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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 7, 2018 6:00am-8:30am GMT

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hello — this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. an emergency meeting of the government's cobra committee into the suspected poisoning of a russia spy and his daughter. the pair remain critically ill in hospital — counter—terrorism police have now ta ken over the investigation. good morning — it's wednesday 7 march. also this morning: lunch with the queen and talks with the prime minister — saudi's crown prince arrives in britain amid protests about his human rights record a crackdown on ticket resale websites — the advertising watchdog says firms must be upfront about the real costs of going to a concert. european leaders are meeting today to discuss donald trump and his trade war tweets — i'll explain what it means for us later.
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in sport, liverpool are the first british team through to the last eight of the champions league. they'll be joined by holders real madrid, who beat paris saint germain 5—2 aggregate. and carol has the weather. today's the day of sunshine and showers. some the showers will be heavy and across northern and western scotland, also wintry for a time but a lot of dry weather however this time tomorrow morning we could see some more snow across parts of wales, the midlands and lincolnshire. good morning. first, our main story. the home secretary will chair a emergency meeting of the government's cobra committee this morning to discuss the suspected poisoning of a former russian agent and his daughter. sergei and yulia skripal are still in a critical condition after being found unconscious on sunday in salisbury. russia has denied any wrongdoing, but the foreign secretary boris johnson has warned of ‘robust‘ action should the kremlin be found to be involved.
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tom burridge reports. uncomfortable questions linger here in wiltshire where a former russian agent and his daughter were struck down on sunday afternoon. yulia skripal lives in russia and was visiting her father, sergei, in salisbury. this cctv footage shows them just half an hour before locals alerted the police that they were unconscious on a park bench. sergei skripal was an officer in russian military intelligence but in 2004 he was arrested and later convicted for working for mi6. in 2010, he was handed over to britain as part of a spy swap. the russian government said suggestions it was involved are completely untrue but the murder in london in 2006 of former russian spy
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alexander litvinenko means suspicion is almost inevitable and the ramifications for russian—uk relations are huge. should evidence emerge of state responsibility than her majesty ‘s government will respond appropriately and prop the cash robust leap. and implications are huge. if russia is behind it, it means they are taking thimgs to a whole new level. this is in fact a kind of declaration of war. experts at this military research centre have been trying to work out whether toxic substances were used to try to kill a former russian agent and his daughter, who are now in hospital fighting to stay alive. we'll be getting the very latest with our correspondents in moscow and at the scene in salisbury later in the programme. the chancellor phillip hammond will today outline his vision of an eu free trade deal for the financial services sector after brexit, despite a difference of opinion with european negotiators. mr hammond is expected to use his speech in london to focus on an agreement which he says
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will be of mutual interest to both parties. we can speak now to our political correspondent jonathan blake who joins us live from westminster. how much do you know about what is in the speech on how significant is it? it is significant because if you consider your bank, your insurance company, your accountant if you have one, the financial services sector in the uk is huge, employing about 2 million people and is worth £125 billion to the uk economy. no surprise that ministers are trying to protect it and make sure those companies can continue to do business freely across the uk after brexit and they don't leave, taking jobs and business. the question is, financial services be included in a free—trade agreement struck with the eu after brexit? the chancellor says yes and it makes sense for the eu
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and the uk. but the eu's chief negotiator says it can't be done, it doesn't exist but the chancellor pointed out in response that the eu itself has tried to include financial services in a free—trade agreement before with the us and canada city aspiration is there on oui’ canada city aspiration is there on our part. saudi arabia's crown prince, mohammed bin salman, is beginning a three—day visit to britain. he'll have lunch with the queen and hold talks with the prime minister. the government regards saudi arabia as an important strategic ally but protest marches are planned by campaign groups angered by the war in yemen, where the kingdom is fighting rebels. here's our security correspondent frank gardner: embarking on his first foreign trip since becoming crown prince, saudi arabia's mohammed bin salman is a man ina arabia's mohammed bin salman is a man in a hurry. after stopping over in egypt this week, he is coming to
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britain to promote his is an —— vision of a new, tolerance saudi arabia. he has lifted the ban on women climbing from june. a new mega— city will be built. he also imprisoned without trial hundreds of wealthy saudis in this regard hotel, accusing them of corruption, something that is worrying foreign investors. defence and security contracts dominate ties with britain. the uk supplies the saudi air force with warplanes and munitions. in neighbouring yemen, saudi led airstrikes on uranium backed houthi rebels are being blamed the mounting casualties prompting calls by some to break off relations with saudi. a protest is scheduled for later today outside downing street but oil—rich saudi arabia is britain's biggest arab trading partner. thousands ofjobs depend on it. in a post— brexit world britain is looking to boost alliances like this one while saudi arabia is looking for foreign
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investment to find jobs for its erbil lovingly young population. when crown prince muhamed meets leaders in london, his message will be saudi arabia is open to business but this relationship will lossless bea but this relationship will lossless be a controversial one. the top economic adviser to the white house, gary cohn, has announced his resignation — after failing to persuade president trump not to impose significant tariffs on imports of steel and aluminium. art mr cohn was regarded by many business leaders as a moderating influence in the administration.he's the latest in a long line of people who've left the white house. he has tremendous energy, tremendous spirit. it is a great place to be working. many, many people want every singlejob. i'm reading that people may be don't want to work the trump but believe me, everybody wa nts to trump but believe me, everybody wants to work in the white house. they all want a piece of that 0val office, they all want a piece of that oval office, they all want a piece of the west wing. sorry, i think that was
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possibly my fault for speaking too much. action‘s being ta ken against so—called "secondary ticketing" companies over what's being described as "misleading pricing information" on their websites. the advertising standards authority says the firms — which re—sell tickets to sold—out shows — have to be more upfront with customers about hidden fees. our business and consumer correspondent nina warhurst reports: i was born in crossfire tara cheyne. the rolling stones are coming to town and i am keen to being there. this secondary ticketing sites viagogo is selling a ticket for £141 but when i go to pay, this happens. £47 vat and booking fees are a ticket that we thought was costing —— costing us £141 is now almost 200 quid. these nasty surprises are common. claire used viagogo to vie
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for ed sheeran tickets she thought was costing less than £300 but that was costing less than £300 but that was for one ticket and other fees we re was for one ticket and other fees were added, more than £1400 e.|j rang my daughter crying and i said, i thought i had done something. the awful feeling is that i felt i had done something wrong and then i realised i hadn't actually, that the sole practice was very deceptive. we contacted viagogo for a response but didn't get a reply. claire did get her money back and from today, new guidelines could see secondary sellers prosecuted if they mislead consumers. we are saying that they got to be much more clear and upfront about the prices that we are painting when we buy tickets through their sites and in a nutshell, we are saying the price that we see when we first input how many tickets we wa nt when we first input how many tickets we want should be the price we pay at the end. if you already forked out these to see mick and again, you
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can appeal them and next time thereunto, the ticket price you see should be what you get. do send us your thoughts on that as well. if you paid more than your port. people get caught in a spiral, they wa nt to people get caught in a spiral, they want to see the artist they love and spend vast amounts of money and regretted but it seems there is no other way around it. a spanish tourist has died and another is critically ill in hospital after a suspected carbon monoxide leak in a west london hotel. 29 people were moved out of the mayflower hotel in kensington after emergency services were called on monday afternoon. scotland yard said initial carbon monoxide tests showed high readings. a bbc investigation has found more than 1,500 ambulances were deployed to just five people last year. the figures show one patient in london dialled for an ambulance more than 3,500 times over 12 months.
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the nhs say frequent callers are not "time wasters", but people with a genuine need, although they are costing the health service millions of pounds each year. it does impact on our ability as a service. to give a context, we do around 540,000 calls per year and about 10% of those calls are frequent callers that it has an impact because it means sometimes we do need to send an ambulance to these people because there is a concern about the information they are giving and the ambulance response vehicle is being deployed to the patient to win was a frequent caller, it means a resource might not be available for a potential cardiac arrest. craft brewing company brewdog is being criticised after unveiling a new drink, in pink packaging, which they're calling a ‘beer for girls'. the company says it's a satirical dig at lazy marketing and stereotypes. the beer will cost less for women than men and proceeds will go towards tackling gender inequality. but some people on social media have described the campaign as "ill—judged".
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i enjoyed your dramatic pause there. it's all in the pausing. the world's oldest known message in a bottle has been found a staggering 132 years after it was thrown overboard on the 12th ofjune, 1886. the bottle was found by a family in perth whilst out walking on a remote beach in western australia. experts confirmed the find, which was launched by the german naval observatory as part of an experiment into ocean and shipping routes, was authentic. they confirmed that it was authentic. the messages were all a little dull. i remember another bottle was found a few years ago. the german navy just bottle was found a few years ago. the german navyjust through thousands of bottles into the sea at ferris points around the world and the message says, can you please contact the german naval office and tell us where you found it. it's not
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like, i love you beatrice, will you marry me? it is rather logistically dialled. that's a shame. it is an old bottle. john is here it this morning. where a use starting? with a smiling jurgen klopp. liverpool have a rich history with the european cup but you've got to be in it to win it. no wonder he is smiling. liverpool could relax last night. (00v) all the work was done in the first leg all the work was done in the first leg of their match against porto. they were already five—nil up and sadio mane's shot was as close as they got to adding to that last night. 0—0 saw liverpool through comfortably. the holders are also in the last eight. that man cristiano ronaldo scored as they saw off another one of europe's richest clubs, paris st germain. it isa
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it is a smoky stadium after players we re it is a smoky stadium after players were lit by the home fans. england's women take on america in the shebelieves cup knowing that a point will be enough to win the tournament. it is phil neville's burst the competition since he has been in charge. england's cricketers can seal their one day series against new zealand with victory in dundedin. jonny bairstow and joe root both hit centuries to set the hosts a stiff target but new zealand have responded well to set up another tight finish. along one of cricket england, hasn't it been? fingers crossed we get a result. john isner the lots throughout the morning. as is carol. good morning. good morning, everyone. this morning, quite a lot of weather on once again but for many today it will be a much drier and but for many today it will be a much drierandi but for many today it will be a much drier and i today, especially in scotland. sunshine and showers there, a nice
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simple one. showers around at the moment in the north and west of scotland, they could turn wintry across shetland, and there's also a noticeable wind here too. heavier showers moving around east anglia and the south—east, clearing away, leaving some cloud behind. you can see a lot of dry weather and sunshine, compared to yesterday in parts of scotland, vastly different. showers coming in across wales and south—west england, temperatures today up to ten or 11 in the south, a more respectable 6—8 further north, compared again to what we've been used to. through the evening and overnight, a lot of dry weather and overnight, a lot of dry weather and the risk of ice on untreated surfaces and then this system from the south west wiltshire in heavier outbreaks of rain or showers, but as it engages with cold air in parts of wales, central and northern wales and into the midlands, we could see snow. bear that in mind early in the
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morning and that could include lincolnshire first thing as well. as we go through tomorrow, that will eventually pull away, pushing into the north sea. you can see the tail and producing rain in the south—east. then tomorrow again not a bad day. —— tailand. some south—east. then tomorrow again not a bad day. —— tail and. some cloud, some sunshine, but for most it will be dry and a low pressure centre in the north—west bringing in some showers in western parts of scotland as we go through the day. temperatures are similar for most of tomorrow as today, 6—9 or maybe ten as we push into the south of england. by the time we get to friday, we are still looking at dry weather, we start with some snow showers in scotland first thing but they will fade through the day. a fair bit of sunshine. however, we have our next area of low pressure coming our way. this will include three things. heavy rain across the south—west pushing north. the wind
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will strengthen around it but it will strengthen around it but it will so bring in milder air as well. we've got ten, 11 and 12. with this, there will be a fair bit of cloud. into the weekend, as that moves north, the milder air is coming in to southern counties. because it will be wet and windy the temperature will be around 13, iimgiléigli and qeélngs‘s 151 ~ , iemeeufleie ei‘fi qeélggls‘s ee1 ~ 1 to iemeeufleie ei‘fi eee.ee.ee ee1 ~ 1 to the iemeeufleie ei‘fi eee.ee.ee ee1 17 1 to the temperatures of compared to the temperatures of late, an improvement, the cold, mild air not getting into the far north of scotland. as we go through the weekend, we have the rain continuing to push north. there will be a fair bit of cloud behind it. turning that bit of cloud behind it. turning that bit milder as well and also some sunshine as well. carol, thanks very much, we will look out for it. let's look at the papers, steph has joined look out for it. let's look at the papers, steph hasjoined us. where are you going to "as you like i'm going to start with... —— where are
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you w; 75277117 7 7 scri -t will. that's the sto sergei script will. that's the story in the front page of the daily mirror, worldwide hunt for spy assassin. —— sergei skripal. and mr turnbull on the front page
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e, se was on 5 was on stand w moved tor—en... ee. . , . ea}... ‘iilf. = = sent. puddings appreciates that. —— sent. puddings swears reve ng e . appreciates that. —— sent. puddings swears revenge. “— appreciates that. —— sent. puddings swears revenge. —— putin. the screening for roster concert doesn't save lives and may do more harm than good according to one study —— prostate cancer. it follows a long debate about whether the nhs should have routine screening. i've got three stories bore you. i'm going to go through them quickly. they are all interesting —— for you. we will be the judge of that. the
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first story is about lego, their sales have fallen for the first time because they have too much stock. a company that has done particularly well, nearly went into bankruptcy in 2003, now they are saying sales have been great but they have too much stock, not great for them. gregg's is employing bouncers outside some of its shops. people are fighting for the sausage rolls. i like a sausage roll. would you enter into a fisticuffs for one? i wouldn't, i would wait patiently but interesting they have employed bouncers. mainly to do with football days. is it a particular time? yeah, anywhere near a football ground. final story, you can put a bet on anything. there's a website where they will take bets on whether aliens will land on the earth by 2030. loads of rich people
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are betting on there, like eric schmitt, the chief executive of google, has used the website to bet against a senior executive of microsoft that there won't be pilotless planes in the skies by 2030. you can bet anything you want? yeah, that there will be scientific evidence that a large... a yeti exists. you can put $800 on. that's evidence we have too much time and money on our hands. what have you got, john? looking at the world cup, 99 days to go until the start of the tournament in russia and they have launched a video. famous players doing keep erps and the fifa president is doing keep erps with vladimir putin. incredibly cheesy and awful. the youngest child and
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brother set for a debut for england at 71. is this brother set for a debut for england at 71. istwill hoefull wee two your elks to your dog? full dog speak. all that sort of stuff. what does that mean? hello, lovely face. don't do it to lou. it is very offputting. dog owners speak to their dogs like babies. they may get baffled looks from their friends but a study has found animals love you more for it.
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you see! remember the story about barbara streisand and cloning her dog? yes. the dog was called samantha. here's a picture that has gone up this year. this is samantha's grave and these are the two clones from some of the and miss scarlet and miss violet are their names. bonding with. .. scarlet and miss violet are their names. bonding with... i want to say their mum but it isn't really their mum, there root dog. if you fancy dog cloning, £70,000 for that. there you go. none of us are going to clone our dogs, that is my bet for that website. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the majority of women who suffer from domestic violence aren't reporting the abuse to the police, according to a new survey. the research, which was carried out by women's aid, shows thatjust under half of women in refuges make an official report.
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domestic abuse comes in many forms including harassment and assault and can affect both men and women, as ali fortescue reports. sometimes a lot of the violence was towards the children, and it was me stepping in the way. that's how it would turn onto me. but, yeah, i feel a lot of regret. a lot of regret. emma, not her real name, was with a partner who she says abuse durval 15 with a partner who she says abuse durval15 years but like so many other survivors, she never told police what was happening to her.- the end of the day it is still the children's that and i would have to live with the fact that if he got arrested and sent to prison, that's taking the child ren's arrested and sent to prison, that's taking the children's dad away from them. of more than 14,000 survivors using refuges and community services, figures show less than a third went to police last year. fewer than in 2016. and injust one
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in seven cases has there been a criminal case or sanctions against the perpetrator. see an awful lot of women who don't think that prosecuting their abuser is worthwhile. they aren't sure they will get an empathetic response. they get a sense that actually things mightjust they get a sense that actually things might just spiralled they get a sense that actually things mightjust spiralled even worse out of their control. a recent report by the independent criminaljustice inspector found that police responded to more than 400,000 domestic abuse crimes in the year to june 2016. 400,000 domestic abuse crimes in the year tojune 2016. that's a 23% increase in just one year. they found that while some progress had been made, a changing culture is still needed by many forces. morning, and the. hi, i'm dealing with a... northumbria police has been praised for its work on domestic abuse. it says building relationships with support charities have helped to create lines of contact with victims.
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30% of all violence against the person is through domestic abuse, so it's a huge issue for the police to manage. we need to attack it very strongly and very intelligently. and what are the main problems that we saw in them report was the culture of frontline staff, does that mean victims aren't being trusted?” of frontline staff, does that mean victims aren't being trusted? i hope not. not every frontline officer understands it, has been trained in it, takes it seriously. so, yes, comprehensive training must be done andi comprehensive training must be done and i think there's a big drive to do that. the hope is that more work is being done to engage with survivors like emma, but today's figures show just how many still aren't coming forward. if you ask in time then you're going to get that help you need to get you away, to get you out of that situation so it never needs to get to that point. ali fortescue, bbc news. we will be discussing that later both with a policewoman as well. coming up on breakfast this morning: from music speakers
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to baby monitors. more and more everyday items are connected to the internet these days. we'll hear about moves to keep our homes safe from hackers. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alpa patel. investigations are continuing after a spanish tourist died following a suspected carbon monoxide leak in a hotel near earl's court. another spanish man remains in hospital in a critical condition. 29 people were evacuated from the mayflower hotel. the death is currently being treated as unexplained. a parliamentary inquiry will start today after a bbc london investigation revealed how market stalls and shops across london were selling fake fur that was actually real. the inquiry is looking at how labelling can be improved to prevent customers being mislead in future.
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one of the markets featured, camden, has confirmed they are employing inspectors to ensure the fake fur on sale isn't real. islington council is appealing for landlords to offer accommodation to syrian refugees. it was one of the first local authorities to welcome syrian refugees three years ago. since then ten families have been given homes in the borough. according to the un more than one million refugees will need to be settled in 2018. sir michael caine will be celebrating his 85th birthday next week, and to celebrate the london actor will release a new documentary called my generation. the film is his take on the swinging 60s. there will also be a pop exhibition in celebration of his birthday opening on tomorrow in carnaby street. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tube, the hammersmith & city line has minor delays between edgware rd and hammersmith. and the piccadilly line has severe delays between hyde park corner and acton town due to a signal failure at king's cross. on the trains, delays on south—eastern via tonbridge due
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to signalling problems. on the roads tooting high street is closed between tooting broadway and hoyle road due a burst water main, which has flooded the road and caused traffic diversions. and marylebone road is still down to one lane at park crescent following a burst water main there. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. a rather damp start out there this morning, we've had outbreaks of rain overnight, further outbreaks of rain overnight, further outbreaks of rain this morning but gradually they will start to clear away and we'll get some brighter spells. sweeping away north and east and behind it the cloud will start too thin and break, so we're looking at this afternoon some sunny spells becoming prolonged towards the end of the afternoon and temperatures getting up to 10 celsius so actually in the sunshine feeling quite pleasant. still outbreaks of rain and patchy cloud overnight tonight. some heavy bursts as
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z’ "t t t”% cities, ett ”t t ttt% cities, between 1 1111 1 ett ”t t ttt% cities, between so 1 11 1 tomorrow, ,, e got damp le 1 — damp ee 1 1"the clearing, 15“’e“* 7 7115—12 the 1 1 clearing, againe1f1fffz1e1e3th1e 7 7 rain clearing, again leading to sunny spells in the afternoon, then for friday, noticed the temperature, sunny spells around but turning and settled into the weekend. things getting a little milder. looking at the end of the weekend, temperatures by saturday and sunday, despite it being rather wet, getting up to 13 celsius. if you're heading out then take a brolly with you. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello — this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: after being seriously injured in the westminster bridge terror attack, pc kris aves could do longer live at home. but now he's back with his family, thanks to work by the diy sos team.
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we'll give you a sneak preview. secondary ticket sites can end up costing music fans a small fortune. but there's some good news this morning. we'll be hearing about new rules to stop hidden charges. and she was a glamorous star of silver screen. but hedy lamarr was also an ingenious inventor. we'll talk to the director of a new movie which tells how her work helped to revolutionise modern communication. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. the home secretary will chair an emergency meeting of the government's cobra committee this morning to discuss the suspected poisoning of a former russian agent and his daughter. sergei and yulia skripal are still in a critical condition after being found unconscious on sunday in salisbury. counter—terrorism police have now ta ken over the investigation. russia has denied any involvement. saudi arabia's crown prince, mohammed bin salman,
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is beginning a three—day visit to britain. he'll have lunch with the queen and hold talks with the prime minister. the government regards saudi arabia as an important strategic ally but protest marches are planned by campaign groups angered by the war in yemen, where the kingdom is fighting rebels. action's being ta ken against so—called "secondary ticketing" companies over what's being described as "misleading pricing information" on their websites. the sites resell tickets for sold—out shows but the advertising standards agency says they have hidden charges and sometimes don't even guarantee entry to the gigs. it follows an investigation by trading standards and the competition and markets authority. the chancellor phillip hammond will today outline his vision of an eu free trade deal for the financial services sector after brexit. mr hammond, who wants special access to the eu's single market, is expected to use his speech in london to focus on an agreement which he says will be of mutual interest to both parties. the european commission has previously said that a free trade deal including the city
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is not an option. the top economic adviser to the white house, gary cohn, has announced his resignation — after failing to persuade president trump not to impose significant tariffs on imports of steel and aluminium. mr cohn was regarded by many business leaders as a moderating influence in the administration.he's the latest in a long line of people who've left the white house. the white house has tremendous energy, it is tremendous spirit. it is a great place to be working. many, many people want every singlejob. i ready, "oh, gee, maybe don't want to work with trump," but believe me, everybody wants to work in the white house. they all want a piece of that oval office, they all want a piece of the west wing. a spanish tourist has died and another is critically ill in hospital after a suspected carbon monoxide leak in a west
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london hotel. 29 people were moved out of the mayflower hotel in kensington after emergency services were called on monday afternoon. scotland yard said initial carbon monoxide tests showed high readings. a bbc investigation has found more than 1,500 ambulances were deployed to just five people last year. the figures show one patient in london dialled for an ambulance more than 3,500 times over 12 months. the nhs say frequent callers are not "time wasters", but people with a genuine need, although they are costing the health service millions of pounds each year. craft brewing company brewdog is being criticised after unveiling a new drink, in pink packaging, which they're calling a ‘beer for girls'. the company says it's a satirical dig at lazy marketing and stereotypes. the beer will cost less for women than men and proceeds will go towards tackling gender inequality.
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but some people on social media have described the campaign as "ill—judged". last week, and image of parker curry ‘s staring at a picture of michelle obama went viral. she said she didn't know who she was. well, michelle obama invited of the war turned out to be a dance party. that looks like a lot of fun. adorable. adorable. look at them go. i would like to hear the music as well. it isa like to hear the music as well. it is a silent movie. john is with us this morning. a bit of that going on in the liverpool
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dressing room. iwould have of that going on in the liverpool dressing room. i would have thought so. a shocked shoe shuffle. liverpool as we know, such a rich history in the european cup. he wa nts to ta ke history in the european cup. he wants to take them back to those great days once again. they are on the path, aren't they? they were on easy street because of what they did. it wasn't as thrilling as the first leg. when the first leg was as thrilling, liverpool could afford to take ite asy last night. sadio mane closest as anyone to adding to that but hit the post, 0—0 enough to see them through. i think this year will be longer, to be honest. it should not a big surprise. in the next round will be very difficult. i think that's clear. we have a lot of good teams,
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seven of the very good teams will be then involved so maybe five of them, for them i learned from england. let's make it easier, to be honest. but i think we will have a chance, for sure, to go to the semis then and that is of course to tire. look at the scene in france as paris saint germain supporters let off flares in the stadium as they lost to real madrid. perhaps no wonder their keeper failed to stop cristiano ronaldo's header as smoke flooded the field, as the holders go through. can tottenham join them there? they are locked at 2—2 with the italian champions juventus heading into tonight's second leg. by the looks of it mauricio pochettino's been doing his homework. they came from two nil down in the first leg, hoping to reach the quarter finals forjust the second time. england's women only need a point from their match against usa tonight to win the she believes cup. the tournament features some
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of the top sides in the world and england have already beaten france and drawn with germany. but the americans are the highest ranked team in the world, the toughest test yet for new boss phil neville. see the scheme is a little bit of, not where we can just go for it really, in a way, and campbell and risk because you need to find out about your players in the biggest game. this could be a world cup final in12 game. this could be a world cup final in 12 months' time and i want to see whether we can play this part —— this to see whether we can play this part -- this 12 to see whether we can play this part —— this 12 months' time and the biggest occasions one go to test my players even more. england's cricketers had few problems seeing off australia in a one day series earlier this year but they're finding new zeakand a much tougher proposition. —— zealand. the hosts have levelled the seresi at 2—all with one to play with england posted 334 thaks to centuries from jonny airstown and joe root but the black caps chased down the total. five wickets in three balls to spare. ross taylor scored 181. he
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managed that while limping and earlier hurt himself diving to avoid being run out. not that it mattered. and england's rugby union captain dylan hartley might not be able to play against france at the weekend. he's struggling with a leg injury. hejoins a growing injury list— sam underhill‘s definitely out of that match and wing jack nowell, seen here scoring against italy, will miss the rest of the six nations. england realistically need to win to have any chance of the title. now, any idea who this is? a famous british athlete, who has been turned into a barbie doll to mark international women's day tomorrow. nicola adams, the first uk athlete to form part of the ‘shero' range. it's all about inspiring young women, and breaking the mould of what typical barbies looked like. nicola is the first uk star to join barbie's ‘shero' range, which is designed to honour inspiring women. the manufacturers of the doll say they chose nicola
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because of her outstanding contributions to boxing. nicola said she's excited to become the first ever boxer barbie. it appears the investigation into what happened to a former russian spy, found collapsed in salisbury, is already putting a strain on relations between the uk and russia. the kremlin strongly denies any involvement. but the foreign secretary says the government would be forced to act "robustly" should it find any evidence of wrongdoing. but what could that mean? joining us is james nixey, head of the russia's programme at chatham house. is it possible for this to not affect anglo russian relations? you might it's impossible and implausibly as russia. we keep
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saying that ross and relations with the uk are at the bottom of the barrel but we keep finding new depths depths. —— depths. it is hard to say what this means in real terms. uk will usher relations have been described as toxic by the russians themselves. we are in a new era of relations which has always been peaks era of relations which has always been pea ks and era of relations which has always been peaks and troughs but largely periods of hostility. there are so many things we don't know. we don't know what the substance is, or whether they were both targeted but it is found to be there was russian involvement, are their options or more sanctions, for example? we heard borisjohnson talking about a boycott the world cup. at the moment, while we remain in the eu, borisjohnson moment, while we remain in the eu,
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boris johnson called moment, while we remain in the eu, borisjohnson called for moment, while we remain in the eu, boris johnson called for an moment, while we remain in the eu, borisjohnson called for an increase in sanctions after the russians were shelling aleppo and causing human rights atrocities but that was knocked down by other governments. we are locked in for another year. there is a unique relationship between the uk and russia whereby a lot of very wealthy russians whose money is dirty and they reside in london, they properties, they run newspapers and football clubs, and they could be squeezed and that would have an effect but is they are the russian elite and they have close contacts with the russian president said there are things the uk could do bilaterally with russia or against russia if it needs to. this is what the russian embassy responded to borisjohnson's statement. we are impressed by his statement. we are impressed by his statement and he spoke in a manner as if the investigation was over and russia was found responsible for what happened in salisbury. we regret instead of a proper clarification he chose to threaten
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russia with retribution. they go on to talk about an anti— russian campaign. is that the feeling in russia? on the russian embassy response, the mandy rice davies things comes into response, they would, wouldn't they? but the uk has to be seen to respond or it would look impotent. this is a pattern and we are simply in this period whereby the two governments, i mean the level of educational exchanges and cultural exchanges are fine, trade is not bad, it hasn't fallen much since russia annexed crimea in 2014 but this unique relationship between politicians and civil servants, that is something new and it's getting worse. let's talk about sergei
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skripal. why it are being targeted? would his daughter have been targeted? we are in the realms of conjecture. one can hypothesise that it is a warning to others not to turn, not to sell russian secrets abroad. it could be because he was still working with the uk intelligence services but this is conjecture. in that respect, i do agree with the russians. a proper investigative process does need to ta ke investigative process does need to take place. but what happened on sunday its recent patterns of russian state—sponsored assassination attempts in the uk. still so many questions as yet unanswered. we will be live in salisbury as well later. let's have a look at the weather with carol. today we are looking at sunshine and showers. some of those will be heavy
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and some could be wintry but the wintry ones will be confined to the north and west of scotland. currently here we have rain, but it could turn to snow particularly across shetland even at lower levels, and also here we have a keen wind. for the rest of us, showers around, a showery and rain pushing into the north sea, clearing eventually east anglia but behind it afair bit eventually east anglia but behind it a fair bit cloud around and showers... some heavy. look at the dry weather and the sunshine. the sunshine will come out for a lengthy amount of time, but not seeing much in the far east of east anglia, hanging on to the cloud until after dark. as we head on through the overnight period, a lot of dry weather but where it's been damp there's the risk of ice on untreated surfaces, we could see some patchy missed forming as well and then we have these showers from the south.
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you can see the arc of it coming through the channel islands and the south—east, that will be rain. as it moves south—east, that will be rain. as it m oves a cross south—east, that will be rain. as it moves across parts of wales, central and northern wales, into the midlands and potentially, depending on the speed, lincolnshire, by this time tomorrow we could see snow and there's the potential for that to be disruptive. keep watching the weather forecast, especially if you're travelling. as we go through tomorrow, that will move away slowly from lincolnshire, getting dragged into the north sea. behind it once again, a lot of dry weather. a fair bit of sunshine around, our low pressure centre by then is across the far north—west of scotland so around it we have showers wrapped around it we have showers wrapped around the low pressure, bringing some showery breaks into western scotla nd some showery breaks into western scotland and the outer hebrides. temperatures tomorrow, five, six or seven in the north, eight, nine, ten in the south. by friday we will have snow showers to start the day in parts of scotland. they will tend to
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fade and again, a lot of dry weather. where you see the greens on the :1:es 1— weather. where you see the greens on the t1?“ that's égé 1have1 weather. where you see the greens on the t1?“ that's éttt have the the chart that's where we hayeethee but through the day a new sunshine, but through the day a new area of low pressure is coming our way doing three things, bringing in heavy rain from the south—west, pushing north—east. also it will bring strengthening winds and milder conditions. temperatures in the north on friday, seven, eight. in the south, ten, 11. as this comes in, it will raise the temperatures probably to around 13. doesn't sound great but that's because it's also bringing afair great but that's because it's also bringing a fair bit of cloud and rain. look how the milder air travel is that bit further north. not quite getting into the far north of england, scotland and northern ireland but it won't be as cold as it has been. this weekend we have the rain pushing north, it will turn milder, because it's bringing in the milder, because it's bringing in the milder airfrom the milder, because it's bringing in the milder air from the atlantic, but also there will be sunny spells to look forward to. i'm not sure i can remember the last
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time you said that, carol, thank you very much. steph's here. reacting to donald trump's export tariffs? most of donald trump's tweets are controversial but the ones around trade have got the business world worried. let me and the british car industry, which employs nearly one million people, sold more than 200,000 cars to the us last year. there's lots of concern about what
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trade tariffs could mean. kevin doran is managing director aj bell investments. thanks forjoining us. good morning. why is this such a big deal? donald trump is involved basically. essentially it's the initial volley on what could be a trade war. the eu will potentially retaliate and then of course you're dealing with someone who doesn't like to negotiate and leads through bravado and then you could have a tit for tat war on trade tariffs and quotas. this causes uncertainty for business, which they hate. it does. how much is the us worth to the uk? we're talking billions and billions in terms of the amount of trade that ta kes pla ce in terms of the amount of trade that takes place between countries. it's not just the uk/ takes place between countries. it's notjust the uk/ us story, essentially this is politics. it interferes with the business world but this is donald trump saying thank you to the rustbelt because without the key states of michigan, pennsylvania, wisconsin we wouldn't
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be talking about president trump, we would be talking about president clinton. what happens next, now he has done these tweets, what will happen? to be fair, it didn't need the tweets to bring it to our attention. this has been going on for about a year now but it's now coming to a head and he needs to decide whether he will impose tariffs or quotas in the next couple of weeks. the next stage will be how the eu retaliates. the eu has come out and said they will look to go for tit for tat tariffs. they will go for political items. orangejuice, affecting they will go for political items. orange juice, affecting florida. they will go for jeans, affecting california. and then the rustbelt with things like harley—davidson and jack daniels in kentucky. it is a political trade war as well as an economic one. it could be a while before we see any tariffs coming in? u nfortu nately before we see any tariffs coming in? unfortunately one of the quirks of the us system is the president can
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almost unilaterally impose tariffs. then you go to the wto and an arbitration process. the last time this was done by president bush in 2002 it took 20 months for that to go through the wto. but even then, and this was steel tariffs imposed, it hit the us economy more because they are more involved in construction and calm any factoring. there's morejobs in those industries than in the steel industry —— car manufacturing. industries than in the steel industry -- car manufacturing. often we see with companies worried about brexit, they will look for opportunities elsewhere, so in some ways it could be helpfulfor the uk because we could be more entrepreneurial? it's certainly going to happen while we're part of the eu, so we will have to respond as part of the eu negotiation. don't get me wrong, there's too much steel on the planet. the chinese, in order to basically build the country they have over the past 20 have massively
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increased the amount of steel they produce and now have a slowdown in chinese construction meaning you have these creation facilities for steel and they are looking to put it elsewhere in the world. that's why when you look at what's happening in the us political system, the likes of paul ryan saying to trump, there is too much steel in the world but we shouldn't be doing this through tariffs, we should do it through quotas instead. interesting, we'll see how this plays out, kevin, thanks. an exhibition celebrating the works of picasso has opened at the tate modern in london. it's a look at his art from 1932 and there's one very distinct influence. his young lover, at the time kept secret from his wife, inspired what would go on to be some of his most celebrated works. one recently sold at auction for a european record of £49 million. here's our arts correspondent, david sillito. there's a lot of emotion in this
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exhibition. it's kind of into lust and life. there's also drama. normally a tate show would be a rip respect of a life's work but this is just one year of picasso's and that year is 1932. this is picasso and this is his wife, olga, but when you look at the paintings, it's another face. wherever you look you see the same shock of blonde hair, the same profile. and here she is again, the same hair, the same profile. we're not looking at picasso's wife here, though, this is married to raise walter. and this is married to
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raise's granddaughter, diana. two generations have passed but you can probably see a certain family likeness. when i think of it as a granddaughter when i walk into an exhibition like this is it's not testimony to a great artist, it's a testimony to a great artist, it's a testimony to a great artist, it's a testimony to an encounter. she is everywhere, and accession, picasso was approaching 50 when the affair began and marie trees was a teenager. she was very young, she was a teenager? she was 17.5. she's excepting the idea to see him again the following day. she was young but also adventurous. if a relationship can bring you to an extraordinary level of life experience, i could neverjudge that. london's tate gallery honours picassos. these days we've become used to anyway of
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seeing, today this could go for £100 million but that's the art market. this is the story of the man and the artand this is the story of the man and the art and the paintings. david sillito, bbc news. extraordinary amounts of money. we have good news for music fans. regulators are cracking down on so—called secondary ticket providers that re—sell tickets for sold out shows and inflated prices. many artists like ed sheeran are opposed to their practices, which can often see tickets selling for far more than their face value, he now insists that four forms of id are shown by fans at his concerts. lots of you getting in touch about this, you feel strongly about it. paying for foo fighters tickets, i pay double the price on a certain site because i wanted to see them and the official site sold out in minutes. they resold tickets for the original
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price. lots of artists are getting involved in solving the problem, aren't they? 300 pounds for gaga tickets, they were £46 each face value. went on sale 10am, straight on the site, never again. this person said they were too ill to go to the gig so they were unused. many people saying about the time that tickets go on sale, people are at work, they disappear completely and they can only get them through these sites. we would like your solutions and your experiences and we will be talking about it later. you can e—mail us. use bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk share your thoughts with other viewers on our facebook page. and you can tweet about today's stories using #bbcbreakfast or follow us for the latest from the programme. we will be talking about this later. so many people have been in this situation. a lot of ticket tourism goes on. people have said they come
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on holiday, one says canada, they spend £500 to go and see liverpool against bournemouth in the premier league, which is over the odds, but they come to watch the football so they're willing to - whatever the they're willing to pay whatever the see it. i would love to know some solutions, tell us what you think. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alpa patel. investigations are continuing after a spanish tourist died following a suspected carbon monoxide leak in a hotel near earl's court. another spanish man remains in hospital in a critical condition. 29 people were evacuated from the mayflower hotel. the death is currently being treated as unexplained. a parliamentary inquiry will start today after a bbc london investigation revealed how market stalls and shops across london were selling fake fur that was actually real. the inquiry is looking at how labelling can be improved to prevent customers being mislead in future.
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one of the markets featured, camden, has confirmed they are employing inspectors to ensure the fake fur on sale isn't real. thames water say a large number of their customers in south east london now have running water again, but there are still some customers who have been without water for five days in a row. the government has urged the company to pay more than the minimum compensation to residents who've been affected. sir michael caine will be celebrating his 85th birthday next week, and to celebrate the london actor will release a new documentary called my generation. the film is his take on the swinging 60s. there will also be a pop exhibition in celebration of his birthday opening on tomorrow in carnaby street. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tube, the hammersmith & city line has minor delays between edgware rd and hammersmith. and the piccadilly line has severe delays between hyde park corner and acton town due to a signal failure at king's cross.
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on the trains, there are delays on south—eastern via tonbridge due to signalling problems. on the roads, tooting high street is closed because of a burst water main which has flooded the road. that's between tooting broadway and hoyle road. wandsworth police are advising people to avoid the area. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. a rather damp start out there this morning. we've had outbreaks of rain overnight, further outbreaks of rain this morning but gradually they will start to clear away and we'll get some brighter spells. sweeping away north and east. behind it the cloud will start to thin and break, so we're looking at this afternoon some sunny spells becoming prolonged towards the end of the afternoon, and temperatures getting up to 10 celsius. actually in the sunshine feeling quite pleasant. we've still got some outbreaks of rain and patchy cloud overnight tonight. some heavier bursts as we head to dawn tomorrow morning. minimum temperature, staying above zero in towns
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and cities, between 2—4. so again tomorrow we've got another rather damp start to the day but the rain clearing, again leading to sunny spells in the afternoon, then for friday, notice the temperature, sunny spells around but turning and settled into the weekend. things getting a little milder. looking at the end of the weekend, temperatures by saturday and sunday, despite it being rather wet, getting up to 13 celsius. if you're heading out there and have a lovely day. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello — this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin.
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the suspected poisoning of a russian spy and his daughter. the government will hold an emergency meeting of the cobra committee this morning. the pair remain critically ill in hospital — counter—terrorism police have now ta ken over the investigation. good morning — it's wednesday 7 march. also this morning: lunch with the queen and talks with the prime minister — saudi's crown prince arrives in britain amid protests about his human rights record. claire paid £1,400 forfour ed sheeran tickets on a ticket resale site — the advertising watchdog orders a crackdown on hidden fees. i felt i had done something wrong.
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when i realised that i had not, actually, that this whole practice was very deceptive. the government wants to make our everyday items that connect to the internet— like security cameras, music speakers and baby monitors — safer from hackers. i'll find out why. in sport, liverpool are the first british team through to the last eight of the champions league. they'll be joined by holders real madrid, who beat paris saint germain in a smoky stadium in paris afterflares were let off by the home fans. and how a police officer paralysed in the westminster bridge terror attack has moved back in with his family — thanks to the diy sos team. and carol has the weather: good morning. it is a chilly start to some of us. most of us to relatively mild start. there will be
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lengthy sunny spells as well but tonight, some of us could see some more snow and i will tell you where in15 more snow and i will tell you where in 15 minutes. first, our main story. the home secretary will chair a emergency meeting of the government's cobra committee this morning to discuss the suspected poisoning of a former russian agent and his daughter. (pres2) sergei and yulia skripal are still in a critical condition —— sergei and yulia skripal are still in a critical condition after being found unconscious on sunday in salisbury. russia has denied any wrongdoing, but the foreign secretary boris johnson has warned of ‘robust‘ action should the kremlin be found to be involved. tom burridge reports. uncomfortable questions linger here in wiltshire where a former russian agent and his daughter were struck down yulia skripal lives in russia and was visiting her father, sergei, in salisbury. this cctv footage shows them just half an hour before locals alerted the police that they were unconscious
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on a park bench. sergei skripal was an officer in russian military intelligence but in 2004 he was arrested and later convicted for working for mi6. in 2010, he was handed over to britain as part of a spy swap. the russian government said suggestions it was involved are completely untrue but the murder in london in 2006 of former russian spy alexander litvinenko means suspicion is almost inevitable. should evidence emerge that implies state responsibility then her majesty ‘s government will respond appropriately and robustly. and the ramifications for russian—uk relations are huge. if russia is behind it, it means they are taking things to a whole new level. this is in fact a kind of declaration of war. experts at this military research centre have been trying to work out
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whether toxic substances were used to try and kill a former russian agent and his daughter, who are now in hospital fighting to stay alive. tom burridge, bbc news. in a moment we'll get the latest from moscow with our correspondent sarah rainsford, but first let's go live to salisbury and laila nathoo. telstra that more about the police investigation. the investigation is being headed up by counterterror police. the wiltshire police were handing it over to counterterrorism police, not because this is being treated as a terrorist act, but because it's an unusual incident. they have the resources to try to deal with it. late last night, a flurry of activity, and cordons in place. there are still police
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cordons in place. last night, those cordons in place. last night, those cordons were widened. mask —— this morning, those cordons seem to have slimmed back down. trying to identify the substance that the couple were exposed to. that could still take a number of days. sarah, the russian embassy say they were impressed. talking about anti— russian campaigns. i wonder how this news has gone down in russia. it seems we have lost her. not quite sure what happened. we will try to get back to moscow at some stage. we will be speaking about this throughout the programme. saudi arabia's crown prince, mohammed bin salman, is beginning a three—day
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visit to britain. he'll have lunch with the queen and hold talks with the prime minister. the government regards saudi arabia as an important strategic ally but protest marches are planned by campaign groups angered by the war in yemen, where the kingdom is fighting rebels. here's our security correspondent frank gardner: embarking on his first foreign trip since becoming crown prince, saudi arabia's mohammed bin salman is a man in a hurry. after stopping over in egypt this week, he is coming to britain to promote his vision of a new, tolerance saudi arabia. he's lifted the ban on women driving from june. cinemas and entertainment are being introduced, and a new mega—city will be built. he also imprisoned without trial hundreds of wealthy saudis in this riyadh hotel, accusing them of corruption, something that's worrying foreign investors. defence and security contracts dominate ties with britain. the uk supplies the saudi air force with warplanes and munitions. in neighbouring yemen, saudi—led airstrikes on iranian—backed houthi rebels are being blamed
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for mounting casualties. that's prompted calls by some to break off relations with saudi. a protest is scheduled for later today outside downing street. but oil—rich saudi arabia is britain's biggest arab trading partner. thousands ofjobs depend on it. in a post—brexit world, britain is looking to boost alliances like this one, while saudi arabia is looking forforeign investment to find jobs for its overwhelmingly young population. when crown prince mohammed meets leaders in london today, his message will be "saudi arabia is open to business" but this relationship will always be a controversial one. frank gardner, bbc news. action's being ta ken against so—called "secondary ticketing" companies over what's being described as "misleading pricing information" on their websites. the advertising standards authority says the firms — which re—sell tickets to sold—out shows — have to be more upfront
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with customers about hidden fees. our business and consumer correspondent nina warhurst reports: # i was born in a cross—fire hurricane...#. the rolling stones are coming to town and i am keen to be there. the secondary ticketing site, viagogo, is reselling a ticket for £141 but when i go to pay this happens. £47 vat booking fee, so a ticket that we thought was costing us £141 is now almost 200 quid. these nasty surprises are common. claire used viagogo to buy four ed sheeran tickets. she thought it was costing less than £300, but that was for one ticket and, after fees were added, more than £1400 left her account. i rang my daughter crying, and i said, like, you know, and thought that i had done...i think the aweful feeling is that i felt i had done something wrong.
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when i realised that i had not, actually, that this whole practice was very deceptive. we contacted viagogo for a response but did not get a reply. claire did get her money back and, from today, new guidelines could see secondary sellers prosecuted if they mislead consumers. we are saying they have got to be much more clear and upfront about the prices that we are paying when we buy tickets through their site and, in a nutshell, we are saying that the price that we see when we see it first imput how many tickets we want should be the price that we pay at the end. if you have already forked out fees to see mick and the gang, you can appeal them and next time they're on tour, the ticket price you see should be what you get. the chancellor phillip hammond will today outline his vision of an eu free trade deal for the financial services sector after brexit.
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mr hammond, who wants special access to the eu‘s single market, is expected to use his speech in london to focus on an agreement which he says will be of mutual interest to both parties. the european commission has previously said that a free trade deal including the city is not an option. a bbc investigation has found more than 1,500 ambulances were deployed to just five people last year. the figures show one patient in london dialled for an ambulance more than 3,500 times over 12 months. the nhs say frequent callers are not "time wasters", but people with a genuine need, although they are costing the health service millions of pounds each year. football freestyle atjohn
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fa rnsworth football freestyle atjohn farnsworth did a record of keeping copies up mount everest. all the time, he will be raising money for the alzheimer's society. and there he is. returning to one of the main stories this morning. the 32 year old crown prince of saudi arabia has styled himself as something of a reformer in his home country — he's lifted a ban on women drivers and is trying to turn the economy away from oil. he's starting a three—day visit to britain today having lunch with the queen and talks with the prime minister. but he'll be met by protestors angered by saudi's role in the war in yemen. the conflict‘s been described by the un as the world's worst man made humanitarian crisis. journalist and middle east commentator baria alamuddin joins us from london and thank you forjoining us. i know you are in the process of writing a book about saudi women. other
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changes going on? there have been so many concerns about the way women are treated. definitely there are changes. i stay away from saudi for two months and i go back. i see a com pletely two months and i go back. i see a completely different saudi arabia. i just came back from saudi arabia and i attended ——i attended a game at the stadium and the girls were there next to the boys, achieving and having a great time so as far as women are concerned, the social attitude. the role in society is changing very rapidly. almost 67% of graduates in the universities are wearing. i met women who were working. and women were up to 20% of women. 70% of the population under
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the age of 30 is they do like this crown prince. your daughter is a leading human rights lawyer. there are very leading human rights lawyer. there are very serious leading human rights lawyer. there are very serious concerned about saudi arabia's human rights record. are you concerned? yes, one is a lwa ys are you concerned? yes, one is always concerned at the lack of human rights in many areas of the world. u nfortu nately, human rights in many areas of the world. unfortunately, human rights are not improving. one is always hoping things will change. this is one of the main concerns. some of the protesters today next to downing street in the parliament, they will be protesting that. there is a lack of progress towards peace. yemen is one of the poorest countries in the world. they see it as a necessity
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war. they feel encircled by iran and iran controls lebanon and indeed controlling —— try to control yemen, controlling —— try to control yemen, control iraq, to take charge of bahrain. they feel quite scared and they have received around 90 ballistic missiles. i was on the border with yemen and i saw and heard the fighting. it's not a very clea n heard the fighting. it's not a very clean war, it's a bad war and one is hoping for peace to arrive soon. do you think in this visit the british government will be in a position to talk to him about how this war is being conducted, how these battles are being conducted? i'm sure this will be on top of the agenda. i think the crown prince, along with signing about £100 billion of deals with the government, they will be talking about iran and how the government of the uk can help contain iran in the
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area. one of them of course will be yemen and ending the war in yemen. i know for a fact of the uk government has been very active in trying to find solutions for that. it will be on top of the agenda. also on top of the agenda will be what the uk government can do to help in various new ventures in saudi arabia, including entertainment for example. i had including entertainment for example. ihada including entertainment for example. i had a briefing with the ambassador, how uk ambassador in saudi arabia, and indeed he was very excited about the changes in saudi arabia and also about the possibilities to be signed. this will be substantial for the economy of this country and at a time of brexit, god knows we need it. thank you for your time this morning on brea kfast. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. i've been admiring that picture all
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morning, beautiful this morning? it is, will change it for the next bulletin so we get some variety through the morning. the forecast today, sunshine and showers. for many we will see lengthy spells of sunshine and compared to yesterday when we had blizzards in parts of scotland, you will really notice the difference. first thing this morning we have some wintryness in the forecast. in the north and north—west of scotland, showery outbreaks mixed in with some sleet and snow. the same for argyll and bute and down to dumfries and galloway, showers fizzling out. showers in northern ireland, pepping up showers in northern ireland, pepping up in the west through the day, and scattered showers in wales and southern england. at the moment we have a band of rain moving steadily away from east anglia, taking a wee
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while before it clears. behind that in east anglia we will be left with a veil of cloud. for the rest of us, this afternoon a lot of dry weather and afair this afternoon a lot of dry weather and a fair bit of sunshine and compared to yesterday, what a difference in parts of north—east scotland. 4—6, in the south, about ten, but still windy in the far north of scotland. through this evening and overnight, a quiet night to start with, dry weather around with the risk of ice on untreated surfaces and maybe some frost but then we have a line of showery rain coming in from the south—west pushing east. in the milder conditions in the south, that will be rain, but as it moves across parts of central and north wales into the midlands and potentially lincolnshire by this time tomorrow, we could be looking at some snow and there's the potential for the snow to be destructive. the timing of it still open to question but this is what we think at the moment. we continue with showers further north and temperatures again mostly in
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towns and cities above freezing, but lower of course in the countryside. tomorrow we could start with the snow in lincolnshire but it moves away through the morning, leaving a largely dry date again with a lot of sunshine. our low pressure area centred across north—west scotland will throw in showers across western scotla nd will throw in showers across western scotland and the outer hebrides at times. temperature wise, five or six in the north, maybe ten further south. as we move into friday morning, a chilly start with the risk of ice here and there. a lot of dry weather with sunshine around and then low pressure comes along and spoils it in the south. this low pressure will bring in more rain, which could be heavy. it will bring windy conditions and milder air. you can see we have ten and 11 in the south, and as this band of rain moves north, we will see the temperature rising a bit but it won't get into the far north of scotla nd won't get into the far north of scotland through the weekend. thanks, carol, i look forward to a
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new picture in about half an hour. thanks, carol, i look forward to a new picture in about half an hourlj had better get my skates on! good luck with your skating! looking at the papers. 1—storey dominating here. terror police take over spy poison case in the guardian and this is a picture on the front page of many of the newspapers, yulia on the front pages, they were found on a bench in salisbury with her father, found on a bench in salisbury with herfather, sergei skripal. boris johnson and the threat to boycott world cup. acclaim he ordered poisoning of a russian double agent. the front pages are all the same. mi5 the front pages are all the same. m15 believes russians tried to kill former spy and it's the front page of the daily telegraph as well. also making the papers this morning is bill turnbull. he revealed yesterday
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that he has been diagnosed with prostate cancer and he's been talking about the amazing amount of m essa g es talking about the amazing amount of messages breakfast viewers have been sending him. we were overwhelmed by the number of messages. he was involved in the programme stand up to cancer on channel 4. he thank you so much to everyone who has been in touch. it means an awful lot. if you weren't watching yesterday, he is really positive. he sounded incredibly upbeat. he is a big softy. the important message, as he has been talking about, get yourself checked. if you have worrying symptoms then go and get checked. good to see him in the papers today. just seeing him back again it has brought a smile to many people's faces. we are still in touch, as you note. if you wind the
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lottery, they are in a syndicate together, so if you tune in on monday and she is disappeared then you know why —— as you know. monday and she is disappeared then you know why -- as you know. lovett! —— love it! almost a year ago, the life of police officer kris aves changed forever when he was injured in the terror attack on westminster bridge. he was left paralysed in a wheelchair and no longer able to live at home with his family. but then, a call to help by the diy sos team was met with the biggest reponse for volunteers in the show‘s history. daniella relph has the story. thursday, the 23rd of march. the morning after the westminster bridge attack. five people died and 40 people were injured, some of them suffering what has been described as codgers traffic injuries. one of those with catastrophic injuries was metropolitan police constable kris aves. critically injured as he walked across the bridge. for much of the past year he's been in stoke
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mandeville hospital. he dislocated this vertebrae, damaged this spinal—cord and is now in a wheelchair. but what he wanted more than anything was to get home to this partner and two young children. it makes me sad when i think forward. to go swimming, i don't know how i'm going to be in a pool inafun know how i'm going to be in a pool in a fun session with them. i won't be able to stand up and kick a football with them. i kind ofjust, feel, you know, it's been taken away from you and it's not fair. the kids ask a lot of questions about stuff, why did daddy get hit, was he not looking when he crossed the road, things like that, it's quite hard to answer. at the end of last year the diy sos team stepped in. this is diy sos! they took the family's north london home and transformed it. they asked
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volu nteers home and transformed it. they asked volunteers to help. the programme had never had such an enormous response. sometimes we look at the police and the people that go out in the emergency services and do what they do for us but when you get behind every person there is a family, they're behind every person there is a family, they‘ re not just behind every person there is a family, they're notjust uniforms, theirfamilies are family, they're notjust uniforms, their families are affected too and what happened to kris had a massive effect on the family. we had exclusive access to the build and the team's work. doorways were widened, allowing access for kris's wheelchair. in the kitchen surfaces we re wheelchair. in the kitchen surfaces were lowered and space made to cook. a lift was built, the first of its kind ina a lift was built, the first of its kind in a family home so kris can move between floors. in the garden, a complete redesign. all to ensure that there is space to play with his son and daughter. this entire project has been about creating a family home, a place where everyone can be involved and live properly together again. the whole build took nine days to
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complete, and depended totally on the generosity of others. its everyday there is just the generosity of others. its everyday there isjust ten, ten, 20 people, do you need a hand, do you need a toilet, do you need a decorator? and every day we get cake delivered. cake is crucial. that's how it works, cake and teas. tonight the programme will reveal what kris aves made of his new home and the impact of one family whose life was so changed by evidence of almost a year ago. daniela relph, so changed by evidence of almost a yearago. daniela relph, bbc news, north london. you are a big fan of that programme, aren't you? i've got my tissues ready for tonight. you can see what the finished product looks like on diy sos, tonight at 8pm on bbc one. we are talking about secondary ticket websites today. so many people getting in touch who have either been bruised or seen the cost
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of tickets and not gone for it. sharon says, i've not paid over the odds but i've gone online to buy them as soon as they become available and a triple the price on available and a triple the price on a recital website immediately. some of them are owned by ticketmaster and the like —— resale website. then you go and they are sold out on ticketmaster and you go to the secondary sites owned by ticketmaster and they are available but at an increased price. sandra said i was lucky to get £50 tickets for a show, their last ever, sold out in 20 minutes, lots of fans missed out because they went straight on the ticketmaster resale website straight after four far higher. you sit there and you wait for the site to go live and the tickets are gone within two or three minutes and you are left with no auldana give. -- no alternative. one other story, doggy speak. auldana give. -- no alternative. one otherstory, doggy speak. can auldana give. -- no alternative. one other story, doggy speak. can you do it? i can't do it unless they are here. is it high-pitched or low?
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probably high—pitched. here. is it high-pitched or low? probably high-pitched. do you go low? we go high as well but our guy was fixing the cook the other day, not a dog owner, and myself and the children were doing the dog speak and he looked at us like we were absolutely mad —— the cooker.m turns out you're not. if you talk to your dog turns out you're not. if you talk to yourdog in turns out you're not. if you talk to your dog in doggies speak then they love it. they might look at you stranger on occasion but it boosts the bond —— doggy speak. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alpa patel. investigations are continuing after a spanish tourist died following a suspected carbon monoxide leak in a hotel near earl's court. another spanish man remains in hospital in a critical condition. 29 people were evacuated from the mayflower hotel. the death is currently being treated as unexplained. a parliamentary inquiry will start
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today after a bbc london investigation revealed how market stalls and shops across london were selling fake fur that was actually real. the inquiry is looking at how labelling can be improved to prevent customers being mislead in future. one of the markets featured, camden, has confirmed they are employing inspectors to ensure the fake fur on sale isn't real. thames water say a large number of their customers in south east london now have running water again, but there are still some customers who have been without water for five days in a row. the government has urged the company to pay more than the minimum compensation to residents who've been affected. sir michael caine will be celebrating his 85th birthday next week, and to celebrate the london actor will release a new documentary called my generation. the film is his take on the swinging 60s. there will also be a pop exhibition in celebration of his birthday opening on tomorrow in carnaby street.
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let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tube, severe delays on the piccadilly line between hyde park corner and acton town due to a signal failure at king's cross. on the trains, there are delays on south—eastern via tonbridge due to signalling problems. on the roads, a burst water main is causing problems on tooting high street, which is closed. the road is flooded between tooting broadway and hoyle road. police are advising people to avoid the area and traffic is being diverted. and on the a13 there are london—bound delays at the canning town flyover following a collision, with congestion back to the north circular. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. a rather damp start out there this morning. we've had outbreaks of rain overnight, further outbreaks of rain this morning but gradually they will start to clear away and we'll get some brighter spells. sweeping away north and east. behind it the cloud will start to thin and break, so we're looking at this afternoon some sunny spells
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becoming prolonged towards the end of the afternoon, and temperatures getting up to 10 celsius. actually in the sunshine feeling quite pleasant. we've still got some outbreaks of rain and patchy cloud overnight tonight. some heavier bursts as we head to dawn tomorrow morning. minimum temperature, staying above zero in towns and cities, between 2—4. so again tomorrow we've got another rather damp start to the day. the rain clearing, again leading to sunny spells in the afternoon, then for friday, notice the temperature, sunny spells around but turning and settled as we head into the weekend. things getting a little milder. looking at the end of the weekend, temperatures by saturday and sunday, despite it being rather wet, getting up to 13 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast
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with dan walker and louise minchin here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. the home secretary will chair an emergency meeting of the government's cobra committee this morning to discuss the suspected poisoning of a former russian agent and his daughter. sergei and yulia skripal are still in a critical condition after being found unconscious on sunday in salisbury. counter—terrorism police have now ta ken over the investigation. russia has denied any involvement. saudi arabia's crown prince, mohammed bin salman, is beginning a three—day visit to britain. he'll have lunch with the queen and hold talks with the prime minister. the government regards saudi arabia as an important strategic ally but protest marches are planned by campaign groups angered by the war in yemen, where the kingdom is fighting rebels. action's being ta ken against so—called "secondary ticketing" companies over what's being described as "misleading pricing information" on their websites. the sites resell tickets
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for sold—out shows but the advertising standards agency says they have hidden charges and sometimes don't even guarantee entry to the gigs. it follows an investigation by trading standards and the competition and markets authority. the chancellor phillip hammond will today outline his vision of an eu free trade deal for the financial services sector after brexit. mr hammond, who wants special access to the eu‘s single market, is expected to use his speech in london to focus on an agreement which he says will be of mutual interest to both parties. the european commission has previously said that a free trade deal including the city is not an option. the top economic adviser to the white house, gary cohn, has announced his resignation — after failing to persuade president trump not to impose significant tariffs on imports of steel and aluminium. mr cohn was regarded by many business leaders as a moderating influence in the administration.he's
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the latest in a long line of people who've left the white house. craft brewing company brewdog is being criticised after unveiling a new drink, in pink packaging, which they're calling a ‘beer for girls'. the company says it's a satirical dig at lazy marketing and stereotypes. the beer will cost less for women than men and proceeds will go towards tackling gender inequality. but some people on social media have described the campaign as "off the mark". last week, an image of 2—year—old parker curry staring in awe at michelle obama's official portrait went viral. parker's mum revealed that her little girl didn't know who the former first lady was — she thought she was looking at a queen. michelle obama was so touched by this, that she invited parker over this week, for what ended up being a very lovely dance party.
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so, not the weather, the sport. i got up to early today. we can switch it up if you fancy. i'm ten minutes ahead of everything you see. this is ahead of everything you see. this is a key to it, isn't it? he has had a copy ten minutes early. greetings earlier. it's only 7:34 a.m.. talking aboutjurgen klopp. they would have had a bit of a party. he says they are back when they are very long. it's hard to disagree because of the rich history that liverpool had bitten more recent yea rs, , liverpool had bitten more recent years,, this is what it has been bought in to do. they put another
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one ahead of them. one of five british teams contesting the last pa rt british teams contesting the last part of the champions league. they could afford to take it easy against porto last night. sadio mane came closest to scoring, but his effort hit the post, nil—nil enough to see them through after that huge scoreline from teh first leg. i think this year will be longer, to be honest. it should not a big surprise. in the next round will be very difficult. i think that's clear. we have a lot of good teams, seven of the very good teams will be then involved so maybe five of them, for them i learned from england. let's make it easier, to be honest. but i think we will have a chance, for sure, to go to the semis then and that is of course to tie. can tottenham join them there, it's locked at two all with the italian champions juventus heading
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into tonight's second leg. look at the scene in france as paris saint germain supporters let off flares in the stadium as they lost to real madrid. perhaps no wonder their keeper failed to stop cristiano ronaldo's header as smoke flooded the field, as the holders go through. can tottenham join them there, it's locked at two all with the italian champions juventus heading into tonight's second leg. by the looks of it mauricio pochettino's been doing his homework. looking very studious in training, with tottenham hoping to reach the quarter finals for the second time in their history. england's women only need a point from their match against usa tonight to win the she believes cup. the tournament features some of the top sides in the world and england have already beaten france and drawn with germany. but the americans are the highest ranked team in the world, toughest test yet for new boss phil neville. i see this game as a little bit of, not where we can just go for it really, in a way, and gamble
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and risk, because you need to find out about your players in the biggest game. this could be a world cup final in 12 months' time and i want to see whether we can play this 12 months' time in the biggest occasions and i'm going to test my players even more. we had to shave this. at long last, the youngest child in bother will have a chance to represent england. amazing. at 71, he is going to get a chance. mike has championed walking football on breakfast. amazing stuff. england's cricketers had few problems seeing off australia in a one day series earlier this year but they're finding new zeakand a much tougher proposition.
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—— zealand. the hosts have levelled the seresi at 2—all with one to play with england posted 334 thaks to centuries from jonny bairstow and joe root but the black caps chased down the total. now, any idea who this is? a famous british athlete, who has been turned into a barbie doll to mark international women's day tomorrow. nicola adams, the first uk athlete to form part of the ‘shero' range. it's all about inspiring young women, and breaking the mould of what typical barbies looked like. nicola is the first uk star to join barbie's ‘shero' range, which is designed to honour inspiring women. the majority of women who suffer from domestic violence aren't reporting the abuse to the police, according to a new survey. the research, which was carried out by women's aid, shows thatjust under half of women in its refuges make an official report.
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domestic abuse, which can affect both men and women, comes in many forms including harassment and assault. this is emma, who shared her story with us. sometimes a lot of the violence was towards the children, and it was me stepping in the way. that's how it would turn onto me. but, yeah, ifeel a lot of regret. a lot of regret. at the end of the day it is still the children's that and i would have to live with the fact that if he got arrested and sent to prison, that's taking the children's dad away from them. that was emma, not her real name. joining us now as deputy chief
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co nsta ble joining us now as deputy chief constable louisa rolf and the ceo of women's aid,, katie ghose. there are stats showing the number of victims reporting domestic abuse is dropping by police recording the highest ever number domestic abuse incidents. how can we square what seems to be statistically things that do not agree with each other. the figures do add up. the crime survey there are many victims are reluctant to report to police and my understanding is that many of those who seek the support of charities won't necessarily always come to police and the work those charities. let's talk about some of the reasons
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why people that you have spoken to seem to be reluctant to report these kind of crimes. let's think first of all about how domestic abuse can be hidden behind closed doors. this incredible life—saving work that our network is providing, as louise said, it helps to give that confidence and strength so women can go to the police and go through the criminal justice go to the police and go through the criminaljustice system go to the police and go through the criminal justice system which go to the police and go through the criminaljustice system which can be quite traumatic if that is the right thing. why has it gone down then? is it the reasons people are saying we are not reporting it? it's really important we are not comparing apples and pears. sometimes the will be talking about incidents of domestic abuse and we'll be talking
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about victims coming forward. what i think the police and louisa rolf and others would agree on is that the police are making significant progress but this is a jigsaw puzzle. doing the right thing for survivors of domestic abuse, they need those local specialist services. we need all of that to be protected and that's why we are calling on the to think again about some very calling on the to think again about some very risky changes to the funding of that network of services and that they are better every survivor of domestic abuse who needs them. domestic abuse affects men and women. the way we deal with it, if such a difficult thing to even report this kind of crime and four police officers like you, try to deal with it. arrest may not be the answer. domestic abuse is a complex crime. victims talk about what is
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right for them and their family. we should be bringing offenders to justice and keeping victims safe. we know that simplistic solutions alone don't work the victims and they will often need the right support, from charities, and they will be concerned about their children and families, finances, housing, whatever support they can have said this need a joined up approach and in the police, we wouldn't imagine we can deal with this alone. we work ha rd to we can deal with this alone. we work hard to deliver —— to develop partnerships with charities and give them confidence. what louise is saying about overly simplistic a nswe rs , saying about overly simplistic answers, that he could change one thing, what would it be? we need to see a guaranteed future for the local network of services that are that helping hand. they have been providing everything from counselling to child ren's providing everything from counselling to children's workers. we need a secure future survey can help the police do theirjob as
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well. some people might say, in different places,, they might get a different places,, they might get a different response. we work with every police force across england and wales and are working hard to ensure that we do our best to support them. in terms of reasons why, is to do a deeperfamily issues? it's all kinds of reasons, fear of having your children taken away if you come forward. which is understandable, isn't it? it is, and sadly that is well founded, the women can be the target and the one blamed for the behaviour rather than the man doing the abuse and control. a well founded fear from the perpetrator. the reason we have this incredible
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network of life—saving refuges is because women are fleeing for their lives, they have nothing but the clothes on their back because of the danger they are in so it's clothes on their back because of the danger they are in so its complex and it's important that help is there for every survivor. we have got a government response. as part of our ongoing work with victims' groups we will be launching a consultation on our draft domestic abuse bill to transform how we respond to domestic abuse to provide better protection and support for victims and bring more perpetrators to justice. thank you very much for yourtime, to justice. thank you very much for your time, good to talk to you about this issue. you were saying earlier carol was going to do the sport.|j you were saying earlier carol was going to do the sport. i don't think she is. that face! good morning. a bit early! good morning. thank the lord i'm not doing the sport, that would be a disaster! mixed fortunes this morning, weather watchers pictures show that nicely, mist and fog first thing, beautiful picture from
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herefordshire this morning and another cracker, look at that sunrise from north tyneside! today's forecast essentially is sunshine and showers, some showers wintry, especially in the north, and especially in the north, and especially over high ground but saying that, shetland not out of the woods just yet in terms of seeing that snow at lower levels. in the north of scotland, rather windy. showers stretching from argyll and bute to dumfries and galloway, wintry on the hills, they will fade, and showers in northern ireland, tapping up later in the afternoon in the west. showery outbreaks we have currently crossing the south—eastern quarter of the uk moving away, leaving a fair bit of cloud in its wake. in east anglia. we have a peppering of showers in parts of wales and south—west england. away from all of these areas, look at the forecast, it is dry and there will be quite a bit of sunshine today. quite a difference in scotland
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compared to the weather some parts had yesterday when we had a lot of snow and it was blowing with blizzards. overnight there will be dry weather around and showers. then we have this system from the south—west introducing rain, it is pushing over to the east. in the south of the country, where we have that, it will be rain but as it moves that, it will be rain but as it m oves a cross that, it will be rain but as it moves across central and northern parts of wales, parts of the midlands and possibly lincolnshire, we see some snow falling from that and even at lower levels with the potential at this stage to be disruptive. possibly lincolnshire because it depends on the timing, if it moves faster it will be lincolnshire, if it moves slower, it be at this stage. through tomorrow morning, that will continue to drift towards the wash, clearing eventually into the north sea. tomorrow there will be wintry showers dotted around parts of scotland. nothing too heavy,
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fizzling out through the day after an icy start and then again we see a lot of dry weather. low pressure close to the north of scotland and everything rotates anticlockwise around it, including the showers. you can see them coming across western scotland and also the outer hebrides. six or seven in the north, nine or ten as we go further south. moving into friday, we have snow showers in scotland to start the day. they will said, a lot of dry weather and a fair bit of sunshine, then low pressure comes in and spoils it. it brings in wet and windy weather and heavy rain from the south—west, pushing slowly north—east, a comfort, accompanied by windy conditions but milder air following on. that's all heading north as we go through the weekend. downland loop, that is your sport! we won't make you do the sport, we promised —— dan and lou. steph's here. and the government is planning
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to tighten up security on so—called smart devices. all the things you have connected to the internet so let me tell you a bit about it. over the last few years, more and more everyday devices have become connected to the internet or other devices in our house in some way. things like fridges, security cameras, watches, baby monitors, music speakers and even kids' toys. according to the government, every household in the uk owns at least ten internet connected devices. and that number is rising quickly. it's expected to hit 15 in the next two years. but are they safe? the government says hackers are increasingly trying to get into these devices and it wants to bring in new measures to boost their security. emily orton is from the cybersecurity company darktrace. good morning, emily. what are the hackers wanting from our devices? we are now seeing hackers take a variety of different pieces of information, mostly it is in the
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company corporate space at the moment. for example, we have seen a fish tank used as a way to take out sensitive corporate day from an organisation. what can you get from a fish tank? the attackers will use that device as an entry point to get to other devices that may have information that is interesting to them, perhaps valuable to them. so you might think, why would anyone wa nt to you might think, why would anyone want to hack my fitness tracking device or my baby monitor? they might be used as gateways to more interesting things. if you think about all the devices you bring into work now, if you're looking at a fitness device that's coming into the office with you, it is connecting to corporate wi—fi, you've got to think about where those things are travelling and what steppingstones they might act as to get other information. what can be done to try and prevent it? at the moment we have a situation where
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it's almost like going out of your house and not locking the door. we have all these devices but they don't have great security. the measures announced today should help that, and that's about bringing some basic protocols in and consumers will get a better understanding of basic good hygiene in terms of a standard that should be expected. bit like hygiene in terms of washing your hands before you leave the house, it's not a perfect solution either. we're looking at on the one hand locking the door after we leave the house and making sure we do the basics, but also looking at new technologies to find the more sophisticated attackers. what would your examples be of those basic hygiene things you could do?m you're a consumer and you're worried about this, think about your passwords, think about the passwords you use for e—mail accounts, those are the most important accounts you
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can have because it's a gateway to a lot of your services. if you're sitting at home and you have the same password for your e—mail as your home delivery service or another app, that's the first thing to change. secondly, keep up to date with updates from the software services you use. we love technology, we love the updates, we're constantly technology, we love the updates, we‘ re co nsta ntly wa nti ng technology, we love the updates, we're constantly wanting these new features and products but we need to make sure we are looking at the standards from the manufacturers and updating the software. fascinating, who knew a fish tank would be so dangerous! emily, thanks for your time. that was fascinating and slightly scary. thanks very much indeed. going for enemy of the state with gene hackman where he doesn't even look up. is that what you're going to do? i think i might do. now, have a listen to this. that is of course ed sheeran, who is
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one of a number of high profile artists campaigning against secondary ticket sites. the advertising watchdog has announced a crackdown on companies selling tickets at inflated prices, saying they need to be more transparent when it comes to hidden charges. we've had a huge response from you this morning. adam webb is from the fanfair alliance, which has support from the likes of ed sheeran. we're alsojoined by the singer rowetta satchell. thanks for coming on both of you. adam, can we come to you first, i know many people this morning are watching this and voicing their concerns of their own experiences, but some may not know how the secondary selling sites work, can you explain? that's one of the challenges in this whole market, it's become incredibly confusing because of the activities of these websites for people to find out who the authorised sellers are. what these platforms do, via gomes is probably the most prominent one, they allow people to buy and sell
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tickets. —— vivagogo. huge volumes of tickets get these sites before events of tickets get these sites before eve nts go of tickets get these sites before events go on sale, just after and they are marketed heavily on google in particular so people get diverted to the sites and end up paying considerably over the price the artist intended. so many people have got in touch who have done that. we've tried to talk to viagogo and repeatedly asked them for a statement but they have declined to respond. rowetta, you are from the happy mondays, you are a fan and an artist, how is this affecting things? many times tickets go on sale at nine a on a friday, if you work normal hours, you've got no chance... you can't sit in a queue foran hourand get for an hour and get the tickets and later in the day they are sold out when you go home and these are secondary websites have loads on sale at extortionate prices quite
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often and then there are delivery and booking fees. just as you press play it appears an extra amount and eve ryo ne play it appears an extra amount and everyone feels ripped off. —— pay. it's unfair loyal fans can't come to the concerts because of this. some people are doing stuff about it, the charlatans, ourfriends, people are doing stuff about it, the charlatans, our friends, they people are doing stuff about it, the charlatans, ourfriends, they are doing something, they have a system with a phone code. in glastonbury if you could climb over a fence you could get in, now they have photo id and they are making it more difficult. it should be a criminal offence. they are ripping people off and being greedy, it is awful. ed sheeran once four types of id. that is too many because my sun wouldn't have four to get into a gig. i think it will make people suffer who haven't got as much muggy because you're paying for a passport, driving licence and all the things you need... i know why he is doing it but i don't want him to punish
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the working people who are loyal fans. ticketmaster say they work on making things transparent. ticket resale sites say they inform fans what they will play at every stage of the process. rowetta, you said there are quite high handling fees. many people have said today, getmein and seatwave are owned by ticketmaster, they sell out immediately at 9am, then they are insta ntly ava ila ble immediately at 9am, then they are instantly available on the secondary sites, owned by the same people officially selling the tickets. massively problematic and hugely confusing and the people listing these tickets, they are marketed as fan to fan websites on the whole, but from the evidence we see the bulk of people reselling tickets are dedicated businesses. not of a very high calibre as well. rowetta, briefly, have you seen concerts that
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are sold out but then people aren't there? there are empty seats at some of these concerts. quite often people don't meet them, or they try and complain about how much they paid and they try to get their money back and they lose out on hotel fees and travel costs. i have seen seats where it is meant to be sold out. the system doesn't work and it should be a criminal offence. there's a reason they haven't replied today, they don't reply to the customers either. adam and rowetta, thanks very much indeed. we did contact viagogo but nothing yet. don't purchase from them. pete says time to reopen ticket offices and venues and put an end to the extortion. tracy said if you don't wa nt to extortion. tracy said if you don't want to pay the fees, don't buy the tickets. but people are desperate to see some of the artists they love. someone here said i'd booked through viagogo for little mix, my
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daughter's birthday, £300 for two tickets, i didn't realise how much they were until i paid online and how much the booking fee would be. i was mortified. just coming up to 8am. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alpa patel. investigations are continuing after a spanish tourist died following a suspected carbon monoxide leak in a hotel near earl's court. another spanish man remains in hospital in a critical condition. 29 people were evacuated from the mayflower hotel. the death is currently being treated as unexplained. a parliamentary inquiry will start today after a bbc london investigation revealed how market stalls and shops across london were selling fake fur that was actually real. the inquiry is looking at how labelling can be improved to prevent customers being mislead in future. one of the markets featured, camden, has confirmed they are employing inspectors to ensure the fake fur
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on sale isn't real. wandsworth police are urging people to avoid tooting high street this morning after a burst water pipe caused severe flooding near the tube station. road closures are in place while thames water work to repair the problem. thames water say a large number of their customers in south east london now have running water again, but there are still some customers who have been without water for five days in a row. the government has urged the company to pay more than the minimum compensation to residents who've been affected. sir michael caine will be celebrating his 85th birthday next week, and to celebrate the london actor will release a new documentary called my generation. the film is his take on the swinging 60s. there will also be a pop exhibition in celebration of his birthday opening on tomorrow in carnaby street. let's have a look at
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the travel situation now. on the tube, severe delays on the piccadilly line between hyde park corner and acton town due to a signal failure at king's cross. on the trains, still delays on south—eastern services via tonbridge due to signalling problems. and on the a13 there are london—bound delays at the canning town flyover following a collision, with congestion back to the north circular. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. a rather damp start out there this morning. we've had outbreaks of rain overnight, further outbreaks of rain this morning but gradually they will start to clear away and we'll get some brighter spells. sweeping away north and east. behind it the cloud will start to thin and break, so we're looking at this afternoon some sunny spells becoming prolonged towards the end of the afternoon, and temperatures getting up to 10 celsius. actually in the sunshine feeling quite pleasant. we've still got some outbreaks of rain and patchy cloud overnight tonight. some heavier bursts as we head to dawn tomorrow morning. minimum temperature,
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staying above zero in towns and cities, between 2—4. so again tomorrow we've got another rather damp start to the day. the rain clearing, again leading to sunny spells in the afternoon, then for friday, notice the temperature, sunny spells around but turning and settled as we head into the weekend. things getting a little milder. looking at the end of the weekend, temperatures by saturday and sunday, despite it being rather wet, getting up to 13 celsius. if you're heading out there and have a lovely day. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. the suspected poisoning of a russian spy and his daughter — the government will hold an emergency meeting of the cobra committee this morning. the pair remain critically ill in hospital — counter terrorism police have now ta ken over the investigation good morning. thanks for being with
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us. good morning. thanks for being with us. also this morning: lunch with the queen and talks with the prime minister — saudi's crown prince arrives in britain amid protests about his human rights record. claire paid £1,400 for four ed sheeran tickets on a ticket resale site — the advertising watchdog orders a crackdown on hidden fees. i felt that i had done something wrong. when i realised i hadn't actually. but this whole practice was very deceptive. security cameras, music speakers and baby monitors need to be made safer to prevent them being hacked according to the government. liverpool are the first british team through to the last eight of the champions league. they will be
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joined by real madrid, who beat psg ina joined by real madrid, who beat psg in a smoky stadium. and how a police officer paralysed in the westminster bridge terror attack has moved back in with his family — thanks to the diy sos team. carol has the weather for us this morning. good morning, sunshine and showers and some of the showers feel wintry. it is windy in the north, but many of us will see lengthy spells of sunshine. but there is snow in the forecast for first thing tomorrow morning. i will tell you where in 15 minutes. good morning. first our main story. the home secretary will chair an emergency meeting of the government's cobra committee this morning to discuss the suspected poisoning of a former russian agent and his daughter. sergei and yulia skripal are still in a critical condition after being found unconscious on sunday in salisbury. counter—terrorism police have now ta ken over the investigation. russia has denied any involvement. in a moment we'll get the latest from moscow with our correspondent sarah rainsford,
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but first let's go live to salisbury and laila nathoo — we're still waiting for toxicology reports? what more can you tell us? well, so far the unknown as yet unidentified unknown substance that the two were exposed to is being analysed in the military research facility by scientist. we are expecting it could ta ke scientist. we are expecting it could take a few days for the results to come in. the police investigation here, this is the scene, where the two were found, there is a police cordon still in place. there are a couple of other locations that are cordened off. last night the cordens we re cordened off. last night the cordens were widened, but now they seem to have slimmed back down. we know counter terrorism police are leading
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the investigation. they took over not because it is considered an act of terrorism, but they have the resources to deal with what they describe as an unusual incident. the government is convening the cobra meeting, it is convened in response toa meeting, it is convened in response to a national emergency usually. so you can see how seriously this is being taken at the highest levels of government. thank you. let's go to moscow and speak to our correspondent sarah rainsford. what has been the reaction there? the russian embassy have reacted angrily to what borisjohnson said. what has been the reaction in russia? that has been led from here in moscow where a spokeswoman was indig nantes angry at boris
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johnson's comments and saying the investigation is in its early kay y days. that follows from comments from the kremlin where a spokesman said there was no information in the kremlin about what happened. i would say there is a degree of questioning and bafflement over what motive russia might have for some state—sanctioned attack on a man who has admitted to being a traitor. he served time for that and he was pardoned by the president and exchanged and sent back to the uk in a spy swap. so questions about why it would be necessary to target him many years after he went to the uk. thank you. we shall get more detail on this and speak to a former mi5 officer in a few minutes time. saudi arabia's crown prince, mohammed bin salman,
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is beginning a three—day visit to britain. he'll have lunch with the queen and hold talks with the prime minister. the government regards saudi arabia as an important strategic ally, but protest marches are planned by campaign groups angered by saudi's role in the war in yemen. here's our security correspondent frank gardner: embarking on his first foreign trip since becoming crown prince, saudi arabia's mohammed bin salman is a man in a hurry. after stopping over in egypt this week, he is coming to britain to promote his vision of a new, tolerant saudi arabia. he's lifted the ban on women driving from june. cinemas and entertainment are being introduced, and a new mega—city will be built. he also imprisoned without trial hundreds of wealthy saudis in this riyadh hotel, accusing them of corruption, something that's worrying foreign investors. defence and security contracts dominate ties with britain. the uk supplies the saudi air force with warplanes and munitions. in neighbouring yemen, saudi—led air strikes on iranian—backed houthi rebels are being blamed for mounting casualties. that's prompted calls by some
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to break off relations with saudi. a protest is scheduled for later today outside downing street. but oil—rich saudi arabia is britain's biggest arab trading partner. thousands ofjobs depend on it. in a post—brexit world, britain is looking to boost alliances like this one, while saudi arabia is looking forforeign investment to find jobs for its overwhelmingly young population. when crown prince mohammed meets leaders in london today, his message will be "saudi arabia is open to business" but this relationship will always be a controversial one. frank gardner, bbc news. the chancellor will outline his vision of an eu—free trade deal for the financial services sector after brexit. mr hammond who wants special
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access to the single market said the agreement will be of mutual interest to both parties. the european commission said a free trade deal including the city is not an option. action's being ta ken against so—called "secondary ticketing" companies over what's being described as "misleading pricing information" on their websites. the advertising standards authority says the firms — which re—sell tickets to sold—out shows — have to be more upfront with customers about hidden fees. our business and consumer correspondent nina warhurst reports. # i was born in a cross—fire hurricane...#. the rolling stones are coming to town and i am keen to be there. the secondary ticketing site, viagogo, is reselling a ticket for £141, but when i go to pay this happens. £47 vat and booking fee, so a ticket that we thought was costing us £14!
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is now almost 200 quid. these nasty surprises are common. claire used viagogo to buy four ed sheeran tickets. she thought it was costing less than £300, but that was for one ticket and, after fees were added, more than £1,400 left her account. i rang my daughter crying, and i said, like, you know, and thought that i had done...i think the awful feeling is that i felt i had done something wrong. when i realised that i had not, actually, that this whole practice was very deceptive. we contacted viagogo for a response but did not get a reply. claire did get her money back and, from today, new guidelines could see secondary sellers prosecuted if they mislead consumers. we are saying they have got to be much more clear and upfront about the prices that we are paying when we buy tickets through their site and, in a nutshell, we are saying that the price that we see when we see it first imput how many tickets we want should be the price that we pay at the end.
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# jumpin' jack flash. ..#. if you have already forked out fees to see mick and the gang, you can appeal them and next time they're on tour, the ticket price you see should be what you get. thank you for getting in touch. we will read your tweets later. a bbc investigation has found more than 1,500 ambulances were deployed to just five people last year. the figures show one patient in london, dialled for an ambulance more than 3,500 times over 12 months. the nhs say frequent callers are not "time wasters", but people with a genuine need, although they are costing the health service millions of pounds each year. ? cra brewing company brew dog has been criticised for a new beer that
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is marketed for girls. proceeds will go to tackle gender inall the. some people — egender inequality. now regular viewers of breakfast may remember football freestylerjohn farnworth. he recently paid us a visit ahead of his aim to set a new record by doing ‘keepy—uppies' on the way up mount everest. well, the 32—year—old from longridge in lancashire has made it to base camp at an altitude of over 5,000 metres. john's hoping his adventure could see him add to his eight world records total whilst raising money for the alzheimer's society. let's get more now on our top story this morning, the emergency cobra meeting to discuss the suspected poisoning of a former russian agent. the government has warned of ‘robust‘ action if russia is found to be involved. so who is sergei skripal and why would he be a potential target? in 2006 he was jailed in moscow, convicted of passing
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the identities of undercover agents to mi6. four years later, he was released and flown to the uk as part of a swap for 10 russian spies, including the model anna chapman, who'd been arrested by the fbi. he'd lived here under his own name. but his family has told the bbc he believed the russian special services might come after him at any time, and that in the past two years his wife, brother and his son had died in mysterious circumstances. the kremlin denies any involvement. let's speak now to former mi5 intelligence officer annie machon who's in brussels for us this morning. so many unanswered questions. there isa so many unanswered questions. there is a lot we don't know. can you tell us about the background of sergei skripal and his relationship with british security services? from what i have heard and read he was turned
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in the mid nineties. he handed these names over and was caught and was prosecuted and sentenced to a long jail term in russia. then he was lucky enough to be released as part of the spy swap for the russian illegal in america. since then he has been living quietly in the uk. probably pensioned off by mi6. the interesting question is, if he has been here for the last eight years what the work was he involved in because that might have bearing on what has happened to him. at that the list of very good questions for which we still need answers. one of oui’ correspondence was which we still need answers. one of our correspondence was in moscow, saying the russian response was why would we want to target somebody
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like surrogate scriptural who has served time in a russianjail and has been by vladimir putin. might it be to do with that eight—year period where he was living in the uk? be to do with that eight—year period where he was living in the uk7m might well do, yes. i can see no reason why the russian state would go after him. he has been pardoned. in terms of spy swap historically, before anybody is handed over the country makes sure there is no further information that can harm them before they hand them over to their enemy. in terms of when they arrived —— he arrived in the uk, he would have been debriefed by his handlers in mi6. ifail to handlers in mi6. i fail to see why there would be any reason for the russian state to do anything to him at this stage. it would be unprecedented to do that to somebody who had been involved in a swap. that's why it is worth waiting until we get more information about what he might have been involved in over the last few years. we should be circumspect to how we react to these
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allegations that russia did it. because there is no evidence at this point. it's a very tense environment diplomatically with russia. we need to be circumspect in how we approach this case. as a former spy, would he have been permanently looking over his shoulder. a level of paranoia. members of his family died in recent yea rs. members of his family died in recent years. he seems to think that is russian involvement, as well. is that something that happens when you work in that industry? when you have worked in intelligence and you betray your country, giving over names, being involved in the spy swap, there will always be paranoia. he might have been more frightened about the circles he was moving in. it isa about the circles he was moving in. it is a question still open for debate. talking about the diplomatic situation. the police are trying to
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find out the substance, howard was used, white was used. that is crucial now. not just used, white was used. that is crucial now. notjust of the investigation but the uk's relationship with russia. —— how it was used. there is little to go on. my first response when i heard about the story, was the... t unit moved in quickly and his name was flagged up in quickly and his name was flagged up as someone because in quickly and his name was flagged up as someone because of interest, because of his history. i wonder if they moved in quickly, because he was under protection from mi6 and there was intelligence showing there was something looming. from whom, why, this is speculation. we need to be wary of this stampeding to blame russia as a state for what may or may not have been an attack.|j assume you can see he is russian and
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his daughter is russian, there is a situation of his history with the russian state and then the example of alexander litvinenko a few years ago, but to your mind the issue is follow the evidence and we don't know that all these fingers are pointing to russia. absolutely. alexander litvinenko was a different kettle of fish, he was a dissident and somebody who fled to the uk and he was a consultant for mi6 at the time of his death. he would have beenin time of his death. he would have been in their sights potentially of russian state. now we are talking of a man who has been caught, convicted and pardoned. there is no reason i can see that the russian state would have been targeting him. i think thatis have been targeting him. i think that is why we need to think about what else he may have been involved in. thank you. we will keep
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following this story over the days and weeks to come. now the weather. carol has been telling us there will be some sunshine. quite a lot of sunshine. we will have some showers, but as some of the showers clear we will see sunshine. we have a wintry mix in the north and still windy across the far north of scotland. these elements will ease through the day and showers in the south west are easing for northern ireland some showers this morning. pepping up in the afternoon. showers in wales and southern england and they're hit and miss and this morning showers continuing to edge away into the north sea and behind that particular band for east anglia there will be a
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fair bit of cloud. but for the rest of us, you can see from the green on the chart a lot of sunshine and dry weather and compared to what you had in scotland yesterday, what a difference. further south temperatures are still around nine to 11. seven will be the top temperature in scotland. tonight we will see dry weather, still some showers and still some wintry. but this system is going to be drifting eastwards. to the south we will see rain. in the north through wales and central and north wales and southern parts of north of england, we're likely to see some snow and we could see it getting into lincolnshire before the end of the night. i say could, because it depends on the timing of this. this is current thinking. we reckon it will settle above 150 metres, but it could come
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lower. i want to make you aware of it, in case you're making travel plans. this band of rain will move into lincolnshire, taking the rain with it. low pressure anchored to the south of scotland as everything rotates in an anticlockwise direction. showers coming into scotla nd direction. showers coming into scotland and the outer hebrides. as we move into friday, a lot of dry weather around, we will start off again with snow in the highlands, that will fizzle through the day and quite a bit of sunshine. and low pressure arrives, coming across the south west, introducing some heavy rain. with it will come strengthening winds and milder air. so in the south we are looking at nine to ii, in the north sevens and eights. through the weekend, this band of cloud and rain and windy conditions will continue to move
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north, taking the milder air with it. you can see the progress it is making. the mild air doesn't get into the far north of the country. but eventually it will and eventually we will see some of that rain pushing north and some of us could see a bit of snow as well. perhaps not as much as this and there will be some sunshine in between. the snow will continue to thaw as the mild air comes in. yesterday there was a lot of snow across parts of scotland. we had listed in parts. todayis of scotland. we had listed in parts. today is much better than yesterday. thanks very much. almost a year ago, the life of police officer kris aves changed forever, when he was injured in the terror attack on westminster bridge. he was left paralysed, in a wheelchair and no longer able to live at home with his family.
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but then, a call to help by the diy sos team, was met with the biggest reponse for volunteers in the show‘s history. daniella relph has the story. thursday, the 23rd of march. the morning after the westminster bridge attack. five people died and a0 people were injured, some of them suffering what has been described as catastrophic injuries. one of those with catastrophic injuries was metropolitan police constable kris aves. critically injured as he walked across the bridge. for much of the past year he's been in stoke mandeville hospital. he dislocated this vertebrae, damaged this spinal—cord and is now in a wheelchair. but what he wanted more than anything was to get home to this partner and two young children. it makes me sad when i think forward.
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to go swimming, i don't know how i'm going to be in a pool in a fun session with them. i won't be able to stand up and kick a football with them. i kind ofjust feel, you know, it's been taken away from you and it's not fair. the kids ask a lot of questions about stuff, "why did daddy get hit? was he not looking when he crossed the road?" things like that, it's quite hard to answer. at the end of last year the diy sos team stepped in. this is diy sos! they took the family's north london home and transformed it. they asked volunteers to help. the programme had never had such an enormous response. sometimes we look at the police and the people that go out in the emergency services and do what they do for us but when you get behind every person there is a family, they're notjust uniforms, their families are affected too
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and what happened to kris had a massive effect on the family. we had exclusive access to the build and the team's work. doorways were widened, allowing access for kris's wheelchair. in the kitchen surfaces were lowered and space made to cook. a lift was built, the first of its kind in a family home so kris can move between floors. in the garden, a complete redesign. all to ensure that there is space to play with his son and daughter. this entire project has been about creating a family home, a place where everyone can be involved and live properly together again. the whole build took nine days to complete, and depended totally on the generosity of others. it's every day there is just ten, ten, 20 people, do you need a hand, do you need a toilet, do you need a decorator? and every day we get cake delivered. cake is crucial. that's how it works, cake and tea. tonight the programme will reveal what kris aves made of his new home
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and the impact of one family whose life was so changed by evidence of almost a year ago. daniela relph, bbc news, north london. you have been moved to tears by this programme. previously. it is the end bit when they come out and they start crying on everybody starts crying. and they have a cup of tea. iam and they have a cup of tea. i am preparing myself. you can see what the finished product looks like on diy sos, tonight at 8pm on bbc one. i think we have given it a very big promotion. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning... keep going! she's biking from blackpool to brighton. we'll check in with zoe ball to see how she's getting on with her epic cycle ride in aid of sport relief and she will be joined by harryjudd
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today. that's coming up shortly. thank you for your messages about tickets. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. a chilly start this morning, but a quiet weather day in store. plenty of dry and bright weather with some sunshine. a few showers, particularly in northern and western areas and some rain affecting the south—east of england. but that rain will clear from the north south—east of england. but that rain will clearfrom the north norfolk
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coastline. dry with some good spells of sunshine. tonight with clear speu of sunshine. tonight with clear spell there is could be some pockets of frost, a bit of mist as well. but generally a quiet night. we will see a bit of rain moving into south west england, wales and the midlands and that could turn to snow. watch out for the early part of thursday morning across north wales into the midlands. that snow will clear towards lincolnshire and clear off into the north sea. some show showers in scotland, but you will see for many of us some sunny spells on thursday with maximum temperatures around seven to 10 degrees. into friday, again plenty of dry weather. a bit of snow expected across the higher ground of scotland, the far north of england and otherwise plenty of dry weather
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and otherwise plenty of dry weather and some sunshine, late in the day some cloudier and wetter weather moving into the south west. temperatures though across the south just creeping up to about 11, perhaps even 12 degrees. going into the weekend, that rain in the south west will move north. it could turn to snow in the north for a time. otherwise it will become milder from the south with some warmer air moving in. more details on the web—site. that is all tr me. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. the white house's top economic advisor gary cohn quits over president trump's import tariffs bringing the fear factor back to financial markets. live from london, that's our top story on wednesday 7th march. mr cohn has been seen as a moderate voice
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in the white house, so his departure has dealt a big blow to business leaders hoping to prevent the us president igniting a global trade war. also in the programme.... harleys, levi's and bourbon — why the european union is targeting classic american goods as it prepares to retaliate against those us tariffs.
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