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tv   The Papers  BBC News  March 24, 2018 10:30pm-10:46pm GMT

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hello. this is bbc news. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment — first the headlines. hundreds of thousands of people take to the streets across the united states, calling for stricter gun controls. survivors of the florida school shooting led the biggest rally in washington. in a little over six minutes, 17 of our friends were taken from us, 15 were injured, and everyone, absolutely everyone, in the douglas community was forever altered. france will hold a national memorial service for the policeman who died after swapping places with hostages during a siege at a supermarket. president macron says he died a hero. the commander of nato forces in afghanistan, claims russia is trying to stall efforts, to end the war, with the taliban. on meet the author this week, the book that tells the story of two teenage girls who left the family
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home without warning to join the syrian war and never came back. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are city am's rachel cunliffe and henry mance from the financial times. welcome to both of you. many of tomorrow's front pages are already in. the observer reports a staff member for the brexit leave campaign says it may have broken electoral spending law. the express says the government will recruit more midwives. the sunday mirror leads with news
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that filming for a tv series about the murder of teenager milly dowler has provoked anger from local people. the sunday telegraph says facebook was warned about the potential for users' data to be accessed by others seven years ago. the mail on sunday reports that a number 10 aide outed a former partner in a row over the eu referendum. and the sunday times leads with a suggestion that the government is planning to increase funding for the nhs. well that's a pretty vaired set of sunday front pages. let's see what our paper reviewers make of them. henri anier rachel, thanks so much. what strikes you about the front page of the observer —— henry and rachel. somebody who won the referendum is unhappy about the way it was waged, somebody was pro—brexit who worked on the brexit campaign now says it may have done illicitly and the rules may have been broken and the particular rule he is talking about, there were two
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official campaigns, the remain campaign, with david cameron and the official leave campaign with boris johnson and michael gove and they had spending limits. they could give money to other little groups, they could throw away hundreds of thousands of pounds as long as they didn't control the other little groups. what he's saying is i worked ina groups. what he's saying is i worked in a smaller group and he said we we re in a smaller group and he said we were controlled by the main boris johnson and gove group and therefore we we re johnson and gove group and therefore we were breaching the rules services and the victory i wanted. we won at the expense of our democracy. he has been cold a complete lie by vote leave so it has turned into a huge i’ow. leave so it has turned into a huge row. there is a cambridge analytica connection to this. thank you for explaining that because it is much clear —— clearer. explaining that because it is much clear -- clearer. i have to be careful about what i say here because the truth is we don't know. the guardian has spent the last week, a week ago they broke the story about cambridge analytica scraping 50 million facebook profiles for data in the use of the
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trump campaigned and since then they have run relentless coverage on how it was done in the academic involved and how our data is used and they have been building on it. the link here is much more tenuous than for the trump campaigned. it seems that the trump campaigned. it seems that the islands between cambridge analytica and a company that may have been linked to vote leave —— there may have been a link. they are building on the data they have built up building on the data they have built up overthe building on the data they have built up over the last week. whether it was cambridge analytica or another company, political campaigns are starting to use our facebook data and google data in ways that we were not aware of before. we have all beena not aware of before. we have all been a bit naive when it comes to data usage. we know advertisers and marketers are checking on what we click on and what our friends click oi'i click on and what our friends click on to try and sell us things and we are kind of ok with that because we say i will not look at the advert
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and not buy the product so it doesn't matter. when it is political campaigns that may have an impact and actual result we are much more upset about it and it makes us realise how much data there is a must and how it can be used against us. must and how it can be used against us. henry, your take on that. one of the interesting things is the sort of genius, or at least the guru within the leave campaign was a guy called dominic cummings who has talked at length about how they ran this campaign. he said it wasn't inevitable that we won but lots of things went in our favour and we heavily advertised at the end with tailored messages online. people say, why do people miss the result of the referendum 7 say, why do people miss the result of the referendum? wire were people expecting remain to win and expecting remain to win and expecting us to vote to remain to stay in the european union? it's just possible that a lot of this last—minute advertising blitz that the leave campaign did swung some votes. maybe not enough to change the result, but maybe it was very effective. navy it went under the radar because was last—minute and because it so personalised —— maybe
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it went under the radar. even seeing the billboards like in the thatcher era, they were targeted messages on people's facebook pages. another echo of the us. the mail on sunday is running with the same story but they have a different take on it. this toxic sex row, they are calling it. if you are going to sell a sunday paper it helps to have the prime minister and the toxic sex row ina prime minister and the toxic sex row in a headline. the link with theresa may is a little convoluted. what happens as someone who is now close aide of hers and has been before was also a seniorfigure in aide of hers and has been before was also a senior figure in the leave campaign, and he is seen, the whistle—blower that we saw in the observer story come he claims that this guy who is now in downing street is the key link who was in vote leave but also controlling this mini group that the extra money. in response this guy came out and said, hold on, i was in a romantic relationship with you and that's why there was... that's why i gave you
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advice come i wasn't controlling you asa advice come i wasn't controlling you as a group i was giving you advice because you were my boyfriend. he came back and said, you have outed me as gay. just when it couldn't get more bizarre it gets more bizarre. how much trouble does that leave no 10 or stephen parkinson in, do you rachel? think, quite a lot, there has been a response from the whistle—blower has been a response from the whistle— blower and has been a response from the whistle—blower and his has been a response from the whistle— blower and his lawyer saying you don't expect an official downing street statement to make comments about somebody's private sexuality and he also claimed he wasn't out to his pakistani family amber has put his pakistani family amber has put his family at risk. it has all got very messy and toxic as it says. in the opening line, you brought theresa may into it, she was dragged into an extraordinary sex smear row la st into an extraordinary sex smear row last night. if you want to sell a newspaper and a story that's got everything, hasn't it? jilted lover, secret affair, gay love story,
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possibly breaking campaign rolls. if you want to make campaign finance sexy this is the way to do it. obviously it's very serious and he will have to resign. the suggestion that the information commissioner is looking for answers on where the pro—brexit groups got their social media data. the information commissioner has got a lot of work to do with a very small team. remember last week she tried to get a warrant to go into cambridge analytica, didn't get it until the end of the week. i think she has shown a lot of determination to get to the bottom of these things but whether she has the capacity remains to be seen. electoral commission is investigating some of these issues and some of the revelations in the papers will be interesting and undoubtedly influenced those investigations. in terms of what you said, that you think the pressure is on stephen parkinson now. probably, because i think he's made its
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sensationalist, he has drawn attention to himself, and now it's not a case of what he did or didn't do as part of the campaign, it's a case of him outing somebody and putting their safety at risk. that's just very unprofessional and not something we expect from the government. but i think with the data, what the guardian and observer have done which is really interesting, is they managed to link something that they have been i’uitioui's something that they have been rumours about for a while, campaign finance loopholes, linked into the cambridge analytica data scandal and we don't know how it fixed together yet but they are building up a picture here basically that the leave campaign didn't play fair. the leave campaign didn't play fair. the leave campaign didn't play fair. the leave campaign would say the remain campaign didn't play fair either but it is cleverjournalism on the part of the guardian. you two explain it in simple language but it is convoluted dizzying sowe. yes. let's go to something that is sad but i
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suppose in a way the picture on the front page of the sunday times of paul mccartney, who is getting up with that t—shirt, we can end gun violence. —— dizzyingly so. with that t—shirt, we can end gun violence. -- dizzyingly so. the florida gun shooting continues to dominate us politics and may be a watershed in the regulation and violence, hundreds of thousands of people on the streets of various us cities today, all us states have protests, and i think around the world as well. macani has a personal link to this. he says i had a friend killed by a gun not farfrom here, john lennon in 1980. it's interesting that he doesn't name him, hejust says interesting that he doesn't name him, he just says one of my best friends was killed from gun violence not too far from here. it is amazing really, isn't it? if you think about how much that shooting shocked us here and in america i don't know the exact statistics, but shootings every single day, it seems, they have kind of become anaesthetised to
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it. what is really special about this story is the momentum that has built from these teenagers. you heard them speak earlier on your newsreel. it was so emotive, they we re newsreel. it was so emotive, they were so newsreel. it was so emotive, they were so passionate, they have really ke pt were so passionate, they have really kept this issue in the news when previous shootings, it has been thoughts and prayers and nothing has been done. they have actually made a real impact, they are calling for stricter gun laws and i hope they succeed. already the spending bill donald trump signed this weekend, or at the end of last week, included clarification that the centre for disease control can now start studying the impact of gun violence and how many people have guns and how many guns are licensed and how many gun accidents there are. there is no date on this because of a regulation that explicitly said the government couldn't collect data on this, and so already they have had an impact, at least we can study it and have a conversation about it and they are truly inspirational. let's look at the main story on the sunday
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times, theirfront—page look at the main story on the sunday times, their front—page stories that theresa may is going to order £4 billion worth of spending to save the nhs. we are a divided country politically but one thing that the polls show that leavers and remainers want as a high priority is more nhs spending. theresa may's government under pressure from labour according to the sunday times, is willing to find some more money. again, this pits downing street, theresa may, against the chancellor phillip hammond is said to bea chancellor phillip hammond is said to be a bit more nervous about the state of the economy and worried about public finances. theresa may is going to overrule him, this story says. do you believe that? do you believe there is conflict over this? there has been conflict over lots of issues and that seems credible to me. the interesting thing about this story is it is saying there is going to be lots of announcements in the run—up to july, the to be lots of announcements in the run—up tojuly, the 70th anniversary of the nhs being founded, so that is not a budget period. philip hammond
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wa nts to not a budget period. philip hammond wants to keep his announcements until autumn really. if there are any announcements in that time we can assume he has had his arm twisted. there is a suggestion in the sunday times that these plans area the sunday times that these plans are a response to the growing realisation in cabinet that health is the tories‘ achilles' heel. realisation in cabinet that health is the tories' achilles' heellj highlighted that line because it is beautifully written as if they didn't know. we all know this is a massive problem. 22,000 operations cancelled, 4 million people on waiting lists, waiting times going up, there is a line that says: if nothing is done and they will be a funding gap of 20 billion by 2,022. we have an ageing population, the nhs is in crisis basically perpetually. we know all of this. will more funding be the solution? we we re will more funding be the solution? we were doing the maths earlier, four billion sounds a lot of money, not as much as the 18.2 billion the nhs was promised on the side of a bus, that 350 million a week. so it isa bus, that 350 million a week. so it is a lot of money but in the context
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of what we are expecting the nhs to do now and the pressure that we are putting onto it with an ageing population and things like social ca re population and things like social care that are linked to it, it is not going to be enough. 0k, not going to be enough. ok, and sunday telegraph. a russian story. russia has somewhat receded from front pages in the last... you know, overnight. but the sunday telegraph obviously have found an angle on russian tv station showed propaganda using uk bases. henry did such a good job of explaining the convolutions of the other top story. will you have a go at this one? what are they doing? the interesting thing about this is britain, we know, is very anti—russia. what some of its allies have said is you are anti—russia but you are also letting the russians used london as a base and one of the ways they do that is that our tea, a kremlin finest channel, has a british licence to broadcast allowing it to broadcast anywhere around the eu. another european country cannot say that we are banning you because while we are
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in the eu it relies on a british licence —— rt. british latvians and others are saying we want ofcom, the communications regulator, to take a closer look and say this is propaganda, not something that should be broadcast on our channels

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