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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  March 6, 2018 5:00pm-6:00pm GMT

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today at 5: counter—terror officers are now leading the investigation into the suspected poisoning of a former russian spy in wiltshire. sergei skripal and his daughter, yulia, were found slumped on a bench in salisbury on sunday, prompting a major emergency response in the immediate area. our focus has been ourfocus has been tried our focus has been tried to establish what has caused these people to become critically ill and whether or not criminal activity has taken place. the prime minister has been briefed at a meeting of the national security council, and foreign secretary borisjohnson had a warning for russia. should evidence emerge that implies state responsibility, then her majesty's government will respond appropriately and robustly. we'll be live in salisbury and westminster with the very latest. the other main stories on bbc news at 5: donald trump says the world is watching and waiting after hearing north korean leader kim jong—un will discuss giving
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up his nuclear weapons when he meets his south korean counterpart next month. it's time for britain to go on a diet — the message from public health england, which tells manufacturers, supermarkets and takeaways to cut calories and portion sizes. it's five o'clock. our top story: counter—terrorism police have taken over the inquiry into the suspected poisoning of a former russian spy and his daughter in wiltshire. 66—year—old sergei skripal and his daughter, yulia, who's 33, were found unconscious on a bench in the centre of salisbury two days ago. they're both critically ill in hospital. police say they're keeping an open mind. the ministry of defence laboratories at porton down have confirmed
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they‘ re providing support. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has said britain will respond robustly if it's found that the russian state was involved. richard lister reports. two figures, believed to be sergei skripal and his daughter, yulia, caught on cctv on sunday. within hours, they'd be fighting for their lives, poisoned by an unknown substance. there was a man slumped over on the bench, being sick. i was told that there was a woman on the floor, but i couldn't see because there was paramedics around. but the man he saw has a complex past, mr skripal is a russian convicted of spying for the west before coming to the uk. two figures, believed to be sergei skripal and his daughter, but the man he saw has a complex past, mr skripal is a russian
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convicted of spying for the west before coming to the uk. wiltshire police are still examining the area outside a shopping centre where he and his daughter were found unconscious but counter terror officers are now leading this investigation. due to the unusual circumstances, the counter—terrorism network will be leading this investigation as it has the specialist capability and expertise to do so. it is important to reiterate, they have not declared this as a terrorist incident. as at this stage, they are keeping an open mind as to what has happened. the ministry of defence laboratory has confirmed it's received samples of the substance thought to have been involved in this incident. it has the facilities to test highly toxic compounds. with a mystery poisonious substance involved, tracing the pair's movements is a priority. after taping off the area around the maltings shopping centre, where they were found, police then secured the zizzi restaurant as a precaution. today, they said the bishops mill pub in the centre of salisbury had also been sealed off. sergei and yulia skripal are still in a critical condition at salisbury hospital. it was also confirmed today that some emergency services personnel
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at the scene on sunday were also taken to hospital for assessment. all but one has since been released and the authorities believe there's no wider threat. but parallels with the 2006 poisoning of alexander litvinenko are hard to ignore — a russian dissident, he was poisoned by a radioactive compound. an inquiry said he was probably murdered by the kremlin. the russian embassy today complained of "speculative stories" which it said were "demonising russia." but the government has now put moscow on notice. while it would be wrong to prejudge the investigation, i can reassure the house that should evidence emerge that implies state responsibility, then her majesty's government will respond appropriately and robustly. the first pictures have now emerged at 33—year—old yulia skripal, who was visiting her father from russia when they fell ill. they may be able to shed some light on what happened to them on sunday,
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but they remain gravely ill. well, the kremlin says it is willing to co—operate in the police investigation but says russia has "no information" on what could have caused the incident. richard galpin takes a look at what motives there might have been. sergei skripal and daughter yulia, now fighting for their lives, are not the only russians in britain who may have been targeted for assassination by moscow. it was proved the former spy, alexander litvinenko, was poisoned by radioactive polonium in london 12 years ago. and an inquest is continuing into the mysterious death in surrey of this whistle—blower, alexander perepilichny. this is the moment in 2004 when sergei skripal was arrested in russia for betraying his country. he was a military intelligence officer who'd been secretly supplying mi6 with information and was convicted for high treason. but after several years in prison,
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he was pardoned and was able to fly to britain as part of a spy swap. but that was never a guarantee he would be safe here. the fact that he was a british spy, a former member of the russian military, in the minds of most russians, they would categorise him as a traitor. so, yes, there would be, and there are, people there who would be delighted to see him dead. from the kremlin today, a guarded response. it's said what had happened was a tragedy and it was open to co—operating with british authorities. but for many russians living here in the uk, who oppose the kremlin, it's been clearfor a long time that they are vulnerable and they want greater protection. we need to be sure that people receiving political asylum here are completely safe, and the state, that provided this asylum, needs to be more serious, particularly now, after what happened to this sergei.
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meanwhile, back in moscow, vladimir putin is almost guaranteed to win yet another term in office in the presidential election later this month. the british inquiry into the death of alexander litvinenko concluded that mr putin probably ordered the assassination, something which the kremlin denies. the question now is whether there has been another killing in this country ordered by the russian state. let's cross over tojeremy cook in devizes in wiltshire, where police held a news conference earlier. police say they are keeping an open mind on this. are there any toxicology reports? wiltshire police
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have effectively handed this investigation over to the counterintelligence unit at the metropolitan police which suggests they are thinking this may lead in that direction, but at the same time they are stressing they have not established any crime committed, certainly not an act of terrorism. but toxicology is crucial to this. how did these two individuals become so sick so quickly? that is the main focus of attention. at the moment, we can confirm government laboratories, not so far away, are analysing samples. if they come back positive for a toxic substance, i think that will lead the investigation in the direction from here on in. police say that some
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members of the emergency services have been treated and looked at as a result of responding to this incident, but police are now convinced there is no wider problem with the general public. we understand that three police officers have been treated. 0ne understand that three police officers have been treated. one of them this afternoon remained in hospital but was not said to be in a serious condition. very much stressed here today that there is not a risk to public health. that was one of the main messages that the temporary chief constable here was giving on the steps a short time ago. having said that, this is a very difficult incident in this community. the police and crime commissioner talked about a shocking incident in this quiet and peaceful cathedral city of salisbury, and clearly, the main response police todayis clearly, the main response police today is to reach out to people and tell them that there is nothing to
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worry about, there are no further implications for the public other than a shocking incident on the doorsteps. reassurances, many thanks. let's cross over to salisbury and speak to 0lga ivshina from the bbc‘s russian service. you've been talking to members of mr skripal‘s family in russia, what have they been telling you? we managed to speak to them. they told us that sergei skripal was called backin us that sergei skripal was called back in two weeks ago. he spoke to his mother and promised to call soon. he sounded optimistic but on the other hand, he believed that russian security services may come after him at any time. we also must add that the skripal family condemns any accusations of his connections to mi6. they say he was the biggest
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traitor of russia they have ever known. the sale of the last few years, sergei has lost a few family members, the burst his wife died, then his elder brother and then his son, who was just 43, and then his elder brother and then his son, who wasjust 43, and both sergei and his daughter are in hospital in a critical condition and the family believe this is more than a coincidence. the kremlin has made it clear they were not involved and wa nt to it clear they were not involved and want to help in the investigation, but they have no knowledge of exactly what happened. what is your view of the russian response? the russian ministry of foreign affairs said that british comments were preposterous. they say that the british media is exaggerating the case. but even back in russia, it seems that there is not that much doubt about what might have happened here, even though no one is
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conducting a properly. we should not be quick tojump to conducting a properly. we should not be quick to jump to conclusions, but it seems this exchange of top words between diplomats on both sides will not actually lead to any results. many thanks for that. to get the political reaction to this, let's speak to our chief political correspondent, vicki young. we know that the prime minister has been briefed in a meeting of the national security council, boris johnson has been on his feet this afternoon, making it clear that there could be serious ramifications it is proved that there was the fa i rest it is proved that there was the fairest intent from the kremlin. senior figures, fairest intent from the kremlin. seniorfigures, including boris johnson, saying they do not want to jump johnson, saying they do not want to jump to conclusions, there is no evidence as yet that moscow is behind this alleged attack, and yet the foreign secretary met house of commons really being pretty clear, saying there are echoes of what happened to alexander litvinenko
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here and also talking about the response that might be if it is proven that russia is behind all this. the prime minister wasjoined today by seniorfigures this. the prime minister wasjoined today by senior figures in this. the prime minister wasjoined today by seniorfigures in downing street including the defence secretary as the national security council met were briefed on the cabinet room about what has been going on. that is not a normal reaction to an event like this. the official spokesman was asked what the seniorfigures were official spokesman was asked what the senior figures were talking about, why they had to be briefed, and he said this has been described as an unusual event. in the house of commons, boris johnson coming as an unusual event. in the house of commons, borisjohnson coming under a lot of pressure from all sides to say whether the steps taken in the past by the uk have been enough, whether sanctions have been enough. he was adamant and said the uk wants to call rush out on various issues of imposing sanctions and he suggested that britain finds itself the target of this kind of thing, if proven, because we are the country
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thatis proven, because we are the country that is prepared to stand up. he was also asked about whether any more could be done and he raised the prospect of some kind of demonstration or protest around the world cup due to take place of course in russia this summer. world cup due to take place of course in russia this summerlj think we will have to have a serious conversation about our engagement with russia and, for my own part, it would be very difficult to see how... heading into the world cup thisjuly, this how... heading into the world cup this july, this summer, how... heading into the world cup thisjuly, this summer, it would be very difficult to imagine that uk representation at that event could go ahead in the normal way. we will certainly have to consider that. afterwards, officials who worked for borisjohnson afterwards, officials who worked for boris johnson clarified afterwards, officials who worked for borisjohnson clarified he did not mean the england football team potentially boycotting the world cup, he was talking much more about the attendance of ministers, officials, ambassadors, the kind of thing that has happened in the past because they do not want to be seen
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to be welcoming president putin on any kind of world stage. that was interesting that others have referred to the relations with the uk and russia as a soft war, talking about cyber attacks, interference in democratic processes, and others in the house of commons today had even harsher words. personally, i believe, that this period we are passing through now is as dangerous as the 1930s, and russia as the new germany with a leader who is also very unpredictable and determined to ta ke very unpredictable and determined to take on america and the world. boris johnson said there were other countries that might be prepared to turn a blind eye to this kind of thing, the president putin's actions, and said that britain was not a country willing to do that. 0ther mps raising their own suspicions about other cases of russian citizens who have died here in britain, deaths that have been put down to natural causes or even
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suicide. m93 2 today look fixi’ look fiji’ at thank you for nothing so far has been proved as regards moscow's possible involvement in the case of mr skripal and his daughter's incapacity, but it must be hard for you seen this case, bearing in mind what happened to your husband? yes. a very good evening. it is very hard because everything was very hard. it
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was just to prove our case. it has never happened again on british soil. but yesterday, i was in shock because all the images i saw, it was so similarto because all the images i saw, it was so similar to what i saw 11 years ago. do you firmly believe that, in this latest incident, the kremlin and the russian security services are involved, are responsible for what has happened? are involved, are responsible for what has happened ?|j are involved, are responsible for what has happened? i think it is too early to say. what we tried to do to prove a ny early to say. what we tried to do to prove any detail, any evidence, it was a very strong prove any detail, any evidence, it was a very strong case, and prove any detail, any evidence, it was a very strong case, and only afterwards the case was brought to court, people only then started to
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believe me. these people took my husband. i do not like to point to russia so quickly. we had a similar case to sergei and his daughter. but it is very important that there is full evidence and facts, particularly now in the early stages during the investigation. it is very important to have a full statement from police to understand what actually happened. do you believe there is enough protection for defectors and for those who have left russia are living the united kingdom? you're absolutely right. we do not only have defectors in england who asked for political
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asylu m england who asked for political asylum or refugee status, we have people who are politically very active and the need to leave it because their life is in. danger. it , to because their life is in. denser. it , to if because their life is in. a'ahaer. it , is to to if ceuhtru is able te braviae that , taunt"; is able ta braviaa that , again, what taunt"; is able ta braviaa that , again, - what happened security. again afterwha; igggggggg my husband, and after a full to my husband, and after a full investigation, i believe it has never happened again. and i hope it is another lesson, it is a very difficult lesson, but the british government will understand, they need to do something, very seriously, to protect people. and what about the timing of all this? if it is proved to be at the hand of the kremlin, two weeks before the presidential election russia? the kremlin, two weeks before the presidential election russia ?m the kremlin, two weeks before the presidential election russia? it is a big question. nobody likes this kind of attention before elections in russia. but this kind of case, if
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it is proved, there is no logic. if this guy was punished for what he did and was a traitor, it does not matter about timing. it is just an order, and people ‘and to kill him. timing is not a tried to kill him. timing is not a logical way for now. the man accused of being responsible for your husband's death, he is back in russia. there is probably next to no chance of him being extradited to face charges in relation to your husband's death and it is highly likely that if it is proved the kremlin is behind what has happened, no one will be brought to justice. exactly. the first time he was named
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asa exactly. the first time he was named as a prime suspect, they never extradited people from russia. they said they needed a document. we will try to investigate ourselves. it is exactly the same, people from russia trying to say it now, we are going to help, cooperate. it is quite similarto to help, cooperate. it is quite similar to the case with my husband. but if somebody would be named, we believe there will never get extradited from russia. we would leave it there, marina litvinenko, thank you very much forjoining us. annie machon is a former mi5 intelligence 0fficer, and we can speak to her now from our studios in brussels. the speculation is that the cracknell and had a hand in this, but they actually handed him over,
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mr skripal, to the united kingdom or transferred him in a spy swap some yea rs transferred him in a spy swap some years ago. why transferring and potentially get involved in an assassination attempt? but is a very good question. i am in agreement with mrs litvinenko that we need to wait to see what evidence comes out of this, the substance used in everything, in terms of the police investigation, before we start casting aspersions against kremlin, russian or putin. we need to be circumspect on this point particularly in our diplomatic relationships between britain and russia. we need to wait to see what the substances. i would also agree with her, there is a duty of care for people who have worked as mi6 agents who then come to the uk and continue to be under the aegis of mi6. we saw this in the case of our
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husband, who was consulted the mi6 once he lived in the uk, and also with the current man who was actually convicted of treachery in russia and sentenced to long term in prison, and then released by russia, pardoned and come to come to the uk, but because of his service to mi6, mi6 had a duty of care to him which has not worked out too well. so you are saying that this duty of care that mi6 should have, they are not fulfilling it? it appears to have happened in both of these cases, yes, and that might explain why they have been so many high—level political meetings today particularly involving the foreign secretary, who is the political head of mi6. but notjust these two cases. a recent investigation suggested there are 14 suspicious deaths of russian nationals in the uk that have not been explained fully so have been put down the suicide but some believe those deaths may have been the hands of
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russian security services.|j deaths may have been the hands of russian security services. i am well aware. i had been following these cases for many years. but is that down to the russians? it has not been proven by the police. some of it has been claimed to be suicide, but does that imply police bungling or no evidence of russian involvement? at the moment there is such a feeble environment, to blame everything on russia because of the hacking of american elections, it is very easy to point fingers too soon, but that's very dangerous in terms of our diplomatic relationships. we do need to be circumspect, take a step back, not rush to accuse one country or another, and let's see with the evidence takes us. there was one article in the times today which seem to point to the fact that skripal might have been a potential source of the christopher steel dirty dossier on donald trump. that
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is interesting. we can only speculate on that. but the suggestion might be that you are a former mi5 intelligence officer, do we have british spies running around russia? well, i would hope they do have! i have been out of mi5 for a long time now, but that is how it has always been. it used to be a gentleman's game where you infiltrate everyone's countries. this is all countries do. it is naive to say that russia is the only country that does bad things, america has an assassination programme with the drone strikes across the middle east and central asia, our country has been involved in dirty tricks, so have israelis. this goes on. every country does this. so to single out one country for something particular is naive diplomatically. but you are not suggesting we bump off spies in
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russia? i am suggesting there had been well documented issues of dirty tricks carried out by british spies in the past. we will leave it there. thank you forjoining us. the leaders of north and south korea have agreed to meet on the heavily—armed border between the two countries next month in the first such summit for more than a decade. president trump tweeted that, for the first time in many years, a serious effort was being made by all concerned and that it may be a "false hope", but the united states was ready to "go hard" in either direction. 0ur correspondent, barbara plett—usher, has been following developments from washington. this is has been following developments from washington. this is all has been following developments from washington. this is all getting has been following developments from washington. this is all getting interesting, has been following developments from washington. isn't this is all getting interesting, has been following developments from washington. isn't it? this is all getting interesting, has been following developments from washington. isn't it? now this is all getting interesting, has been following developments from washington. isn't it? now the this is all getting interesting, has been following developments from washington. isn't it? now the this is all getting interesting, has been following developments from washington. isn't it? now the this is all getting interesting, has been following developments from washington. isn't it? now there is the suggestion that kim jong byrne is believed to be willing to give up its nuclear arsenal in return for security guarantees and many are
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excited by the prospect. the south koreans are excited by the prospect because they have been very worried about tensions on the peninsula and whether it would lead to war, given the rhetoric coming from washington. anything to diffuse tensions right now would be a big relief to them. there is interest in washington and these latest developments which is that the south koreans have said pyongyang is willing to meet us conditions for talks and those conditions for talks and those conditions are that it is willing to discuss at least given up nuclear weapons and that it would in the meantime freeze its nuclear and missile tests, and these are some of the things the americans have been talking about. so on the face of it, it looks like a ground could be prepared. north korea has not confirmed any of this, so intelligence and political communities are waiting to see about that. we saw president trump's tweet, possible progress here, some
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encouraging signs, but a lot of scepticism, especially from intelligence chiefs. they said they are deeply sceptical, this may be a breakthrough but i doubt it, this is the show me moment, we want to see what north korea is really up to, and there is a history here in the us going into talks with north korea, making concessions and the north korea backtracking are not meeting its commitments and quietly building it weapon capabilities, so that history is very much in mind and americans are wary. having said that, if what is reported is true, there may be grounds for exploratory talks. but any future longer term security guarantees that north koreans would want would include us troops out of south korea, us troops possibly moving out of japan, and end tojoint military possibly moving out of japan, and end to joint military exercises. the chances of all that happening are
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pretty much zero. yes, i think you are right there. the demands that north korea would make... according to south korea, they want security guarantees and an end to military threats and north korea says joint military exercises, american troops on the peninsula at a military threat, so that would be a hard sell for the americans. possibly for the south koreans as well. this formula, denuclearisation in exchange for security guarantees, this would be the first time kim jong and has tripped about if confirmed, this has been used as a basis for talks before, and the former president bill clinton gave them to the north koreans in writing, and that was not enough. so again, a question mark over how much can actually be done constructively on such a formula, but as i said, it is an opening at least an quite a different tone from the one we have seen in recent
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months. a little chink of light. thank you in washington. time for a look at the weather now. in scotland we have seen further snowfall today, quite heavy in places especially across the highlands and the grampians. this is where we have that smell at the moment. now clearing away from parts of the grampians and turning back to rain further south. snow in the north of scotland is easing and we have some missed and fog patches possible. the return of the frost is the story into tomorrow morning. but wednesday should be dry and bright for the majority. there will be some
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showers in the west and for scotland and northern ireland some sleet and snow over the hills. south—east england and east anglia could stay cloudy for much of the day. another mild day in store with any sunshine. this is bbc news — the headlines. counter—terror officers are now leading the investigation into the suspected poisoning of a former russian spy in wiltshire. foreign secretary borisjohnson says any evidence of russian involvement will be met with a robust response. donald trump says the world is watching and waiting, after reports that north korea is willing to discuss giving
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2 look at the e look at the sports news. russia remains suspended from international athletics, and the sport's governing body says it could permanently exclude the country if key doping reforms aren't met soon. the iaaf first banned russia in november 2015 over evidence of state—sponsored doping. iaaf chairman lord coe meanwhile insists he didn't feirateéqfissefiié 555: a a w ,. , tells me we're in much better shape
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than we were two years ago. it's for others to judge what we've done, but it's not what i say, i think it's what we've actually achieved as a sport. so, no, our sport is not in tatters, it is extremely strong. we want exactly what that group of members of parliament want, which is the eradication of drugs in sport and a road map to that. i think we have provided a road map, not just at a national level, but i think it's become a template. there's two big games in the champions league this evening. in paris, psg take on holders real madrid, looking to overturn a 3—1 defecit. meanwhile, liverpool manager jurgen klopp says he will only make two or three changes to his side despite their 5—nil advantage against porto. no side has ever come from five goals down to progress in the competition. you do not rotate to avoid
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something. you only use the players which are in the best shape. and if it isa which are in the best shape. and if it is a different line—up to saturday i do not know. but if so only because we want to win the game and no other reason. that is what i meant when i said we would not rest players. we will maybe make two or three changes also but only to win the game. serena williams is to return to competitive tennis for the first time since having herfirst competitive tennis for the first time since having her first child. she warmed up at the competition in new york. she beat marion bartoli in the comeback tour. she was trying to keep expectations to a minimum. yeah, it's been hard. there's been so many days, even still, that i'm like,
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how am i going to keep going, you know? and it's been really, really difficult. but i keep going, and i know that i might not be at my best yet, but i'm getting there. and every day is a new day, and every day, i should be getting better. and so as long as i'm moving forward — even if it's at a turtle's pace — i'm ok with that. the england captain dylan hartley is a doubt for the must—win six nations match against france next saturday. he has been struggling with muscle tightness in a leg and will be assessed daily. england wingerjack nowell is definitely out of the rest of the tournament with an ankle problem. he's been used as a replacement so far but scored against italy on the opening weekend and also featured against wales and scotland. flanker sam underhill has a toe problem and will miss the france match. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. let's return to top story and the
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suspected poisoning of a former russian spy and his daughter in wiltshire. one of the suspects in the poisoning of former kgb agent alexander litvinenko in london, has accused british media of unfairly pointing the finger at moscow. russian politician andrei lugovoi has been speaking to the bbc, and says the uk isjumping to conclusions. it is not a russian problem. it is the uk and the us. it is not about russia. britain gives shelter to people and then you get problems because russians are hiding behind this so—called reddish one of justice. they are always having problems. these people are problems by themselves, usually criminals or people who betrayed their motherland orare people who betrayed their motherland or are working against it. so of
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course they would create problems. and look at the history of relations with pertinent russia over the past 200 years. every time something happens which written always blames russia. first stalinist russia now communist russia and now modern russia. that is the cane dashed the kind of thing that britain plays. we also have such habits and anything happened we point the finger at america and usually by the way, we are right. yuri felshtinsky co—authored the book ‘blowing up russia' with alexander litvinenko — who died in london in 2006 after drinking tea containing a radioactive substance. we can speak to yuri from our studio in paris. do you believe what we are seeing now in the uk, in wiltshire, bears the hallmarks of a hit by the kremlin? i think we need to spend
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some time with this story to understand what exactly happened what kind of poison was used. we need to look for that information. but i think right now we have indications that it was done by the kgb. because there is a damage control operation. so i think the more we will learn about the story the more facts will emerge about russian involvement. the line is particularly bad but we willjust about get what you're saying. you seem to be suggesting that perhaps moscow is involved. if so what is
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there to be gained from all the bad publicity just two weeks there to be gained from all the bad publicityjust two weeks before the presidential elections? the elections by itself, they have nothing to do with this. but you see the story of the exchange of sergei skripalfor the story of the exchange of sergei skripal for ten the story of the exchange of sergei skripalfor ten russian the story of the exchange of sergei skripal for ten russian spies was the first time when a russian citizen was exchanged for russian spies caught abroad. so this was new. what is also new is u nfortu nately new. what is also new is unfortunately that his daughter was also harmed during this attempt. this has never happened before. and now maybe it is an indication to former defectors who have moved
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abroad that they're going to punish not just them but their children abroad that they're going to punish notjust them but their children as well. this is actually a very new and troubling development. well. this is actually a very new and troubling developmentm well. this is actually a very new and troubling development. if that is the case it would be new and troubling. but to be clear, the spy swa p troubling. but to be clear, the spy swap in 2010, that is the first time that a person deemed to be a traitor in moscow was allowed to leave the country in a swap? that is true and i think this happened because of that time moscow wanted to get back those ten russian spies arrested in the united states. they wanted to get them back to russia. and since they did not have any foreign spies they did not have any foreign spies they had no choice but to use sergei
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skripalfor they had no choice but to use sergei skripal for this exchange. they lova bly skripal for this exchange. they lovably did it understanding that they were making a major mistake. — probably. when a russian citizen is exchanged. and this is dangerous, they probably knew this was a mistake because they are inviting other russians to spy against their motherland. so from day one they knew when opportunity presents itself they would punish him. thank you very much. we will leave it there. apologies for the flight difficulty we had understanding a bit about what he was saying. dashed slight difficulty. scotla nd
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scotland yard has are looking to find the boys of a woman stabbed in twickenham yesterday. the bodies of a man and two children were found at east one seafront in east sussex. 0ur correspondent gave us this update earlier. patient enquiries were made about the family of the woman. the husband and two sons. meanwhile an hour before this sussex police had been called by a member of the public to the discovery of the body of a man and two boys in eastbourne and they then contacted the much appalled at police about the discovery and that
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is when the link was made. while there is no formal identification as yet, police believe they are the immediate family of the deceased woman. a postmortem is due on all four bodies. at this early stage police say they are not looking for anyone else in connection with what has happened here but they are treating what happened to the women asa treating what happened to the women as a murder investigation and asking anyone who has any information to come forward. we understand next of kin have been informed but we still do not know the names of those who have died. a lorry driver has been found guilty of causing the deaths of eight people by dangerous driving ina of eight people by dangerous driving in a crash on the m1 near milton keynes last summer. ryszard masierak parked his lorry in lane one of the motorway for 12 minutes and was also found guilty of four counts of causing serious injury by dangerous driving in the collision near milton keynes. the 21—month—old alfie
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evans, his parents have been refused permission to seek further treatment. the parents had wanted to ta ke treatment. the parents had wanted to take their son to a hospital abroad. homes across the uk are continuing to face water supply problems. 1000 people in wales are still without water while some household in south—east england are being urged to use as little as possible. water supplies say that there have been breast water mains. the industry regulator says water firms have fallen short. britain is suffering an obesity epidemic, and the country needs to go on a diet. that's the message from public health england, which has told food companies they must cut the calories in their products within six years. our health correspondent adina campbell reports. they are firm family favourites but too many processed foods and grab—and—go meals do not
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do our waistlines any favours. it is a personal choice if they want to buy it. it's up to them, they choose what to buy off the menu. i am very lazy. personally, i would not sit there and look at the calories and think, this has 200, i'll eat them. when you are really hungry, you do not focus on what you are taking in. especially if you have a lot of fast food restaurants near where you work. now supermarkets, food manufacturers and fast food restaurants are being urged to shoulder some of the responsibility by reducing calories by 20% over the next six years. public health england says this can be achieved in three ways. changing the recipes, using better quality products, smaller portion sizes, which would help control how much we eat, or steering us to buy lower calorie products, making better informed decisions. we all need to be part of this journey because it is affecting us now and if we think we have free choice in our supermarkets,
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in our fast food restaurants, we probably don't. we are being guided towards the choices we currently make by those businesses. quite simply, as a nation, we are getting fatter and the sheer volume of high—calorie foods available to us is not helping. notjust bad for our health, bad for the nhs and taxpayers. to help us make healthier choices, you could soon be seeing more of these posters — a rough guide advising us to eat 400 calories at breakfast, another 600 for lunch and dinner. but campaigners say the advice goes too far. it is far too low, people will look at that and see how much a roll in terms of calories is and they will say, no, we can't handle that, we need to eat more. it is estimated some children are consuming up to 500 calories more than needed every day. and around a third leave primary
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school overweight or obese. if the food industry fails to take action, they could face tougher consequences by the government. adina campbell, bbc news. this is bbc news at five — the headlines. counter—terror officers are now leading the investigation into the suspected poisoning of a former russian spy in wiltshire. donald trump says the world is watching and waiting, after reports that north korea is willing to discuss giving up its nuclear weapons, in return for security guarantees. and it's time for britain to go on a diet. public health england says producers supermarkets and takeaways must cut calories and portion sizes, to fight obesity. an update on the market numbers for you — here's how london and frankfurt ended the day. and in the united states this is how the dow and the nasdaq are getting on. some breaking news following the
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events in wiltshire and suspected poisoning of a former russian spy and his daughter. the russian embassy here in the uk have been responding to a statement made by borisjohnson in the comments regarding all this. laced with irony, so bear with me. russian embassy is saying we are impressed by the statement of the foreign secretary in parliament today, the foreign secretary spoke in such a manner as if the investigation was already over and russia were found responsible for what had happened in salisbury. we regret that instead of a proper official clarification on theissue a proper official clarification on the issue the foreign secretary chose to threaten russia with retribution. it is not the script of yet another anti—russian campaign has already been written. the criminal already made it clear it is willing to cooperate in the
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investigation into what has happened in salisbury. that's the kremlin. they made it clear also they have nothing to do with the actual suggested attack on these two people, the former russian spy and his daughter. we know investigators at porton down laboratory are looking into what might have been used to incapacitate these people, the suspected poisoning and the toxicology report on that will be key as to whether or not this continues as a criminal investigation or indeed whether or not as boris johnson suggested investigation or indeed whether or not as borisjohnson suggested there may be a robust response from the british government. but the russian embassy in london making it clear as far as they're concerned they're not impressed with the comments made by borisjohnson impressed with the comments made by boris johnson today impressed with the comments made by borisjohnson today in the commons and if moscow is behind what happened in salisbury there will be a robust response, that is what he said. now the russian military in
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syria is offered rebels safe passage after the besieged enclave of eastern ghouta. more than 780 civilians — including 170 children — are believed to have died there since the syrian government started its latest offensive over two weeks ago. yolande knell has been to a refugee camp in lebanon, where families are waiting for news. this refugee camp is deeply affected by syria's latest deadly battles. every family here comes from besieged eastern ghouta. relatives back home are constantly on their minds. translation: they cannot move because of the attacks, they are terrified. they spend day and night in basements. this is a disaster. i call on the world to save our children. hussaima lost two brothers, onejust days ago.
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people come and give their condolences and i am burning inside as i mention my brother, she says. her husband is devastated by what he sees. this was yesterday in ghouta. translation: the news is terrible, air strikes, bombings, rockets, massive destruction of houses and people being killed. it is protest songs, not cartoons, that the children in the camp watch online. how is the camp? many refugees have spent five difficult years here. it is a long time to be living in a tent with poor sewage and little water, she tells me. now these syrians are pessimistic about their future and what is
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happening in eastern ghouta. translation: every minute is a minute of pain for us, we cry over every new loss. we just hope this war and the bombing will soon be over. but there is no sign of that and for now, for these children of eastern ghouta, this camp will have to remain home. yolande knell, bbc news, in lebanon. the former bbc breakfast presenter bill turnbull has revealed that he's suffering from prostate cancer. the 62—year—old broadcaster says he was diagnosed at the end of last year and that he wants to encourage men to get tested. 0ur medical correspondent, fergus walsh, reports. there were some moments that i had forgotten about entirely. bill turnbull on his last day on bbc breakfast in 2016 after presenting the programme for 15 years. the star of many shows,
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among them strictly, he tweeted the news he was diagnosed with prostate and bone cancer last november. he added, i am in good spirits and i hope to be around for some time yet. i will place that there. that's very sweet. the diagnosis came when he was recording a special celebrity bake 0ff for stand up to cancer which begins tonight. in an interview, he said, i was getting pains in my legs and my hips particularly, and i thought, this is old age. eventually, they got so bad i thought i'd better go and see my gp. he said, i will give you a blood test. the next morning, the doctor said it is fairly clear you have advanced prostate cancer. in an interview in the radio times, he urges men not to ignore symptoms that might indicate prostate cancer which will affect one in eight men. the key symptoms are any very rapid changes to how often you go to the toilet to urinate,
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any pain when you do or pain generally in the pelvic area, though symptoms might not be cancer, they probably are not, but they would potentially suggest there is an issue and men should go to their gp if they have any symptoms. bill says he's still working and does not want to be defined by his illness. he adds, although cancer will shorten his life, his consultant's ambition is he will see another 18 years. and we wish him all the best. now time for a look at the weather forecast. it feels like ring has arrived across southern areas as that for continues. this was a shot in carmarthenshire on the beach. but
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winter is still with us in parts of scotland with snow in parts of aberdeenshire in particular. mainly confined now to the north grampians and the highlands. there is rain around the coast which all fizzles out through the night. more clear skies around during the night. but with dry conditions for many. a greater chance of some frost tomorrow morning. so a cold start, it should be dry and bright for many. in east anglia, there could be some shower was around through the day some of those heavy. some showers into the west with some hail to with devon and cornwall. sleep and hill snow for parts of northern ireland and western scotland. — sleet. the area of low pressure is
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still with us into thursday, some showers around the coasts. we are just watching this weather system to the south of us. at the moment it looks as if it will affect the channel islands but there is a chance that it could move into southern counties of england bringing potentially some wet weather. some showers around and still some snow over the hills, tem ptress still some snow over the hills, temptress holding around six, 10 degrees. into friday some snow and longer showers across the north and scotland. after a bright start in the south, the cloud increases bringing outbreaks of rain, potentially heavy. also some mild air moving north into the weekend. still that cold air in place as we start the weekend. so the rain pushing north on saturday which could turn to snow in some places. by
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could turn to snow in some places. by sunday just could turn to snow in some places. by sundayjust one to showers and some sunshine for many. details the way you live available on the bbc website. the bbc news at six is next. poisoning of a former russian spy and his daughter in salisbury. sergei skripal and his 33—year—old daughter yulia both collapsed suddenly in the city centre on sunday afternoon. it's believed the two were captured on cctv shortly before being found on a bench nearby. her eyes were just completely white, wide—open, butjust white, and frothing at the mouth. and then the man went stiff, his arms stopped moving. but he was still looking dead straight. a restaurant and a pub remain cordoned off tonight as the foreign secretary warns there'll be consequences if russia's found to be involved. should evidence emerge that implies state responsibility, then her majesty's government will respond appropriately and robustly. we'll have the latest on the investigation.
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