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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  March 12, 2018 5:00pm-6:00pm GMT

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today at five — the prime minister briefs mps on the nerve agent attack in salisbury on a former russian spy and his daughter. eight days since the attack on sergei and yulia skripal, theresa may is under pressure to say who the authorities believe was responsible. this is the scene live in the house of commons where the prime minister is due to make her statement. she may point the finger at russia, and the bbc has asked president putin if the kremlin is to blame. ms russia behind the assassination of surrogate script file? translation: we are here to about agriculture and first you talk to me about this. get to the bottom of it there and then talk to me about this. we'll bring you that live in full. the other main stories on bbc news at five. # happiness, happiness
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tributes to the comedy legend sir ken dodd, who's died at the age of 90. sky sports suspends tv football pundit jamie carragher after he was filmed spitting towards a 14—year—old girl. i lost my right, there is no excuse. what i did, everybody has seen the footage, whatever happened in the lead up to that, there is no excuse for my actions. and an icon of fashion — givenchy — most famous for his collaboration with audrey hepburn in breakfast at tiffany's with the little black dress — has died at his home in france. it's five o'clock.
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our main story: in the next few minutes, the prime minister is due to update parliament on the investigation into the nerve agent attack in salisbury on a former russian spy and his daughter. it follows a meeting this morning of the national security council, where ministers were briefed on the latest intelligence about the attack. president putin has told the bbc britain should work out what happened to sergei and yulia skripal before talking to russia. richard galpin reports. eight days after the attack, and police, including large numbers from counter—terrorism command, are focusing their investigation on who was behind the attack. and they have spread to other areas of salisbury, into this car park. there has been further activity further afield in this area around seven miles from the city, it is not clear why. all this while detectives work to find out who was behind the
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attack and how and where sergei skripal and his daughter yulia ingested the nerve agent. they remain ina ingested the nerve agent. they remain in a critical condition in hospital. should you have acted sooner hospital. should you have acted sooner to alert the public? this morning, ministers arrived in downing street for a key meeting with senior officials. the question of who was behind the attack on how to respond high on the agenda and already, some politicians are expecting the prime minister to accuse russia. we are expecting the prime minister to make an announcement soon. and frankly i would be surprised if she did not point the finger at the kremlin. today, whereof the church of the bbc to speak to the russian president himself. president putin, bbc news, is russia behind the poisoning of sergei skripal? translation: we are dealing with agriculture here, as you can see, to create conditions for people's lives
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and you talk to me about some tragedies. first, get to the bottom of it there and then we will discuss this. here in london, a more forthright response to a bbc question from forthright response to a bbc question from the forthright response to a bbc question from the russian forthright response to a bbc question from the russian embassy. it said... it was sunday last week when sergei skripal and his daughter headed into the centre of salisbury. a few hours later, they were found collapsed on a bench outside the maltins shopping centre. outside the maltings shopping centre. the bbc understands that traces of the nerve agent have been found at the zizzi restaurant, where the skripals ate on the day. the table was so contaminated it had to be destroyed. traces were also found at a nearby pub they visited. several other locations in the city
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are still under investigation. while emergency teams and experts use protective gear as they work to gather evidence and decontaminate areas, last week, health officials were insisting there was no immediate threat to the public. that has all now changed, with hundreds of people who had been in the restaurant and pub told to wash their clothes as a precaution, raising questions about why this advice had not been given earlier. proportionate additional advice was given when more information was known about the nerve agent. it couldn't be given earlier because they didn't know what they had. and most people understand that. some may not be satisfied by this. the investigation is making progress. and if the evidence does ultimately implicate russia, the government here will be under intense pressure to take robust action in response. let's listen in to the prime
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minister in the house of commons now. the incident in salisbury and the steps are taking to investigate what happened and respond to this reckless and despicable act. last week, my right honourable friends, the foreign and home secretaries, set the details of events as they unfolded on sunday the 4th of march. iam sure unfolded on sunday the 4th of march. i am sure the whole house will once again want to pay tribute to the bravery and professionalism of our emergence serves and armed forces —— emergency services and armed forces in responding to this, as well as the doctors and nurses treating those affected. our ports in particular are with sergeant nick bailey, who remains in a serious but sta ble bailey, who remains in a serious but stable condition. in responding to this incident, he exemplify the duty and courage which define our emergency services and which the whole nation takes the greatest pride. mr speaker, iwant
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whole nation takes the greatest pride. mr speaker, i want to pay tribute to which the fortitude and calmness in which the people of salisbury have responded to these events and all those who have come forward to assist the police their investigation. this incident has of course caused considerable concern across the community. following discoveries of traces of nerve agents in the restaurant above, the chief medical officer issued further advice but as public health england have made clear, the risk to public health is low. mr speaker, i share the impatience in this house and that the country at large to bring those responsible to justice and ta ke those responsible to justice and take the full range of appropriate responses against those who would act against our country in this way but as a nation that believes in justice and the rule of law, it is essential that we proceed in the right way, led not by speculation but by the evidence. that is why we have given the police the space and time to carry out their investigation properly. hundreds of officers have been working around
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the clock, together with experts without —— from the armed forces to sift all available evidence, investigate crime scenes and decontamination sites and follow every possible lead to find those responsible. that investigation continues and we must allow the police to continue with their work. this morning, i chaired a meeting of the national security council in which we considered the information so far available. as is normal, the council was updated on the assessment and intelligence picture assessment and intelligence picture as well as the state of the investigation. it is now clear that mr skripal and his daughter were poisoned with a military grade nerve agent of a type developed by russia. this is part of a group of nerve agents. based on the positive identification of this chemical agent by world leading experts and the defence science and technology department at porton down, russia has previously produced his agent
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and would still be capable of doing so. and would still be capable of doing so. russia's record of conducting state—sponsored assassinations and our assessment that russia views some defectors as legitimate targets for assassinations, the government has concluded that it is highly likely that russia was responsible for the act against sergei skripal and yulia skripal. there are only two plausible explanations for what happened in salisbury on the 4th of march. either this was a direct act by the russian state against our country or the russian government lost control of its potentially catastrophically damaging nerve agent and allowed it to get into the hands of others. this afternoon, my right honourable friend the foreign secretary has summoned the russian ambassador to the foreign & commonwealth office and asked him to explain which of these two possibilities it is. and therefore to account for how this russian produced nerve agent could have been deployed in salisbury against mr
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skripal and his daughter. my right honourable friend has stated to the ambassador that the russian federation must immediately provide full and complete disclosure of the nerve agent programme to the organisation for the prohibition of chemical weapons and has requested the russian government response by the russian government response by the end of tomorrow. this action has happened against a backdrop of a well—established pattern of russian state aggression. russia's illegal annexation of crimea was the first time since the second world war that one sovereign nation has forcibly taken territory from another in europe. russia has commented conflict in the dom bass, violated the airspace of several european countries and mounted a cyber campaign of espionage and disruption. this has included meddling in elections and hacking the danish ministry of defence and the danish ministry of defence and the bundestag among many others. during his recent state of the union
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address, president putin showed video graphics of missile launches, flight video graphics of missile launches, flight trajectories and explosions, including the modelling of attacks on united states with a series of warheads implanting in florida. while the extrajudicial killing of terrorists and dissidents outside of russia were given legal sanction by the russian parliament in 2006 and, of course, russia used radiological su bsta nces of course, russia used radiological substances in its barbaric assault on mr litvinenko. we saw promises to assist the investigation then but they resulted in denial and obfuscation and the stifling of due process and the rule of law. mr speaker, following mr litvinenko's death, we expel russian diplomats, suspended security cooperation, broke off bilateral plans on visas, froze the assets of the suspects and put them on international extradition lists and these measures remain in place. furthermore, our
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commitment to collective defence and security through nato remains as strong as ever in the face of russian behaviour. indeed, ourarmed forces have a leading role in nato's enhanced forward presence, with british troops leading a multinational battle group in estonia. we have led the way in tough sanctions against the russian economy and have at all stages worked closely with our allies and will continue to do so. we must now stand ready to take much more extensive measures. mr speaker, on wednesday, we will consider in detail the response from the russian state. should there be no credible response, we will conclude this action amounts to an unknown —— unlawful use of force by the russian state against the united kingdom. and i will come back to this house and set out the full range of measures that we will take in response. mr speaker, this attempted murder using a weapons grade nerve agent in a british town was notjust
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agent in a british town was notjust a crime against the skripals. it was an indiscriminate and reckless act against the united kingdom, putting the lives of innocent civilians at risk, and we will not tolerate such a brazen attempt to murder innocent civilians on our soil. i commend this statement to the house. jeremy corbyn. thank you, mr speaker. i would like to thank the prime minister for would like to thank the prime ministerforan would like to thank the prime minister for an advanced copy of her statement on this deeply alarming attack that raises very serious questions. the whole house condemns the suspected poisoning of sergei skripal and his daughter in salisbury and of course we wish them a return to good health. and i'm sure the whole house willjoin me in wishing detective sergeant nick bailey a speedy recovery as well. no memberof our bailey a speedy recovery as well. no member of our police force and nobody on the streets of britain should ever faced such an attack, let alone with chemical weapons. i thank the prime minister for
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updating the house. the investigation into the shocking events in salisbury must reach its conclusions. we need to see both the evidence and a full account from the russian authorities in light of emerging evidence that the prime minister hasjust emerging evidence that the prime minister has just referred emerging evidence that the prime minister hasjust referred to. for now, can the prime minister clarify what level of threat it was believed mr skripal faced at the time of the attack and what security protection, if any, was deemed necessary for him and his daughter? this morning, the conservative chair of the foreign affairs committee said "i would be surprised of the prime minister did not point the finger at the kremlin". the honourable member also accused the russian government of behaving in an aggressive and corrupting way in this country. mr speaker, we need to continue seeking a robust dialogue with russia on all theissues a robust dialogue with russia on all the issues currently dividing our countries, both domestic and
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international, ratherthan countries, both domestic and international, rather than simply cutting off contact and letting the tensions and divisions get worse and potentially even more dangerous. mr speaker, we are all familiar with the way huge fortunes, often acquired in the most dubious the way huge fortunes, often acquired in th( in iost dubious tt’ party influence in—britis hearty» pc'ahfib elections, as g prime put it, and there has been minister put it, and there has been over £800,000 worth of donation to the conservative party from russian oligarchs and their associates. so, mr speaker, if that is the evidence before the government even before
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the investigation in salisbury is complete, the government could be taking action be taking mr ours, so to the sanction .777777 amendments to the sanction and money—laundering bill —— magnitsky powers. more significantly... order. there can be strongly held opinions and inflamed passions but i do appeal to colleagues whose sincerity and integrity i don't doubt to remember that we hear views and other colleagues will be heard, but the right honourable gentleman must
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be heard. jeremy corbyn. thank you, mr speaker. more specifically, when it comes to the salisbury attack, what actions are the local police taking to identify fellow diners at the restaurant and the mill pub in salisbury on the day in question and ensure they come forward and checked? what ensure they come forward and checked ? what extra ensure they come forward and checked? what extra resources are being provided to the local police force which, quite understandably, have never had to deal with such an incident before. we know that across the country, the national health service is under incredible pressure is at the moment, but what extra resources have been provided to the nhs hospitals in and around salisbury and what training has been given to nhs staff and gps in identifying the symptoms from a nerve agent attack? mr speaker, the events in salisbury on the 4th of march have appalled the country and
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need thorough investigation. the local community and public services involve need reassurance and the resources necessary. the action the government takes once the facts are clear needs to be both decisive and a portion of an focused on reducing conflicts and tensions, rather than increasing them. i joined conflicts and tensions, rather than increasing them. ijoined the prime minister in paying tribute to the magnificent work of our public services responding to this attack. the nhs staff, police and security services, the armed forces and the a nalysts services, the armed forces and the analysts from porton down. let us do everything we can to ensure this never, ever happens again. can i first of also to the right honourable gentleman that i'm sure everybody in the hole house sends their best wishes to all those who
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have suffered as a result of this incident and wish them eight recovery. in the case of detective sergeant nick bailey, i saw a quote which i was not surprised that, because i've heard it from so many police officers who have been in dangerous situations before, but he was merely doing hisjob dangerous situations before, but he was merely doing his job and we are grateful to him and all our police officers and emergency services were doing that. we don't comment on the threats in relation to individual cases but, of course, the police and others always look to ensure we are taking these matters fully into account and taken very seriously. in relation to russia, we have a very simple approach to russia which is engaged but beware, and i think this shows how right it is that this government has been cautious in its dealings with russia. i set out in my mansion house speech last november very clearly the concerns we have about the activities with
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russia. it is a matter i have discussed with fellow leaders that the european union council and i think we must all be very well aware of the various ways in which russia is affecting activity across the continent and elsewhere. there can be no question of business as usual with russia. the right honourable gentleman raised the issue of party donations. i will say two things to him. first of all, as my right honourable friend the chancellor of the exchequer said at the weekend, you shouldn't tar anybody who lives in this country of russian extraction with the same brush and, secondly, there are rules on party political donations and i can assure him that my party, and i hope all parties follow those rules. he talked about the magnitsky powers. this is an issue where i've been challenged previously on this question, where we do already have some of the powers that are being
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proposed in relation to the magnitsky law but we have already been talking with all parties about the amendment that has been put down and we will work to others to ensure we have the maximum possible consensus before the report stage. he also raised the question of police capabilities and resources. not only are wiltshire police involved in this but they have support from neighbouring forces, as would normally happen when an incident takes place which requires that extra capability, but crucially, at a very early stage, it was decided that counterterrorism police should take over the responsibility of this because the counterterrorism police network has capabilities which are not available to regional forces and they are indeedin to regional forces and they are indeed in charge in relation to this. and i can assure the right honourable gentleman that wiltshire cou nty honourable gentleman that wiltshire county council, salisbury city council, are working with public
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health england, working with the nhs locally and working with the police to ensure there is maximum information available to members of the public. the chief medical officer has herself reassured members of the public that the public health risk is low and to ensure the proper arrangements are put in place to help the police to get on with their enquiries and that is important. the police are still working, investigating this and we should ensure they have the time and space to be able to conduct those investigations. mr iain duncan smith. may i commend my right honourable friend for rising to this occasion, as she should. many in this house should wish the leader of the opposition had abandoned party politics and done just the same. she is quite right. if the response from
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the russian ambassador is simply not credible, she is quite right to expect the house to back her in taking the most severe action as is required and commensurate and she is also right to remind the house and the country that this country, russia, is now close to being a rogue state as any. it occupies crimea, it has helped occupy eastern ukraine, it has created a hell on earth in syria and is even now overseeing worse action. this is a country locking up its members of the opposition. it is a country, frankly, we have learned this lesson before, if we appease a country like this, then we expect even worse.|j thank my right honourable friend for his remarks and he is absolutely right. nobody should be in any doubt of the various activities that the russian state is involved in across the continent of europe and elsewhere and the damage that this
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is doing in so many different places. and he is absolutely right that that is why it is important that that is why it is important that this government, that this country, stands up very clearly and not only calls out actions by russia but also ensures that we have a robust response to them. ian blackford. thank you mr speaker and i would like to thank the prime minister for advance copy of her statement and share with her the concerns around the recent attack in salisbury. it is important we all work together to get to the bottom of what has happened here. mr speaker, there can be no denying that this assassination attempt on mrsergei that this assassination attempt on mr sergei skripal and his daughter is not only a step too far by those responsible but calls into question every aspect of our current and future relationship with russia. mr speaker, this ruthless action puts not only the lives of our emergency
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services at risk but also threatened the safety of the wider public who we re the safety of the wider public who were enjoying a sunday afternoon in the cathedral city of salisbury. everyone has the right to live in the uk in security and safety and any challenge to those rides needs to be responded to in an appropriate manner. the police have so far identified more than 200 witnesses and more than 240 pieces of evidence for this attempted killing. all of our thoughts are with nick bailey and his family and we wish him a speedy recovery. we commend the emergency services for putting their lives on the line in order to defend all of us. however, there are legitimate concerns around the delay in time between the events on sunday the 4th of march and yesterday, when the 4th of march and yesterday, when the chief medical officer advised the chief medical officer advised the public that have been at the re sta u ra nt the public that have been at the restaurant and the pub to watch the clothing and personal items. can the prime minister give reassurance today to those members of the public
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who may have real concerns that they may have been exposed to the effects of the nerve agent used? i welcome the prime minister's actions detailed in her statement and can i ask when she intends to return to the house to update us all on what measures we can all take? there must be strong action taken to send a clear message to the kremlin, we will not accept russian interference in our democracy or in our way of life. i hope the prime minister will be taking time to raise this matter with colleagues across the eu, as our closest allies help to give us a strong voice when we speak as one. this kind of international outrage must never again be seen on our streets. can i first of all thank the right honourable gentleman for the trial and that he has adopted in his response to the statement, because this is indeed a matter which should concern us all. this is a matter of national interest, it is a matter of national interest, it is a matter of an attack that has taken
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place and we must respond to it appropriately, as he said. he asked appropriately, as he said. he asked a question about the chief medical officer's most recent advice to those who had been in the zizzi's restau ra nt those who had been in the zizzi's restaurant or in the pub and the a nswer restaurant or in the pub and the answer is, of course, over the course of time last week, as work was being done on this issue, more information became available about the nature of the agent that had been used and that led to that precautionary advice being made yesterday. he also asked when i will be returning to the house. as i said in my statement, we will consider in detail the russian response on wednesday and i will return to the house at the earliest possible opportunity. tom tugendhat. thank you, mr speaker. this, if not an act of war, was certainly a warlike act by the russian federation and this is not the first we have seen an while some in this house have stayed silent and decided tojoin
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while some in this house have stayed silent and decided to join the information warfare that that state is conducting against us and our allies, we have seen them invade countries in the east, attack allies, attempt to kill prime ministers and even now, even now, they are backing the murderous assad regime which thinks nothing of gassing its own people and the honourable gentleman opposite stays silent. would my right honourable friend agree with me that now is the time for us to call on our allies, to call on the european union, who has worked with us so well on sanctions, nato and particularly on the united states and asked what they will do to assist us in this moment when we are in need? can i say to my honourable friend, i think he is absolutely right, we should be giving a robust response from the whole of this house to this incident, this act which has taken place, but we also will be working, there has already been a number of
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engagement with our allies on this particular matter and we will be continuing to talk with our allies to ensure both that they are aware of what has happened on british soil and also that we can talk with them about the response that we will be giving. sir vincent cable. with the prime minister not agree that one of the most effective ways of punishing russia of these appalling activities would be to seize the private property assets of members of the putin regime and their associates? and as a first step, could she arranged to publish a list of who they are and what they own?|j arranged to publish a list of who they are and what they own? i say to the right honourable gentleman that, of course, we are aware here of the needin of course, we are aware here of the need in the united kingdom to ensure that our financial system cannot be used for illicit money flows and appropriate action is taken by law enforcement and other bodies to ensure that we do identify such flows a nd
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ensure that we do identify such flows and that we make the appropriate response to them. as he will know, we are already putting in place a number of measures to improve the information that is available in transparent ways in relation to the holding of certain assets here by those from overseas and that is something that we will continue to work on. mr dominic grieve. i entirely agree with the prime minister in her approach to this murderous attack. she will be aware and has stated that it is part ofa aware and has stated that it is part of a pattern of behaviour by which a state uses covert means in breach of both international law and the rule of law to attack with impunity whoever it wishes. in those circumstances, does she agree with me that we face a very particular challenge, which is not likely to go away any time soon, and in that context, in trying to inform the public of the risks and of the
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appropriate way of responding for a parliamentary democracy, could i encourage her to make use of the intelligence and security committee who chose to carry out an inquiry into russia's threat last autumn, so that we can take that forward and provide as much information as we can publicly about the nature of the threat and the best means of responding to it? of it was very good that it was already announced that it would be considering activities and organisations around russian activities in the uk —— investigations around russian activities. the government will work with the isc to share information that is relevant within its remit. with the isc to share information that is relevant within its remitlj think the prime ministerfor her statement, it is hard to see any alternative to her conclusion that
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this was either a direct act by the russian state against our country or the russian government has lost control of a dangerous nerve agent. in that context, i hope the whole house will be able to come together behind a firm response in the interests of our national security and public safety. can i therefore ask whether the national security council have asked for a review of the 14 other cases i wrote to the home secretary about to see whether any of those should be investigated, and also to press her on what further action she has taken in preparation for potential un security council resolutions that perhaps should be drafted to get the widest possible international support? can i say to the rhetorical lady, she is absolutely right about the need for a clear response from the whole of this house, and i think eve ryo ne the whole of this house, and i think everyone in this house should be in no doubt of the nature of what has happened and that we should respond
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the bus link to it. —— right honourable lady. i understand my friend the home secretary has responded to the lady's letter in response to those —— relation to those 14 other cases, i think at the moment, the focus should be on making sure resources are put into this criminal investigation so that the police are able to do their work with maximum time and space. does the prime minister recall that when edward heath expelled over 100 russian so—called diplomats in the early 19705, it gave a blow to russian intelligence operations against this country from which it never recovered till the end of the cold war? do5hi also recall that when it was clear that a member of the libyan emba55y staff, which one was unknown, had killed the a wpc, a
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wholesale expul5ion was unknown, had killed the a wpc, a wholesale expulsion of staff occurred then? do5hi concluded it would be had been impossible for an operation to be mounted within the russian state without someone in the london russian embassy knowing about it, similar measures may well be necessary? i think my honourable friend and as i said in my statement, my honourable friend the foreign secretary has called the russian buster into the foreign and commonwealth office today. he has presented these two possibilities, the origin of this action, to him. —— the russian ambassador. and we wait for the russian state's response. i am clear that if that response. i am clear that if that response is not credible, we will conclude that this action is on lawful use of force by the russian state against the united kingdom and asi state against the united kingdom and as i said earlier, i will come back to this house and set out the full range of measures that we will take in response. naturally, there is an intense interest in this matter and
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i ask colleagues to help me to help each of them by confining themselves to questions. does the prime minister agree that in the face of further aggression from the russian mafia state, that the policy of the leader of the opposition to engage in robust dialogue will only putin to engage in acts of state—sponsored terror and the only response of this country is to have a firm response against those who are using the uk isa against those who are using the uk is a battle ground? i agree with the honourable gentleman that we need to ensure we do in fact respond robust later this matter, but we need to do so later this matter, but we need to do so with careful consideration of the assessments and had been made in the information available to us, and thatis
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information available to us, and that is exactly what the government is doing. but i think nobody in this house should be in any doubt that there can be no suggestion of business as usual in relation to our interaction with russia. mr speaker, the whole country will welcome the precise and clear statement which the prime minister has delivered to the prime minister has delivered to the house this afternoon and in particular, setting out precisely what she will do in terms of laying out the evidence for the international community and the united nations of the act that has been perpetrated on british soil. may i also welcome the comments she made about the amendment, there are many of us across the house that believes this could make a big contribution. i hope she will continue to consider following the way in which america, canada and free european countries have introduced this amendment.” recognise that my right honourable friend has been supporting the amendment and working on this issue,
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andi amendment and working on this issue, and i say to him as i have done earlier that we do want to ensure that we get the maximum possible consensus across the house on this particular issue and we will talk to those parties involved. to ensure that the approach that is taken is one that is going to the... that the shadow foreign secretary saying there down, there is an amendments down, discussions are taking place with parties about the impact of the amendment as currently drafted and ensuring that any action that is taken is going to be action that we can assure will work. can i commend the prime ministerfor can assure will work. can i commend the prime minister for today making the prime minister for today making the sort of resolute and realistic statement about the kremlin that many of us have been looking for in this house for some time? would she invite the heroic and brave person who has done more than any other
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individual to give her a full briefing of what he knows about putin's cronies money—laundering exploits in london and otherfigures who have bankru pted exploits in london and otherfigures who have bankrupted by cram the money, and will she make sure that the whole government machinery is now giving full cooperation to the enquiry in the united states because of what mueller has already uncovered about what the russians are doing here? —— figures who have been corrupted by cram the money.” have been clear about the mueller enquiry that we will respond and inappropriate requests. i'm told the other individual he referred to has already met the security minister and has been able to brief him on what he knows. friends from scandinavia, the baltics and across eastern europe have often told me how much they feel increasingly at risk from a rise in russian aggression. can my right honourable
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friend update the house on how we work with our allies in response to this incident? my honourable friend is absolutely right and i'm very conscious that those who are particularly geographically close to russia on the european continent do feel very much the immediacy of many of the activities that russia gets involved in, particularly around matters for example on propaganda use. and i will certainly be speaking to a number of our allies, adding it is important people not only recognise what has taken place here in the united kingdom but also the implications it has if it is russian state activity, the implications it has four russia's activities elsewhere on the continent of europe. can i also commend the prime ministerfor her remarks. the last time we had a clear, defined state—sponsored act
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of terrorism was in 2006 and she has researched it. can she also have conversations with her predecessor prime minister at that time, tony blair, but some of the issues that arose subsequent to some of the actions we took? because it is clear the russians will regard the eighth and we will then be interrupted for tap process. —— retaliate and we will be entered at tit—for—tat process. we have got to say resolutely and strongly, we are not backing down, this is an act of terrorism and all members of parliament should stand together.” say to the honourable gentleman committee is absolutely right that when we take action we must ensure that that is action that we will continue to follow through. a5 that that is action that we will continue to follow through. as i said a statement, many actions that we re said a statement, many actions that were taken response to litvinenko are still in place in relation to the russian state. but we should be
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in no doubt that there will be an impact from the russian state in attending to, as they did in that case, in attempting to suggest that the information we were putting out was incorrect. what we saw, particularly from the enquiry that obviously followed significantly later, which very firmly put the responsibility for litvinenko's murder at the door of the russian state and indeed of president putin. i commend the prime minister freddie robust tone of her statement. —— for the robust tone. but i believe is entirely appropriate. but she also accept that while we may not be in a period of cold war with russia as we we re period of cold war with russia as we were in the 19805, because of their actions, it could be said that we are at least now entering a period of call the war? and if that be so, would you be prepared the appropriate time to look at our
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ability and the resources we may require? —— a period of cool war. ability and the resources we may require? -- a period of coolwar. as i have said previously, there is no question of business as usual with russia. we must be clear of the actions that they have taken. i think this incident proves the actions we have taken over the past decade have been entirelyjustified. what we see is a kremlin that seems to be intent on dismantling the international rules —based order and we should stand up resolutely in defence of that international order. the evidence the prime minister provided today makes it clear that the onus is on the russian state to explain how this nerve agent entered into our country and i thank her for her answer to my colleague, the chair of the intelligence and acuity committee. it is essential that we can where possible ensure the public
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are aware of the russian threat. but she also agree that our enquiry should also be able to understand the pressures on our intelligence security services and how best they are supported to do the job they have? of course, it is for the isc committee itself to determine the breadth of enquiries it undertakes within the remit it has been said by this house and by government. —— set by this house. it is for that committee to determine those particular issues. resources are being put into the security and intelligence agencies because we have recognised the increasing challenges and threats that we need to address and that is why those resources a re to address and that is why those resources are going into the sia. in the grisly face of so many of
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putin's opponents, no one in this house should have any doubt of the nature of the government we are dealing with. having said that, and supporting all the measures she will ta ke supporting all the measures she will take against the government of russia, if it turns out the way we all anticipate, will she try as far as is possible to continue the opportunity for british society in its widest sense to be opened with the people of russia so the virus of truth and openness can do its work on that resume? i think my honourable friend has raised an important issue which is of course what we are talking about the dealings the uk government has with the russian state. i think it is in portland that people in russia understand the exact nature of the rich even that isn't government there. —— it is important that people in russia understand the nature of the regime.”
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people in russia understand the nature of the regime. i don't think anyone in this house is surprised that president putin would resort to violence committee has done it so many times before. 334 killed in a massacre, 170 killed unnecessarily in the moscow theatre siege, the m seven aeroplane brought down by the russians, countless journalists, people who have stood up to him as political opponents in other countries around the world, murdered by him and yes, sergei. but can i, can we make sure at the end of this process that no one who was involved in this murder or the corruption that was unveiled will be allowed in this country? and can we stop russia
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today broadcasting its propaganda in this country? as i say to the right honourable gentleman, visa, i know he has asked me this question before on many occasions and his house, and subsequently. and we do already have a number powers that enable us to ta ke a number powers that enable us to take action against individuals to prevent them from coming into this country but we are looking seriously at the amendments and as i say, we do want to make sure we get maximum consensus in relation to this issue. and on the further action that we might take as a government, as i say, i will be returning to the house at the earliest possible opportunity once we have the response from the russian state to update the house on the further measures we will take. if you have one permanent member of the un security council carrying out a targeted assassination in the country of another, surely it is
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time for the un secretary—general to launch an immediate enquiry?” time for the un secretary—general to launch an immediate enquiry? i thank my honourable friend for his suggestion. i say to him that of course, the united nations is one of those bodies we will be speaking to about the nature of this incident is that has taken place here in the united kingdom, among other allies and other organisations, such as nato. but we will certainly be raising this matter with the un. while these investigations are ongoing, and we are waiting from the response from the russian government, can i ask what the government is doing to protect other people who might be targeted here in the uk? we don't talk about the measures that are taken in relation to individuals, that is a matterfor the police and and law enforcement generally, but i assure you that thatis generally, but i assure you that that is a matter that is being considered. i think i have seen,
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that is a matter that is being considered. ithinki have seen, i look at my honourable friend opposite as i say this, i think i have seen the most shameful moment i have seen the most shameful moment i have seen the most shameful moment i have seen in this house of commons in my time today. it is clear this sovereign united kingdom has come under attack from another state. does the prime minister agree with me that the conflict is changing and we must be relentless in tried to keep pace with it, and those who stop this work need the resources they need to do it? my honourable friend is right that the character of the threat we face is changing. they are diversifying and we need to ensure that we are able to deal with those threats across the range of actions that need to be taken. indeed, some of those will not a lwa ys indeed, some of those will not always fall into what might conventionally be considered to be defence. will be prime minister
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confirm that we barely russian people nothing but good will, it president putin who we have in our sights and we will not allow him to use this in the presidential elections to burnish his image as a strongman? the honourable gentleman is absolute the right. it is the russian state that we are challenging inhalation to this particular act that has taken place on uk soil. —— in relation to this act. not the russian people. is it not increasingly clear that we are engaged in hybrid warfare with russia which includes disinformation, political interference, cyber attacks and now very possibly this act of attempted murder? in considering how to respond, will my right honourable friend also look at what additional help we might give to the people of ukraine, who are the front line in resisting russian aggression and expansionism? i thank my honourable
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friend and he is right, we need to look across the very diverse nature of the threat we face and the actions we are taking, and we have already been taking a number of actions in support of the ukraine, is also an important part of our deliberations and an important part of our response. everybody understands what is happening here today and there can be no criticism of the town the prime minister has adopted. she will know that under article four of nato, she can raise this as a concern with our nato allies, that she intends to do so? a5 allies, that she intends to do so? asi allies, that she intends to do so? as i have said in response to a number of other questions, we will be raising this would allies in a number of forms, and i will obviously consider as i said earlier the response from the russian state on wednesday and return at the earliest possible opportunity to this house to set out further
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measures. will be prime minister join me in commending wiltshire's police and health care services, who have done a superb job police and health care services, who have done a superbjob in responding to this case? and they highlight the level of dedication and public service present not justin level of dedication and public service present notjustin butcher but up and down the country in our public services. —— notjust in wiltshire. i'm happy to join my honourable friend in commending the valuable work done by emergency services in wiltshire, who are a fine example of the dedication and commitment of our public services and emergency services across the whole country. i have no doubt that the only way to deal with putin's resume in russia is robust, decisively and together as a parliament and a country. i want to add my voice to those talking about the repression of the russian people themselves, not least in chechnya, but pitting continues to back the brittle resume and his attacks on the lgbt community. i urge the prime
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minister to speak with the culture secretary about russian today's broadcasting licence. why should we be watching their propaganda in this parliament? i have said in response toa number of parliament? i have said in response to a number of questions, we will look at the response of the russian state and i will come back to the house at the earliest opportunity to look at the range of measures which could be necessary. i think in relation to the health authorities, as the honourable gentleman will be aware, that is not a matterfor as the honourable gentleman will be aware, that is not a matter for me but for the house authorities. we have had the honourable gentleman loudly and clearly, thank you.” congratulate the prime minister for a powerful statement and for her leadership in this incredibly grave matter. is russia if it proper state to be hosting or engaging in international sporting fixtures in 2018? -- is international sporting fixtures in 2018? —— is russia a fit and proper
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state ? 2018? —— is russia a fit and proper state? i say in answer to my honourable friend that, as i said in response in prime minister's questions last week, we will be any position of the attendance at that particular event that is coming up in russia, notably the world cup, of dignitaries and ministers here from the united kingdom. there should be unity across the house in terms of what i feel is a proportionate and sensible approach that she is taking to analysing what has happened in coming back to report to the house. i also say that there are certain circumstances, as she knows, where we ta ke circumstances, as she knows, where we take part in political differences of opinion but when our country is potentially under attack, thatis country is potentially under attack, that is just not appropriate. all: hear, hear! he is absolute right.
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this is not just hear, hear! he is absolute right. this is notjust a question of our interests, it is a question of what is right for our country and what is being done on our soil to people living here in the united kingdom, which should be a concern to all of us and above party politics. having served with my right honourable friend in the home office, she will do what is right to keep our country safe. can she confirmed that if it is the conclusion of her majesty's government that it was unlawful use of force by the russian state, that we possess a considerable range of offensive cyber capabilities which we will not hesitate to deploy against that state if it is necessary to keep our country safe? we of course will look at responses across a number of areas of activity, should it be, as he said and asi activity, should it be, as he said and as i said in my statement, that we conclude that this action does amount to an unlawful use of force by the russian state here in the uk.
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it is good that the prime minister comes here today and spells out what actions are already taken and promises to return again and inform us on what happens next. will she also make sure that the lessons learned on the salisbury community about this threat and how to prevent it in local communities is shared in an appropriate way with other communities across the country's? —— across the country? i am sure there will be lessons coming out of this for communities, the nhs, the police themselves as they look into this matter and i am sure that they will ensure those are available to all across the country. when considering russia, we should neverforget across the country. when considering russia, we should never forget that for all its geographical size, russia's economy is little more than half that of the uk. in those circumstances, does my right honourable friend agree that british economic levers are far more potent
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than some might realise and we should not hesitate to circumstance demands to pull them hard? as i have said, we will be looking at the full range of measures, should we once we have considered the response that has come from the russian state, that it has come from the russian state, thatitis has come from the russian state, that it is in fact the united kingdom we have been one of the leaders in ensuring that was in the european union, that sanctions against russia are in place as a result of the actions that took place in crimea and ukraine. this horrific attempted murder on british soil demands a strong and united response by this house. can she confirm whether the nerve agent in question is banned under the chemical weapons convention and that russia are signatory to that convention? it is illegal to use russia are signatory to that convention? it is illegalto use a nerve agent of this sort, it is one thatis nerve agent of this sort, it is one that is banned under the convention. with the prime minister agree with
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me that this attack probably involved a professional russian trade operative in order to carry out such an individually targeted assault with what must have been a very minute amount of something like sarin, which could easily have had catastrophic, wide scale, indiscriminate and deadly consequences? i will not speculate about the nature of the individual who is responsible for this, individual or individuals, responsible for this attack. that is a matter for the police investigation. that was theresa may's statement to the house of commons and questions from mp5, telling parliament is there that the nerve agent used in salisbury was indeed a military grade a nerve agent developed by
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russia. there will be on watch more on this in the six o'clock news, coming up injust a couple of minutes, but first, let's pause and ta ke minutes, but first, let's pause and take a look at the weather. good evening. some places have had a lot of rain today, there has even been a bit of flooding reported across parts of the midlands, but tomorrow, things should be a bit brighter. you can see this area of clear skies west, this is heading our way, but underneath this swirling area of cloud, we have had some outbreaks of rain. which will slowly retreat eastwards as we head through tonight. but western areas will start to see the skies clearing out, that could allow some mist and fog patches, and perhaps parts of northern ireland and scotland will have a touch of frost but most places will see temperatures holding well above freezing. tomorrow,
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starting with the legacy of cloud and the odd spot of rain across central and eastern areas, brighter skies further west and as we go through the day, those brighter, sunny conditions will spread a bit further eastwards. so on balance, not a bad day, temperatures around 7-11 at not a bad day, temperatures around 7—11 at best. wednesday, we are likely to see wet and windy weather in some western areas, but the further east you are, sunshine, very mild indeed. it stays unsettled until the end of the week and then for the coming weekend, things will turn upa for the coming weekend, things will turn up a lot colder. the attack on a former russian spy in salisbury.
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theresa may says sergei skripal and his daughter were poisoned by a military grade nerve agent of a type developed by russia. this attempted murder using a weapons—grade nerve agent in a british town was notjust a crime against the skripals. it was an indiscriminate and reckless act against the united kingdom. a5 investigations continue, the russian ambassador is summoned and told to explain by tomorrow how the chemical weapon found its way to salisbury. he brought laughter to millions — tributes to ken dodd, the last of the great music hall variety comedians, who has died aged 90. jail for the teenager who carried out a string of acid
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