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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 19, 2018 6:00am-8:30am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. stranded — heavy snowfall traps drivers for hours overnight. more than 70 are sleeping in an emergency shelter. the a30 is still closed. yellow ice warnings are in place across much of the country. sarah keith—lucas will have the latest forecast. it is cold and icy to start this morning, but we are expecting a dry day, with some sunshine. things eventually turning a bit milder through this week but certainly are lots of live snow still today. i will bring you all the details in about 15 minutes. good morning, it is monday 19 march. also this morning: international weapons inspectors are due in the uk to examine the nerve agent used to poison russian ex—spy sergei skripal. tv presenter ant mcpartlin is arrested on suspicion
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of drink—driving after a collision involving three cars in south—west london. a significant breakthrough in the treatment of multiple sclerosis, as an international trial shows that stem cell transplants can stop the disease. the decline of local newspapers could be fuelling the rise of fake news. that is according to the government. i will be looking at why. in sport, rory is back. mcilroy wins the arnold palmer invitational, seeing off the challenge ofjustin rose and tiger woods, with the masters just a couple of weeks away. good morning. first, our main story: more than 70 drivers have been stranded overnight in devon. the a30 was hit by heavy snow, and police say conditions are changing rapidly from passable to impossible. 0ur reporter sarah ransome is in devon for us this morning. an initial yellow warning for part
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of the country in south wales was issued this morning and a further area of snow moving west overnight has produced fresh snow. we will get all the details in the next few hours on breakfast. roads and ra i lwa ys hours on breakfast. roads and railways are likely to be affected, longerjourney times as a result, and sarah will have the actual forecast later. it sounds like there are serious issues. a few hours ago they were saying it was still snowing, an emergency rest centre in 0akhampton, with 80 people and two dogs, and they are continuing to help people out who are stranded on the a30. international chemical weapons experts are due to arrive in the uk later today to test the nerve agent used to poison former russian spy sergei skripal and his daughter yulia. president putin says claims his country was behind the attack are nonsense, but borisjohnson claims russia has been stockpiling novichok for years. tom burridge reports. the mod's top—secret scientific
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research centre at porton down. today, a group of international chemical weapons experts will travel there to work out how samples of the nerve agent used in the attack in salisbury could be transported abroad to be tested in an independent lab. the government says the only credible theory is that the nerve agent used to attack former russian military intelligence officer sergei skripal and his daughter came from russia, something moscow denies. but, as the police in salisbury continued their work over the weekend, the foreign secretary said the government has evidence that russia has, within the past decade, been stockpiling the type of nerve agent used in the attack. russia has not only been investigating the delivery of nerve
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agents for the purpose of assassination, but has also been creating and stockpiling novichok. we still don't know where the skripals came in contact with the nerve agent. but his car, which was taken away by the military late on friday, is of particular interest to the police. they want to hear from anyone who saw it in the hours before the couple fell violently ill. vladimir putin has told a victory rally that russia must maintain unity, following his landslide win in the presidential election. he received more than 76% of the votes, but cctv footage from a number of polling stations appears to show election officials stuffing boxes with ballot papers. some cameras were obscured by things like balloons as well. the television presenter ant mcpartlin has been arrested on suspicion of drink—driving. the police say they were called to reports of a collision involving three cars in south—west london yesterday afternoon.
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0ur correspondent andy moore is in our london newsroom for us this morning. what sort of detail do we have on this at the moment? is on the front page of a number of the papers today. that's right, photographs of what happened after the papers, and you can see that ant mcpartlin‘s black mini came to rest bumper—to—bumper against another car. scotland yard say a 42—year—old man was arrested on suspicion of drink driving after failing a roadside test. that man was taken to a south london police station for questioning. the fire brigade and the ambulance service attended. some people were treated for minor injuries. a child was taken to hospitalfor a injuries. a child was taken to hospital for a checkup as a precaution. now, ant mcpartlin‘s personal problems have been well documented. last year he checked into a rehab clinic, he said he was suffering from an addiction to
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prescription drugs and alcohol, and this year he announced he was separating from his wife, lisa armstrong. thank you very much for that. we will have more detail on that. we will have more detail on that story for you throughout the morning. a british woman has been killed in northern syria while fighting alongside kurdish forces. it is understood that anna campbell, who was 26 and from lewes in east sussex, died in the town of afrin, which has been the target of a turkish offensive. she travelled to syria last may. her father has told the bbc she was idealistic, and knew she was putting her life at risk. 0ur correspondent emma vardy reports. anna campbell was a passionate human rights activist, who travelled to syria last may to join the kurdish women's armed group, the ypg. she even dyed her hair so as not to stand out among the other fighters. herfather, dirk stand out among the other fighters. her father, dirk campbell ‘s, stand out among the other fighters. herfather, dirk campbell ‘s, said he could not prevent his daughter from travelling to the war zone. she
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was quite adamant about it. i said, you know, you could be killed. and she said, i know, dad. there is nothing i can do to reassure you about that. but i have got to do this, because it is the most important thing for me. at first, anna campbell had been involved in fighting with the kurds against so—called islamic state in deir ez—zor, but injanuary so—called islamic state in deir ez—zor, but in january turkey ez—zor, but injanuary turkey began attacking the kurds along the border around the town of afrin. it is here that kurdish commanders say anna campbell was killed. in a statement, the ypj said they tried to keep her away from the front line, but she had insisted on being part of the operation to defend afrin. since 2015, seven british men have lost their lives. friends of anna campbell in syria told the bbc she was killed by turkish air strikes,
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the first british woman fighting with the kurds to have died. scientists researching the treatment of multiple sclerosis say they have made a significant breakthrough. results from a decade—long international trial have shown a stem cell transplant can halt the disease and improve symptoms. doctors in sheffield who were part of the study say it is a game—changer for many patients. 0ur medical correspondent fergus walsh reports. this was louise willetts in 2015, undergoing her stem cell transplant in sheffield. the treatment involves chemotherapy to knock out her faulty immune system, and then a transplant of these healthy stem cells, taken from her bone marrow, which rebuilds her immune system. it has transformed her health, from being ina transformed her health, from being in a wheelchair during her worst relapse, she is now symptom—free. it does feel like a miracle. almost have to i pinch myself
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and think, is this real, is it really gone, is it ever going to come back? i don't live in fear anymore, so i actually live every day the way that i want to live it, rather than around my ms. around 100,000 people in the uk have ms, which attacks the brain and spinal cord. in an international trial of around 100 patients, those who had a transplant not only experienced a reduction in their disability, they were ten times less likely to see their treatment fail after three years compared to those who received drugs. the stem cell transplant who received drugs. the stem cell tra nspla nt involves who received drugs. the stem cell transplant involves a 1—off cost of £30,000, no more expensive than the yearly cost of some drugs. it is a gruelling treatment, and not suitable for all ms patients, but sheffield's royal hallamshire hospital, part of the international trial, said it was a game changer, and it hoped many more ms patients would receive a transplant.
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the gambling commission is to recommend the government reduced the maximum stake on fixed odds betting terminals to £30 or less. bookmakers claimed that if the gambling watchdog has stuck to its original limit ofjust £2 it could have caused hundreds of betting shops to close and thousands ofjobs to be lost. thousands of tiny paws pattered their way through greenwich park in london over the weekend, as hundreds of dachshunds and their owners braved freezing temperatures for the third ever sausage walk. the owners were there as well, taking to the great outdoors despite the freezing temperatures to take pa rt the freezing temperatures to take part in the third ever sausage fest, created to celebrate the breed. lovely dogs. another dog update for
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you. we know that about 80 people had spent the night in shelters, after snow shut stretches of roads along the a30. we will have updates on breakfast this morning. quite a few schools closed today as well so if you are in that part of the country we will keep you up—to—date on that. our correspondent can bring us on that. our correspondent can bring us the very latest details, but they may well have a television in that rescue centre, and if you are watching, good morning. if you are a golf fan, the sport is in quite healthy shape. the leaderboard of the arnold palmer invitational looks to be tasty, tiger woods back in contention, for his last two tournaments he has been in the mix and you wouldn't rule him out at augusta, and rory mcilroy has never won the masters. it is that one major which he has really wanted to com plete major which he has really wanted to complete his career grand slam, and what he really wants. the pressure
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he has been under, every time he goes to augusta, is whether he is going to do it this year. he seems in much better shape than he was last year. that final putt which he sang to win the title, and his first title in1.5 sang to win the title, and his first title in 1.5 years —— sank. with the masters just a few weeks away, rory mcilroy is back in form. he won the arnold palmer invitational in florida for his first tournament victory in a year and a half. justin rose finished third, while tiger woods was in contention once again, finishing tied for fifth. the draw for the semi—finals of the fa cup has been made, with chelsea taking on southampton and manchester united meeting tottenham hotspur. chelsea secured their place in extra—time, beating leicester 2—1 yesterday. southampton made the semis after beating league one side wigan 2—0. the match was mark hughes‘s first in charge of saints, who make the last four despite struggling in the premier league's relegation zone. and roger federer‘s incredible run at the start of this year has come to an end. he was beaten in the final of indian wells by argentina'sjuan martin del
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potro. it is del potro's second tournament win in a row. and funnily enough, del potro had won 17 as well at the start of this season, and a remarkable comeback for del potro. he has had multiple wrist surgeries, at one point thinking he would never hit his backhand again, so to see him beating the world number one like that, i know everyone was talking about federer, but del potro's story is just as about federer, but del potro's story isjust as good. about federer, but del potro's story is just as good. it was a really, really good final as well. back to oui’ really good final as well. back to our main story, that heavy snowfall which has caused disruption in parts particularly of south—west england, oui’ particularly of south—west england, our reporter is in devon, and the loa n our reporter is in devon, and the loan is a little bit affected by snow, possibly. what can you tell us —— the line. snow, possibly. what can you tell us -- the line. good morning, that
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amber warning we had all day yesterday, it was downgraded overnight and we now have a yellow warning, possibly more snow but predominantly ice. as you were saying in the introduction, we have around 70 and possibly 80 people in around 70 and possibly 80 people in a local school, 0kehampton college, who have spent the night because they were stranded in their cars. the very high point of the more is the a30, and people who travelled to cornwall on holiday will probably know you go up over the hill and then you drop down and very quickly you end in cornwall. it is at that point that the heavy snow, along with other parts of devon, there was a lot of snow yesterday, and late yesterday evening a number of them we re yesterday evening a number of them were stuck and were stranded in their cars, were stuck and were stranded in theircars, and were stuck and were stranded in their cars, and had to be moved to this college. some of them had to walk, some of them were given a lift by local rescue groups, dartmoor rescue group were out in force last night, along with other emergency
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services. and they were a number of children there as well. so this morning we understand that the road is still closed. a large stretch of it is still closed. they are working ha rd to it is still closed. they are working hard to try and clear it but at the moment a number of these people are still in the rest centre, hopefully having had a bit of a sleep and maybe a nice cup of tea to wake them up maybe a nice cup of tea to wake them up this morning. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. that doesn't seem to be much snow in london but causing problems in some parts of the country? i'm on the in central london, we have a few white rooftops around london but up and down the country really it is a similar pick, a lot of snow and ice around. today i think we will see an improvement in the weather so it will be a most lieb dry day. a return to some sunshine. ice will be a problem because what we will see it is some of the snowfall will ring out during the day and then re—
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freezing once the sun goes down. some pretty tricky conditions over the next few days, disruption also likely. through the course of this week, things will start to change and feel a little more springlike. after the cold and the dry start, temperatures bradley on the rise. but reform gradually. —— gradually. but reform gradually. —— gradually. but across the country, we have got a largely dry day. a little more cloud in the far south in one or two flurries of snow hanging on down towards the channel isles. the cloud wolf dean and break up. much of the country a dry day and return to some fairly feeling sunshine. this afternoon across southern england and wales, still a cold north—east of the wind so although there will be some sunshine it will feel cold. watch a fall of the lying snow and icy conditions. in scotland and northern ireland, dry and sunny. for
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more cloud the eastern scotland and for this england but towards the west of scotland and northern ireland it will feel quite pleasant with a light wind and sunshine. temperatures still not great, between 3—7 out there today. chile, particularly with the wind chill across england and wales. 0vernight, largely dry conditions, more cloud filtering in from the east across england and wales. scotland and northern ireland see the coldest temperatures so we could well have -5 temperatures so we could well have —5 or through the central scotland tomorrow morning. through the day tomorrow, not a bad day. cloudy in the east, perhaps one or two rain showers for lincolnshire down towards sussex. most other parts of dry and sunny. still chile for the time of year. through into the middle of the week, a front moves into the north—west which brings more cloud of scotland and northern ireland and into wednesday. patchy rain also the scotland and northern ireland. england and wales should
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stay dry, again, a lot of fun trying but you'll chile. eight or nine degrees for most of us by wednesday but we could just about see the temperatures creeping into double figures in one or two spots. a milder theme as we look to what the middle and the end of the week but we're not out of the woods yet, it is still cold and we have a lot of ice over the few days. thank you very much, see you later on. when i heard you were outside i feared the worst but you don't look too bad. she has your favourite thing, a worst but you don't look too bad. she has yourfavourite thing, a big coat. you know what, sometimes a big coat. you know what, sometimes a big coatis coat. you know what, sometimes a big coat is all you need in life! that isa coat is all you need in life! that is a terrible visions of this time of mourning. let's have a look at today's papers. the front page of the telegraph, they are talking about it, and i think steph will talk about this as well, facebook, the wild west, technology firms would facebook and google is over, according to the
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cabinet minister responsible for overseeing them, declaring that today, saying the silicon giants are facing greater regulation to control people's data and ensure they cannot avoid being proper tax. people's data and ensure they cannot avoid being propertax. i people's data and ensure they cannot avoid being proper tax. ithink you we re avoid being proper tax. ithink you were talking about that stephanie brunner to the financial times has a big story across both sides of the atla ntic big story across both sides of the atlantic this morning because here, facebook is under increasing pressure to explain how the data collect did on 50 million users was exploited for political gain, and this is the story that claims the data firm can reach analytic at which used leaked information to help donald trump win the us election. it is a complicated story but the basic premise of it is there was lots of data, data is powerful, isn't it, information about everyone, and faced or is involved in somehow these claims, that they gave the information to cambridge at analytic. —— cambridge analytic. vladimir putin, his landslide
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victory. it was confirmed about 9pm i think the final vote numbers came through but 75% of the vote for him, quite a bit turnout, two thirds of the russians turned out. and the watchdog turned away from tough vetting curbs. and ant mcpartlin is on the front pages of a few as well. he makes the front page of the sun, some of the other tabloids as well. the mirror, held by police after drink drive crash, it took place in richmond in london and that is the front page of the daily express. that is the guardian, a bit of a meat batch today. talking about facebook also an vladimir putin and the daily mail have a campaign about plastics and they are talking about that today. it is also the end of the six nations this week? a lovely
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celebration and some photos in the paper, this is in the times. grinning bare as he shows off the trophy. —— there. you cannot imagine the football is flying back after winning the champions league on a private jet. he looks like he winning the champions league on a privatejet. he looks like he is winning the champions league on a private jet. he looks like he is on some kind of ryanairflight back to dublin. nothing wrong with that! anna fitzpatrick there as well winning the gold. i love that photo of them jumping. and millie knight and brett wild won the bronze the way to finish the winter paralympics. a really interesting piece in the mirror before rory went on to win the other factor for arnold palmer invitational but he complains he keeps getting abuse from people in the crowd and he said more and more at golf tournament these days people used to wander around with a couple of beers but now people are wandering around with tales! it has become less big boozefest a nd tales! it has become less big boozefest and they should think about banning alcohol because people we re about banning alcohol because people
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were shouting and putting them off because golf is a game built on etiquette and respect and silence and concentration. justin thomas had someone and concentration. justin thomas had someone removed, didn't he? stefanie? a nice story about a village in somerset because their local villagers have saved the local pub. the race more than £1 million to buy it developers. it closed six yea rs to buy it developers. it closed six years ago, developers were going to turnit years ago, developers were going to turn it into flats, villagers rallied around and made £1 million and bought it back. that is a lovely story. they did a similar thing in my parents's village but we still have to go to the pub than now. you have to go to the pub than now. you have sorted it and bought it a knack you have to go. would you like to see a siberian tiger almost catching... no. this is, look at this wonderful picture taken in a park in china. in harbin. he doesn't quite get it. the guinea fowl and
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gnawing a tiger, the tiger tries to grab it but it escapes the drawers. where did the guinea shall come from? i don't know. we will look into that guinea fowl later on! when you say a park, dear me a wildlife park? just a public park? i have another guinea pal story for you. but before guinea fowl. last week we went to dinner, didn't we. it was a lunch. we all turned up late and dinner was on the table and we all thought it was chicken that would later found out it was guinea fowl but we ate it anyway. i did know. that is my list of great stories. thank you, dan. 623, you were watching breakfast. the use of a breakthrough drug, which is the first to tackle the root cause of cystic fibrosis, will be debated by mps later today. 0rkambi is available in several countries including ireland,
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germany, and the us, but it's not used on the nhs because it costs 100,000 pounds per patient, per year. brea kfast‘s graham satchell has more. lucy is doing a special workout to help her condition. she has cystic fibrosis, and inherited illness that affects lung and digestive system. fibrosis, and inherited illness that affects lung and digestive systemlj do affects lung and digestive system.” do all i can at the moment to try and sort of keep alive longer. it is a bit sad in a way that like all of my friends don't have to worry about this it would that i am doing it to stay alive. yeah? yeah? yeah. she is attempting a new personal best, to lift 120% of her body weight. cystic fibrosis is a devastating illness, half of the people who have it will die by the age of 31. lucy takes a small mountain of antibiotics to try
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and stop infections. there is a new drug, called 0rkambi, the first treatment that tackles the root cause cystic fibrosis. it cost is per year. it is too expensive to the nhs. people with it can pick up the bacteria and can be really poorly so knowing there is a drugged out there that would help all that, it is more than frustrating, it is heartbreaking. dublin in ireland, 14 you rob bennett altered a lot of antibiotics. the irish government approved the use of 0rkambi last year, it is make a huge difference to bennett's condition. it has improved my weight, my height, my liver function, the overall health, energy. it is really impacted in a good way. do you feel better? better and more energetic than before i started taking 0rkambi. campaigners
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say 0rkambi will save money in the long run by reducing expensive hospital additions but the deal done in ireland with the companies that make 0rkambi was controversial, costing the irish health service and more than 100 million europe. costing the irish health service and more than 100 million europem costing the irish health service and more than 100 million europe. it is a lot of money but can you put a price in anyone's life, especially your child? and also for the quality of life, you know, you cannot put a price on that. this amount of money could be spent elsewhere for other products and services. if you consider the population that would be using this kind of treatment which is around 3000 patients, if you multiply 3000 patients by £100,000 per year, this is around £300 million per year for the nhs. backin £300 million per year for the nhs. back in preston, lucy and her mum about to do physio. it takes one hour twice a day to clear lungs. invictus england say unless the drug
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company refuse its price, a deal is unlikely. we are told they are dismayed by nhs england's approach but want further dialogue. what about the patients like lucy?m shouldn't be about to live, it shouldn't be about to live, it should be about what you have. people may die because it may be because of a funding issue, it is unfair. this will discuss access to 0rkambi in westminster today but while the arguments go on, lucy's conditions continues to get worse. you get a sense of how difficult that is. it is monday morning, good morning. we will get some news and travel wherever you are watching. difficult in the south—west of england with people stuck on the a 30 overnight. the national headlines inafew 30 overnight. the national headlines in a few minutes time. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins.
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residents in croydon have been evacuated overnight after a car drove into an energy plant and caused a gas leak. police were called to whitestone way just before 8:30pm last night. cordons have been put in place and the disruption is expected to continue throughout this morning. the incident is not being treated as suspicious. law—abiding russians are welcome in london and should be able to live their life peacefully in the capital, says mayor sadiq khan. police have begun to contact a number of russian exiles following the death last week of businessman nikolai glushkov in london. it has not been linked with the poisoning of former spy sergei skripal. the mayor said that any russians feeling threatened in any way should contact the authorities. if you are somebody who has left russia and you are worried about your personal safety, contact the police. we are a safe city. police ta ke police. we are a safe city. police take any concerns to a public safety very seriously. it is really
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important you are able to go about your life peacefully here in london. a new network of rapid charge points for electric vehicles across the capital will be launched later. they can charge vehicles in about half an hour, compared to eight hours at a standard charge point. it takes the total number to 100, half of which are for taxis. transport for london has previously faced criticism for not installing enough for electric black cabs to use. 0n the tubes this morning there are minor delays on thejubilee and northern line. there's also a part suspension on the piccadilly line. 0n the roads, the a23 purley way in waddon is closed between the lombard roundabout and fiveways corner, after a collision which led to a gas leak that i mentioned earlier. in surbition, portsmouth road closed for burst water main repairs let's have a check on the weather now with sara thornton. good morning. an icy start this morning but the wintry threats are
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starting to recede now. it is very chilly out there though and so do watch after the ice, particularly where you have some lying snow, and a dry and bright day ahead although we do start with some cloud around the first thing but it is doing nicely, sunshine developing, particularly the further you are. still a very cold day, not as cold as it was through the weekend but the very best we will see is full five degrees and that is somewhat tempered by the easterly wind. the wind is easing which is good news but to go through the night, temperatures fall away sharply this evening. we have some cloud moving towards us from the north. but could give a wintry flurry, no more than that expected. it means some places like central london could fold up a bit. for tomorrow, starting to feel an awful lot more like spring has sprung. it is the equinox tomorrow. through the week the temperatures recover into double figures and by the middle the end of the week, it does look like these numbers might
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not be telling quite old story, we may turn cold again next weekend. it is better out there this morning. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. it is 6:30am on monday 19 march. coming up on breakfast today: as a global team of chemical weapons experts descend on salisbury to verify the nerve agent used to poison a former russian spy and his daughter, we will find out what the results could mean for international relations with russia. also this morning: steph will be taking a look at whether the decline in local newspapers is fuelling the rise in fake news. strictly‘s kevin and karen clifton will be here to tell us how they are stronger than
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ever professionally, despite their recent split. good morning, here is a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: more than 80 drivers have been stranded overnight in devon. the a30 was hit by heavy snow, and police say conditions are changing rapidly from passable to impossible. many spent the night at a local school after a 64—mile stretch of the road was shut while police officers and highways england cleared the route. police say accidents have started to be reported to them this morning. they are advising motorists to delay their journeys they are advising motorists to delay theirjourneys in they are advising motorists to delay their journeys in the they are advising motorists to delay theirjourneys in the south—west of england, and to slow down. it comes asa england, and to slow down. it comes as a new weather alert is in place in parts of south—west england and south wales, where more snow is expected. we will have a full weather report in ten minutes' time. and our correspondent is at the
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scene of some of the worst of those conditions, but we are struggling technologically to get hold of her. yes, because of guess what... snow! international chemical weapons experts are due to arrive in the uk later today to test the nerve agent used to poison former russian spy sergei skripal and his daughter yulia. president putin says claims his country was behind the attack are nonsense, but borisjohnson claims russia has been stockpiling novichok for years. official results from russia show president putin has been re—elected with more than 76% of the vote. he told a victory rally that russia must maintain unity following his landslide win, but cctv footage from a number of polling stations appears to show election officials stuffing boxes with ballot papers. the television presenter ant mcpartlin has been arrested on suspicion of drink—driving. police say they were called to reports of a collision involving three cars in south—west london yesterday afternoon.
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a child passenger in one of them was taken to hospital as a precaution. in a statement, scotland yard said a 42—year—old man was arrested at the scene after failing a breathalyser test. a british woman has been killed in northern syria while fighting alongside kurdish forces. it is understood that anna campbell, who was 26 and from lewes in east sussex, died in the town of afrin, which has been the target of a turkish offensive. her father has told the bbc she was idealistic, and knew she was putting her life at risk. scientists have announced a significant breakthrough in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. results from a decade—long international trial have shown a stem cell transplant can halt the disease and improve symptoms. the disabling condition affects about 100,000 people in the uk. doctors in sheffield who were part of the study say the new treatment is a game—changer for many patients. we will talk about that in a little
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bit more depth a little bit later on brea kfast. if you are a big golfer, you may be watching rory mcilroy producing one of those... they say when he putts as well as he can, he is pretty unstoppable. he said yesterday he played the perfect round of golf. i have no idea what that feels like.” am sure very few people do. can you imagine playing the perfect round golf? he said on twitter, 529 days but worth the wait. he has obviously been counting the days. it was 25 september 2016 he won his last tournament, which funnily enough was the day at arnold palmer died, and the day at arnold palmer died, and the arnold palmer invitational was the arnold palmer invitational was the tournament he won yesterday. he is back, with just the tournament he won yesterday. he is back, withjust a couple of
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the tournament he won yesterday. he is back, with just a couple of weeks to go until the masters. the northern irishman hit five birdies in the last six holes to finish on 18—under—par, three shots clear of the rest of the field. tiger woods's rejuvenation continued. the 14—time major winner was tied forfifth, eight behind mcilroy. all these little barriers that you have to overcome, whether it be physical or mental, it is huge for my confidence going into the next few weeks. and, you know, i kept saying i didn't need a win going into augusta. i feel like saying i didn't need a win going into augusta. ifeel like i had a chance, i just wanted into augusta. ifeel like i had a chance, ijust wanted to see signs of good golf, and thankfully i have been able to get both today. another brit returning to form was laura davies. she finished tied for second at the founders cup, in phoenix. it is her best finish on the lpga tour since 2007. she said maybe now people will stop asking her when she will retire. chelsea will face southampton in the semi—finals of the fa cup, coming through 2—1 against leicester after extra—time. it was pedro's goal that sealed chelsea's spot in the final four. it is their tenth fa cup
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semi—final in 18 years, and their only realistic chance of winning a trophy this season. for sure, if you are able to win a trophy, it is important. it is important for the team. at the same time, the most important thing is for us to fight until the end for every competition. mark hughes had a good first game in charge of southampton, as they beat league one side wigan 2—0 to reach the fa cup semi—finals. defender cedric soares scored their second in stoppage—time. people questioned this group, clearly, before i arrived, and maybe questioned my appointment as well. so i think it's only a start, but it's a statement of intent as well. we've got a lot of work to do in the premier league, but we'll enjoy this moment.
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it's a wembley semifinal. celtic were held to a goalless draw by ten—man motherwell, but they still extended their lead at the top of the scottish premiership to ten points. motherwell‘s cedric kipre was sent off for kicking out, but this was the closest celtic came to taking the lead, despite being a man down, the home side held on for a point. roger federer‘s incredible run at the start of this year has come to an end. he was beaten in the final of the indian wells masters byjuan martin del potro. it is the argentine's second tournament win in a row, after victory earlier this month in mexico. the former us open champion had to save three match points before becoming the first person this year to beat the world number one. and the women's final was won in straight sets byjapan's naomi 0saka, who overcame russia's daria kasatkina in the final. it is a first—ever wta tour win for 0saka, who is ranked 44th in the world. ireland's six nations grand slam—winning team celebrated their success in dublin yesterday. the following images do contain flash photography. the irish team were supposed to be attending a grand slam celebration event at the aviva stadium, but it was cancelled due
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bearers rory best and - trophy reflecting those camera lights —— there is rory best. scotland finished their women's six nations campaign in fifth place, after being well beaten by italy in padova. %h; a seal; ekh i is a famously... hotel! michael mcintyre,
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anybody's hotelligiégiiggélggiii ii has donejust the comedian, has done just that. a look at these teachers. this 155 $4 s-ort relief, 33131 t33 '3 33? 3333fi313i—3’u1 33333 t33 '3 333 333l3fi3133—33u1 ,, 3 this; as michael mcintyre does this as part of i saturday night show. l they and then a| holy in a| holy leap mac. welcome to the andy! holy leap mac. welcome to the sport relief midnight game—show —— holy bleep.. and andy murray needs a bleep when he is on the tennis court, let alone being awakened by one of the world's most famous comedians. and then peppa pig. he is a very funny chap, is andy murray. he has gone very quickly from being fast asleep to smiling, which is
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admirable. i like the fact the whole crew are in tennis gear. everyone is dressed up, they have really gone for it, haven't they? the question which concerns me, does he sleep in the nerd? i don't know, i haven't done that much research! there is nothing wrong with that. but what if the duvet had slipped, it could have been a very different story, you are right. and sport relief is on friday. more than 80 drivers have been stranded overnight in devon. the a30 was hit a heavy snow and police say conditions have changed rapidly from possible to impossible. many people spent the night in a local school after a stretch of the a30 was shut. police say accidents are now starting to be reported this morning
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and they are advising motorists to delay their journeys and they are advising motorists to delay theirjourneys in the south—west of england, and perhaps most importantly, to slow down. joining us is richard, who has been managing this rescue centre where many of the motorists took refuge. we canjust many of the motorists took refuge. we can just about see you, tell us what has been going on overnight. how many people have you had to look after? we have 82 people here at the moment, some of them are just waking up moment, some of them are just waking up to moment, some of them are just waking uptoa moment, some of them are just waking up to a very, very cold morning. it has just stop snowing about 20 minutes ago, but as you can probably see behind me, there are quite significant. snow here. and it has been —3 for most of the night. so the snow which has started to melt has now read frozen, and it is absolutely treacherous. and how was the mood overnight refrozen. -- refrozen. we had medical staff to make sure that they were 0k, and as
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soon as make sure that they were 0k, and as soon as they were fine, we equip them with duvets, with blankets, and got them to sleep. so how long do you think they are going to be there, and what are you going to give them for breakfast? well, we are very lucky. we have a fantastic waitrose in 0akhampton, who take their social responsibility very carefully, and we have some food from them for breakfast. so it will be breakfast butties, with lots of bacon, and cereal for the be breakfast butties, with lots of bacon, and cerealfor the kid, and a really hearty breakfast. the mood here is absolutely superb. 0bviously people don't want to be trapped in their vehicles, this is not a scenario that they envisioned when they set out, and so it is nice to come into a centre where it is warm, where they are being cared for. we will look after them, and eventually when the conditions are ready, we will pop them back in their cars and get them on their way. thank you very much forjoining us, and best
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of luck throughout the morning. thank you. here is sarah with a look at this morning's weather. there are still, as we are saying, those weather reports and concerns out there. that's right, good morning to you both. it is a cold start to the day, certainly. a lot of lying snow around the country, a lot of ice around as well. i am on the roof of new broadcasting house in central london, and we have some lying snow. not too much of it but across other parts of the country there is up to around 20 centimetres of note. and ice is going to be more of note. and ice is going to be more ofa of note. and ice is going to be more of a problem today as well, because what we will see some of that snow starting to thaw out a little bit during the day and re— freezing once the sunsets overnight tonight. i think we are not out of the woods just yet in terms of the disruption to the wintry weather, but as we head through the course of the week things will start to change a bit. after that cold, dry start, it will
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be gradually turning a little bit milder, and later in the week there will be the arrival of some rain as well. for the here and now this morning, most of us are dry. a bit more cloud across southern england, down towards the channel isles, bringing a few flurries of snow around here, but most other places look dry. plenty of sunshine on offer. still quite breezy across england and wales, less windy for scotla nd england and wales, less windy for scotland and northern ireland. through the afternoon it is certainly looking drive for the south—west of england, wales, through the midlands and the south—east of england as well. heading northwards, plenty of sunshine breaking through any of that cloud across northern england, scotla nd that cloud across northern england, scotland and northern ireland. a bit more cloud just pushing it around the east coast of scotland and north—east england. but for western scotland and northern ireland it should feel really quite pleasant out there today, with the sunshine and the light winds around as well. temperatures still not doing great for the time of year, so only reaching around about three to seven celsius for most of us out there this afternoon. quite a windchill still across part of england and wales, but it won't be as cold or is
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windy as it was through the weekend, and most places staying dry. 0n into the evening hours, a bit more cloud rolls in across parts of england and wales as well, whereas scotland and northern ireland keep the clear skies in the light winds, so it will be here that the temperatures will be lowest overnight. in fact, as low as about minus five degrees through the central belt of scotland first thing. further south, the central belt of scotland first thing. furthersouth, not quite the central belt of scotland first thing. further south, not quite as cold but they will still be some icy stretches around, perhaps one or two patches of freezing fog first thing tuesday as well. through the day on tuesday as well. through the day on tuesday we are expecting a bit more cloud than perhaps one or two rogue showers across parts of eastern england but elsewhere dry and sunny. less windy during tuesday and temperatures starting to nudge up. we might see around eight or nine degrees during the day on tuesday. tuesday evening, we will start to see that cloud in the south and east slowly clearing away. but then we are going to see the next area of low pressure arising from the atlantic. so from tuesday night and on into wednesday, more cloud build across scotland, in the northern ireland as well. and then overnight
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that cloud will bring some patchy outbreaks of rain to the north—west of the uk. through the day on wednesday we will continue to see a bit of patchy rain for scotland and for northern ireland as well. england and wales, though, should hold onto the slightly drier weather, with the best of the sunshine towards the south of the east. eight or nine degrees for most of us, but we could just see double figures in one or two places on wednesday, something we haven't seen for a little while. so slowly those temperatures through this week are starting to creep up but certainly for today it is a cold and wintry day, still a windchill around. and the weather is likely to continue to cause a little bit more disruption today. did you think that was snow on that bus or what? that is what i was looking at two. we were transfixed. there are concerns the decline of local papers could be fuelling the rise of fake news. steph is looking at why. it is not a surprise is that the
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people? the local newspaper sectors that have tough time, it is more of us getting our news online the last week, the culture secretary matt hancock decided to launch a review into whether this is feeling better for fuelling fake news. into whether this is feeling better forfuelling fake news. you look at how many places have closed since 2005 it is 200 local newspapers that have shut down to argument is given that they are not there doing local journalism what is filling in the gaps? i went to find out more about it at the coventry evening telegraph. by by 330,100,000 copy of the paper have been printed. over by 330,100,000 copy of the paper have been printed. 0ver100 years the coventry evening telegraph has been a trusted source of news in this city. and only once in that time has its presses stop trolling. when it was hit by the blitz in 1940. at its peak it had 600 staff and sold 130,000 copies every day. but things are different now. in the
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last 12 years about 200 local papers have closed and the reason is simple— they are not making as much money from advertising. the back in 2007 about £3 billion was coming into local papers from ads. last year, it was under 700 million. the thing is, advertisers are still spending, it isjust going elsewhere. a lot of that money is going online at it isn't coming online the online newspapers, it is generally going to big classified specialist sites like right move or auto trader and the google search and in the last couple of years, facebook, big—time. and in the last couple of years, facebook, big-time. this is one of our old presses that were state—of—the—art when it was installed. the editor of the paper says although newspaper sales were down by a fifth last year, more people than ever are reading the work its reporters. we can see how the presses were used in the past, obviously, all of this kit is redundant now but the paper certainly isn't, is it? there is a
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much innovation going on. we still publish three conditions are day six days a week but also our website is absolutely thriving. we reach a bigger audience now across interdigital and we have in decades seven a soldier is great but the world has changed and we have changed with it and my reporters are as adept as doing a facebook live as they are at writing 400 words a copy. this paper has moved on but as a matter if others close? the government is worried the decline of local newspapers could be filling the rise of fake news and has launched a review of the industry. a recent study by kings college london found people in areas no local daily paper willis engaged in local elections. and had no petrol less trusted local institutions. the heart of the people of coventry get their local news? do you ever by a local newspaper? no, no, because it is easy to access everything that is going on and crosschecking everything at the same time, via my phone. i have the localtelegraph
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delivered every day. if we need to find anything, it is google, cove ntry find anything, it is google, coventry telegraph on the up. it is news rather than having to look at all of the adverts. people still want local news but with the paper is facing a fierce battle for our attention online, can they find the audience and the advertisers they need to make it pay? if they cannot, there is a chance we will all be poorerfor there is a chance we will all be poorer for it. i love seeing those old pictures. what is interesting is the fact that they don't make as much money from they don't make as much money from the online advertising as they did, from other printing papers, but if you look at the numbers, they are growing the online side of things, we gave you the statistics there with the coventry telegraph, the birmingham mail20,000 with the coventry telegraph, the birmingham mail 20,000 they physically sell but 400,000 look at their website every day. the manchester evening news is huge, 40,000 sell a day but actually over 1 million people are visiting their
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website every day, the liverpool echo over 40,000 by the paper, and 700 people are looking online. there is the growth on the online side of things and that is what the culture secretary wa nts things and that is what the culture secretary wants to get into, is that enough to make sure that we do not have a fake news there? it is interesting because local news is so important. it is what happens around you. so many people want to be journalists, and it is a great way of learning a trade. and local radio as well. look where you are now. well! i didn't know why or saying it, iam passionate well! i didn't know why or saying it, i am passionate about it, ok was to mark good morning. residents of 13 seaside chalets teetering on the edge of cliffs in norfolk have been evacuated from their homes after parts of the fragile coastline gave way during high winds and waves over the weekend. 0ur reporter robby west is there for us now. robby, have there been any developments overnight? 0vernight even more of the coastline
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has disappeared leaving residents to really fear that their homes could plunge into the sea at any moment. if you look behind you can really see what a fortnight of strong winds, rough seas have done to the cliff will stop repeatedly battering the shoreline three metre high waves and on saturday night wins act of 40 miles an hour and it nearly blew me off my feet. i spent the weekend here with a local community and emergency services to see how they have evacuated people. 0ver over the weekend as the tide was drawing in, lifeboat crews helped move people's furniture out. steven chadwick knew he had to go after seeing his garden disappear overnight. yeah, bought it for the sea overnight. yeah, bought it for the sea views, the beautiful sea views, and now the sea has taken it away. work up this morning, had a cup of copy out the back door at 730 and i
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felt like an earthquake and the cliff just went. i felt like an earthquake and the cliffjust went. i was in total shock, watching people, taking my house apart. i don't think will be here tomorrow. homeowners were evacuated following a fortnight of high tide winds that washed up the coast‘s natural defence away. the next morning the damage could be seen. next morning the damage could be seen. the council say 13 homes remain ina seen. the council say 13 homes remain in a precarious position. they are being expected after each high tide. these properties probably won't be lived in again. the damage caused, i was up there as i say friday, and then saturday the tune that was their, a six metre, it was gone. paul reid joined the lifeboat crews after seeing his home. he believes it is unsafe to his wife and two dogs to return to the house that they have lived in the past eight years. the look out, i think to myself you know that is my home andi to myself you know that is my home and i have lost it. but obviously i have got to look on the positive
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side that i wasn't in their last night, i have lost their lives or anything. and everyone looked after us very well so i have to move forward although i have lost my home. five years ago here in hemsby three homes were washed away following a storm surge. this morning, people will return, hoping history has not repeated itself. i'm joined now by keisse with the chairman of the parish council. how is the community holding up? well actually, it is a good rally of support to everyone over the weekend, the local councils is here on the weekend, the lifeboat crew have been fantastic as they always are, the police, everyone has worked well, the fire brigade were here, eating is all day yesterday trying to ensure that everyone is safe so even tesco, they have helped with food, hemsby village hall had accommodation there, the local pub has put people up to. this is the first time this has happened? it happened a couple of years ago and with all the government would have listened to how we were badly
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needing the sea defences here. people '5 homes went into the sea, two or 32 years ago and now could potentially have six. how many more houses will it take to go to sea to get the sea defences sorted out for hemsby? what happens now? everyone will sit around and talk about it and hopefully it will go back to parliament or the government to see if they can help us down here. we're ina bad if they can help us down here. we're in a bad state down here, as you see. thank you very much talking to us. i understand it is a time but you have to help people get back on their feet. this you have to help people get back on theirfeet. this morning, more people will come back to their homes to find out if they are still there and if they will ever be able to live in them again. the lifeboat crew said to me this morning there isn't a chance of if they will go into the sea, it is more a case of when. that is a shame, thank you, we can see the drone shot and it is a staggeringly beautiful area but you can really see and get an impression of how much danger the homes are in.
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thank you, we will come back to you later. you can see the power of the sea. later. you can see the power of the sea. that is norfolk for you this morning. we shall be bringing you the news international headlines from around the uk in a few moments time. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning: # life without you... can you believe it's 10 years since alexandra burke won the x factor? she'lljoin us a little later to talk about the happiness and sadness of the last few years. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. i cannot believe it has been 10 yea rs. i cannot believe it has been 10 years. victor anichebe beyonce in the final? good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollins. residents in croydon have been evacuated from their homes overnight after a car drove into an energy plant and caused a gas leak. police were called to whitestone way just before 8:30pm last night.
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cordons have been put in place and the disruption is expected to continue throughout this morning. some local residents were initially evacuated to the local sainsburys. the incident is not being treated as suspicious. law—abiding russians are welcome in london and should be able to live their life peacefully in the capital, says mayor sadiq khan. police have begun to contact a number of russian exiles following the death last week of businessman nikolai gluskkov in london. the mayor said that any russians feeling threatened in any way should contact the authorities. if you are somebody who has left russia and you are worried about your personal safety, contact the police. we are a safe city. police take any concerns to a public safety very seriously. it is really important you are able to go about your life peacefully here in london. a new network of rapid charge points for electric vehicles across the capital will be launched later. they can charge vehicles in about half an hour,
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compared to eight hours at a standard charge point. it takes the total number to 100, half of which are for taxis. transport for london has previously faced criticism for not installing enough for electric black cabs to use. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes this morning there is no service on the picadilly line between heathrow terminals 1,2,3 and terminal 5 due to a signal failure. and there's a part suspension on the jubilee line. 0n the roads, a23 purley way in waddon is closed between the lombard roundabout and fiveways corner after a collision which led to a gas leak that i mentioned earlier. and in surbition, portsmouth road closed for burst water main repairs. let's have a check on the weather now with sara thornton. good morning. certainly an icy start this morning but the wintry threats are starting to recede now. it is very chilly out there, though, and so do watch out for the ice, particularly where you have some lying snow, and then a dry and bright day ahead, although we do start with some cloud around the first thing
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but it is doing nicely, we'll get some sunshine developing, particularly the further north you are. still a very cold day — not as cold as it was through the weekend but the very best we will see is four or five degrees and that is somewhat tempered by the easterly wind. the wind is easing which is good news, but as we go through the night, it means temperatures fall away sharply this evening. we have some cloud moving towards us from the north. that could give a wintry flurry — no more than that expected. it means some places like central london, temperatures could hold up just above freezing. for tomorrow, starting to feel an awful lot more like spring has sprung. it is the equinox tomorrow. through the week, the temperatures start to recover into double figures by the middle to end of the week. it does look like these numbers might not be telling quite all the story — we may turn cold again next weekend. oh, dear.
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i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. heavy snowfall traps drivers for hours overnight. more than 80 are sleeping in an emergency shelter. a 60—mile stretch of the a30 is still closed. yellow ice warnings are in place across much of the country. sarah keith—lucas will have the latest forecast. good morning, it is monday 19 march. also this morning: international weapons inspectors are due in the uk to examine the nerve agent used to poison russian ex—spy sergei skripal. tv presenter ant mcpartlin is arrested on suspicion
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of drink—driving after a collision involving three cars in south—west london. a significant breakthrough in the treatment of multiple sclerosis, as an international trial shows that stem cell transplants can stop the disease. the decline of local newspapers could be fuelling the rise of fake news. that is according to the government. i will be looking at why. in sport, rory is back. mcilroy wins the arnold palmer invitational, seeing off the challenge ofjustin rose and tiger woods, with the masters just a couple of weeks away. what a finish. sarah has the weather for us this morning. good morning. it is certainly a cold and icy start to the day to day but it looks like the cold snap could be easing. temperatures slowly on the rise over the next few days, looking largely dry through the day. i will bring
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you a full forecast in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: more than 80 drivers have been stranded overnight in devon. a 64—mile stretch of the a30 was hit by heavy snow, and police say conditions are changing rapidly from passable to impossible. 0fficers officers are asking people in devon and cornwall to delay travelling until around mid—morning at the earliest. 0ur reporter sarah ransome is in devon for us this morning. you are near the rescue centre. give us an update, as traffic is now moving. yes, good morning. i am here in devon at the side of the a38 this morning, because it was here yesterday that there were enormous problems keeping this stretch of the a38 clear. gritters and snowploughs we re
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a38 clear. gritters and snowploughs were working to keep this stretch of road clear, but overnight we had those of severe weather warnings in place and overnight there was a tremendous amount of snow. we had about 3—4 centimetres but there was about 3—4 centimetres but there was a real drift over the highmore, creating massive problems for a number of motorists who, for a short while, were stranded in their cars. with me from devon and cornwall police is the sergeant. you have had an update as to what is going on. how are things looking this morning? at the moment the a30 is still closed between exeter junction at the moment the a30 is still closed between exeterjunction 31 and launceston, while the operation is under way to clear the carriageway of those vehicles which became stranded. we evacuated 70 people from the a30 to a local rest ce ntre people from the a30 to a local rest centre where they are being looked after by partner agencies. so i guess those 70 are still there, any idea as to when they might be able to get back into their cars and get to where they want to be? at the
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moment it is a little bit of a moveable feast. it has stopped snowing so we are working hard with our partners to get that road clear, get those moved and get it in the position where we can start getting back to business as usual. you were here all day yesterday as well, looking after this particular stretch. clearly ca rs looking after this particular stretch. clearly cars are moving this morning, we can see them behind you. i guess once you this morning, we can see them behind you. i guess once you come this morning, we can see them behind you. i guess once you come off this sort of road, it is still very tricky out there. yes, very much so. people shouldn't become complacent and although the a38 and other primary routes are running fairly freely, as soon as you get off those routes, conditions are very treacherous through this area. thank you very much indeed. well, the snow may have stopped here, but of course there are problems, as 0llie has just been telling us, and if you have schoolchildren and are hoping to get them to school, please check that their school is open, because hundreds have been declared shout this morning. so it is another snow
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day for some people today. thank you very much, we will be speaking to the man running that rescue centre, they are providing them with breakfast and hopefully at some stage will get them on their way. a full weather report in ten minutes' time. international chemical weapons experts are due to arrive in the uk later today to test the nerve agent used to poison former russian spy sergei skripal and his daughter yulia. president putin says claims his country was behind the attack are nonsense, but borisjohnson claims russia has been stockpiling novichok for years. tom burridge is in salisbury. we have had a presence there for quite sometime. this has been continually developing story, and again now, as these nerve agent experts come to analyse exactly what this is. that's right, good morning, everyone. let's talk about the timeframe of this. the international delegation from the watchdog, the 0pcw, will arrive
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today and will spend a week here, most of that time at the ministry of defence's porton down facility. the idea is that samples of the agent used against sergi skripal will be sent to 20 different independent laboratories in 16 different countries. the key question, i think, is then came the 0pcw, the 0rganisation think, is then came the 0pcw, the organisation for the prohibition of chemical weapons, go any further than confirming the composition of the nerve agent used, and the formula to make it. can it back up the government's claim that it was in the government's words, of a type used in russia. it is worth noting that 0pcw, the watchdog on banned chemical weapons, is independent. that 0pcw, the watchdog on banned chemicalweapons, is independent. it doesn't like to get drawn into political diplomatic rows and its independence is vital for its very existence. thank you very much for that, and we will be talking about that, and we will be talking about that throughout the morning, speaking to an expert... what time is that? it isjust in a few
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minutes' time. that's right, we're nearly there! that has gone quickly this morning. vladimir putin has told a victory rally that russia must maintain unity, following his landslide win in the presidential election. he received more than 76% of the votes, but cctv footage from a number of polling stations appears to show election officials stuffing boxes with ballot papers. some cameras were obscured by things like balloons as well. bent our correspondent is in moscow for us this morning. so he has one, no surprises there. what more information do we have about how the election was carried out? well, as you are saying, there have been violations. not massive, i don't think, as far as we have heard. but there is this election monitoring organisation which is saying there have been hundreds of violations. people have witnessed what they called carousel voting, where a group of people are bussed around, taken to different polling stations, and vote multiple times in multiple polling stations. there was one case where someone who had actually died
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14 years previously was still on the electoral roll and apparently had voted. i think perhaps, even more seriously, there are lots of allegations that people working for the state, and also in private businesses, were put under a lot of pressure to go out and vote. and they had to take photographs of themselves at the ballot boxes to prove they voted, and i think that might bea prove they voted, and i think that might be a significant number of voters. i am sure there will be more information on that in the coming days. the television presenter ant mcpartlin has been arrested on suspicion of drink—driving. the police say they were called to reports of a collision involving three cars in south—west london yesterday afternoon. 0ur correspondent andy moore is in our london newsroom for us this morning. good morning to you. as we say, it
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is on the front page of many of the papers this morning, and there is not that much more detail that we accede know about it. no, you can see from some of those pictures that ant‘s black mini came to rest bumper—to—bumper against another car. he was reportedly travelling with his mother out walking their dogs. scotland yard say a 42—year—old man was arrested on suspicion of drink driving after failing a roadside breath test. that man was taken to a south london police station for further questioning. the fire brigade and ambulance service were called to this incident. a number of people we re this incident. a number of people were treated for minor injuries. the child was taken to hospital for a checkup a precaution. now, ant mcpartlin's personal problems are well documented. he went into rehab last year, and also earlier this year announced he was separating from his wife, lisa armstrong, his
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wife of 11 years. thank you very much for that. scientists researching the treatment of multiple sclerosis say they have made a significant breakthrough. results from a decade—long international trial have shown a stem cell transplant can halt the disease and improve symptoms. it affects about 100,000 people in the uk. doctors in sheffield who were part of the study say it is a game—changer for many patients. let's return to one of our main stories, as inspectors from the 0rganisation stories, as inspectors from the organisation for the prohibition of chemical weapons will arrive in the uk later today. they will carry out tests on the nerve agent used in an attack on a former russian spy and this daughter earlier this month. we have been talking about it for quite sometime. a chemical weapons expert is in salisbury for us this morning.
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thank you forjoining us on bbc brea kfast. thank you forjoining us on bbc breakfast. give us your assessment, what are their priorities when they arrive, the 0pcw? well, the key thing about the 0pcw is that they are the independent investigators for united nations, so it is critical they will get here, and they will first go to porton down for a briefing, because porton down will be providing them with the sample is they have collected around salisbury from this attack. they will want to visit the locations of where these attacks happened, and they will do a detailed investigation, really in parallel with what both porton down and the police have done here. of course, they then need to verify those results. this is going to take some time, i expect. most critical to this, they also need to get to russia, where these novichoks originate from and are made, because
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until they can crosscheck with a russian sample, it will be difficult for the un to a tribute. i personally have absolutely no doubt that these novichoks came from russia, that is the only place in the world they are made, but president putin needs to allow them into russia. he has signed a chemical weapons convention, which says that he will do it, and we will now see whether he is as good as this word. yes, i was going to say, what are the chances they will be allowed to do that, and go to russia, do you think? well, again, it is do we trust the russians? in a lot of cases, recently, perhaps we don't. but president putin has signed a chemical weapons convention, and he is obliged to allow the 0pcw to go to russia, and if he is as innocent as he claims, the only way of proving that is to get the 0pcw to investigate whether
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novichoks are made, and only a few days ago a minister admitted russia had novichoks, we know they are only made there, they were made the 70s and mac 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, and we had suggestions from the foreign secretary that not only are they made there, but they also stock pile. it is interesting, because the ambassador was on the andrew marr show of, denying any involvement. just tell us more about the substance itself. a week on from when we last talk, how do you think they came into contact with it? is there any more information? well, there any more information? well, there is a lot. let me take you up on the ambassador‘s comments. they we re on the ambassador‘s comments. they were pretty ridiculous, but classic russian, what we call plausible deniability, trying to put doubt in the air. as far as the novichok itself, porton down have done a
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detailed analysis. what we don't know is whether it was a powder or liquid. iam know is whether it was a powder or liquid. i am erring towards a liquid, because had been a powder, they had read it in, through car ventilation is tom for example, they would have died instantly. it seems more likely that novichok was absorbed through their skin, and therefore taken a lot longer to act on their nerves. if you breathe in, it goes straight to your blood, virtually. there are still a lot of u na nswered virtually. there are still a lot of unanswered questions, and the fact that the three are still alive gives great hope that they will make some sort of recovery. but still a lot of u na nswered sort of recovery. but still a lot of unanswered questions, and i am sure also the police and porton down are telling us as much as we need to know, but would want to verify and pass that information on to the 0pcw before they give out the full details of this. and as has already been said, don't expect results quickly from the 0pcw. they are very deliberate, and they will take time.
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they won't apportion blame, as such, that will be up to the un to do that. hopefully in a timely fashion, but we are talking weeks, not days. let's bring you up—to—date on the main stories, heavy snow in devon leaves drivers stranded in their castle hours overnight, 80 others are being camped out in emergency shelter. international experts, as we have been hearing, due in the uk today to assess the type of nerve agent used to poison a former spy and his daughter. in salisbury. we showed you some pictures of norfolk earlier with the beecher routeing and there was a growing shot, beautiful, glorious sunshine, blue skies, windy and cold. sarah is in london for us, it is a little murky debit what is the weather picture
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like the rest of the uk today? good morning. certainly a cold start wherever you are first thing this morning, temperatures below freezing, we have got a lot of cloud around across parts of southern england at the moment but for much of the country, blue skies from the word go. the dry day on the cards, the weather is causing disruption with a lying snow and a lot of ice. it will be pleased to hear that through the course of this week things are starting to turn a little less cold so temperatures slowly on the rise after the cold icy start a lot of dry weather on the cards but later in the week we will start to see the snow replaced by a little bit of rain. certainly today for much of the country it is a dry, icy, frosty start. 0ne much of the country it is a dry, icy, frosty start. one or two snow flurries continuing in the far south of england. down towards the channel isles. most other places dry. we will see plenty of sunshine breaking through. not everywhere, there are
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some cloudier areas across england and wales this afternoon, much dry days of the south—west, you have lost the heavy snow you have had and overnight, wales and northern england also seeing sunshine today, a little more cloud edging into the north—east of england and eastern scotland, could bring an isolated snow flurry, but the west of ireland and scotland should feel pleasant, temperatures here to around with light winds too. pretty comfortable there. a culture elsewhere, particularly with the wind chill, the north—westerly across england and wales, temperatures between 0— seven celsius, still chilly. in the evening, a little more cloud drifting in from the east across the england and wales, still some clear spells of the clearest of the skies will be for scotland and northern ireland and with the light winds here, likely to see temperatures around minus five degrees through the central part of scotland, it is called further south across the
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country but still some icy stretches and also the chance of seeing some freezing fog patches on tuesday, particularly in the west. through the day on tuesday, we will keep a bit or cloud across eastern england, one or two rain showers for the likes of lincolnshire, sussex, but for the rest of the country it looks like another dry day, the high preacher in the chart, lots of sunshine on the cards are not doing too much to lift the temperature so still at best around 6— eight degrees or so during the day on tuesday. it is cold as it was through the weekend. in the evening and overnight into wednesday, the cloud clears from the south—east ben moore cloud rolls in from the north—west and that is a weather front that will bring outbreaks of rain to scotland and northern ireland. through the day on wednesday, the northwest southeast split to the weather, a patchy rain for scotland and northern ireland, england and wales mostly dry but the best of the sunshine in the south and east. by wednesday, one or two
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places are starting to creep into double figures so that is a sign of things to come through this week. it looks like things will gradually turn milder but certainly still cold and icy out there today. back to you both. thank you indeed. let's look at some of the papers, the front page of the times has got vladimir putin ina page of the times has got vladimir putin in a coat which is the sort of thing you'd should be wearing this morning in the uk. this is in celebrating winning another election, another six years vladimir putin in russia, 75% confirmed last night around 9pm the final details of the watchdog backed away from tough beating curbs, we will talk to the gambling commission later on about this. the other ones, and let the —— ant it makes a lot of the front pages. the mirror, the sun, the express. the front page of the
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guardian as well, pressure growing on facebook and the mass bridge of personal files, this is on facebook and the mass bridge of personalfiles, this is about on facebook and the mass bridge of personal files, this is about the cambridge analytic of files which the suspicion is that may have been helped to win the election in 2016 in the us and the front page of the guardian as well —— analytica. facebook story is a different take on that, they have got some snow pictures also. did you do the front page of the mail? no. the daily mail, the toll of the plastic we eat and breathe. they find airborne plastic particles in every sample of shot what fish they test. i noticed something on the weekend and i want to know if this is going to happen, you and somebody else on another channel that i will not mention, they may be doing strictly come dancing? no, well, do you know when they read a story saying a tv source. they read a story saying a tv source. that is normally the fellow with the big mouth. 0k. source. that is normally the fellow
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with the big mouth. ok. we have done here is just with the big mouth. ok. we have done here isjust in with the big mouth. ok. we have done here is just in case you were considering we thought we would see how you a look together. very nice! he looks fetching. if it a denial of the moment? it is not a flat denial, it is just very much not going to happen. although if i did do it i would beat him. it goes without saying! think if watching breakfast. let's bring you up—to—date with some other news, a breakthrough drug that is the first to tackle the root cause of this —— cystic fibrosis will be debated by mps later today. it is available in ireland, germany and the us but not used on the nhs because the cost is £100,000 per patient per year. graham satchell has more. right, jump on. let's go. lucy is doing a special workout to help her condition. she has cystic fibrosis, an inherited illness that affects her lungs and digestive system. i do all i can at the moment to try and sort of keep alive longer. it's a bit sad in a way that, like,
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all of my friends don't have to worry about this and when i exercise and that, i'm doing it to stay alive rather than for fun. you got this, yeah? yeah. yeah? yes. good! lucy is attempting a new personal best — to lift 120% of her body weight. drive, drive, drive, drive, drive! nice! cystic fibrosis is a devastating illness, half of the people who have it will die by the age of 31. lucy takes a small mountain of antibiotics to try and stop infections. but there is a new drug, called 0rkambi. it's the first treatment that tackles the root cause of cystic fibrosis. it costs £100,000 per patient per year and nice says it's too expensive for the nhs. people with cf can just pick up a bacteria and can be really, really poorly, so, yeah, knowing there's a drug out there that would help all that, yeah, it's more than frustrating — it's heartbreaking. dublin in ireland.
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14—year—old benat also takes a lot of antibiotics. the irish government approved the use of 0rkambi last year. it's made a huge difference to benat‘s condition. well, it's done a lot, so it's improved my weight, my height, my lung function, my overall health, my energy. so it's really impacted in a good way. yeah, you feel better, do you? yeah. ifeel a lot better and more energetic than before i started to take 0rkambi. campaigners say 0rkambi will save money in the long run by reducing expensive hospital admissions, but the deal done in ireland with vertex, who make 0rkambi, was controversial. it will cost the irish health service almost 400 million euros over five years. it's a lot of money but, you know, can you put a price on anyone's life, especially your child's life? and also for the quality of life, you know, you can't put any price on that. this amount of money could be spent elsewhere for other products and services.
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if you consider the available patient population that would be using this kind of treatment, which is around 3,000 patients, if you multiply 3,000 patients by £100,000 per year, this is around £300 million per year for the nhs. back in preston, lucy and her mum are about to do physio. it takes one hour twice a day to clear lucy's lungs. nhs england say unless the drug company reviews its price, a deal is unlikely. vertex told us they are dismayed by nhs england's approach but want further dialogue. and about the thousands of patients like lucy? it shouldn't be where you live, it should be what you've got. people in the uk might die or it might be too late because of, like, a funding issue. it's not really fair. mps will discuss access to 0rkambi at westminster today but while the arguments go on, lucy's condition continues to get worse. graham satchell, bbc news. it really gives you a sense ofjust
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trying to live with that with lucy and her mum and if you want to get in touch on social media and with your thoughts or any of that, please do. we will be put in that report up on our social media channels as well. you can find it on facebook and twitter. still to come, i winds and crystal roshan has meant these homes in norfolk on the cliff there are in danger of falling into the sea. we shall be live in hemsby a little later. and you can see why you would wa nt to later. and you can see why you would want to live there, it is stunning this morning with the beautiful light. time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollins. residents in croydon have been evacuated from their homes overnight after a car drove into an energy plant and caused a gas leak.
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police were called to whitestone way just before 8:30pm last night. cordons have been put in place and the disruption is expected to continue throughout this morning. some local residents were initially evacuated to the local sainsburys. the incident is not being treated as suspicious. law—abiding russians are welcome in london and should be able to live their life peacefully in the capital, says mayor sadiq khan. police have begun to contact a number of russian exiles following the death last week of businessman nikolai glushkov in london. the mayor said that any russians feeling threatened in any way should contact the authorities. if you are somebody who has left russia and you are worried about your personal safety, contact the police. we are a safe city. police take any concerns to a public safety very seriously. it is really important you are able to go about your life peacefully here in london. one month on and the oil spill along the river lea in north east london has still not
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been cleared up. in an open letter to the authorities, local residents, businesses and boaters are calling on them to clean up the large stretch of river between enfield and newham. they also say lessons need to be learned. let's have a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes this morning, there is no service on the picadilly line between heathrow terminals 1,2,3 and terminal 5 due to a signal failure. and there's a part suspension on the jubilee line. the gas leak i mentioned earlier is causing problems for the trams. no service between therapia lane and wandle park. severe delays on the rest of the line. 0n the roads, the a23 purley way in waddon is closed between the lombard roundabout and fiveways corner, after a collision which led to a gas leak that i mentioned earlier. let's have a check on the weather now with sara thornton. good morning. certainly an icy start this morning but the wintry threats are starting to recede now. it is very chilly out there, though, and so do watch out for the ice, particularly where you have some lying snow, and then a dry
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and bright day ahead, although we do start with some cloud around just first thing but it is doing nicely, we'll get some sunshine developing, particularly the further north you are. still a very cold day — not as cold as it was through the weekend but the very best we will see is four or five degrees and that is somewhat tempered by the easterly wind. the wind is easing which is good news, but as we go through the night, it means temperatures fall away sharply this evening. we have some cloud moving towards us from the north. that could give a wintry flurry — no more than that expected. it means some places like central london, temperatures could hold up just above freezing. for tomorrow, starting to feel an awful lot more like spring has sprung. it is the equinox tomorrow. through the week, the temperatures start to recover into double figures by the middle to end of the week. it does look like these numbers might not be telling quite all the story — we may turn cold again next weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom
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in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: more than 80 drivers have been stranded overnight in devon. it is after a 64—mile stretch of a major road in south—west england, the a30, was shut because of heavy snow. police officers and highways england have been trying to clear the snow from the road. devon and cornwall police have been keeping their twitter followers up—to—date on the disruption all morning, especially over the problems with the a30. they say that if you're already on it, drive with caution as conditions are variable, changing rapidly from passable
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to impossible, and that those who haven't yet set out should delay their journey until mid—morning at the earliest. this morning they reported that road traffic accidents are now starting to be reported to them by those insisting on driving this morning. they also warned parts of the m5 is icy, and advised drivers to delay their journey and slow down. and we will have a full weather report for you in about ten minutes. international chemical weapons experts are due to arrive in the uk later today to test the nerve agent used to poison former russian spy sergei skripal and his daughter yulia. president putin says claims his country was behind the attack are nonsense, but borisjohnson claims russia has been stockpiling novichok for years. test results could be seen in around two weeks' time. official results from russia show president putin has been re—elected with more than 76% of the vote. he told a victory rally that russia must maintain unity, following his landslide win, but cctv footage from a number of polling stations appears to show election officials stuffing boxes with ballot papers.
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the television presenter ant mcpartlin has been arrested on suspicion of drink—driving. police say they were called to reports of a collision involving three cars in south—west london yesterday afternoon. a child passenger in one of them was taken to hospital as a precaution. in a statement, scotland yard said a 42—year—old man was arrested at the scene after failing a breathalyser test. a british woman has been killed in northern syria, fighting alongside kurdish forces. it is understood that anna campbell, who was 26 and from lewes in east sussex, died in the town of afrin, which has been the target of a turkish offensive. her father has told the bbc she was idealistic, and knew she was putting her life at risk. scientists have announced a significant breakthrough in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. results from a decade—long international trial have shown a stem cell transplant can halt the disease and improve symptoms. the disabling condition affects about 100,000 people in the uk. doctors in sheffield who were part
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of the study say the new treatment is a game—changer for many patients. we will have an update on the weather in about ten minutes' time, orso, weather in about ten minutes' time, or so, because it is still causing problems for people. and police in the south—west of england are saying that if you need to go out, please ta ke that if you need to go out, please take care and slow down, but if you can possibly delay yourjourney, mid—morning as the best time to go, or later on today. in the sport, rory mcilroy is very much the story. rory mcilroy is very much the story. rory is the story, have you been working on that? at least ten seconds. he has been counting the days, 539 days since his last victory on the tour, which was
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september 20 16. i have been looking at the odds for the masters, and he is the favourite to win the green jacket, then dustinjohnson behind him, tiger woods ‘s third favourite. justin rose is in the mix, henrik stenson, all the big names you would expect to be there. that leaderboard looked very tasty indeed. let's have a look at how rory mcilroy closed off the arnold palmer invitational. the northern irishman hit five birdies in the last six holes to finish on 18—under—par, three shots clear of the rest of the field. tiger woods's rejuvenation continued. the 14—time major winner was tied forfifth, eight behind mcilroy. all these little barriers that you have to overcome, whether it be physical or mental, it's huge for my confidence going into the next few weeks. and, you know, i kept saying i didn't need a win going into augusta. ifeel like i had a chance. ijust wanted to see signs of good golf, and thankfully i've been able to get both today. another brit returning
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to form was laura davies. she finished tied for second at the founders cup, in phoenix. it is her best finish on the lpga tour since 2007. she said maybe now people will stop asking her when she will retire. 54, laura davies. chelsea will face southampton in the semi—finals of the fa cup, coming through 2—1 against leicester after extra—time. it was pedro's goal that sealed chelsea's spot in the final four. it is their tenth fa cup semi—final in 18 years, and their only realistic chance of winning a trophy this season. for sure, if you are able to win a trophy, it's important. it's important for the team. at the same time, the most important thing is for us to fight until the end for every competition. mark hughes had a good first game in charge of southampton, as they beat league one side wigan 2—0 to reach the fa cup semi—finals. defender cedric soares scored their second in stoppage—time. celtic were held to a goalless draw
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by ten—man motherwell, but they still extended their lead at the top of the scottish premiership to ten points. motherwell‘s cedric kipre was sent off for kicking out, but this was the closest celtic came to taking the lead, patrick roberts letting fly late on. despite being a man down, the home side held on for a point. roger federer‘s incredible run at the start of this year has come to an end. he was beaten in the final of the indian wells masters byjuan martin del potro. it is the argentine's second tournament win in a row, after victory earlier this month in mexico. the former us open champion had to save three match points before becoming the first person this year to beat the world number one. ireland's six nations grand slam—winning team celebrated their success in dublin yesterday. the following images do contain flash photography. the irish team were supposed to be attending a grand slam celebration event at the aviva stadium, but it was cancelled due to bad weather. instead, fans got to see the players showing off the trophy outside the team's hotel.
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scotland finished their women's six nations campaign in fifth place, after being well beaten by italy in padova. on a terrible pitch, italy won by 26—12, with beatrice rigoni crossing to secure their bonus point. france clinched their fifth grand slam with friday's thumping of wales. written's pa ralympian written's paralympian is, returning from south korea after hitting their medals target. with all seven podium finishes won byjust two women —— britain's pa ralympian finishes won byjust two women —— britain's paralympian is. questions we re britain's paralympian is. questions were posed about the breadth and depth of the british team. the past ten days has seen the british team pushed to their limits on the snow and ice. disappointment for the curlers as they came up short, and the snowboarders faulted. but on the ski slopes, it was a
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different story, with this pair winning four medals including gold on the final day to become britain's most successful in the paralympian is. it has been amazing, it has been an incredible event. everyone has been really helpful, really lovely. it is really like nice to have family and friends here, supporting us. the resilience of the athletes have shown, from a dnf to race won the golden race five, and i think the golden race five, and i think the preparation and the ability for them to deliver those kinds of performances is down to talent, but also the support behind the scenes. great britain had a target of six 12 medals here in pyeongchang, aiming to improve on a performance from four years ago, when they won six medals than the historic gold. with british athletes competing across more sports than ever before at bealiba games, the target seemed achievable. and it was, thanks to one sport, one classification and a
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small contingent of athletes winning all seven medals but it calls into question the breadth and depth of the british team. i am proud of all of the athletes who came to pyeongchang to represent in the paralympics. yes, the medals came from snow, but every one of those athletes gave it their all. so the game drew to a fitting clothes with britain's golden girls carrying the flag. international paralympic committee could also celebrate, with more nations taking part than ever before and a record number of tickets sold. they can now call these games late greatest paralympics to date. and shall we watch andy murray getting a rude awakening again? this is all for sport relief, and it is michael mcintyre creeping into former world number one andy murray's bed at st george ‘s park where he is doing rehab and training, before returning to tennis from andy! welcome!
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holy bleep! ..to the sport relief midnight game—show. this is 1am, and poor andy murray's face. there is all kinds of leaping and expletives, as you would expect from andy murray. —— bleeping. and expletives, as you would expect from andy murray. -- bleeping. he deals with it very well, because upturn is peppa pig, for some reason. and surprised by finding michael mcintyre in your bedroom, and on top of that you have to once again show questions. it is one of the things michael mcintyre does on his show, and it is normally unsuspecting members of the public, but for sport relief it is andy murray. and you will see how he gets on with his midnight game—show on friday, as well as all the other fund of sport relief. that is brilliant, i am fund of sport relief. that is brilliant, iam really fund of sport relief. that is brilliant, i am really enjoying that. he went from fast asleep to being amused, in a record time. he
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looks like dan looks when he arrives in the morning. don't give my secrets away, i switched the brain on about three minutes before six a.m.. my hairwas on about three minutes before six a.m.. my hair was a right old mess this morning. and sport relief continues throughout this week. let's go back to our top story this morning, and 80 motorists have been stranded overnight in devon. police have warned people living in the county not to travel until mid—morning at the earliest. let's go to haldon hill in devon, where our reporter sarah ransome is this morning. good morning to you, how are things? it is really cold here this morning, as you might imagine. some of those weather warnings are still in place. as you say, i am at the bottom of haldon hill, the scene yesterday of frantic snow ploughing and gritting as the emergency plan was put into place to get this road clear. you might be behind me some of those gritters are out again this morning,
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on the bridge over there, trying to keep things moving. 0vernight we had such a lot of snow. i will walk over here to give you an idea. inches and inches fell here at this part of devon, and further away, about 30 miles from where i am now, you were talking about those murderers who we re talking about those murderers who were stranded on the a30, they even bigger dump of snow to content with, which made life very difficult for some of them. they had to move to an emergency centre overnight. lizard conditions, 70 or so they are now, —— blizzard conditions. that road is still shut and is unlikely to be open for a couple of hours between exeter and launceston. nobody had to stay in their vehicles overnight, but they were moved to that rest centre. earlier i spoke to one of the gentleman who has been involved in keeping the roads in devon open. he was telling me the latest. it is
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sergeant holly taylor from devon and cornwall police. although the a30 and other routes are running well, conditions are treacherous around that area. as you can hear, he was saying the routes are treacherous and he was telling me that once you get off these a roads, it is really difficult to get around. one thing which others are keen to point out is that if you have schoolchildren and they are thinking about going to school this morning, you might want to just check, because hundreds of schools here in devon and in cornwall and parts of wales are closed. it is another snow day for some of them. thank you very much indeed, and you can see why the snow would be causing some problems. let's have a look elsewhere in the
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uk this morning. this is hull, a little bit of snow on the rooftops, but lovely. and we will go to glasgow, and i think somewhere... i can't really see it. in the far distance you can see snow on the hills. you have got good highs. no sign of the light stuff in belfast. lovely, clear blue skies this morning, which is what it is like when we have the shots from norfolk as well. and we have reports that a couple had just got married and they had to spend the night in the rescue centre. they had their wedding reception on saturday night, and they were trying to get the watergate bay in cornwall for their honeymoon, and nobody knew it was snowing. so they had their honeymoon night in the rescue centre, on the wooden floor in 0akhampton. we might speak to them later. hopefully we can speak to them at a ten this morning. —— 8:10am this morning. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather.
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it is soft powdery snow is so not the best type of snow for making a snowman and igloos and snowballs but could the skiing on. if you have been out there enjoying some of the snow, you still have a lot of lying snow, you still have a lot of lying snow out today but of course it is causing quite a lot of disruption too critical across the south—west of england as well, where we had about 20 centimetres of snow over the past 24 hours. today will be a dry day across the country and gradually through the week, the weather is set to turn a little bit more mild. temperatures will be on the rise and after the dry start there will be some rain on the way later on in the week. for this morning, most parts of the country start the day on a dry but bitterly cold note with a sharp frost and some icy stretches. more cloud across the far south of england and some flurries this morning down towards the channel isles but with
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other places look dry. blue sky and sunshine but still feeling cold, particularly across england and wales, quite the biting north—easterly breeze around. south—west england and wales, they have lost a heavy snow yesterday and overnight so it is more dry that some of the snow will tend to thought and refreeze overnight. scotla nd thought and refreeze overnight. scotland and northern ireland are having a decent sort of day, with the lie to winds it will feel pleasa nt the lie to winds it will feel pleasant in the sunshine but temperatures not great —— lighter winds. it was look older than what it is where you have the north—easterly wind. less windy and so north—easterly wind. less windy and so further north in the scotland and northern ireland. 0vernight, a little more cloud filtering in, particularly towards the east. for east in england, not quite as cold under the cloud but further north and west, still clear skies and light winds too the overnight temperatures once again could be subzero for many, perhaps —5 through
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the central belt of scotland. first in tuesday we are expecting once againa in tuesday we are expecting once again a really sharp frost, lots of ice, some lying snow, and perhaps freezing fog patches here and there. through the day on tuesday, more cloud across eastern parts of england and it could bring one or two rain shower with the parts of lincolnshire, sussex, but they will be hit and miss and much of the country is having another dry day with high pressure in charge. plenty of sunshine, a decent day for wales, north—west england, northwest scotland as well. still chilly but certainly not as cold as it was through the weekend. likely to see eight degrees or so on tuesday during the day, more cloud is working in from the north—west through tuesday night, that is ahead ofa through tuesday night, that is ahead of a weather front living in, it is set to bring in patchy rain to northern ireland and the scotland through tuesday night and on to the day on wednesday it looks like england and wales will stay largely dry on wednesday but the best of the
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sunshine is probably towards the south and the east so for most of us temperatures by wednesday will be eight or nine degrees but we could just about the double figures pushing in through the day on wednesday. it is a sign of things to come, it is turning more mild through the week but the snow that we have out there isn't going to melt ina we have out there isn't going to melt in a hurry, particularly where we have had around 20 centimetres towards the south—west. we have had around 20 centimetres towards the south-west. thank you, sarah, good news, even if there are some trouble issues. thank you for the analysis of the snow also, sarah. there are concerns the decline of local papers could be fuelling the rise of fake news. steph is looking at why. yes, good morning. this is to do with the fact that the newspaper industry has been in decline, particularly the local papers, we are not buying as many of them and since 2005 200 local papers have closed some of its concern about who is filling the gap because people still want local news and the governed have launched a review to look at how the industry has coped with the decline and whether it is
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the cause of fake news of this is something i have been looking into, i went to the coventry file: by 3:30, nearly100,000 copies of the paper have been printed. for over 100 years, the coventry evening telegraph has been a trusted source of news in this city. and only once in that time have its presses stopped rolling — when it was hit by the blitz in 1940. at its peak, it had 600 staff and sold 130,000 copies every day. but things are different now. in the last 12 years, about 200 local papers have closed and the reason is simple — they are not making as much money from advertising. so back in 2007, about £3 billion was coming into local papers from ads. by last year, it was under £700 million. the thing is, advertisers are still spending, it's just going elsewhere. a lot of that money is going online but it isn't going online to online newspapers.
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it is generally going to big classified specialist sites like rightmove or auto trader, it's also going to google search and in the last couple of years, it's been going to facebook, big—time. so this is one of the old presses. it was state—of—the—art when it was installed. the editor of the coventry telegraph says although newspaper sales were down by a fifth last year, more people than ever are reading the work of its reporters. we can see how the presses were used in the past. 0bviously, all of this kit is redundant now, but the paper certainly isn't, is it? there's so much innovation going on. no, no. so we still publish three editions a day, six days a week, but also, our website is absolutely thriving. we reach a bigger audience now across print and digital than we have done in decades, so nostalgia is great but the world's changed, we've changed with it, and my reporters are as adept as doing a facebook live as they are at writing 400 words of copy. this paper has moved on, but does it matter if others close? well, the government is worried the decline of local newspapers could be fuelling the rise of fake
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news and has launched a review of the industry. a recent study by kings college london found people in areas with no local daily paper were less engaged in local elections and had less trust in local institutions. so, how do the people of coventry get their local news? do you ever buy a local newspaper? no, no, because it's really easier to access everything that is going on and, you know, cross—checking everything at the same time via my phone. i have the local telegraph delivered every day. if we need to find anything, it's google, coventry telegraph comes straight on the app. and it's news rather than having to look at all of the adverts. people still want local news, but with the papers facing a fierce battle for our attention online, can they find the audience and the advertisers they need to make it pay? well, if they can't, there's a chance we'll all be poorer for it. what a van! what is important to
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point out is like the coventry evening telegraph there are lots of local papers who were still doing a lot online is that if you look at the manchester evening news they sell 40,000 copies a day physically but they have about! million people who go online on the website. it is important that the local papers find a way to make money from that. that is the issue. people still want local news. of course they do. it is great for training, too. thank you, love. residents of 13 seaside chalets teetering on the edge of cliffs in norfolk have been evacuated from their homes after parts of the fragile coastline gave way during high winds and waves over the weekend. 0ur reporter robby west is there for us now. robby, have there been any developments overnight? even more of the cliffs overnight
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have disappeared, residents here are worried that any moment their homes could plunge into the ocean. if you have a little look behind me, you can really see what a fortnight of strong winds, torrential rain and rough seas have done to this coastline, they have washed away a lot of the natural defences that we hear. i have been here all weekend and the winds averaged 49 miles an hour and the rate of three metres high, i hour and the rate of three metres high, i spent the weekend here chatting to people, seeing the evacuation efforts from the locals and the emergency services. over the weekend as the tide was drawing in, lifeboat crews helped move people's furniture out. steven chadwick knew he had to go after seeing his garden disappear overnight. yeah, just bought it for sea views, the beautiful sea views, and now the sea has taken it away. woke up this morning, had a cup of coffee at 7:30 at the back door and i felt like an earthquake and the cliff just went. i was in total shock, watching people taking my house apart. i don't think they'll be here tomorrow. homeowners were evacuated
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following a fortnight of high tide and easterly winds that washed up the coast‘s natural defences away. the next morning, the damage could be seen. the council say 13 homes remain in a precarious position and are being expected after each high tide. these properties probably won't be lived in again. the damage caused there — i was up there, as i say friday, and then saturday the dune what was there, there about a a six metre dune, that is actually gone. paul rayjoined the lifeboat crews after seeing his home. he believes it is unsafe for his wife and two dogs to return to the house that they have lived in the past eight years. to look at, i think to myself you know, that is my home and i have lost it. but obviously, i have got to look on the positive side that i wasn't in there last night, haven't lost our lives or anything, and everyone got us out and looked after us very well, so i have to move forward, though i have lost my home.
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five years ago here in hemsby, three homes were washed away following a storm surge. this morning, people will return, hoping history has not repeated itself. i'm joined by jan from i'm joined byjan from the county council. what is in the response from the council? it has been an excellent multi agency response, the parish council here locally, the borough council, the yarmouth council, and norfolk county council working together to make sure the lines are preserved and people are looked after and cared for. what are you doing to the people whose homes are at risk as the mark in the immediate short term we are making sure they are safe and that they have their possessions. in the longer term, it is certainly an ongoing debate about how communities along the coast are protected. we spoke to the parish council this morning who want to see the government step in and help. as i
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say it is an ongoing debate. my concern in terms of the emergency response is to make sure that we have plans in place to be able to deal with an emergency when it arises. what we had here was a numberof arises. what we had here was a number of years of planning with the local community to insure, and local volu nta ry local community to insure, and local voluntary agencies, to ensure there was a plan in place to ensure they are evacuated in time before they lost their homes. and it happened in a very successful way. think if joining us, chan. more residents will come back this morning to find out what state they are in. they are worried because it looks like it could be the end of their homes. thank you, robby, it has been lovely to see the shot because you can see it isa to see the shot because you can see it is a very beautiful part of the coastline, you can see why people wa nt to coastline, you can see why people want to live there but also the power of those waves against the cliffs as well. huge chunks of the cliffs as well. huge chunks of the cliff disappearing there over the weekend. we will leave you with that shot while we take you to the news, travel and weather. good morning from bbc london news.
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i'm victoria hollins. residents in croydon have been evacuated overnight after a car drove into an energy plant and caused a gas leak. police were called to whitestone way just before 8:30pm last night. cordons have been put in place and the disruption is expected to continue throughout this morning. the incident is not being treated as suspicious. a new network of rapid charge points for electric vehicles across the capital will be launched later. they can charge vehicles in about half an hour, compared to eight hours at a standard charge point. it takes the total number to 100, half of which are for taxis. transport for london has previously faced criticism for not installing enough for electric black cabs to use. an invasive species of caterpillar is destroying the capital's box trees. the box tree caterpillar arrived from china in 2011, and the royal horticultural society is now breeding them so it can best learn how to tackle the problem.
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it seems to be particularly prevalent pest in gardens in south—west london. they can completely stripped the plant of leeds and they plant ofl—eeds and—they denftéeeie cover plant ofl—eeas and—they danftéeeie cover in plant ofl—eeas and—they danftéeeie and cover in , ‘ proof, it = webbing and insect proof, it doesn't look very nice and severe delays to a signal failure. the rest of the lines are running well at the moment. the gas leak i mentioned earlier is causing problems for the trams. no service between therapia lane and wandle park. severe delays on the rest of the line and on the roads, the a23 purley way in waddon is closed between the lombard roundabout and fiveways corner, after a collision which led to a gas leak that i mentioned earlier. let's have a check on the weather now with sara thornton.
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good morning. certainly an icy start this morning but the wintry threats are starting to recede now. it is very chilly out there, though, and so do watch out for the ice, particularly where you have some lying snow, and then a dry and bright day ahead, although we do start with some cloud around just first thing but it is doing nicely, we'll get some sunshine developing, particularly the further north you are. still a very cold day — not as cold as it was through the weekend but the very best we will see is four or five degrees and that is somewhat tempered by the easterly wind. the wind is easing which is good news, but as we go through like spring has sprung. through the weelfitha'temparatures = by the middle to end of the week. it does look like these numbers might not be telling quite
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all the story — we may turn cold again next weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. stranded — heavy snowfall traps drivers for hours overnight on one of the main routes through devon — more than 80 are sleeping in an emergency shelter. a 60 mile stretch of the a30 is closed. yellow ice warnings are in place across much of the country. the severe weather is also having a dramatic impact on norfolk, where parts of the coast have given way. sarah keith lucas will have the latest forecast. another bitterly cold day today. and
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although things are looking guy with sunshine, we still keep the threat of that lying snow and ice, things eventually turning a bit milder through the rest of this week. i will bring you all the details in 15 gaad morning; the decline of newspapers could be causing a rise in fake news according to the government. i will have more. in sport, rory‘s back... mcilroy wins the arnold
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palmer invitational, seeing off the challenge ofjustin rose and tiger woods with the masters just a couple of weeks away. and we've got a stellar line—up of twinkle—toed performers on the sofa this morning — alexandra burke and strictly‘s kevin and karen clifton will be here. good morning. first, our main story. more than 80 drivers have been stranded overnight in devon. it's after a 64—mile stretch of a major road in south west england — the a30 — was shut because of heavy snow. police say conditions are "changing rapidly from passable to impossible" — and officers are asking people in devon and cornwall to delay travelling until mid—morning at the earliest. 0ur reporter sarah ransome is in devon for us this morning. we can see why the snow might be causing problems. yes, overnight we had several inches of snow, as you can see behind me. we had heavy snow for most of the day yesterday. some
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of the roads are now moving. you can see the a38 was not for most but as you éa. . taday, handradsaf'rnptprisisglat 80 or so had to spend the stuck. 80 or so had to spend the night ina stuck. 80 or so had to spend the night in a rest centre at 0kehampton. there are still there this morning, being fed cups of tea and breakfast while emergency services and the snowploughs and gritters are out trying to clear the road. at the moment, 60 miles of that road is shut because it is simply in pass the ball because there is so much snow and the temperature is dropping and there is a worry that it could to dice later. the amber warning has gone today, but there are still weather warnings in force, but there are still weather warnings inforce, and but there are still weather warnings
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in force, and with temperatures plummeting later, back to be a real problem. hundreds of schools are shut across the patch, and we also have hospitals putting out a request for 4x4 drivers to volunteer to come in to try and help ferry workers who are stuck in outlying locations into work this morning. and we'll have a full weather report for you in about 10 minutes. there is a couple who were on the way to their honeymoon and had to spend the night in a rescue centre. we will speak to them later.” spend the night in a rescue centre. we will speak to them later. i think they are looking forward to their proper honeymoon. international chemical weapons experts are due to arrive in the uk later today to test the nerve agent used to poison former russian spy sergei skripal and his daughter yulia. president putin says claims that his country was behind the attack are "nonsense" but borisjohnson claims russia has been stockpiling novichok for years. tom burridge is in salisbury this morning for us — tom, is the hope that once this has
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been analysed in a couple of weeks' time, we will know exactly where it has come from? that will be the hope of the british government. let's talk through the time frame of augis the delegation from this international watchdog for banned chemical weapons arrived today in wiltshire. they will spend roughly a week here, mostly at the porton down military research facility. the idea is then that samples of the nerve agent used against sergei and yulia skripal which led them to be in a critical condition on the bench area behind me two weeks ago will be sent abroad. we believe they will be sent to as many as 20 laboratories in 16 countries. the testing will take two weeks, so we could be waiting up to three weeks for the conclusions of the 0pcw to come back. the key question is if they can say anything to back—up the government's claim that the nerve agent used in the attack was of a type developed in russia. it is worth noting that the
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0pcw is an independent body and it will want to stay out as much as possible from the political and diplomatic wrangling surrounding all of this. tom, thank you. official results from russia show president putin has been re—elected with more than 76% of the vote. but cctv footage from a number of polling stations appears to show election officials stuffing boxes with ballot papers. 0ur correspondent richard galpin is in moscow for us this morning. we hear some of the pictures are obscured by the linens and things like that. richard, we knew it was guaranteed that putin would win this election, but tell us how it was conducted? as you were saying, there have been violations. certainly, one of the election watchdogs is saying there were hundreds of violations in different parts of the country.
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these included all sorts of methods, including stuffing ballot boxes. there is video showing a couple of women trying surreptitiously to stuff the ballot is into boxes in one area. that was repeated in a number of locations. there was also a case of someone who had been dead for 14 years apparently still appearing on the electoral roll and a p pa re ntly appearing on the electoral roll and apparently still voting. and most seriously in terms of numbers, there were lots of reports of people, particularly those working for state institutions and companies, being forced to vote and proving it to their employers by taking selfies inside the polling stations.” their employers by taking selfies inside the polling stations. i am sure more will be investigated over the coming days. thank you to richard galpin in starry moscow. if you look at the papers this morning, you look at the papers this morning, you have the mirror andy sun.
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the television presenter, ant mcpartlin, has been arrested on suspicion of drink—driving. it is also on the front page of the express. 0ur arts and entertainment correspondent colin paterson is here. what do we know about what's happened ? this happened before four o'clock yesterday afternoon in south—west london. ant mcpartlin's mini was seen london. ant mcpartlin's mini was seen careering into another minute and then bouncing onto a bmw. the police told us 842—year—old man was arrested on suspicion of drunk driving having failed a breathalyser test at the side of the road. people we re test at the side of the road. people were treated on the scene for medical issues and a girl we believe to be three was taken to hospital foran to be three was taken to hospital for an examination. but many said that in the car with ant was his mother and his dog. we know he had been having issues, it's fair to say. last year, he went into rehab. it was sad at the time that this was the painkiller addiction, but this
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is a guy who on saturday night presented saturday night takeaway on itv. the show came back last month and they are at the peak of their game professionally. the 100th episode of that show was watched by 9 million people. in three weeks' time, the finale of that series, saturday night takeaway, they are supposed to be going to florida and taking over the universal theme park, so it will be interesting to see if that happens. colin, thank you. a british woman has been killed in northern syria while fighting alongside kurdish forces. it's understood that anna campbell — who was 26 and from lewes in east sussex — died in the town of afrin, which has been the target of a turkish offensive. her father has told the bbc she was idealistic and knew she was putting her life at risk. 0ur correspondent emma vardy reports. the gambling commission is to recommend that the government reduced the maximum stake on fixed odds betting terminals to £30 or less. bookmakers claimed that if the
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gambling watchdogs have stuck to its original limit ofjust gambling watchdogs have stuck to its original limit of just £2, gambling watchdogs have stuck to its original limit ofjust £2, it could have caused hundreds of betting shops to close and thousands ofjobs to be lost. almost 1,000 tiny sausage dogs and their owners went dashing through greenwich park in london over the weekend. a record number of dachshunds and their owners took to the great outdoors despite the freezing temperatures to take part in the third ever sausagefest, which was created to celebrate the breed. thanks forjoining us. scientists have announced a significant breakthrough in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. results from a decade—long international trial have shown a stem cell transplant can halt the disease and improve symptoms. the disabling condition affects about 100,000 people in the uk. doctors in sheffield who were part of the study, say the new treatment is a "game changer" for many patients. 0ur medical correspondent has this
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report. this was louise willetts in 2015, undergoing her stem cell transplant in sheffield. the treatment involves chemotherapy to knock out her faulty immune system, and then a transplant of these healthy stem cells, taken from her bone marrow, which rebuilds her immune system. it's transformed her health from being in a wheelchair during her worst relapse, she is now symptom—free. it does feel like a miracle. i almost have to pinch myself and think, is this real? is it really gone, is it ever going to come back? i don't live in fear any more, so i actually live every day the way that i want to live it, rather than around my ms. around 100,000 people in the uk have ms, which attacks the brain and spinal cord. in an international trial of around 100 patients, those who had a transplant not only experienced a reduction in their disability, they were ten times less likely
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to see their treatment fail after three years compared to those who received drugs. the stem cell transplant involves a one—off cost of £30,000, no more expensive than the yearly cost of some drugs. it is a gruelling treatment, and not suitable for all ms patients, but sheffield's royal hallamshire hospital, part of the international trial, said it was a game—changer, and it hoped many more ms patients would receive a transplant. let's talk about this more with the director of ms research. tell us about what they found and how significant it is? this is a really impressive results of this study. they found that people with active
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ms, highly active relapsing remitting ms who experience frequent attacks, responded well to this treatment. these were people who have not responded to some of the treatments that are already out there, so it's really encouraging that in the near future, this there, so it's really encouraging that in the nearfuture, this is likely to be a treatment that is available to people with ms on the nhs asa available to people with ms on the nhs as a possible choice if you meet the criteria. janet, tell us about your diagnosis and how this has affected you. i was diagnosed really suddenly in 2015. at the time i was 48 and it was really sudden. i had a huge relapse that put me in hospital and that was when i was diagnosed within the space of a week. then my life went from running my own business, working 12 to 14 hours a day every day to just not being able to do anything. and that has pretty much been how it has gone. it has progressed really fast. there is a
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disability scale. they measure your disability scale. they measure your disability from zero to ten, zero being the disability and ten being dead, and! being the disability and ten being dead, and i went from one to six and a half in the space of a year. and you have had stem cell therapy, but not in this country? yeah. sorry to correct you, but it is actually the transplant. had moscow last year in july. i could have had it on the nhs, but i couldn't wait because i was progressing so quickly. i couldn't wait for it to be done in the uk, sol couldn't wait for it to be done in the uk, so i went to moscow and had it done there. the chemotherapy is what does the job. they have missed your stem cells from your blood. the chemotherapy is like an it reboot, so chemotherapy is like an it reboot, so they switch off your immune system and then switch it on again. the chemo switches it off, and the
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stem cells speed up the recovery and the chemo kills the immune system first. ignorant question - is that the same treatment that would be available in this country now? it has not been routinely considerate as treatment in the uk. it isa considerate as treatment in the uk. it is a very aggressive therapy and there are side effects that need to be considered. so it is great that it soon will be considered wittingly but still for people with very active and highly aggressive ms, we would encourage people to think about treatment options and how it fits in with all the therapies available. getting a diagnosis of ms can be pretty devastating. absolutely, it is life changing. from being fit and well and living your life you suddenly have limitations you did not expect and
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it because it is the central nervous system, it affects everything from mobility which is obvious to brain fog, fatigue. all manner of things. speech, swallowing, cognitive ability, absolutely every part of you. and what was the difference before and after the treatment? i'm about eight months posttransplant and it is slow. my brain fog lifted after the first dose of chemotherapy so after the first dose of chemotherapy soiam after the first dose of chemotherapy so i am much more with it. if i am tired it comes back a little bit but generally i am more alert and cognitive skills are better. for people watching this morning you are saying that this treatment, how soon could be available? it is already available in some centres but not considered as, it will be considered asa considered as, it will be considered as a third line treatment over the next couple of months. that means
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people who have not responded to other treatments available. so it is a very aggressive treatment and i thinkjanet a very aggressive treatment and i think janet and i a very aggressive treatment and i thinkjanet and i spoke for the show and it is quite tough to go through. it is but i would say from the perspective of the patient i did not get the treatment until i was at this massive level of disability. if i had had a similar i would not be fighting the same disabilities because it is designed to hold the progression of the disease. if you hold it soon before you get disabled then you have a better chance. but now i'm fighting disability that i already had existing. so people who this could help, would they be aware of that? there's a lot of great information on the website. we are working with health care
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professionals around the uk, trying to encourage people with ms to be really informed about treatment options. i found most of my information from this group groups, there strong network of faith group books for the uk which all share and help the charity. you're obviously incredibly well informed and also explain it very well. thank you both very much. a very busy morning in terms of the weather. some big issues in devon and south—west england. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. we had a lot of heavy snow, up to 20 centimetres across parts of the south west of england. and some really icy conditions. so the weather continues to cause some disruption to date but the good news is that the cold spell is easing.
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today we expect a dry day and over the next few days temperatures rising. this week of course we have the spring equinox, tomorrow, and temperatures just edging closer to where they should be for the time of year. and after that cold start to the week a bit of rain arriving later in the week. for this morning many of us dry, a bit more cloud around across southern england bringing in the odd flurry of snow. but some blue skies and sunshine elsewhere although it is going to be feeling bitterly cold especially where you are exposed to that risk north easterly wind across england and wales. for the south—west of england and wales a lot of lying snow still around. heading north across the country largely dry for northern ireland and scotland and to the north—west feeling relatively pleasa nt the north—west feeling relatively pleasant in those lighter winds.
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temperatures still not great for the time of year this afternoon. well below what we would expect for the time of year. nearing the end of march. but moving through into the evening with the somewhat cloud heading in across england and wales. scotla nd heading in across england and wales. scotland and northern ireland keeping those clear skies tonight and temperatures falling, as low as -5 and temperatures falling, as low as —5 tonight through the central alps of scotland. and for many of us temperatures below freezing. and some really icy conditions likely as well on tuesday morning. some freezing fog patches possible in the west. tuesday not a bad day with high pressure in charge. a bit more cloud around so some showers for lincolnshire, down towards sussex. most other parts of the country looking dry with some sunshine
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towards the west. not raising the temperature is in too much of a hurry but we could get eight, 9 degrees. then towards the middle of the week we have more of an atlantic influence, so the wind coming from the west. more cloud across scotland and northern ireland through into wednesday morning. a bit more patchy rain arriving across scotland and northern ireland. that lasts on and off through the day on wednesday. the best of any sunshine towards the south and east. a few places could just about creep into double figures. so ending the week on a much milder note. thank you very much. and the weather has caused some issues in the south—west of england. we will tell you about one of those issues and one couple very much affected by this. 80 motorists were stranded overnight in devon.
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many had to abandon their cars and stay the night in a college. 0ne couple who had to stay there isjohn and sara lund — they got married on saturday and were on the way to their honeymoon in cornwall. congratulations on getting married. how did you end up where you are now? well we were heading out to newquay for what would've been very luxurious honeymoon in a beautiful bridal suite but we got caught up just outside 0kehampton. but the lovely people at devon county council looked after us very well. 0bviously council looked after us very well. obviously not what you imagined at all to spend one of your first married delights in this kind of environment expect i did not imagine snow in march to be honest with you and certainly not expecting to spend
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our first and certainly not expecting to spend ourfirst night in a and certainly not expecting to spend our first night in a school college. tell us a bit about the wedding itself, did you know that it was snowing outside? on saturday we had some flurries of snow and it was lovely and then on sunday it was a blanket of snow. but we were thinking we will be ok. bristol was fine, not too much around. and then you got onto the a30 and it was quite bad. we got to a junction and we we re quite bad. we got to a junction and we were able to get off but i know a lot of people are still stranded.” love the idea that you just got married and your in the car, tell us about your decision to get out and walk. i do not think we had a great deal of choice. we were amongst the lucky ones, we could see a pub in the corner of our eyes and that is
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what got us out of the car. and you had this great plan, bridal suite, we are well looked after, did people realise that you were newlyweds and bring you a few biscuits! i had a second sugar in my tea. but everyone has looked after us wonderfully. we have a lot of volunteers as well as the good people of devon county council and i think our storey helped to keep morale high top. and when you think you will get to the honeymoon destination? well i think the a30 is now we're pulling so we are going to keep on trying to awake down there. will you get an extra day now you have appeared on television! well we can speak to the
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hotel about that. we are there for three nights. so let's hope we can get the rest of that time. best of luck to you both and thank you for your good—humoured and many congratulations. you're never to forget where you spent the first night. congratulations. john and sarah, ever married over the weekend and had great plans, a beautiful bridal suite and instead on a floor with 80 other people near 0kehampton. well we have beenjoined now by our next guest. hello, everybody. we have all been so quiet! uk non-when we were speaking,
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the wonderful world of television. hiding down here! tracey, are you all right? lovely to see you all. thank you. and in the next few minutes we will be talking about your projects. you are going back on shore. and you have a new album out. i'm going on tour in december so there is a lot going on. the strictly family this morning. we will chat in a minute. tracy likes to stay incognito! time for the news, travel and weather where you
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are. i think that went really well! heavy snow over the weekend brought disruption to parts of the uk. and with cold nights and some light snow, there is the potential for disruption with ice over the next few days. this morning, we could see some ice, but we are looking at a mostly dry day with increasing amounts of sunshine, but it will be cold. we are still firmly in the cold air that we dragged in from the east as we move through this weekend. we still have a breezy easterly north—easterly wind in the south as well. we could see a bit of snow clearing the south—west to begin with this morning, but it will brighten up
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across england and wales, with good spells of sunshine. perhaps the odd wintry flurry for northern ireland this morning, but good spells of sunshine in the afternoon. a similar story for northern england and scotland. largely dry and bright, cloud perhaps increasing in the north—east later with one or two showers for the northern isles. as we go through this evening and overnight, the cloud will increase from the north. perhaps one or two wintry showers and one or two in the midlands, but elsewhere, a lot of dry weather. with clear skies, it will be another cold and frosty night. we could see a few patches of ice to begin the day tomorrow. tomorrow, a cloudy day across england and wales. there will still be sunny spells, the best of those in the west, with a chance of showers in the east. a bright start for northern ireland and south—west scotland, the cloud tending to increase from the west into the afternoon. as we move into wednesday, high pressure dominates our weather, but we do have this weather front moving in to the north—west. that will bring with it some outbreaks of rain.
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so for wednesday, we're looking at a northwest—southeast split. some outbreaks of rain for northern ireland and scotland. but good spells of sunshine for england and wales, temperatures a touch up on what we have seen over the past few days. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and jamie robertson. six more years! vladimir putin is re—elected as russia's president. live from london, that's our top story on monday 19th march. president putin is promising an increase in the standard of living and big spending on health, education and infrastructure.
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but can he keep his promises? we'll get an expert view. also in the programme... the boss of facebook, mark zuckerberg, faces a backlash over the company's use of data during the us presidential election. and markets are open and trading in europe —
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