action quickly to prevent knife crime, after two more men were stabbed to death in the capital this week. the figures make grim reading. it brings the total number of people fatally wounded by knives in the captial to 16 so far this year — and knife crime's on the rise across the uk. for knife attacks, seven attacks in one area of london. after years of
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dropping, it is going up across the uk. in the run—up tojanuary dropping, it is going up across the uk. in the run—up to january for the last 12 months, police in london recorded 14,521 knife crime offences, a0 recorded 14,521 knife crime offences, - a0 every recorded 1a,521 knife crime offences, - a0 every single offences, nearly a0 every single day. so far in 2018, 16 people have been stabbed to death in the capital. on tuesday, it was this 17—year—old and this 20—year—old. london needs me alive. london needs me alive. the mayor of london launched a campaign last year to tackle knife crime. my thoughts and prayers are with their families. i'm afraid it's not the first time we have sent condolences to the victims of life crime. my worry is that it won't be the last time either. i have asked the prime minister and the home secretary to meet with the commissioner and myself to discuss a way forward, not to name blame, but
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to see if we can work together to grapple with this issue that is causing huge misery to londoners. yesterday, the head of the met police cressida dick was in glasgow speaking to police that. the knife crime rate that has halved in the last 13 years. could the model work here? some are sceptical. some in london say action needs to be taken 110w. london say action needs to be taken now. we have had knife crime fall before and we need to start taking action quickly to have that happen again. this isn't a quick switch. nobody can flick a switch and it falls straightaway. at the moment, we seem to be out in an impasse and thatis we seem to be out in an impasse and that is most frustrating, particularly when we see so many young people being stabbed and murdered. the race is now want to stop some way —— to find some way to stop some way —— to find some way to stop knife crime before any more life is lost. we are joined
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stop knife crime before any more life is lost. we arejoined now stop knife crime before any more life is lost. we are joined now by a former met police borough,. thank you very much for your time this morning. these are very depressing figures. have you any kind of explanation for yet again this spike in knife crime? i think young people when i speak to them feel frightened. i speak to the parents of young people being murdered. a lot of them are working incredibly ha rd lot of them are working incredibly hard with their young people, with their children, but unfortunately children feel frightened, they are carrying knives to protect themselves and ironically because they are carrying knives, we are losing more young people. we really need to make sure people feel confident. i feel very disappointed that ofsted aren't doing more, because we are talking about young people, teenagers who are victims of crime. what we should be doing is seeing ofsted going to schools, checking to see what schools are doing and actually taking their safeguarding responsibility around knife crime very seriously. ofsted are there to ensure standards of excellence in schools. it's not
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really theirjob to bring down crime of this sort, is it? we need to widen the way we look at this, rachel, because you are absolutely right. the police are the wider agency but we need a wider approach. cressida dick was looking at the public health model in scotland which is about other agencies working with the police, working together, working with schools, hospitals, accident and emergencies, community groups to make sure that we have a much wider approach. sadly, by the time the police get involved, we are looking at young people in body bags so we need to gather much earlier, work with the different agencies, and schools have a huge role to play in making sure that young people understand the dangers of carrying a knife and the repercussions. the met police incredibly successful in arresting, charging and convicting people who commit these crimes, so those people who a commit these crimes, so those people who - a knife to murder someone who use a knife to murder someone are likely themselves to have their lives destroyed because - will be lives destroyed because they will be arrested and go to prison for a very
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long time. it is worth perhapsjust bringing you a little bit about what the home office have said on this matter. they said that every single death from knife crime is a tragedy, they talked about consulting on new laws, banning the sales of offensive weapons in certain ways, but also about a new way of thinking. they say their new serious violence and strategy will have early intervention measures at its heart and will look to shift attitudes and challenge behaviour among those young people who viewed knife crime possession as normal and necessary. this is the kind of culture you are having to deal with him. why is it that you say these young people are frightened? that you say these young people are frightened ? what are that you say these young people are frightened? what are they frightened and who are they frightened of?“ you go onto youtube, you will see a breath of videos of young people with knives, waving them about. the technology companies have a huge role to play to make sure that these aggressive and very dangerous videos are taken off. i spoke to one young
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father. week whose son was father this week whose son was murdered by a group of individuals who his son had never met before. they saw a youtube video, they saw a social media video, travelled across london and murdered a young man. what we need to be doing is making sure that everybody steps up to the mark and it is about cooperation. what disappoints me is that u nfortu nately what disappoints me is that unfortunately this is nothing new in terms of resources. we need to make sure we put resources into this and resources have been cut down. the police have been reduced by 20%. we need to increase the resources the police had to deal with this issue. we talk about the role of police, you have been pointing the finger at schools outside funding is an issue. iifififili egiiifié fiufifilfié lg. éfi. $25.2? about what is going on in the what about what is going on in the home, within families and small home withinfamilies and small ~ , , ~~ ~ ~ . that allows this kind neighbourhoods that allows this kind of behaviour to emerge? well, i think the parents i speak to are very supportive of their children but we live in a world where so much happens on social media and we need
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to be looking at how we can deal with- individuals. with those individuals. families need to take responsibilities, you are right, and they need to talk to their children, and it is predominantly young men. we need to make sure young men understand the consequences of carrying knives. i speak to some parents who say that if they catch their young person, their child with a knife, they will ta ke their child with a knife, they will take it off them, and i think that is what we want to see. we want to see people having those conversations. i am see people having those conversations. iam not see people having those conversations. i am not suggesting that families don't have a huge responsibility, but we need a coordinated system across all the agencies that works to make sure that we reduce this tragedy that is happening across the country. thank you very much for your time. a former met police borough governor. just after 9:15am. thank you for joining us on breakfast this morning. if you are sitting inside thinking it looks nice and funny at the moment, apparently it is not going to stay that way, so if you don't like the cold watch the first
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pa rt don't like the cold watch the first part of this weather broadcast and the back end of it, hey, phil? well, thank you to joining the back end of it, hey, phil? well, thank you tojoining my —— building my audience there, john! i will plough on regardless. our weather watchers are not being deterred, they are a hardy crew. this was the scene in the bingley area. at this stage, the high pressure i have been showing you is benign. there is nothing wrong with the weather this weekend. there is a lot of dry weather out there. considering we could have atlantic i’u ns considering we could have atlantic runs piling in at this stage of the year giving us wet, miserable affair, it is not like that today. there are some grey skies, - even there are some grey skies, but even those areas - are cloudy, it those areas which are cloudy, it will pop away and - of you will will pop away and many of you will see sunshine, i think perhaps tempered in northern ireland. temperatures, six, seven, - 8 temperatures, six, seven, maybe 8 degrees. all the sporting fixtures this afternoon shouldn't have too many problems. a feast of running
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by many problems. a feast of running rugby in dublin and the calcutta cup match scotland take on england. that isa match scotland take on england. that is a full a0 5pm kick off with coverage on the bbc. —— for a0 5pm kick—off. it is going to be another chilly night under clear skies. see what a difference it makes. minus four degrees in norwich. and we are off and running into another super day again. ok, we have a shield of cloud tempering the sunshine but a lot of dry weather. not too much of wind at this stage, but it is beginning to look a bit like winter. three, four, five as our maximum and who we go on monday. you have heard all about the beast from the east. this is the first sign of it with a cold that surging in from siberia into the eastern side of the british isles particularly, that is where we see the threat of the snow showers, thatis see the threat of the snow showers, that is your thermometer and this is
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what it is going to feel like with the strength of the wind. it won't be feeling like that this weekend but it will from monday onwards because we are tapping into that great reservoir of dark blue dragging its way towards the british isles. monday night, tuesday, wednesday, snow showers that not long bars of snow, so the north york moors could the significant snowfall, as could other areas. enjoy the weekend. thank you, philip, we are warned. and we are watching, we didn't switch off. it is time to look at the saturday morning papers. and we are delighted to say former raf group captain vicki gosling is here. she has been flicking through the papers and we will speak to her injusta the papers and we will speak to her injust a moment. let's look at the front pages.
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the daily telegraph leads with the story about the latest charity to be involved in the aid sex abuse scandal. the guardian says almost two—thirds of audited meat plants are in breach of safety rules in england, wales and northern ireland. the mirror have a smiling face of maxjohnson, the little boy who had a heart transplant and he has basically become the poster boy of a campaign to try to encourage organ donation. it looks now like there will be legislation passed in parliament which would enable that, some sort of opt out system for england, being nicknamed max's law. his smile there says it all. the sun has lifted a piece from stephen fry's own personal online message that he sent out to his fans in which he spoke about his prostate cancer and the fact that an aggressive tumour was only found because he went in for his flu jab and his doctor suggested he had a
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kind of because he went in for his flu jab and his doctor suggested he had a other —— suggested he had a kind of all over checkup at the same time and he is urging other men to do the same. and the daily express lead with a story about the cold weather on its way. now, stories picked out by you, vicky. this is a chap talking about his eighth probe into an incident that happened 15 years ago. for me, he served for 21 years and it must be devastating, the fact he has felt that he has to give those medals back. when you join the military, you enter into a psychological contract. it becomes your family, you are very much living and breathing your military lifestyle and the fact he served for 21 years and the fact he served for 21 years and have had this hanging over him for 15 of those must be so tough. it
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saysin for 15 of those must be so tough. it says in here that he is broken and i have to say that that, i can sense that, because he hasjoined for a reason, he has committed everything to this and for 15 years, having that hanging over your head must be pretty tough. and yet others would say these have to be —— these things have to be investigated fully, whatever he has caused. yes, and i see that as well, but is putting myself into his shoes, i figured very tragic that he has clearly owns those medals and yet he has that he have to give them back. it will be interesting to see what the enquiry find out. stephen fry them, on the sun and the mirror, he has put himself out there about his prostate cancer and the fa ct about his prostate cancer and the fact it was picked up on a routine check out. i picked up on this because having someone like stephen
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fry, a national treasure, raising it, you think twice when you see this. you think it is so worth getting those checks. it is difficult in the winter because clearly the surgeries are mobbed, but it is coming to spring, coming to that time, and it's probably a good time to get yourself checked. maybe think twice about it. i think when you are a0 you are entitled to a kind of mot at your local gp surgery a kind of mot at your local gp surgery and it's always worth making the time for something like that. yes, iam the time for something like that. yes, i am definitely overdue that one. we have reported before that men are particularly bad for going to the doctor and following up symptoms, just putting it to one side. a powerful message. now, we love this story. this is about a big, 21—month—old, that effectively that the paintbrush in its mouth and moves it said side to
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side and creates these paintings. they are selling for £1700 and they have already sold, i think it said four of them. itjust have already sold, i think it said four of them. it just tickled have already sold, i think it said four of them. itjust tickled me really when i saw it. they are very intelligent creatures, pigs. intelligent, but artistic? well, he has a vision, surely. didn't the gallery some years ago put up pictures by chimpanzees and all the art historians and experts didn't realise they were by chimpanzees. yes, it says it in here, and about an elephant called ruby. it shows that animals can be artistic. i might get my dog onto it. we are celebrating the winter olympics this morning and britain's record—breaking success and in all the talk about today, this is lovely, isn't it? i love this story because it is about a former welsh guard. were you in the worst guards?
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no, iwas guard. were you in the worst guards? no, i was in the raf but its military synergy. i love that he was the british two—man bobsled crowned the british two—man bobsled champion in 1962 and then last year he hurtled down the hill in austria, he hurtled down the hill in austria, he ran down a full—size lead at 75 mph at the age of 8a. it shows the military grid in him. he clearly thinks he's never going to give up, is the? i think it might have an implication, we will probably see some of these fantastic athletes retiring at a later age now. we have been talking about billy morgan this morning, our hero of the hour, he is 28. he is 28 and when we said to him is it time to hang up the board, he said, no, he would still be snowboarding at 70 and beyond. fantastic. well done to bruce. he
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has probably been up all night watching the winter olympics thinking, maybe next time. vicki, thank you so much for this morning. lovely to meet you. thank you. you too. we are here until ten o'clock until saturday kitchen takes over. good morning, everyone. ourspecial guest this morning is to mccall. you have to face your food heaven or food hell at the end of the show. what if your heaven? lamb, i love lamb. particularly with sweet potato. any ideas? moroccan spices. slow cooked. yum. and my help, and this really is hell and i will really struggle if i get this, it is liver and anchovies. lots of liver and anchovies and
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aubergine as well, another one of your health. that one is not so bad. we will put extra liver on there again. we have two great chefs here with us and what have you got kicking? -- cooking? we are going to do dumplings with springtime onions and a sheep smoked cheese, heralding the spring, hopefully. sounds good to me. and robin gill, what are you making? i am doing a play on bacon and cabbage, but smoked eel, a bacon after the, and —— and cabbage, but smoked eel, a bacon afterthe, and —— a bacon of and cabbage, but smoked eel, a bacon after the, and —— a bacon of the sea, and an egg because it is breakfast. i love all the accents. ollie, what have you got to go with the wind? a very dull accent. i have got some great wines though.
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fantastic and you guys at home are in charge of divina's food heaven or food hell. it is well worth switching over to bbc two. not yet! i loved the face their when she had eel was on the menu. coming up in the next half an hour, withjust eel was on the menu. coming up in the next half an hour, with just one tweet, reality tv star kylie jenner white billion pounds of the value of snapchat. we will be discussing social media. shall we have a photo? see you in a minute. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and rachel burden. coming up before ten we'll get the weatherfrom philip — a week of very cold temperatures are on the way. but first a summary of this morning's main news.
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team gb is celebrating its best ever winter olympics, after billy morgan won bronze in the men's snowboard big air. the medal is team gb's fifth in pyeongchang, taking them past the four won in 192a and 201a. the women's curling team faces japan in a bronze medal match later this morning. at the age of 28, morgan was the oldest snowboarder competing in the final, and fell on his firstjump, but came back with two good runs to finish less than one point from silver. two people have been charged with causing death by dangerous driving after a crash which killed two young brothers last week. robert brown was
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gwendolen harrison will 53 and gwendolen harrison will appear before magistrates in coventry later this morning. a number of us companies have cut ties with the national rifle association — as consumers call for a boycott of firms linked to the powerful gun lobby. they include the car rental companies hertz and enterprise holdings, both of which have stopped offering discounts for members of the association. of the florida school shooting. one of the uk's biggest children's aid charities has confirmed there have been six cases of child sexual abuse plan international says five of them were criminal cases and reported to the local authorities in the countries involved. the charity works in more than 50 countries to improve children's rights and promote equality for girls. a vote at the united nations calling for a humanitarian ceasefire in syria has been postponed until later today. there's been deadlock since thursday because of objections from russia. syrian government forces have continued their bombardment of eastern ghouta, a rebel—held
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enclave outside damascus, where nearly 500 people have been killed in the past week. a former senior adviser to donald trump has admitted charges of conspiracy and lying to investigators, who are examining russian political interference in the 2016 presidential election. in a plea deal, rick gates admitted conspiracy to defraud the government and making false statements. he's become the third associate of the president to agree to co—operate with a special investigation, in return for more serious charges against him being dropped. britain is set for the coldest february week in five years as freezing air arrives from russia. the coldzsnap will affect.the whole night with temperatures expected to drop to minus—eight in some areas. the met office has issued
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an amber cold weather alert, which warns of increased health risks to vulnerable and elderly people. quite impressive, because out on the road this morning - are trying to road this morning they are trying to get ahead of the game. we can get some advice. what a night it has been the great britain, with billy morgan in the big air, how will it inspire kids l525. 5'.5 1555.5 5.55! e '.5,5;=555 45155555555 55 5 55 5 55 l525 5'.5 ll5,5.5 5.5ii 'l 'l5.lli555 lilil555555 55 5 55 5 55 from gymnastics l'l l'l5 ll5.5 5.5ii 'l 'lllill ililil555555 55 5 55 5 55 from gymnastics into going from gymnastics into snowboarding, potentially? it is, excuse the pun, a snowball effect. all the funding means that more
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people get involved, more funding, more medals, and so dan hunt, the performance director, he did say that he is hoping to do to skiing what he did to cycling, saying this is just the what he did to cycling, saying this isjust the beginning. so what he did to cycling, saying this is just the beginning. so exciting times ahead because of the medals in pyeongchang. let's relive the night that one billy morgan and great britain their highest medal tally in history. let's then re—live this historic night for great britain at the winter olympics in pyeongchang. billy morgan, winning the medal that secured great britain their highest medal tally in winter olympic history. paul frostick was watching. the penultimate day of action in pyeongchang and a chance for the big jumpers to show off their skills. an imposing a9 metre ramp for british hope billy morgan in the big airfinals. complex tricks and a clean landing required to impress the judges. morgan onlyjust qualified for the final. but on his second of three attempts he looked every bit the part. and he holds it up, yes! it was huge! and he put the nose grab on it.
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the hardest grab. yes, billy! that left one last chance to secure a spot in the medal positions. billy morgan, yes! yes! billy morgan with the double grab triple 1a. that is massive! that is absolutely huge. 85.5. billy morgan moves into bronze medal position and it is a very long and nervous wait. canada's max parrot was his biggest threat to walking away with bronze. but on his finaljump it all went wrong. an injury in december nearly ruled him out of these games. but the oldest man in the final helped great britain come home with a fifth medal to ensure their best performance at a winter olympics. iam sure i am sure it will hit me later, i never expected it. if you come in
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shooting for a medal i am sure you're ready for it. but i did not. would you have thought that two weeks ago with your knee injury? no, isaid in weeks ago with your knee injury? no, i said in interviews i be stoked to get into the finals. an amazing story. and a couple of british bobsleigh sleds were also ‘campaigns ataround ‘ campaigns at around the same their campaigns at around the same time. the four—man team struggling a little bit and down in 19th place at the halfway stage. the final couple of runs the halfway stage. the final couple of ru ns ta ke the halfway stage. the final couple of runs take place tomorrow. now most of us chose between skiing or snow boarding but ester ledecka, does both and has become the first athlete in history to win gold medals in two unrelated events at the winter games. the 22—year—old czech claimed a shock win in the skiing, super g last saturday, and followed that up with victory and today the women battle it out
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for a bronze in the curling later today after being beaten by sweden yesterday in the semifinal. great britain reduced the deficit but sweden as at a couple more to secure their place in the final so great britain play japan at around 11 o'clock on bbc one this morning. a chance fori model number six. and chance for a model number six. and later on as well. away from the winter olympics, it's a huge day of six nations rugby, with scotland hoping to end england's grand slam ambitions. our man olly foster is at murrayfield. and olly, you have to go back a decade for the last time scotland last beat the auld enemy? incredible. but what a rivalry this is, you never quite rule out any kind of result in this fixture. one
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of the great debates, what is the greatest rivalry in rugby, australia against new zealand. when it comes to the northern hemisphere, scotland against england and especially here at murrayfield. it is right up there. well this is the tone of where they will be leading their men out. england for the last eight times ina out. england for the last eight times in a row have lifted that famous trophy, the famous calcutta cup. and scotland humiliated somewhat last year and that is still smarting as england put 60 points on them down at twickenham. england obviously going for a hat—trick of six nations titles. theyjust missed out on the grand slam last year in scotla nd out on the grand slam last year in scotland have had a so—so start to the championship, guilty they say of believing their own hype because they got thumped by wales, they got that good win against the french but they will be going all out to upset england and are unbeaten run here. a
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little bit of mind games as ever, eddiejones has little bit of mind games as ever, eddie jones has been little bit of mind games as ever, eddiejones has been building up the scottish fly—half finn russell who has not had a great championship for them but eddie jones has not had a great championship for them but eddiejones has been saying we need to watch out for him, they will be targeting the scotland fly—half. and gregor townsend had a chat but the referee nigel owens and he said you need to watch out for the english defence because they are surely offside all the time. they did give up a lot of penalties against the welsh. so it will be a lot of needle as there usually is, it will be intense and expect some big hits early on. well two men who will be out there on the field this afternoon spoke to us.|j will be out there on the field this afternoon spoke to us. i think this complacency thing is a horrible thing thatjournalists complacency thing is a horrible thing that journalists or cultures throughout the players. it is quite an insult to everyone whether it is the players or the people you think are on the side which is not as good, as players you're usually respectful of each other. we know this is a massive challenge for us.
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and we are excited to go there, a great place to go and play rugby. they're one of the best teams in the world, their record is fantastic. they come here as massive favourites. in my opinion. so they area favourites. in my opinion. so they are a quality side with quality players throughout. british lines throughout. a big challenge for us. a massive game and ireland and wales fa ns a massive game and ireland and wales fans shouting at tv sets right now shouting, we have the biggest rivalry! that is in dublin today. that will be fantastic because we have got this all hum nation ‘s double—header. ireland is the only other team in the championship who are unbeaten, they had a fabulous win against the french. they played the italians and they beat them as most teams do. now on the home run, ireland have a tough home run because they have got all the home nations. they will be hoping they go
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into the final match with england at twickenham and that could be a decider. but not to get ahead of ourselves. ireland have some big injury worries. they're missing ty furlong, robbie henshaw, the players coming in to replace them, only 11 caps between them and wales have got some big players back in position. dan bigger back in the team, leigh halfpenny. and liam williams. so you just sense that the welsh, the balance might be tipping towards them. that could be so tight at the aviva stadium in dublin. of course avivastadiurii5iri5dlliblir5i.5 of ceilllse six avivastadiorii5i'ri5oliblir5i. of ceilllse six nations, the third round the six nations, the third round already under way, but great result last night by the french will top they got their first win of the championship beating italy 3a haddin 17. this was played down in marseille. bastareaud back after his van. he was instrumental as they overpowered the italians. italians
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still looking odds—on for the wooden spoon at the end of the championship. the french have a win on the board but it is all about who comes out on top in all the home nations this afternoon. ireland against wales first in dublin and then here who is going to be lifting then here who is going to be lifting the calcutta cup. really too close to call, amazing. one other story end hull city, their match with sheffield united were suspended last night because of a protest by the home fans against the club ownership. suspended for two and a half minutes. items thrown on the pitch by some of the fans midway through the first tower. but the whole —— hull city did go on to win in fact whole —— hull city did go on to win infactand whole —— hull city did go on to win in fact and they now moved out of the relegation zone in the championship. so a huge day of sport already ahead. from the big air in pyeongchang to the rugby. amazing. really close to call, scotland had
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not scored a try at home against england since 200a. not scored a try at home against england since zooai not scored a try at home against england since 2004. i guarantee that england since zooll= change england since 2ooll= change today. i will be will change today. i will be watching. i do not remember a saturday morning sports bulletin with one of football story - at with one of football story right at the end. so much other stuff going in. and of course the league cup tomorrow. i have hardly mentioned that. thank you. with forecasts suggesting next week could be the coldest sure they have the right skills and equipment before heading for the hills. there were a record number of mountain rescue call—outs in the lake district last year, and with more snow likely, experts say winter skills training could be life—saving. peter marshall has been to find out more. a day on the winter fells can begin with sheer beauty. and in moments, it can turn brutal. wind howls. that is why this group has taken to the slopes of helvellyn in one
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of the coldest weeks of the year. the idea of today is to learn the basic snow craft that will help keep us alive in bad weather conditions. and i think i'm in pretty good hands. the leader of the expedition today has reached the summit of everest. so helvellyn should be something of a walk in the park. typically the wind will come in, it will be scouring the snow off the side. mountaineer zach poulton has also led expeditions in antarctica and greenland. he is a fell top assessor for the national park. every day from december to april, he scales helvellyn to provide weather updates and safety advice for walkers. as the snow gets deeper, it's time to attach crampons — spiked boot attachments. i always challenge people, can you stop, take your bag off, get your crampons out, get them on and walk away in two minutes? and it's worth thinking about, can you do it in the worst—case scenario?
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and that is 100 mph winds buffeting you, knocking you over. well, i'm trying out my crampons. i have to say, it took me more than two minutes to get them on. we've got an expert here. i said earlier on that helvellyn should be a walk in the park. well, i think i was wrong. last year saw the highest number of mountain rescue incidents on record in the lake district. 5a3 in total. 17 people died. over 300 needed medical attention. in these conditions, ice axe skills can save lives. and you're pushing with that shoulder and you are really kind of levering it in. to either slow you down and carve your way down or to stop you dead. the risk is on the spectrum from very safe to very unsafe. as long as people are making conscious decisions about the kit they are taking, the route they're taking and the risks
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they are exposing themselves to, then i don't have any issue with it. i think the problem comes where people are not aware of the risk and they're making unconscious decisions and putting themselves at risk, and then putting other people at risk in terms of solving that problem. eventually, we make it. the 950 metre high summit of helvellyn. that last ascent was pretty exciting. was intimidating earlier on. but with the right instructors and the right equipment, it was all right. just gradually step—by—step we made it. you can feel that in your fingers just watching that! there will be more on that story on monday evening on bbc inside out in the north west at half past 7, and on the bbc iplayer. and we are being warned it is going to get very cold over the next few days. i said
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to get very cold over the next few days. isaid it to get very cold over the next few days. i said it was time to get a cardigan but you said no cardigan allowed! i do not care, i'm getting it. well fashion tips from me, that bea be a short book. you just go would be a short book. you just go with it, you will be needing a few layers. we will have to wait for the really cold air until next week. our weather watchers have been outdone about gathering the scene. we have high pressure pulling in that cold airdown high pressure pulling in that cold air down from siberia, through northern europe and eventually over to the british isles. but this weekend it is quite a benign feature. keeping the atlantic weather fronts at bay. and a lot of fine weather around. not quite wall—to—wall sunshine but a lot of decent sunny weather out there. around four, 6 degrees out there. so whatever your plans may focus
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around, perhaps a couple of six nations fixtures this afternoon, looking quite pleasant. certainly the weather not getting away but overnight underneath relatively clear skies you can see what a difference that makes. —a in norwich. and again a decent sunny day, the cloud on the eastern shores. not too much in the - of a shores. not too much in the way of a breeze but just shores. not too much in the way of a breeze butjust beginning to see temperatures tumbling. the change is coming as early as monday where we begin to see the wind picking up and wintry showers look begin to see the wind picking up and wintry showers - look at wintry showers flowing. look at those temperatures and adding in the wind factor, feeling like —6, minus
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seven. that is how cold it is going to feel. and really ramping up night into tuesday, monday night into tuesday, wednesday. do keep up—to—date with the four test if you have travel plans. because by that stage some areas will be looking at significant amounts of snow. back to you. we are ready for you! we decided to prep early. early for next week. i'm feeling overdressed for what! you better have this forecast right! thank you very much indeed. it's the time of year when snowdrops are appearing in our gardens, a welcome sign that, believe it or not, spring is on its way. but did you know that
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the current world record for the sale of a snowdrop bulb is £1a00? breakfast‘s graham satchell has been to meet a couple of experts to find out if you could have a goldmine in your garden....and he stumbled upon a new obsession. they are a cheery little flower, something which sort of helps remind you that spring is just round the corner. michael myers suffers from a little—known condition. gala nthamania. it has quite particular symptoms. i often refer to a thing called dirty knees syndrome. and that involves people getting down on their knees and looking at the minute details of snowdrops. galanthamania derives from tulip mania, which took place in holland in the 1630s. where tulips would exchange prices for the equivalent of the price of a house, maybe even more.
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and thankfully at the moment gala nthamania has not quite got that silly. franklin gardens, a national trust property in perth. head gardenerjimjermyn is a fellow sufferer. a true galanthaphile. once you have started down the road of collecting snowdrops, it becomes totally infectious. it becomes must have. you just desire to have something better and better each time. what am i looking out for? samethingthat—stands so you have hundreds of snowdrops that look very similar and then suddenly your eye can pick out one with a broad leaf or larger flower. good markings. if you find something more different, and you are excited about it, you need to seek out the owner of the land and ask if you might be able to collect a small part of the bulb from the clump. snowdrops are a magical burst
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of life in the depths of winter. and very common. surprising then that there might be a gold mine on your doorstep. you may be lucky enough to find a new variety in your own garden. the current world record for a single snowdrop isjust under £1a00. and i would not be surprised to see a new snowdrop go for £2000 in the nearfuture. so get your knees muddy, look out for unusual green and yellow markings. there will definitely be a galanthaphile or two who will want to know. i had my aunt staying with me this week and she asked today but —— to
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dig up some snowdrops, i did not realise that they were a gold mine! sometimes you see something and you wa nt to sometimes you see something and you want to post something on social media. do you go facebook, snapchat, so media. do you go facebook, snapchat, so many different options. in just one damning tweet this week, reality tv star kyliejenner wiped a billion pounds off the value of snapchat, saying she no longer used the image sharing service. snapchat has recently undergone a redesign and it's facing intense competition from instagram — which is owned by facebook — for celebrity users. so what does this say about the popularity of social media and the way we use it? it's a question we've been putting to some college students. snapchat is just for messaging friends. instagram is for keeping up
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with people, watching feed and everything. making sure i'm up to date with everything. everything. making sure i'm up to date with everythinglj everything. making sure i'm up to date with everything. i feel facebook is the first one that exploded and everyone used it at one point. so your grandma and your cousins. i was on it for a month and then just gave up convicted. because my mum wanted to add me so i was like, maybe not. this is a picture of and if itjust like, maybe not. this is a picture of and if it just explains just what you want to say, whereas with words you want to say, whereas with words you do not always get it right. you want to say, whereas with words you do not always get it rightlj you want to say, whereas with words you do not always get it right. i do not like the new update on snapchat, it is so bad. you do not know where to find certain things. it is not so flue nt to find certain things. it is not so fluent to use any more. to find certain things. it is not so fluent to use any morelj to find certain things. it is not so fluent to use any more. i do not like the new update, it is confusing. i stopped using snapchat ages ago. it isjust complicated, i
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do not like it. for me it is not a popularity thing, it is more what is populazitythingr it ismore what is for me to use. populazitythingr it ismore what is ‘for me to use. just to show easier for me to use. just to show my friends cool pictures, i'm not really bothered if they like it or not. i suppose it is trying to please your friends. it is changing all the time. let's discuss this with social media strategistjemima gibbons, and entertainment reporter lucy ford. good morning. i'm reminded of a judge who once asked who are the beatles. but what is snapchat? snapchat is an app you can use on your phone to share video, messages, your phone to share video, messages, you can put up funny photos. like those ones with the rabbit ears. exactly, they have a load of filters, it is good fun to use and really popular with teenagers. snapchat lost a lot of value just
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with one tweet from kyliejenner but as a company they have in fact never beenin as a company they have in fact never been in profit. why is that, part of this is they are trying to monetise it more effectively and that is why they did that redesign. it more effectively and that is why they did that redesignlj it more effectively and that is why they did that redesign. i think social media companies are trying ha rd to social media companies are trying hard to figure out how to monetise things and it does not always work. almost it is playing catch up trying to monetise videos where they have not done it before. maybe seeing value in it where they did not before. and copycats as well, taking the best bit years from each other. —— best idea. but if there room for all these different apps? well it is like a full—timejobjust all these different apps? well it is like a full—time job just keeping up all your profile. and increasingly we just live in all your profile. and increasingly wejust live in a all your profile. and increasingly we just live in a world where a lot of teenagers and even professional people are online the whole time.
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that is just the reality of the world now. you need to learn to manage it. the changing nature of celebrity is interesting. for my children you tube stardom would be the gold standard of celebrity rather than film or music. definitely, some of the people who are most famous to teenagers probably would not be household names. logan paul came through re ce ntly names. logan paul came through recently because of the controversy but he has been one of the biggest you tube stars of all time. and then also 1015 years ago, traditional celebrities like actors, they could make a couple of bad films and their career make a couple of bad films and their career would be over. but. if have a good social media they have a good social media presence they can stay relevant. and kyliejenner presence they can stay relevant. and kylie jenner criticising snapchat was critical because she owes a lot of her celebrity to her snapchat profile. it is a kind of symbiotic relationship, they both need each
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other. and after that - she other. and after that tweet she immediately said, i love you, snapchat. do not abandon me yet! i wonder if someone got in touch. is there a point at which we would reach peak usage estimates we know that people are beginning to digitally detox a little bit.|j think people now i say ijust need to have a week away from iphone, that would be people my age and your age. i think young people do it as well. there is more awareness. recently there was a piece about mental health and people said they just had to go away from snapchat because of the attention. thank you so because of the attention. thank you so much for talking about that and explaining. that is all from us. stay with us here on bbc one. this is bbc news. the headlines at
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10am. great britain celebrates its most successful winter olympics ever mostsuccessfu‘rwinteretympicrever billy morgan bags a big air as billy morgan bags a big air bronze in the men's snowboarding. it's just wild. i bronze in the men's snowboarding. it'sjust wild. i had such bronze in the men's snowboarding. it's just wild. i had such a bronze in the men's snowboarding. it'sjust wild. i had such a bad training and! it'sjust wild. i had such a bad training and i fell on that first jump training and i fell on that first jump and! training and i fell on that first jump and i thought it was game over. i went into the next two thinking, i hope i don't follow the three times and everyone will be devastated. big companies cut ties with america's powerful gun lobby the national rifle association after last week's mass shooting at a florida school. one of the uk's biggest aid charities plan international reveals six cases of sexual abuse and exploitation of children by its staff and associates.
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