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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 24, 2018 7:00am-8:01am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and rachel burden. a police officer hailed as a hero during the french terror attack has died of his injuries. arnaud beltrame swapped himself for a hostage during the supermarket siege and secretly recorded what happened on his mobile phone. good morning, it's saturday the 24th of march. also this morning: investigators work through the night, searching the offices of the company at the centre of the facebook data row. labour mps react angrily to the sacking of the shadow northern ireland secretary for saying he wants a second brexit referendum. nick dinham, she is eight, and she has just given nick dinham, she is eight, and she hasjust given her entire pocket money. i mean, you cannot argue with
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that, can you 7 money. i mean, you cannot argue with that, can you? —— meeting. celebrity boat races and boxing matches — the sport relief live show raises more than 38 million pounds for charity. in sport, england fly high in amsterdam as their world cup preparations continue with victory over the netherlands. jesse lingard scored his first international goal to win 1—0 during last night's friendly and extend their unbeaten run to seven matches. and alina jenkins has the weather. good morning, a north— south split across the country, sunshine and showers in the north but a lot of cloud with patchy rain further south. i will tell you all about it in around 15 minutes. the then! —— see you then! good morning. first, our main story: a french police officer who helped bring a terror attack to an end yesterday by swapping himself for a hostage in a supermarket siege has died in hospital. three other people were killed and several injured in separate attacks by a gunman who claimed to be acting on behalf the islamic state group. he was later shot dead by police. our correspondent lucy williamson has more. france's interior minister called it
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an act of heroism but it seems to have also been key in ending the deadly siege in a supermarket. being exchanged for a hostage being held at gunpoint by 26—year—old redouane lakdim. lieutena nt—colonel beltrame secretly kept his mobile phone connected to a colleague outside, allowing them to hear what was happening. the attacker had already killed two of his captives and mr beltrame was shot several times before security forces stormed the building, killing the gunman and ending the siege. three people were killed in a series of attacks by redouane lakdim and over a dozen injured. he claimed to be acting on behalf of the jihadist group islamic state and said he wanted to secure the release of salah abdeslam, a french detainee linked to the november 2015 paris attacks. lucy williamson, bbc news.
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18 investigators from the uk's information commissioner have been searching the london headquarters of cambridge analytica overnight after a high court judge granted them a warrant. the firm is at the centre of a data privacy row and is accused of using information from millions of facebook users to help political campaigns without their consent. ben ando reports. after a week of waiting for a warrant, last night, the inspectors called, the doctor searched the offices of cambridge analytic of the evidence that data gathered by faith oi’ evidence that data gathered by faith or personality test from around 50 million americans in 2014 was not destroyed. and whether, if cambridge analytic used to be data, it had an impact on the election two years later that put donald trump in the white house. but seemed to be the claim of its saint suspended boss when recorded by undercover reporters. some believe it is time to ask what they want from the web. we came collectively and think and
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deliberate meaningfully about what matters to us in terms of a digital environment and the digital world and impose appropriate constraints upon what is done personal data and where we think the boundaries ought to be. others or ready voting with their keyboards, elon musk the founder of space x has revealed he is the most high profile user yet to join the so—called elite facebook movement i culling his company's profile pages. ben ando joins us now from outside the cambridge analytica headquarters. thank you for your time. apologies. where are we going with the investigation? what is it specifically they are looking for? well, we are not exactly sure what they are looking for here. in that arrived last night it was shortly after the warrant had been granted by the high court, a team investigators coming here, they had crates and boxes as they took inside and they left at around 3pm, shortly
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after peters had been delivered. ——3 in the morning. what they were looking for wasn't clear, the specific data that cambridge analytica said it had destroyed in 2014 or are they looking the traces that it wasn't done immediately when it should have been done? we don't know. what we do know, with the information commissioner has said, it is part of a wider investigation would give at all aspects of how data and analytics could be influencing people ‘s political views, possibly questionably. 0ne other thing we should of course say though is of cause facebook and crew to deny any wrongdoing at all. in fa ct yesterday, to deny any wrongdoing at all. in fact yesterday, mark zuckerberg the founder of facebook held a meeting to which all employees were invited. thank you, ben. jeremy corbyn has sacked his shadow northern ireland secretary, 0wen smith, after he went against labour party policy and called for a new eu referendum. the move has prompted criticism from several labour mps, some of whom criticised jeremy corbyn for the support he gave six years ago to a mural artist whose work has been seen as anti—semitic.
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0ur political correspondent chris mason joins us now. chris, what has the reaction been to jeremy corbyn‘s decision? there is a lot that the labour party is contending with. good morning, what this is done is prized over the paint can if you like a flavour divisions. we've always known they have existed within the parliamentary labour party and remember all of those news stories over the last couple of years with resignations and backbiting, public squabbling at one stage so many resignations in one day that we lost count of them but since the general election there has been relative calm, at least publicly. not since the sacking of 0wen smith last night, described by peter hain a former northern ireland secretary of the terrible stalinist purge. what had he done? he had gone country while away from official labour party policy. he said that the uk
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should stay in the single market after brexit, it is a labor polls policies, and he said there should bea policies, and he said there should be a second referendum on the final deal that the government comes to as far as brexit is concerned. that isn't labour party policy either. the twist is diane abbott another frontbencher has articulated views not 1 frontbencher has articulated views not1 million miles differently from this in the past and has managed to survive. anyway, mr smith's supporters are rallying to his cause, he tweeted last night saying he had been sacked for saying what he had been sacked for saying what he believed and yes, he did say a lot of this stuff before he was at the top table but the idea is once you are in shadow cabinet you are bound by collective responsibility. the view from mr corbyn‘s team was that this was a disappointing lack of discipline from mr smith and he simply had to be replaced. chris, thank you very much. we will talk to you more later. hundreds of thousands of people are expected to take part in marches around the world today calling for tighter gun controls in america. the main rally in washington will include survivors of last month's school shooting in florida.
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last night, the usjustice department confirmed it will propose a ban on bump stocks — devices which can turn ordinary assault rifles into machine guns. conservation officials in australia have confirmed that more than 140 pilot whales which became stranded off the western coast have died. fishermen made the discovery at hamelin bay, just south of perth, yesterday, prompting a large scale rescue effort to return the animals to deeper waters. only six whales are thought to have survived. 0ur correspondent phil mercer joins us now from sydney. this is a terrible story, i know that there was a huge community effort to try and get wales akin to water. what happened? about 100 volu nteers water. what happened? about 100 volunteers laboured in very hot conditions for many, many hours to try to save those animals that had survived this beaching at hamelin bay. this is about 180 miles to the
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south of perth in western australia. most of the pod of about 150 died shortly after being stranded on the beach and volunteers using heavy equipment were able to lift six of these large mammals, they can weigh up these large mammals, they can weigh up to one tonne, into the water and those six animals were shepherded out into deeper water at hamelin bay. sadly, one was beached again and had to be put down by a vet. there is a risk of course that the others will follow that animal back to dry land. as far as the causes, scientists don't really know, there is speculation a powerful tropical cyclone in northern australia has been pumping very strong winds and waves into the southern part of the continent, disrupting the sonar system of the animals that they use for navigation but we understand that dna from some of the carcasses will also be taken as the hunt for
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clues as to why these beatings takes place continues. in the meantime, dozens and dozens of those carcasses are being lifted off the beach and there is a warning that all of these dead animals in the area could attract sharks to the particular pa rt attract sharks to the particular part of the western australian coastline. thank you for your updates, sad to see those pictures. drivers are being dazzled by the headlights on new cars, according to an rac survey. two thirds of motorists said they were caught by the glare of headlamps regularly and 15% claimed they had nearly crashed because the lights of oncoming cars were too bright. all headlamps on uk cars must conform to eu guidelines. £38 million was raised during last night's sport relief. the amount is below the record 55 million pounds pledged in 2016, but organisers are still hailing the event a huge success. 0ur entertainment correspondent colin paterson reports. and away they go, pushing hard. this
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was a competitive sport relief. there was the clash of the channels, bbc versus itv, but with dan walker in one boat and charlotte in the other, it was really bbc breakfast versus good morning britain. and look who won. the bbc will take victory in this sport relief! celebrity boat race. there was the return of celebrity boxing. she is taking a lot of heavy shots. he used to be on blue peter. this was black and blue peter. she won a full on encounter with camilla from love island. now for sport relief, shay given has embarked on a 12 hour penalty marathon, he has been saving more than half of them. how will i get on? let's get the microphone in my hand. disaster for scotland's! andy murray is asleep. in his hotel. andrew murray genuinely did not know
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about plans to wake him up from michael mcintyre's nick knight game—show. michael mcintyre's nick knight game-show. andy! he ended up duetting with a spice girl.|j really, really want. zig. backstage the donations were coming in. she is eight and she has given her entire pocket money. i mean, you cannot argue with that, can you? what is pocket money these days? i didn't wa nt to pocket money these days? i didn't want to ask, it is personal, but whatever she had she has given it to us. whatever she had she has given it to us. and although no records were broken it was still a sizeable amount donated. i'm still annoyed about that penalty. well done to everyone who made an effort contributing. let's return to our top story now — a french police officer who helped bring a terror attack to an end yesterday by swapping himself for a hostage in a supermarket siege has died in hospital. let's get the very latest now from our europe reporter gavin lee,
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who is in carcassonne. this news just came out 1.5 hours ago that this officer has passed away. after selflessly swapping his life to that of a hostage. we had a statement early this morning from the french interior minister gerard collumb who said that a no tram ban, a 45—year—old police officer, had died of his injuries this morning —— arnaud beltrame. he talked about france being so proud of its hero, the store behind me, the super u in the store behind me, the super u in the city of trebes, about 11 o'clock yesterday morning, the attacker, a moroccan man, had taken hostages, about 50 people inside the supermarket and a number of them managed to escape through the refrigerator meat storage area and
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it was the officer were about one hour or go volunteer to exchange himself or the other hostages, 45—year—old woman and he left his phone is an open mind on a table inside the supermarket behind me and the police special forces were able to monitor what was going on when they heard gunshots they went in and killed the attacker but as we know, arnaud beltrame died of his severe injuries and we also had a brief word from emmanuel macron late last night. at this stage he was still in a critical condition, to say he was a critical condition, to say he was a hero to put himself first in front of so many other people who could have been killed in a terror attack but was also saying the other two people killed in the supermarket, 16 injured in the attack started around 50 miles from here in car design when the attacker hijacked a car, killed one of the passengers, carried on the shooting spree from the car and injured also seriously and other police officer —— carcassonne. for other big things,
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three are to be named today. —— victims. so how do we deal with the security threat posed by these kinds of attacks? let's speak to security specialist will geddes. it looks like this man was low and to security services to an extent. he was involved in petty crime, involved in ha rd—core he was involved in petty crime, involved in hard—core salafist islamic networks. but you can't monitor every individual. particularly because of the quantity of these individuals were agreed on the radar. and redouane lakdim had been on the watchlist, also being a petty criminal that he was on the low end. we are seeing in some of these instances that these individuals quite often will have
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been prioritised in the first insta nce been prioritised in the first instance and then de— categorised, if you like, in terms of their importance and they have come back again this was almost an insurmountable task is the biggest challenge is trying to profile and detect and monitor. this is interesting, this attack, he wasn't just out to kill and cause damage that made a demand for the release of salah abdeslam, one of the paris attackers. it makes a change from previous attacks. they will always involve their attacks and strategies. the other concerning aspects, links to their organisation, islamic state in this instance. we have seen a change from the days of al-qaeda when there was a much more direct chain of command and communication. anybody with extremist ideals can go out, carry
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out a horrific act, and pledge allegiance to a group like islamic state. islamic state equally, they released a statement on their accredited source for publicising claims for attacks that this individual was fighting on the behalf. interestingly, this was a way from paris which is well prepared and at the ready for terror attacks. choosing a location slightly off the radar, will that be of concern to other towns around france? naturally. it's a great concern. with a terrorist, like any criminal, will look to the path of least resistance and the easiest location within which they can perpetrate their horrific attacks. we have seen the move from large cities like paris to provincial
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cities like paris to provincial cities like paris to provincial cities like nice and right down to small towns and there was the attack in northern france, in the church, and they are looking to sustain their siege for as long as they can and where the gendarme or the police force will be at their most stretched or limited however in this instance, this attack in trebes was not that far from stations so their rally and response to it was incredibly quick and the gendarme, we have to give them credit, it to be able to control the situation as quickly as they could. they tried to control the situation and we had the braver —— the bravery of this individual, arnaud beltrame, who sadly died as a result, attempting to save other lives in the process. how differently do the french police deal with these situations to the uk? not a great deal of difference. all of the agencies across europe to ci’oss all of the agencies across europe to cross train with each other and share capability and skill sets and
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experience and in the wake of this particular instance, no doubt representatives from all these law enforcement agencies and the special forces will attend meetings to sit down and look at it intrinsically in terms of a response, how they manage it, or what they did and what lessons could be learned to expedite their response in the most effective way in future. the french response is no different in some regards to the uk. they are a little behind us. since 2015, they have had to up their game incredibly quickly and they have lent on their european partners including us. and you say european partners will support us. how much will that change after brexit? will it impact on the uk's own security operations?” brexit? will it impact on the uk's own security operations? i don't think it stands in anybody‘s interest to isolate one selves.
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sharing capability with partners, it will no doubt continue, as will the sharing of intelligence. the changes in the privacy act, certainly in terms of the percy borders and what we can and can't share. inevitably, we can and can't share. inevitably, we face universally this problem. here's alina with a look at this morning's weather. a beautiful rainbow but it seems we will have some mixed fortunes. not a bad weekend. there will be some sunshine around. a few showers. also some rain around. a really down, soggy start but that rain woollies. an area of low pressure. storms yugo is going to track its
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way south. a lot of cloud across. particularly across england and wales. maybe something a little later in the day. further north, a different sort of story. a touch of frost in places. down to minus three degrees in parts of northern ireland in scotland. showers pushing into the far north—west of scotland. it really is a north and south split today. sunshine and showers across parts of northern ireland. some of that sunshine arriving into northern england. still giving some patchy rain in the afternoon. temperatures 9-11 rain in the afternoon. temperatures 9— 11 celsius. the highest of the temperatures across eastern parts of scotland. clearer skies overnight. still a few wintry showers into the
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far north—west of scotland and this cloud, quite stubborn to go. as you can see, a difference in temperature. it's a cold start to much of us tomorrow. from south—eastern parts of england, patchy drizzle. yes, a few showers the north—western parts of scotland. a largely dry day. temperatures 10— 12 celsius. as we moved into next week, things will start to turn colder. there is the risk of some snow, particularly tuesday and wednesday. try and keep an eye on a forecast. monday, dry and bright. a good deal of sunshine. all the while, cloud building from the west, with outbreaks of rain into northern ireland, in south—west england later
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in the day. 10— 12 celsius, into tuesday and wednesday, heading towards easter, things do start to turn colder. there is an increasing chance we will see some wintry showers. we trust you on that one. so many little lambs out at the moment. we trust you on that one. so many little lambs out at the momentlj feel sorry for them. they have got police on them. they will be ok. —— fleece. as we've been hearing, information commissioner officers have been searching the london headquarters of cambridge analytica the firm at the centre of a data privacy row. it took them four days to get a warrant to search the premises and overnight, we've seen investigators at work in the building. so what could they be expecting to find? we'rejoined now byjeni tennison, chief executive of the open data institute. thank you to talking to us this morning. what could, or what should investigators find to help eliminate
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what's been going on? it is quite ha rd to what's been going on? it is quite hard to speculate, really. they were looking for what data has been collected, how it might have been used and what might have been done with it but it's very hard to tell what they might find. the long-term implications, you have been following this. you are aware of what happens. the long-term implications are around where data is being collected. there are long—term implications for facebook, for the other social media platforms, the other platforms that collect data about us and how they use it and share it. your not—for—profit company advises governments on how to manage data. do you think there might be a clash?
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everyday people say, you are not touching it every more —— any more. you have no right to access any of my data. i am shutting down your access. i think that's a risk not for the companies and government departments that actually price as a society. we can get huge benefits out of data. we've been collecting the censors for decades and decades. that plans had to do schools and transport links. it would be a real shame if the misuse of personal data then meant we withdrew permission, there is that really useful data collection which helps us as a society. the census is different, we give permission. we fill in the census. so say facebook and other
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social media site, we are unwittingly giving data. we are unwittingly giving data. we are unwittingly being observed in our habits are unwittingly being used to define what is going on in society. that, we haven't said yes to. well, technically, when you join and you say yes to all of those terms and conditions and you set your privacy settings in a particular way or you leave them as the default, then you have given permission, you have given consent. the larger challenge there, is that really informed consent and what kind of extra protections do we need for people who really don't, who really can't guess at the implications, the wider implications of how their data about there might be used. these companies know, if you are going to put reams and reams in terms of conditions, and reams in terms of conditions,
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and everyone is on facebook or another site, you will scroll to the end and tech. they are not making it clear to us, are they, about what exact rights they have because it is wrapped up in pretty legal and technicaljargon. that's right, and there are some things we can do about changing the design of those terms and conditions, the way in which permissions are granted by us but frankly, who has the time? are there inducements that we might be offered in order to get us to give that permission. even when it's not in our best interests. strong regulation. also, bumping up the roles of consumer groups who can help to advise us to detect what might be going wrong. you say we need good regulation and protection, does it feel good to you that this is going to happen. there are people say in, leave facebook. elon musk
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has that facebook. there are going to be reactions. but it is not proven to the consumer that we are going to be protected, we arejust going to be protected, we arejust going to be protected, we arejust going to abandon these sites. i'm not sure that we are going to abandon, everybody is going to abandon, everybody is going to abandon those sites. we get huge benefits from being able to connect with our friends and family through social media. i think that is a good thing for us. we get to connect with oui’ thing for us. we get to connect with our networks. the question is, how the data that then gets stored it gets used to target advertisements and gets used in the kind of cambridge analytica style, gets used when assessing whether our insurance premiums are working, whether we are applicable for a job. we really need good regulation. even if not
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eve ryo ne good regulation. even if not everyone is going to leave facebook in droves, of course, is then our space per a new social media player. i want to say ethical without implying that facebook is not ethical. a clearer and more transparent social network. social networks are one of those tricky monopolies. that is what they are there for. i'm not that optimistic about an alternative coming on. myspace was about an alternative coming on. mys pa ce was really about an alternative coming on. myspace was really popular, facebook was really popular. we do have these different waves of social media platforms. there is opportunity for new ones. it's been really interesting to talk to you. thank you so much. a really good point about whether there is an
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opportunity to some kind of other social network to move into that territory given they are so enormous and powerful. coming up in the next hour. we'll be asking if modern headlights are too bright, as two—thirds of motorists say they're regularly dazzled by oncoming cars even when the headlamps are dipped. stay with us, headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and rachel burden. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. a police officer who swapped himself for a hostage in a supermarket siege in france has died in hospital. lieutena nt—colonel arnaud beltrame had been praised for his heroism by the french president, emmanuel macron. three other people were killed and several more injured in separate attacks by a gunman who claimed to be acting on behalf of the islamic state group. he was later shot dead by police. earlier, we were told the nature of the terrorism threat is changing. again, they are always going to
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evolve their tactics and strategies and other sort of, the really concerning aspect is the fact that it is incredibly tenuous in terms of their link to their organisation, it is like having a stake in this insta nce is like having a stake in this instance and we have seen quite a change from the days of al-qaeda where there was a much more direct line of communication or chain of command, but surely anyone who has extremist ideals can go out, carry out a horrific act, as we saw yesterday, and placed it all pledged allegiance to a group like islamic state. investigators have been working overnight to search the london headquarters of cambridge analytica — the company accused of illegally using data to help political campaigns. the uk's information commissioner was granted a warrant amid claims the firm used information about millions of facebook users without consent. they were seen leaving the offices in the early hours of this morning. both cambridge analytica and facebook deny any wrongdoing. 0wen smith has said he will continue to argue against brexit,
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despite being sacked from the labour front bench for disagreeing with party policy. last night, he was dismissed as the shadow northern ireland secretary byjeremy corbyn after calling for a second eu referendum. several labour mps, including chuka umunna, have questioned their leader's decision. hundreds of thousands of people are expected to take part in marches around the world today calling for tighter gun controls in america. the main rally in washington will include survivors of last month's school shooting in florida. last night, the usjustice department confirmed it will propose a ban on bump stocks — devices which can turn ordinary assault rifles into machine guns. conservation officials in australia have confirmed that more than 140 pilot whales which became stranded off the western coast have died. fishermen made the discovery at hamelin bayjust south of perth yesterday, prompting a large scale rescue effort to return the animals to deeper waters. only six whales are thought to have survived. scientists have warned that europe's
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most active volcano, mount etna, on the italian island of sicily, must be monitored more closely after it was found to be moving. the uk—led team of researchers says a weak underlying platform is forcing etna closer towards the sea at a rate of 14mm each year. geologists say there is no immediate risk to residents or to the island itself. 14 millimetres each year. it is significant when you think about it. we don't need to worry! 38 million pounds was raised during last night's sport relief. we saw the bbc beat team itv in the clash of the channels boat race. the amount is below the record 55 million pounds pledged in 2016 but organisers are still hailing the event a huge success. i don't think you could knock £38 million for charity. we'll talk to
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the organiser a little later. formula one is back and it looks like it's going to be the same old story after qualifying for the season opening australian grand prix. holly, good morning. also, that boat race, i know we have another boat race, i know we have another boat race but it isn't nearly as important as the bbc versus itv. i think we could take some tips from those guys later on, obviously we are talking about the cambridge and 0xford boat race, i am quite looking forward to it, the women's especially. but now formula 1 is under way? like christmas, especially. but now formula 1 is underway? like christmas, it especially. but now formula 1 is under way? like christmas, it comes back around before we know it and i'm afraid to say it is looking like the same old story. lewis hamilton and mercedes, pole position for the fifth year in a row at the australian grand prix. qualifying was this morning in melbourne. lewis hamilton destroyed the opposition, claiming pole position for the fifth year in a row. he was more than half a second quicker than the ferrari of kimi raikkonen. it's a record seventh pole in australia for the briton, who'll be favourite to win tomorrow's race. his mercedes team—mate valtteri bottas won't be anywhere
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near him, though — he crashed early on in the final session but wasn't hurt. it's not just raining in melbourne, though. over in auckland, the rain wiped out virtually the entire third day's play in the first test between new zealand and england. only 17 balls were bowled and four runs scored this morning as the hosts increased their lead to 175 runs. there was time, though, for batsman henry nicholls to reach his half—century off 149 balls but the umpires decided to abandon play just before 6:00 this morning. the kiwis will resume day four on 233/4. and with further rain forecast, england may yet get away with that first innings score of 58. england's preparations for the world cup in russia stepped up a notch with the first of four warm—up matches. jesse lingard's first england goal was enough to see off the netherlands in amsterdam, from where our correspondent
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david 0rnstein was watching. stepping out into the limelight, this is where england's world cup countdown begins. the first of four pretournament friendlies, and experimental squad vying for seats on the plane to russia. jordan henderson was named captain, and came closest to scoring in a first half that offered reason to be encouraged. at the other end, jordan pickford was given the gloves, the question is whether he will keep them. after the break, england showed more intent and felt they should have had a penalty. they were getting closer, more dominant and soon, jesse lingard with a moment of inspiration, a goal for his country caused a celebration. he works incredibly hard to the team, and this season is a real rate through to him, in turning what we see in training into matches. the nearest the netherlands came was a freekick, easily saved. the disappointing dutch showing why world cup qualification was beyond them.
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england next faced italy on tuesday. for gareth southgate and his team, a job well done. not too much joy for scotland fans, i'm afraid. alex mcleish‘s second reign as manager didn't get off to the best of starts. costa rica, six places above them in the world rankings, were comfortable 1—0 winners at hampden park. marco rena the scorer in the 14th minute. scotland play hungary on tuesday evening. was a bit disappointing, we were never really up in the way we wanted to be high on the back three, and they still played out a wee bit, but it was a bit we were half—hearted, some new caps in the team. the rap sheet of former england women's head coach mark sampson has had another misdemenour added to it. the day after being sacked, it's emerged he was punished
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for intimidating a female official at last year's european championship with a metal pole. uefa said sampson's behaviour "grossly violated the basic rules of decent conduct". it was a busy night in rugby league's superleague with big wins for the in—form teams including leaders st helens over hull kr and second placed wigan against huddersfield. elsewhere, brian mcdermott‘s 200th game in charge at leeds ended in a narrow defeat at home to castleford who beat them 25—24. the win moves castleford level on points with leeds. there were also wins for warrington and hull fc. in rugby union's premiership, champions exeter secured a late victory against west country rivals bath. joe simmonds kicked the decisive penalty six minutes from time. it takes the chiefs nine points clear at the top of the table. in the pro 14, there were wins for glasgow and edinburgh, but the dragons lost to the cheetahs. so we've already had
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the boat race of the year, of course, after dan walker's efforts for sport relief earlier this week but today, we'll see how it should be done with cambridge and oxford set to face off in the university boat race this afternoon. 0xford have won four of the past five men's races and are catching up with cambridge in the overall standings — it's 82—80 to the light blues. there is a bigger gap in the women's head—to—head with cambridge leading 42—30, but 0xford hope to narrow the gap with an experienced crew. this year marks 80 years since the event was first televised by the bbc. it is of course live on the bbc this afternoon to you can watch all of the action from the thames. a p pa re ntly the action from the thames. apparently one quarter of a million people will be watching. i have never seen people will be watching. i have never seen it, never been down there to see it. i have been in the pub nearby. i have. i have done exactly
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that. i didn't quite make it to the river. this weekend, the first regular service of a non—stop passengerjet between australia and london will take off, slashing travel time to just 17 hours. the flight comes 71 years after the first service which saw passengers making a staggering seven stops across four continents along the so—called kangaroo route. that trip in 1947 took four days to complete at a cost of around £20,000 in today's money — considerably more than the £700 a seat costs today. travel expert simon calder has one of those seats and joins us now from our london newsroom. good morning, simon. what time do you take off? at the very first flight, it you take off? at the very first flight, it takes from perth in three hours 10 minutes from now. i'm in london and i'm going to be meeting the flight when it gets in just after five am tomorrow. and then it flies straight back to perth. it
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arrives at six o'clock on monday morning so i am already getting into shape by getting up extra early, it is now mid afternoon in perth and the idea is i will get on board, have a meal, go to sleep and wake up in perth. we shall see! something far available at around £700 but u nfortu nately i far available at around £700 but unfortunately i booked mine as soon as they went on sale last april, i paid over £1300 for mine. i thought i had booked a bulkhead seat with nobody in front of me and they phoned be up this week and said a family with a baby is books we have moved you. the good news is that i am still very close to the sound of the baby and i am right next to the toilet in 43 f. it is a very exciting prospect, the idea that one moment you were at the end of the ru nway moment you were at the end of the runway at heathrow and the next time you are on dry land you are on the other side of the world. you are on dry land you are on the other side of the worldlj you are on dry land you are on the other side of the world. i can't wait! despite your seat, 43 f? weather is sitting next to simon, i
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apologise for his grubby nature. —— whoever. tell us about it, 17 hours isa whoever. tell us about it, 17 hours is a long flight, lunch, dinner, how will you manage your sleep, etc? adjusting to the time when you get to your destination is always a good idea, not drinking alcohol of course isa idea, not drinking alcohol of course is a very good idea, i'm not sure i will be able to do it for the full 17 hours, get plenty of hydration, walk around, that is what you need to do, but it will be quite an adventure, the most grapefruit sta rts adventure, the most grapefruit starts by getting slightly north and you fly over the middle of germany, austria, then over the black sea, iran, dinneri austria, then over the black sea, iran, dinner i think will be roughly over the north—western corner of the indian ocean, the new fly right along west coast of india, across the island of sri lanka. i think about 10 hours in we should be flying over colombo and at that stage quite a lot of people, possibly me, would think that is enough, let's stop here and have a
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break. but no, you then have to do a 3500 stretch right across the indian 0cean, the equivalent of its own london— new york flight. finally, you arrive at six o'clock british morning at lunchtime in western australia, so you have a very long night and australia, so you have a very long nightand a australia, so you have a very long night and a very long day. australia, so you have a very long night and a very long daylj understand why people would want to be on this maiden journey but i understand why people would want to be on this maidenjourney but i do wonder, you touched upon it briefly, people do like stopping, perhaps, if you have a long journey, it does break it up having a couple of hours to stretch legs. certainly, and better for the planet but i do think social media, people wanted to go non—stop outnumber those who wanted to stop by a ratio of four to three and the whole idea is that qantas hoped that business travellers will like the idea because they are the people who really bankroll the whole operation, not a slot down the back.
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simon, good to talk to you. safe journey, be nice to the baby. goodbye! here's alina with a look at this morning's weather. we know there was more cold weather on the weekend. we were talking about snow and severe windchill last weekend but not this weekend. some rain around at the moment which will slowly start to ease, bringing a lot of cloud as well. sunny spells and showers would sum it up. a swirl of clouds to the south—west of the uk southwards across spain. for us, spilling a lot of cloud. that's going to continue across much of england and wales, slowly starting to ease. a better brightness across south—east england and northern and western parts of wales. temperatures
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well below freezing. plenty of sunshine through the morning. some wintry showers feeding in parts of scotla nd wintry showers feeding in parts of scotland particularly over higher ground. a north—south split through the day. the best of any sunshine through scotland and northern parts of england. always keeping this cloud across much of england and wales. some patchy light rain, becoming more confined. temperature wise, 9— 11 celsius. the highest temperatures across eastern parts of scotla nd temperatures across eastern parts of scotland where we see the best of the sunshine. clearer skies overnight and temperatures getting down to freezing is not below. that band of cloud going south, here, a cloudy and mild night. further north, colder with a touch of frost. you can see this area of cloud still
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ring —— still lingering across parts of england but besides in scotland, most of us having a dry day. 10— 12 celsius should feel quite pleasant in the sunshine. slowly things start to turn colder. there is the risk of some snow but some uncertainty around the details. as vicki dunne the forecast, that would be a good idea. monday, dry, brighton cold. some sunshine earlier on for the crowd starts to build with outbreaks of rain. eventually western scotland later in the day. ahead of that, quite pleasant in the sunshine. slowly, through tuesday and wednesday, things start to turn colder. quite unsettled. we'll keep you updated as you know more. we'll be back with the latest headlines at 8 o'clock but first, it's time for newswatch.
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hello and welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed. russia's attitude to the british media and the uk as a whole is chilly at best. how does the bbc‘s moscow correspondent approach the reporting of this tense relationship? and complaints about that hat continue to pour in. did newsnight doctor an image ofjeremy corbyn to paint him as a kremlin sympathiser? it is almost three weeks since the poisoning of sergei skripal and his daughter yulia, and it is fair to say that relations people between the uk and russia have not improved during that time. reporting on that deteriorating relationship from moscow has been correspondent steve rosenberg, who had a rare opportunity last week to question vladimir putin, then on the campaign trail for his re—election. president putin, bbc news. is russia behind the poisoning of sergei skripal?
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translation: we are busy with agriculture here, to create good conditions for people's lives, and you talk to me about some tragedies? first, work out what actually happened there, and then we'll talk about it. tonight, russia described theresa may's commons statement as "a circus show". and it dismissed accusations against moscow as an informational political campaign based on provocation. a fairytale. the rhetoric was blunt and it has continued since president putin, to the surprise of no—one, was re—elected last sunday. tonight, by the kremlin, vladimir putin thanked his people for re—electing him their president. "we are destined to succeed", he said. russia! "russia! russia!", they chanted. but in putin's fourth term, are russia and the west destined
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for a cold war? steve rosenberg reporting again there, and we'll be talking to him in a moment. before that, a couple of your thoughts on the bbc‘s coverage of russia. 0ne twitter user posted this: jack leggett was concerned about how bbc news has covered russian reactions to the accusations of its involvement in the salisbury poisonings. well, steve rosenberg joins me now on the line from moscow. steve, you do give us the kremlin‘s side of the story. and as we just heard in those e—mails, some viewers fear that it gives them credibility. how do you answer that? well, i consider myjob as the bbc‘s moscow correspondent to tell viewers
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in britain and around the world what moscow is thinking. this is a very confusing story and i think it is important to listen to what the russians are saying. they have a range of arguments. and i think then i have to use my experience of living and working in russia — and i have been here for 23 years, not with the bbc all that time — but to use my experience to examine what the russians are saying and to try to cut through all of that and give my interpretation, my opinion, about what is going on here. as i say, it is a very confused story but i think it is important to present the russian perspective on it. we saw you on the campaign trail
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asking quite a tough question of putin. was that a difficult, even scary, thing to do? i wouldn't say it was a scary decision. it was quite a challenging thing to do because normally, question and answer sessions with president putin are heavily controlled. we were covering him on the campaign trail, we found ourselves in a position physically where we were able to pop a question to him and it was the question that really everyone wanted to ask at the moment.
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journalistically, i think it was the right thing to do. and the thing about vladimir putin, whether you like him or hate him, whatever you think of him, you know, he has no trouble answering questions. as you mentioned, you have been in russia for 23 years. one wonders how hard it is to report there now, and how it compares to reporting from there in the past. i think one thing that we can't always get into our short two—minute news reports but i think it is important to say is that if you go outside the bureau here, moscow seems like a normal european city. having said that, we have been harassed while covering controversial stories, sensitive stories, and this didn't happen, say, ten years ago. one wonders how much real political opposition there is in russia, including from ordinary citizens. an interesting question. vladimir putin has just been re—elected with a landslide victory and although this was not a level playing field, this election, and only those candidates who posed no serious challenge to vladimir putin were allowed to take part, many russians do support vladimir putin — some because they really like his sort of muscle—flexing, his strong—arm tactics, his anti—western rhetoric.
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other people who support him because they fear change. many russians fear change. they don't want life to get worse than it is now and they fear picking a new president. you talked about being on the campaign trail for this election. how did it compare to covering a western election? well, it's not like a western election. as i said before, only those candidates who didn't threaten vladimir putin were allowed to take part. russia's most prominent opposition figure, alexei navalny, he was barred from taking part in the election. and then you look at the amount of airtime that was given to president putin on russian television ahead of the election — he had far more airtime than all of the other candidates put together, and all of the coverage of putin was very positive. so, you know, in that sense, no, this is not like a western election. the russian authorities have been particularly critical of the british media.
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do you worry about your safety at all? i have not worried up till this point. as i say, walking around moscow right now, it feels pretty normal. you go into the coffee shop, you get happy smiley faces serving you. and although there is — i have noticed more anti—british sentiment on russian television. for example, i saw a report the other day where the reporter claimed that over the last few centuries, britain has had it in for russia and they listed all the things over the last few hundred years that britain has done to russia, so we have seen that, but from the public, i have not noticed really any rise in anti—british sentiment. and also, russian government officials are still talking to the bbc. we get comments from the foreign ministry, from the parliament, so — which is important because, as i say, it is important for us to be able to listen to what russia's argument is and then include that in our pieces. steve rosenberg, thank you. thanks. well, one aspect of the ratcheting
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up of tension between the uk and russia this week was reported on wednesday's news at 10. it began like this. tonight at 10, another plunge relations between britain and russia as boris johnson compares president putin to adolf hitler. during the day as inspectors continued their investigation in the salisbury area, the foreign secretary suggested that russia would use the forthcoming world cup like adolf hitler had used the olympics in 1936. what is going to happen in moscow in the world cup and all of the venues, yes, i think that the comparison with 1936 is certainly right. what was not spelled out, though it was made clear later in the programme, was that borisjohnson had not suggested that analogy of his own accord, but merely agreed with the comparison proposed to him by the labour mp, ian austin.
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given that russia responded with outrage, the distinction seemed an important one to several viewers, including graham rains, and if that caused a stir among viewers, it was nothing compared to the ongoing row about last thursday's newsnight item onjeremy corbyn‘s attitude to russia. we mentioned on last week's programme complaints that the graphics used in a report and subsequent studio discussion portrayed the labour leader as a kremlin stooge with a russian—style hat that some thought had been digitally altered. since then, the bbc has received thousands more complaints from those adding their voices to the objection which has spawned its own hashtag — #hatgate.
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but many people remained unsatisfied by that explanation, with stan byrne tweeting: thank you for all your comments this week. if you want to share your opinions on bbc news and current affairs, or even appear on the programme, you can call us or e—mail us. you can find us on twitter and do have a look at our website. we are off the air over easter next
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weekend but we will be back to hear more of your thoughts about bbc news coverage again in a fortnight. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and rachel burden. a police officer hailed as a hero during the french terror attack has died of his injuries. arnaud beltrame swapped himself for a hostage during the supermarket siege — and secretly recorded what happened on his mobile phone. good morning. it's saturday 24th march. also this morning: investigators work through the night, searching the offices of the company at the centre of the facebook data row. labour mps react angrily to the sacking of the shadow northern ireland secretary for saying he wants a second brexit referendum. nadine is eight and she's just given her entire pocket money.
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i mean, you can't argue with that, can you? with that, celebrity boat races and boxing matches, the sport relief
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