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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  March 22, 2018 5:00pm-6:00pm GMT

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today at 5. .. ajudge rules blood samples can be taken from sergei and yulia skripal, nearly three weeks after they were poisoned by a nerve agent in salisbury. the samples will be tested by the organisation for the prohibition of chemical weapons. the father and daughter remain in a critical condition. we'll have an update from the hospital shortly. russia's ambassador to the uk accuses boris johnson of insulting his country, after the foreign secretary compared russia to nazi germany. nobody has the right to insult the russian people. we defeated nazism and lost more than 45 million people. by comparing our country to nazi germany. and here in brussels, the prime minister is asking for european unity against russia. we'll have the latest on the deepening row between russia and britain over the salisbury poisoning, as well as an update
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from the hospital. one year on from the westminster bridge attack, a memorial is lit to remember all those affected by last year's terrorism in the capital. the founder of facebook apologises for its role in the cambridge analytica scandal and admits more needs to be done to protect the personal data of its users. there is a lot of hard work that we need to do to make it harder for nation states like russia to do election interference and make it so that trolls and other folk cannot spread fake news. and the invitations are in the post. prince harry and meghan markle invite 600 people to their wedding, although it's not yet known who's made the guest list. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at five.
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i'm jane hill. our main story tonight: ajudge has given doctors permission to take blood samples from the russian double agent sergei skripal and his daughter yulia, so that tests can be carried out by chemical weapons experts. the father and daughter remain sedated in hospital in a critical but stable condition, after being poisoned earlier this month. let's go to salisbury now, and duncan kennedy is there with the latest. some of the developments are very recent, in the last hour or so. bring us up to date, please. this coming from the high court in london where mrjustice williams sitting in the court of protection, part of the family division, has been making a ruling about this issue. it was set
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in motion by the organisation for the prohibition of chemical weapons, the prohibition of chemical weapons, the chemical weapons inspectors that came here in the last few days for the but an application into this court, into thisjudge, to get the but an application into this court, into this judge, to get blood samples from sergei skripal and yulia skripal. they are unconscious and cannot give that permission themselves. the organisation for the prohibition of chemical weapons has had to go through the courts in order to get that blood sample released. they have asked the judge to collect fresh blood for it to be tested to see whether there is evidence of a nerve agent and they have also had permission from the judge to carry out dna tests on this blood sample is well thought that they have also asked the judge to retest sa m ples already they have also asked the judge to retest samples already been analysed by porton down all those requests have been granted by thejudge, mr justice williams. he said in his ruling this afternoon in the last
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few minutes that it is not inconceivable that the condition of sergei skripal and yulia skripal could rapidly deteriorate and he said the precise effect of their exposure to a nerve agent on their long—term health remains unclear. there will be more details about all of this at about 5:30pm when the chief constable, acting chief co nsta ble, chief constable, acting chief constable, of wiltshire, and the chief executive of the salisbury nhs trust will give a press conference here at the hospital in salisbury where sergei skripal and his daughter are being treated. the official condition on them is that they remain critical. the development we were unaware of because the hearing was made in private with only the judgment by thejudge being made public in the last hour or so. it seems that the judge may have spent a while deciding on this, even though he knew the application in the words of
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himself, that the application was herjob because of the condition of both of them. he has said the blood samples can be taken for the all—important samples can be taken for the all—importa nt testing. samples can be taken for the all-important testing. and also duncan we should not forget there is still a police officer in hospital asa still a police officer in hospital as a result of all of this as well. and some very encouraging news on his condition. his name is sergeant nick bailey. at some point in the early stages of this incident, two and a half weeks ago, he came into contact with the nerve agent. we are unclear of the circumstances. for two weeks the hospital has been describing his condition is serious. this afternoon they said sergeant davey was no longer in a serious condition but stable and talking. we know in the past few days he has met with the prime minister, theresa may. she came to salisbury before that dashes up as she came to salisbury and before that he met up
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with amber rudd. the news has come through from health officials that the condition is not serious. that will be encouraging, not only to his family and colleagues but to all of those in this investigation that his condition does seem to be improving. no word yet on today's that on about when he might be leaving hospital. that may be a while yet but his condition is not serious and sergeant paley is in a stable condition in hospital. as duncan suggests, we are expecting a further update round about 5:30pm for the latter is when we believe we will hear more. more on this story after half—past, hopefully. there are many elements to that story. meanwhile, russia's ambassador to the uk has accused theresa may of having no proof for her accusation that moscow was involved in the nerve agent attack in salisbury. alexander ya kovenko also repeated a suggestion that the substance used to poison a former russian spy and his daughter came from the porton down research facility, which is only a few
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miles from salisbury. well, the prime minister arrived in brussels this afternooon to attend an eu summit, at which she is asking for european unity against russia. my colleague christian fraser is at the summit for us. she got unanimity at the council last week in a statement where they said they saw the incident in salt spray as very serious. she might get stiffer language today, that is what we are being told she will set out the pattern of russian behaviour. the downing of an asian airliner, the interference in the american elections, and the poisoning in salisbury and the poisoning of
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alexander litvinenko. she will say you will see them as a strategic threat, an enemy, rather than a partner. the ambassador has been speaking in london, condemning remarks made by the foreign secretary, comparing russia's sting of the world cup to adolf hitler's 1936 olympics. —— hosting. boris johnson's men swept called totally irresponsible and says the british government has not provided thus far is any evidence that his country was behind the poisoning of the double agent and his daughter. theresa may said russia posed a threat to the entire block and she is seeking that united backing against moscow. theresa may arriving in brussels on a diplomatic mission to get eu countries to back her stance on russia. her government says
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president putin's date has become a strategic enemy for the whole region. russia staged a brazen and reckless attack against the united kingdom and is attempted the murder of two people on the streets of salisbury. all raising this issue with my counterparts today because it is clear that the russian threat does not respect borders and, indeed, the incident in salisbury was part of a pattern of russian aggression against and its near neighbours from the western balkans to the middle east. relations with russia seemed to be worsening yesterday boris johnson russia seemed to be worsening yesterday borisjohnson compare president putin's is to the world cup to hitler hosting the 1936 olympics. yes, i think the comparison with the 1936 olympics is certainly right. today, the russian ambassador said that was irresponsible comment. the british government is free to make a decision about its participation in
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the world cup but nobody has the right to insult the russian people, who defeated nazism, and lost more than 25 million people, by comparing out than 25 million people, by comparing our country to nazi germany. it goes beyond common—sense and we do not think british war veterans, including those of the arctic convoys , including those of the arctic convoys, would share this opinion. britain has, without any evidence, blamed russia of poisoning of three people and continues to refuse to cooperate. we cannot accept that. but, borisjohnson, cooperate. we cannot accept that. but, boris johnson, here cooperate. we cannot accept that. but, borisjohnson, here on a visit to derby, still was not happy at the attitude struck by the ambassador. we have had no real response from the russian authorities, except it kind of sarcastic of the station. we don't want to escalate this any
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further. we want some kind of way in which they will at least accept that the russian state must have had some role business and that is what we are trying to do. jeremy corbyn meanwhile suggested escalation was a real danger and said serious dialogue was needed. real danger and said serious dialogue was neededlj real danger and said serious dialogue was needed. i am not sure the language used by some of our ministers is particularly helpful or sensible. i don't have any problem with the people of russia. i don't have any problem with people of any country could do we have problems with people who abuse human rights? yes, sure we do for that you have to draw that distinction and difference. britain wants to see unequivocal support from its allies this evening and, with britain heading out of the eu in a year's time, that will be a test of theresa may's out on the world stage. —— clout. let's go to westminster now and our assistant political editor, norman smith.
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given the equivocal edition that donald trump has taken, theresa may will see a fight of his supporters —— important she gets the support of eu leaders here. downing street are clear they are not going to get any additional sanctions or diplomatic expulsions by other eu countries, at least not tonight. her ambition is to get the beefed up statement. that is not in a way all that tonight is about. i think what mrs may is hoping is almost to use tonight as a form of shock therapy for eu leaders to try and jolt them into realising the scale of the threat that the british government believes russia 110w british government believes russia now poses. there is a view that many eu countries, they have a brother equivocal view of president putin. many are heavily dependent on russia for energy supplies. perhaps there
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isa for energy supplies. perhaps there is a view this is predominantly a british problem because we have large numbers of russian emigres, often vigorous opponents of president putin. the hope of mrs may is to begin to try to change that mindset among eu leaders so that they, too, begin to see russia a threat to western values that western democracies, the western way of life, and that gradually, not overnight but over a prolonged period, billy —— begins to lead to a change of approach towards russia, are much more assertive, forthright and would bust approach. thank you very much. we are expecting —— a russia tri—lateral due to be held between theresa may, emmanual macron and angela merkel in the next hour. with me here is our europe reporter, adam fleming. norman wasjust norman was just saying we're not going to get direct attribution or
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any new sanctions. what is really obvious is the splits between the baltic states and the european states. exactly. the president of lithuania, next door to russia... that is the exception to the rule. the other 27 eu leaders are united in wanting to stick to the formal process of getting a chemical weapons watchdog to give the final word on what substance was used and to come to —— and assessment of who deployed the substance. they stand shoulder to shoulder with the uk as the territory where this happened. solidarity wanted to do with the issue and look into it. they are not there to a tribute blamed to russia in the wake of the uk has done for the uk has been sharing intelligence with its european partners
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behind—the—scenes i don't think theresa may will be providing any smoking gun or evidence at the table for dinner tonight. donald trump has been threatening trade tariffs on steel and aluminium. some slightly better news perhaps from washington. perhaps. there have been rumours all day that there will be what the eu has been hoping for which is an exemption for europe from the ta riffs exemption for europe from the tariffs on steel and aluminium from the us will stop the saudi us trade representative speaking in washington, saying that was going to be the case. —— we saw the us trade representative. they are waiting for official confirmation from president trump himself as to whether that is because they don't quite believe one pa rt because they don't quite believe one part of the us administration for that they don't want to offend president trump by responding before he has had his chance to say or whether it is the protocol that they have done the agreement and this
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will be a president trump level thing rather than a representative trade level thing they'll be having their own discussions over dinner. thank you very much. given that the state of affairs? it says something about transatlantic relations at the moment when you get a senior trade figure in washington saying one thing but they don't know whether to believe it until they hear it from president trump. even then they don't know whether it will be policy. thank you very much indeed. an inquest into the death of mr gluskov has been opened and closed it was shown that he died from compression to the neck. police have begun a murder enquiry and up urging for anyone with images of the area to come forward.
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a minute's silence has been held to mark one year since the westminster terrorist attack. five people were killed, as khalid masood drove into pedestrians on westminster bridge, before stabbing pc keith palmer outside the houses of parliament. the prime minister has laid a wreath in parliament square and a memorial has been created to remember all the victims of the three terrorist attacks in the capital last year. vickie young reports. a year ago today, on this estate, and on westminster bridge, we were visited by what i regard as evil. eight day that westminster will never forget. a shock as the car ploughed into pedestrians on the bridge. the panic as people fled to
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safety. romanian tourists —— one romanian tourist was killed. her family are struggling to cope with the loss. there are moments when we ta ke the loss. there are moments when we take the phone to call her or to write on messenger. we spend our whole time together. now, all of this does not make any sense. just inside the gates to parliament and other horrific scene was unfolding. massoud had stabbed pc keith palmer. a conservative minister was among those desperate you trying to save him. u rack your brains as to what more you could have done. there are all sorts of things that you'd torment your mind but you cannot. you have to stand that everybody did their utmost on that day. when you got home that night, the shock must have been starting to kick in at
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that point. there is obviously a delay as reality kicks in. i didn't really appreciate it until i found my son on the stairs and he was really wanting to ask some searching questions he was incomplete tears andi questions he was incomplete tears and i could not offer him very much, other than to say there are some bad people in this world. if they are good people, they win in the end. one of pc keith palmer's colleagues recalls the moment he heard of the death. mass confusion really. eventually one of my friends came over and said, who is it? who is the officer on the floor? who is it? it was your friends, keith. terrible. in her tribute, the prime minister said this was a day to remember those who were lost but also to defy those who were lost but also to defy those who were lost but also to defy those who sought to silence our
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democracy one year ago. this is bbc news at 5.2opm. the headlines: ajudge has ruled that a judge has ruled that blood samples can be taken from sergei skripal and yulia skripal. they will be tested by the organisation for the prohibition of chemical weapons. the father and daughter remain in hospital in a critical condition. one year after the westminster bridge attack on memorial is lit to remember all of those affected by last yea r‘s remember all of those affected by last year's errors in the capital. mark zuckerberg apologises for its role in the cambridge analytica scandal and admits more needs to be done to protect the personal data of its users. in the sport, gareth bale —— gareth bale becomes wales's record goal—scorer. he overtook ian rush with 29
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international goals. ibrahimovic is set to leave manchester united imminently with speculation he is on his way to mls and la galaxy. in cricket, trevor bayliss says he is embarrassed and hurt by the england collapse as they are bowled out for 58 in the first test against new zealand. more on those stories just after 5:30 p:m.. thank you. let's talk more about facebook. the founder of facebook, mark zuckerberg, has apologised after data from 50 million users was exploited by the british company cambridge analytica. speaking publicly for the first time since allegations surfaced that data was misused during the us presidential election, he acknowledged there has been a major breach of trust. from washington, chris buckler reports. facebook contains a world of personal information. more than two billion users have entrusted it with details
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including their age, whether they're in a relationship and perhaps crucially their political leanings. cambridge analytica and potentially other firms are accused of exploiting that data in an attempt to influence, among other things, the us presidential election, and ultimately for that breach in trust, facebook and its founder are having to take responsibility. if you told me in 2004 when i was getting started with facebook that a big part of my responsibility today would be to help protect the integrity of elections against interference by other governments, i wouldn't have really believed that was going to be something i would have to work on. for days, mark zuckerberg was silent, while damaging allegations were broadcast around the world of how came —— cambridge analytica took advantage of information
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from facebook users. now he's promising a full forensic audit and he says anyone whose date may have been compromised will be told. but mr zuckerberg knows his social network will continue to be tested by those looking to exploit it. there's a lot of hard work that we need to do to make it harder for nation states like russia to do election interference, to make it so that trolls and other folks can't spread fake news, but we can get in front of this and we have a responsibility to do this not only for the 2018 midterms in the us, which are going to be a huge deal this year, and that's a huge focus for us, but there's a big election in india this year, there's a big election in brazil, there's big elections around the world. politicians in both the uk and the us also have questions for mr zuckerberg. he said he would appear before congress in america if it was the right thing to do. and with talk of greater regulation and new rules, the face of facebook might find he has little choice. chris buckler, bbc news, washington. we will be talking more about that
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story after half past five as well. jeremy corbyn has told voters in england they should use the local elections to tell the government "enough is enough". the labour leader was speaking at the launch of his partys campaign for the may elections. he highlighted the recent increase in council tax bills and said the conservatives were asking people to pay more for less. on may the 3rd people have the chance to send an unmistakable message to this government — that enough is enough. enough of cuts to vital services that hurt local communities. enough of cuts to schools, hospitals and local policing. enough of library and youth centres closures. enough of leaving elderly and disabled people without essential care. jeremy corbyn at the launch of his
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pa rty‘s manifesto jeremy corbyn at the launch of his party's manifesto in the run—up to the local elections on may the 6th. now, has yours arrived yet? invitations have been sent out to 600 people to the wedding of prince harry and meghan markle. a select, 200 close friends will be invited to the party after the ceremony, on 19th may. our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell, is with me. a mere 600. that is the question. has it arrived? social death for some people. i would imagine the arrival of postmen and women are keenly awaited. 600 people have now or will shortly receive invitations to the wedding. they will go into st george ‘s chapel. family, friends and others. i imagine there has been competition to get onto that list. it will not be published. we'll wait until day. not the done thing to go
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out and say, waving a stiff card around. ithink out and say, waving a stiff card around. i think that is one way of being excluded from the circle of friends. 600 people are receiving invitations to the royal wedding. that is to the ceremony itself? the party afterwards one hopes is a bit more private. 600 people will go on to the lunchtime reception in st george ‘s hall within windsor castle. the most select invitation is the 200 family and friends who will be invited to the evening reception, invited by the prince of wales, and that is at frogmore house. mark your diary. also today we have seen the final planned public appearance of the duchess of cambridge. the duchess of cambridge is now on maternity leave. not maternity leave. she has gone into whatever it is. i forget the expression for stud she is now getting ready to give birth. it was
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five weeks that she sort of retired from public duties before the birth of george and charlotte. so, if we do the same calculation again, this birth is likely to be at the end of april. if it is, that means five weeks retirement from active duties and it brings us to the end of april. she and william worked at the copper box at the olympic park in a commonwealth themed event. this was held by sports aid. some will chair basketball players showing no sign that she was not, despite the high heels, able to cope with all of that on this occasion. clearly, pretty heavily pregnant now. considered to be time for her now too, not take it easy, but prepare for the imminent arrival of baby humphrey, who will
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be fifth in line to the throne when that little boy girl finally arrives. and few weeks before the wedding. a busy time, very busy time. thank you. now for the weather. rain is crossing the country can do right now it is pretty wet in northern ireland. rain in the western isles of scotland. all of us tonight will get a spell of rain. this rain is crossing the country right now. the wind is coming from the south—west. another mild night were just like last night. here is the rain during the course of thursday evening. reaching the south—west, wales and the north west of england. pushing into scotland as well. east anglia and the south—east problem we will not get the rainfall until very early on friday morning. just a few drips and traps. 5 degrees in the
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north and seven in the south. tomorrow starts wet across scotland for the showers in northern ireland, to northern england. to the south it is dry for northern england. to the south it is dryfora time northern england. to the south it is dry for a time before later in the afternoon rain sweeps into cornwall, devon, and then eventually into wales and some other parts of the country later on friday night. goodbye. this is bbc news. the headlines: ajudge has ruled blood samples can be taken from sergei and yulia skripal, nearly three weeks after they were poisoned by a nerve agent in salisbury. the samples will be tested by the organisation for the prohibition of chemical weapons. the father and daughter remain in hospital in a critical condition. russia's ambassador to the uk has
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hit back at comments made by the foreign secretary that compared russia's staging of the world cup to hitler's hosting of the 1936 olympics. the ambassador said the comments were insulting to the russian people. £51:— ‘jh; fezeea‘éfis a}; more § more about that in the next couple minutes. first, the sports news. hello. gareth bale has been the towers man
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for wales and now he has become the country's record goal—scorer after scoring a hat—trick in a friendly against china today. it took two minutes to get his first as wales swarmed over and over matched chinese team. impressive performance in ryan giggs's first match in charge. bale scored the first and then the fifth to round things off. it it's his first international hat—trick and he says breaking the record might be his biggest achievement in football and was a special day for more than one reason. it's amazing, ithink special day for more than one reason. it's amazing, i think on my daughter's birthday today so obviously happy birthday to her and disappointed i cannot be with her. no, it is great individually to get the record, but as i say, always the most important thing is the team plays well and under the new manager, it is important to get off toa manager, it is important to get off to a good start. zlatan ibrahimovic will beat manchester united imminently before his contract
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expires at the end of the season although there has been no announcement yet, jose mourinho has agreed to release ibrahimovic from his deal. there has been speculation he willjoin la galaxy in mls, their season started this month. the line after yea rs of pressure, season started this month. the line after years of pressure, united hope to set up a senior women's team for the first time since 2005. the club have submitted an application to the super league and if successful, they will play in the second tier from next season. i think it's hugely significant for the women's came. many other teams may have been able to up out of this idea that you don't have to support women's team and finally we have one of the biggest brands in the world saying women's football matters, we are going to put our money on it, whatever the fans say, we are going to support it. if you were baffled by what you saw with england's first test against new zealand, you are
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not the only one... ido not the only one... i do apologise, we are going to return to salisbury. this is an update from the police and from salisbury district hospital about sergei and yulia skripal. salisbury district hospital about sergei and yulia skripallj salisbury district hospital about sergei and yulia skripal. i am the chief executive at salisbury district hospital. enjoy and by lorna wilkinson, director of nursing. i would like to make a statement on the condition of the patient exposed to the nerve agent receiving hospital treatment and i will hand over to my colleague after that from wiltshire police. will not ta ke that from wiltshire police. will not take questions following the statement. i am pleased to say that sergeant nick bailey's condition has now improved and he was discharged from hospital this afternoon. i personally want to nick and his family well and i know the staff across the hospital will want me to share their very best wishes. i am sure you will understand that the reasons “— sure you will understand that the reasons —— for reasons of patient
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confidentiality, i cannot go into further detail regarding nick's condition or his treatment. we still have two patients at the hospital and their condition remains critical, but stable. ourstaff and their condition remains critical, but stable. our staff will continue to work around the clock to provide them with the very best care and we will continue to keep you updated regarding their progress. in addition to this, the three individuals, 48 other people have asked for advice from salisbury district hospital. as part of the community, we know how concerning the events of the past couple of weeks have been. i want to reiterate that all of these people have been assessed and provided with health advice. as public health england have said, the risk to the public remains low. the hospital remains fully open and providing high—quality care to the people of salisbury and surrounding areas. i would like to take this opportunity to thank all of our staff, the way in which they have responded to this
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incident. and for their commitment, professionalism and dedication to all of the patients. i am really proud to be their chief executive. they have responded in the best traditions of the nhs. this is as true of our front line staff who are providing care as it is of the staff who work behind—the—scenes to support them. i also want to thank the general public for the patience and understanding your support has been absolutely fantastic. we also work closely with the number of agencies and partners who have provided support and expert advice, andi provided support and expert advice, and i want to acknowledge their role in supporting us in the management of this incident. i am immensely proud of our staff, our hospital and the way everyone has pulled together to keep services open for all our patients. these last few weeks have again highlighted the very best of our nhs, ourstaff again highlighted the very best of our nhs, our staff and our community. thank you and i will hand
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over to chief constable of wiltshire police, hugh prichard. thank you, good evening. i am police, hugh prichard. thank you, good evening. lam keir pritchard, chief constable of wiltshire police. you will be aware that detective sergeant nick bailey has today been discharged from hospital, which is absolutely fantastic news. nick and his wife sarah have asked me to read some statements on their behalf. however, nick and his family have stressed that they do not wish to take part in any media interviews. so here is what nick has asked me to read for him today. people ask howl what nick has asked me to read for him today. people ask how i am feeling. there really no words to explain howl feeling. there really no words to explain how i right now. surreal as the word that keeps popping up and it really has been completely surreal. i have been so very overwhelmed by the support, cards and messages i have received. everyone has been so incredible. some days, we have had about 300
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messages from offices, the wider police family and the public. the level of support has been unbelievable and i have tried to respond to what i can. but i want to say i have really appreciated every single message. one thing that has lifted me throughout the last few weeks has been the public support the police saw this has received during this incident. stories of community spirit and local businesses providing food and hot drinks to the officer standing for endless hours on the chord is, to the members of the public to showing their support for our work have been quite simply overwhelming to hear about. i want to pay tribute and give my absolute heartfelt thanks to the staff at salisbury district hospital. the care i have received the medical staff has been simply outstanding from day one. from the man that cleans the floor, to the doctors giving the treatment, they
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have been absolutely phenomenal. thank you just doesn't seem to say enough and just does not convey the gratitude i feel for what they have done. i have spent all my time since the incident really focusing on trying to get better and trying to not to think about anything else. but as i had begun to feel better, i have become aware of the widespread and enormous attention this incident has attracted. i find this really overwhelming. i am just a normal person, with a normal life, and i don't want my wife, children, family orito be don't want my wife, children, family or i to be part of that attention. i do hope the public can understand that. i want people to focus on the investigation. not the police officer who was unfortunate enough to be caught up in it. i understand why there is attention on me, but all i have done is represent every police officer who goes out there every day and put their life at
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risk. as for what happens now, we are just taking each day as it comes at the moment. i recognise that normal life for me will probably never be the same. and sarah and i now need to find focus on the new normal for us and for our children. what i need now is time to regroup, re cove r. what i need now is time to regroup, recover. and most importantly, spent time with my loved ones. i do understand and appreciate —— appreciate the attention on this incident but i would ask people to put themselves in my shoes. i want to respectfully ask the media for privacy for me and my family at this time, and for no intrusion into my private life, so that my family and ican try private life, so that my family and i can try to come to terms with what has happened to us. thank you so much for all of your support. here is what sarah, nick's wife, has asked me to read out in relation to her. this is quite simply the most
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traumatic event of our life and it feels like our world has been turned upside down in a really short space of time. i am so grateful for the support from our immediate family and friends and the police family liaison officers during the last few weeks. i really don't know howl would have coped without them. i really never realised what the term police family was all about until this incident, but now i really do. all the messages we have received from the police family have been so heart—warming and have meant so very much to me, i can't put it into words. nick doesn't like the term hero, but he has always been a hero to me and our children. i would like now to say some words on behalf of wiltshire police. firstly, iwould like to pay tribute to nick and his family. none of us can begin to understand just how terrifying the
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la st understand just how terrifying the last few weeks must have been for them. whilst the world has been fixated on the incident and the investigation, nick has had to undergo significant medical treatment which has undoubtedly been very daunting for him and for his family. i have personally been amazed at the strength and resilience of nick. he is an absolute credit to wiltshire police and the wider policing family. this incident, although extremely unusual, has highlighted some of the complexities of modern—day policing and the willingness of police office rs and the willingness of police officers and staff, and volunteers to always put others first. nick was pa rt of to always put others first. nick was part of the initial response to what was primarily an unknown incident, and he, inadvertently, put himself in harm's way while simply carrying out his role. while simply carrying out his role. while simply carrying out his role. rightly now wants to spend time with his wife, sarah,
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their children and spend time with his wife, sarah, theirchildren and their spend time with his wife, sarah, their children and their wider family andl their children and their wider family and i ask that members of the media please respect these wishes. of course i understand how much interest there has been in this case, but please remember that nick and his family had been through a hugely traumatic ordeal and therefore deserve complete privacy so that they are able to work their way through it. secondly, i would like to reiterate nick and his family's thanks to the incredible stuff here at salisbury district hospital. they have done and they continue to do a truly amazing job under intense national and international focus. their dedication and professionalism is simply inspiring. at this stage, it would also like to say that our thoughts and prayers equally remain with sergei skripal and his daughter, yulia, and their family. so finally, as eloquently put by
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nick's wife sarah in her statement i read out to you, the response from the wider policing family has been exceptional. nick and sarah have been inundated with messages of support from across the country and beyond. i know they have been truly touched and humbled i this outpouring and of course i would like to echo that thanks. i know this has really helped them to get through this extremely challenging and difficult time. the number of messages that we have received from the public has also been wonderful to see and, again, thank you. this has not only meant a lot to nick and his family, but it would also have meant a great deal to all of the police staff — — meant a great deal to all of the police staff —— police staff across the country. so nick will now take some much deserved time away with his wife and family, so i ask once again please avoid nick the privacy that he asks for at this time. —— please forward. moving forward, the
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complexes investigation into the attempted murders of sergei skripal and his daughter, yulia, continues. the investigation is highly likely to take many months and, where it is operationally possible, updates will beissued operationally possible, updates will be issued to the media. we thank the public and you for your continued support. lastly, anyone that has any information, that may assist the investigation, please call the police, thank you. thank you very much for coming this evening, we appreciate it, thank you. thank you. the chief constable of wiltshire police and the chief executive of the salisbury district hospital hospital with one good piece of news emerging from a grim story, the news that detective sergeant nick bailey was discharged from hospital this afternoon and we heard a lengthy and very moving statement written by him and his wife, talking about how
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utterly overwhelmed they have been by the huge amount of support they have seen. but not surprisingly, saying they now want to be together asafamily saying they now want to be together as a family and really would appreciate their privacy. but good news that detective sergeant nick bailey, one of the first on the scene following that poisoning in salisbury, has now been discharged from hospital. in terms of sergei skripal and his daughter, yulia, the hospital chief executive making the point that they remain critically ill in hospital. and that in total, following that event in salisbury 2.5 weeks ago, 48 people look for advice. but stressing that the risk to the public is low. just some thoughts finally from our correspondent, duncan kennedy, from salisbury, who has been covering this throughout. so the police officer, one of the first responders here, mercifully now discharged from
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hospital. yes, as you can tell from both the hospital staff and the chief executive and the chief constable, they are absolutely delighted with they are absolutely delighted with the progress of sergeant nick bailey and reading his own statement, you get a sense of the impact this has had on him, his wife and their children. nick bailey described it asa children. nick bailey described it as a surreal, completely surreal experience. 300 messages a day from the public and elsewhere. he appreciates everyone and it wants to thank this hospital and the staff. the attention has been overwhelming, describing himself as just a normal person, just representing what every police officer does. incredible piece of news that he has now been discharged, which you can tell the impact on this family and this man will continue for many months to come. duncan kennedy, in salisbury, thanks very much indeed. and more on that story, got in the six o'clock news.
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let's return to another story that has been prominent for the last few days. relating to facebook. advertisers are telling facebook that "enough is enough", following a data breach that left millions of users' information open to exploitation. the incorporated society of british advertisers — or isba — a trade body which represents major uk advertisers, will meet with facebook tomorrow, and if the online giant fails to provide assurances about the security of users' data, advertisers may spend money elsewhere. facebook founder and ceo, mark zuckerberg, has said he is "really sorry" for the data breach. he spoke to cnn yesterday. if you'd told me in 2004, when i was getting started with facebook, that a big part of my responsibility today would be to help protect the
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integrity of elections against interference by other governments, i wouldn't have really believed that that was going to be something that i would have to work on 1a years later. i'm going to challenge you... but we're here now... i'm going to challenge you. and we're going to make sure that we do a good job. this isn't rocket science. there's a lot of hard work that we need to do to make it harder for nation states like russia to do election interference, to make it so that trolls and other folks can't spread fake news. but we can get in front of this, and we have a responsibility to do this, not only for the 2018 midterms in the us — which are going to be a huge deal this year, and that is a huge focus for us — but there's a big election in india this year, there's a big election in brazil, there are big elections around the world. mark zuckerberg in his first broadcast interview. with me in the studio is phil smith, the director general of isba. the trade body for advertisers.
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thank you so much. what contact has your organisation had, have you had, with representatives from facebook since this emerged? so far this week, we have been in contact through e—mail. we did ask for the meeting because advertisers naturally very concerned. the use of personal data without permission is governed by law and from now, the law will be tougher with new regulations that give users, brightly, the people rightly more control over their personal data, with big fines for people that breach that. we asked for the meeting to understand how this has happened. we welcome the scope of the enquiry that mark zuckerberg announced but we want to understand the scope and how deep it will go and the implications for the advertisers and the public and make sure there is no recurrence. when he first heard about it and you realised the number of people, facebook users, probably affected by this, were you surprised, or were
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there members of your organisation that thought secretly, that should be, i wonder whether that sort of thing went on? how much surprise? advertisers are very concerned about this because the use of personal data without permission, which is what we are looking at here, is potentially a very serious issue. that is why we really want to get the bottom of it. what do you want to hear? at the meeting tomorrow. and if you don't hear those things, what you do? we want to explore the scope of the enquiry. what are we looking at, what is going to come out that will give advertisers reassurance about the possibility of other occurrences of data leakage, where might that data been out and what does that mean for the public and what does that mean for advertisers themselves? in terms of what happens with that, every advertiser has to make up their own mind about what they need to do to ta ke mind about what they need to do to take measures to protect themselves. and ourjob is to make sure we briefed them with the very best information we can. when you say
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protect themselves, are you talking about reputational damage? there could be a number of measures individual advertisers look at. it could be about where they spend their money, it might be about where they source their data from. but they source their data from. but they would come up with some have no compunction in polling their advertising if they feel they spoke, for whatever reason, it is not doing what they want, would they do that? individual advertisers will have to look at that separately. what we have not seen so far is announcements from any of our members that they have removed advertising from facebook. one company in the us has paused advertising and people will want to know what has happened to get us to this state, so what is the history from the facebook point of view, and have prepared as facebook to face this interview and change for the future and prevent a recurrence? and where else might it be happening? that is one big question. mark zuckerberg's enquiry has focused a
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lot on what happened before 2014 when the policy is changed. and advertisers here are really concerned about, where else might there have been data leakage? we merrily —— we may be talking more about this, but your meeting is tomorrow. thank you very much for now. as we've been hearing, events have been held today to mark the one—year anniversary of the westminster terrorist attack. five people were killed, as khalid masood drove into pedestrians on westminster bridge, before stabbing pc keith palmer outside the houses of parliament. the mp tobias ellwood tried in vain to save pc palmer and, a year on, he's been reflecting on the day's events with our chief political correspondent, vicki young. it's deeply sad. really really. you rack your brains as to what more you could have done. if you'd has done things differently. i actually chose
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a different route, i normally walk across the bridge. if i had walked across the bridge. if i had walked across the bridge. if i had walked across the bridge, i would have seen the attacker run into parliament and i don't know what i would have done them. so there are all sorts of things that you torment your mind, but you can't. you have to understand that everybody, i think, did their utmost on that day and it is very, very sad. and we have to remember, we mustn't let the terrorists win. if we allow ourselves to be tortured in this way, then they succeed. if we allow our communities to fragment or be scared, then the terrorist succeeds. we need to be emboldened, we need to be empowered, we need to be stronger to say, actually, we're not going to be affected by this. we are going to stand up to it, we are going to ensure it. we have been hit by tougher things in the past, and likewise in the future. it has actually done the opposite of what the terrorist was trying to do in polls apart, it has actually announced —— united our community.
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we saw that in manchester after the attack there and likewise with london bridge to and it is important that we step forward. when you got home that night, the shock must have been really starting to kick in at that point? it did, there is obsolete the delay in these things as reality kicks in. i didn't really appreciate it until i found my son on the stairs and he was really wanting to ask searching questions and he was in complete tears and i could not really offer him very much other than to say, there are some bad people in this world and there are more good people. it's the good people that enjoy and it is the good people that enjoy and it is the good people that enjoy and it is the good people that win in the end. was he worried about you, back to this place? he was, he has been here many times and he knows what it is like and he didn't understand why a step forward and why do that. so that a good bit of explaining as well. you gladly step forward? yes, it would have... and would very much, in all
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these situations, you ask yourselves, if it is in your nature to wa nt yourselves, if it is in your nature to want to do these things, you ask yourself is, what can you do? i'm hugely disappointed that it wasn't just me, remember, many people step forward , just me, remember, many people step forward, that we were not able to save his life, but the more people that do do that, you know, the more of cohesion we have, the more of a stronger message we send to any terrorist waiting to disrupt our lives, is that, we're not going to be cut out, we're not going to be derailed, were stronger than that. more on all those stories coming up. time for a look at the weather. here's tomasz shafernaker. i'll stay of the year so far, 14 degrees in eastern scotland. not that great, considering april is only round the corner. so what have we got over the next 24 hours? we
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have got rain sweeping across the country. and, oh, dear. it looks like one of those days the graphics won't help you with the forecast. one more go. no. let's do it the old—fashioned way. tonight, we have got rain crossing the country. it has been reaching northern ireland, western parts of scotland. the rain is creeping into wales and the far south—west of the country so during tonight, the rain is going to be moving across the country and we will all get at least some spots of rain. most of the rain is going to fall across the northern half the uk, from the peak district northwards, that is where we will get most of the rainfall. in the south, bristol, reading, london, spits and spots of rain first thing. and the temperatures first thing in the morning of friday, very similar to what we have had last night. around 5—7dc. so a relatively mild
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night on the way. friday, last day of the working week, what is it looking like? scotland is waking up toafair looking like? scotland is waking up to a fair bit of rain. some of that is falling across more ireland. but generally, the northern half of the uk on friday will be blustery with showers, and in the south, it is much brighter. we will get the graphics working in half an hour! doctors at the hospital in salisbury treating the former russian spy and his daughter say they don't know when or if they will ever fully recover. sergei skripal and his daughter yulia are heavily sedated and unable to communicate in any meaningful way. the police officer who was also contaminated has now been discharged. his chief constable said ds nick bailey had appreciated the messages of support. i have been so very overwhelmed by the support, cards and messages i have received. everyone has been so
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incredible. it's emerged a fourth patient is also being treated for minor contamination. also tonight... theresa may is in brussels to rally support against what she calls reckless russian aggression. flowers and tributes to the victims of the westminster bridge terror attack one year on. taking back control of our passports after brexit —
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