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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 31, 2018 8:00am-9:01am BST

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well done! we yes! yes! yes! well done! well done! well done! well done! we did it! i did it! i did it! yes! yeah! well done. well done. well done. well done, well done. the family have done, well done. the family have done it and made history. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. more tears as the australian cricketer david warner breaks his silence over the ball tampering scandal. the former vice—captain has apologised and says he accepts he may never play for his country again. right now it is hard to know what comes next. but first and foremost... sobs. is the well—being of my family. good morning, it's
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saturday sist march. also this morning. a new row over anti—semitism as senior labour mps urge lord sugar to delete a tweet that depicts jeremy corbyn sat next to hitler. two british men accused of carrying out a series of beheadings for the so—called islamic state have complained that they won't get a fair trial. flights resume at stansted after a fire on a shuttle bus — but there's anger from the thousands of passengers left behind. in sport — he's leaner but is he mean enough? anthonyjoshua weighs—in a lot lighter for tonight's world heavyweight unification fight with joseph parker. and helen has the weather. the day ahead does not look as wet
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as yesterday's soul and improving picture to date and tomorrow. but monday looks pretty nasty with some disruptive weather and possible snow. please they tuned for more detailed forecast. good morning. our main story. the australian cricketer david warner has spoken publicly for the first time about his role in the ball—tampering scandal, saying he takes "full responsibility" for his actions. in a tearful news conference the former vice—captain said he would regret his involvement for as long as he lived. our correspondent phil mercer reports from sydney. david warner embodied australia's aggressive and confrontational approach to cricket. but is this the end of the road? he knows he may never play for his country again following his part in the ball tampering scandal. it is the biggest crisis to hit australian sport in years. right now, it is hard to know what comes next, but first and foremost... sobs.
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..is the well... the well—being of my family. in the back of my mind, i suppose there is a tiny ray of hope... ..that i may one day be given the privilege of playing for my country again. but i am resigned to the fact that that may never happen. but questions remain. was warner the sole architect of the conspiracy to tamper with the ball during the third test against south africa, or was anybody else involved? he would not say. whose idea was it? whose idea was it, david? thank you. was it your idea?
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who took the sandpaper out there? was it your idea? what happened, have you done it before? have you done this before? why won't you answer the question? but later on social media, he did offer some clarification, and said he couldn't respond to certain questions because of internal cricket australia procedures. teammate cameron bancroft was caught red—handed with sandpaper. he has been banished from cricket for nine months. former captain steve smith has been banned for a year. all three co—conspirators have apologised, but the stain of cheating may not wash away. two british men — believed to have been members of the notorious islamic state cell known as "the beatles" — have complained they can't have a fair trial because the uk government has stripped them of their citizenship. alexanda kotey and el shafee elsheikh whose group is thought to have murdered more than 20 hostages, spoke to reporters in northern syria after being detained. james waterhouse reports. alexanda kotey and el shafee elsheikh became part of the most
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infamous gang of foreign fighters within the islamic state group. along with fellow londoners mohammed emwazi, the killer nicknamed ‘jihadijohn', who was killed in an american airstrike, and aine davis who was jailed in turkey, the pair are linked to a string of hostage murders in iraq and syria during the milita nts' bloody uprising. they include alan henning, a driver and aide workerfrom eccles and david haines, aide worker from perth. speaking to the associated press from a cell in northern syria, alexanda kotey described the executions as something that was regrettable, as he didn't see any benefit. the pair also claimed the illegal taking of their citizenships left them vulnerable to interrogation and torture. the two men were captured in the country by the american—backed syrian democratic forces, a kurdish—led militia. the home office hasn't commented on whether the pair have been stripped of their citizenship. last month, the home secretary amber rudd said she was absolutely convinced and committed to the idea
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of them facing justice. the defence secretary gavin williamson however, says the men should not return to britain because they turned their backs on british values. their interview come a day after a uk soldier embedded with us forces was killed by a roadside bomb in a counterterrorism operation against the militants, making him the first british member of the armed forces killed in combat fighting is. the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell has called on lord sugar to "delete and disown" a tweet depicting jeremy corbyn sat in a car alongside adolf hitler. the labour leader has faced increasing pressure to stamp out anti—semitism within the party. our political correspondent jonathan blake joins us. this has been a row all week. explain this latest twist. it was a
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tweet posted by lord sugar as you say last night. there is a photo of hitler and someone sitting next to him ina hitler and someone sitting next to him in a car and the face ofjeremy corbyn superimposed on that person. idid corbyn superimposed on that person. i did read when you're pictured at nuremberg and claim you thought you we re nuremberg and claim you thought you were going to a car rally in yorkshire, they add the words many a true word spoken in jest. jonathan, we are struggling to hear you properly. we will come back to you ina properly. we will come back to you in a couple of minutes and get that update from you then. we will return tojonathan for update from you then. we will return to jonathan for that. the russian embassy in london has complained that border force and customs officers searched a passengerflight from moscow at heathrow airport. the embassy claimed the officials refused to give a written explanation for their actions on board the aeroflot plane, and called the search a "blatant provocation". so far there has been no response from the british government. almost one in 10 teachers in england have been sexually harassed by a pupil,
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according to the union the nasuwt. a survey of more than 1,200 teaching staff, found 81 percent felt they had suffered sexual harassment or bullying in the workplace since entering the profession. we weren't surprised by the figures of the sexual harassment from pupils. but we were surprised by the figures of one in five teachers had sexual harassment by a colleague. and itjust demonstrated to us that actually it is important to make sure in every workplace this sort of issue is actually being looked at and addressed. the former england and chelsea midfielder, ray wilkins, is critically ill after reportedly suffering a cardiac arrest. the 61—year—old is being cared for by doctors at a south london hospital. chelsea football club tweeted to say everyone's thoughts are with ray and his family tonight. and qpr tweeted to say "we're extremely saddened to hear
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former qpr player and manager ray wilkins has suffered a suspected heart attack. all our prayers are with you, ray." the funeral of professor stephen hawking will take place in cambridge this afternoon. family, friends and colleagues will gather to pay their respects to the physicist who died earlier this month at the age of 76. professor hawking's ashes will be interred next to the grave of sir isaac newton at westminster abbey in june. well backed that story aboutjohn mcdonald, the shadow labour secretary, tweeting regarding lord sugar posting a picture ofjeremy corbyn sitting next to it. jonathan
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blake is here. what is this all about? this was posted by lord sugar last night and as you explained it features a photo of adolf hitler sitting in a car at the nuremberg rally and the person next to him has the face ofjeremy corbyn superimposed on it and the slogan reads when you're pictured at nuremberg and claim you thought you we re nuremberg and claim you thought you were going to a car rally and lord sugar added the words, many a true word spoken injest. so sugar added the words, many a true word spoken in jest. so clearly the century intervention in the debate around anti—semitism in the labour party. and people calling on him to delete it. the shadow chancellor john mcdonald saying he should delete it and disown it. the labour mpjohn delete it and disown it. the labour mp john madden joined the delete it and disown it. the labour mpjohn madden joined the calls to deleted saying that lord sugar was damaging the fight against anti—semitism. and chris williamson, another mp, calling on him to take it down. lord sugar shows no sign of doing it, responding to one person
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saying it was a joke. but a difficult week for the labour party with the issue of anti—semitism dominating. jeremy corbyn making several statements condemning anti—semitism and appealing for unity in the party. but a group of mps, more than 40, calling on him to suspend a leading official on the national executive committee. so far we understand she is willing to go if asked. butjeremy corbyn has so far not showed any signs of doing that. loud and clear this time, thank you very much. let's hear more now on one of our main stories, the chaos for travellers at stansted airport after a fire caused all departing flights to be cancelled. we'rejoined now by brad miller, the chief operating officer at stansted airport. thank you for your time this morning. can you tell us what happened last night? before i get started just my own apologies to
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eve ryo ne started just my own apologies to everyone who has been disrupted. we recognise it is a very busy period for everyone looking to get away for whatever reason and we are trying desperately hard to get them back on track as quick as possible. in terms of what happened, you can see some of what happened, you can see some of the remains behind me, there was a majorfire, a major incident round about four o'clock yesterday, is a far in one of the car park passes. the team did fantastically well, responding quickly. we got the fire under control in 20 minutes but obviously all the duty teams in the terminal tried to react to that to try to make sure something bigger was not going on. at that moment of course they did not realise what it was. i listened to your apology, i'm not sure how useful that is too many of the passengers were still have not been able to leave. earlier we spoke to a couple who were meant to
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be going to barcelona yesterday and obviously because of the problems at the airport they could not take that flight. rbs the airport they could not take that flight. rbs still waiting, and they areafamily flight. rbs still waiting, and they are a family of four, unlikely to get on a flight as stand—by passengers. what are you doing to get people away on holidays because we had scenes of chaos in the airport yesterday. myself and the rest of the team were here until the early hours working out what we could do for people. we are encouraging everyone to contact their airline. a number of airlines are putting on rescue flights today for extra capacity, extra sleep so i would encourage everyone to reach out to their airline and call in or you can. check the website. also some people managed to get hotel rooms overnight here and i know that many airlines are trying to reach out to them to let them know that those rescue flights are on and we
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should be able to get them back to the destinations of where they were planning to travel to as quickly as possible. because of this fire, how is that affecting things, the fire was not on the runway but it led to a string of cancellations because of the difficulty of securing their side and landslides, is that the case? yes, so what happened, when i reviewed cctv last night with some of the team, it appeared that when we reacted we tried to evacuate people, the wind direction meant that the smoke was blowing across the terminal and it was difficult to see where it was coming from inside. it would very dark and their first thought as always is the safety and security of all passengers. and they immediately when thinking where is the safest place we can get them to within the terminal. that happened to be terrified. that caused conflict between people that had
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been properly screened through security and those who had not. and at that point of course we could not let anyone flights if we were not sure about whether they had mixed with people that had not gone through the proper security protocols. so a bit of a hobson ‘s choice, do we disrupt the operation of the rest of the day or not. if we had not we would have risked the operation today and maybe into tomorrow as well. so it was a difficult call but i think they made the right decision. how many people have not made their flights, how many people of those will not simply be able to get away this weekend, do you know? in terms of the amount of people that will not be able to get away we will not know that until all of the flights had been rebooked and eve ryo ne of the flights had been rebooked and everyone has tried their best to get onto the rescue flights i mentioned earlier. in terms of the amount of flights disrupted, over 100 disrupted from four o'clock yesterday. half due to go out and
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half due to come in. some of those coming into the airport managed to divert to other uk airports and people then made their way back to sta nsted as appropriate. people then made their way back to stansted as appropriate. what have you learnt from this? a huge amount, the public reacted fantastically. looking back on all the cctv footage we have got, no one panicked which was brilliant. exactly what you need in this kind of situation. the team reacted really quickly. 0f in this kind of situation. the team reacted really quickly. of course there are lessons to be alert and we will do a full investigation and write up and take what learnings we can over the next few days. thank you very much. and if you're one of those people who was hoping to fly out of stansted for a bit of sunshine and you're stuck here in the uk instead, helen will bring us up—to—date with what the weather is
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going to be like here at home. you have not set her up very nicely at all. i am sorry, helen. but the way you have delivered the weather all morning has been marvellous. it is to not shoot the messenger on this. not great news but we have some drier weather tomorrow. looking like the dry state of the holiday weekend. and hopefully for some who have an extended period of now there will be some light at the end of the tunnel moving through next week as well. so rain at times, snow on the hills, some sunny spells as well. but this weekend the emphasis on the rain and a bit of snow. no surprise with low pressure across the country ofa with low pressure across the country of a typicalfor the with low pressure across the country of a typical for the time of year but unfortunately not coming at the right time for those with that
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extended weekend. we do have some sunshine around. but that is the exception today. even amongst this massive rain in east sussex we have had some brighter breaks. but some snow in the north and over the hills. the other problem is it is sitting on the hills. i drove in through some hill fog as well. gradually through the day rain easing from the western fringes of england and wales. just the odd shower here. so some good weather to be found. not particularly warm but feeling particularly chilly in eastern areas because of the breeze and cloud cover. as i say more so through this evening and overnight. so under the clear skies a hard frost for scotland, parts of northern ireland, the fringes of england and wales. but that means we start tomorrow on a bright note. but in east haemorrhages above freezing, some patchy rain around but tomorrow
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is today, the best of this four day weekend. this is heading in later in the day so unfortunately for devon and cornwall after the fine start the rain marches in through the afternoon. but eastern areas have a better chance of some drier weather put up scotland has some good spells sunshine but wintry showers as well the northern ireland as well. so a lot of but the northern ireland as well. so a lot of- but more dry weather lot of cloud but more dry weather tomorrow. and we do have this significant number of flood warnings out in england and wales but not so warming in tonight and easter monday is not good news. and notjust rain, some snow as well especially over a hills. even some over lower levels. so stay abreast of the forecast if you're travelling on easter monday. you're watching breakfast from bbc news.
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time now for a look at the newspapers. anand menon, the director of uk in a changing europe is here to tell us what's caught his eye. let's dive straight in. we have the chief of the metropolitan police think social media is making, changing the nature of crime on our streets. she think social media is playing a role in driving violence andi playing a role in driving violence and i think the tallies from knife attacks are at the highest level in england and wales since 2010. she said the combination of violence in music, the way that gangs use youtube to publicise what they're doing and glamorise violence, are all adding to this and making it worse. she says i will not be stopped by considerations of being politically correct. and possible tensions here because it was under theresa may at home secretary that stop and search was scaled back because it was seen as racist. now
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there is pressure to increase those numbers again to try to stop knife and gun violence. she is talking about the speed of social media that it makes everything faster and so ha rd to it makes everything faster and so hard to cool down when emotions are high and things are posted. interesting that has been used because this latest row over anti—semitism in the labour party, accusations of anti—semitism, we have just been reporting a tweet by lord sugar whichjohn have just been reporting a tweet by lord sugar which john mcdonnell have just been reporting a tweet by lord sugar whichjohn mcdonnell has asked him to take down and step away from. that is a picture ofjeremy corbyn, his face superimposed on a person sitting next to adolf hitler and comments about something along the lines of when you are in your work and you're told you're only going to a car rally or something like that. it shows a degree of
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scepticism about these allegations of anti—semitism, almost eight out of anti—semitism, almost eight out of ten of these labour party members, ithink of ten of these labour party members, i think the media are believed to be exaggerating this is a way of getting a jeremy corbyn. it shows the loyalty of party members and must add to the sense of isolation that those labour mps who signed the letter calling outjeremy corbyn must feel. there obviously is some strong feeling amongst members of the labour party and when you look at lord sugar who has put this tweet out there, he isjewish, not something that can be done lightly. absolutely not, personally i'm a bit sceptical about those references and after a few exchanges someone always
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mentions hitler put up but it shows the strength of feeling and there are rigid divisions in the party over this. and the future of this labour officeholder, christine shawcross, on the nec. the national executive committee. it basically makes the laws for the labour party. and i think she is head of the dispute resolution panel. she said she would only step down ifjeremy corbyn asked her to. and a group of labour peers and mps wrote a letter la st labour peers and mps wrote a letter last week saying she should not be forced out of the nec —— that she should be. and to date no movement from the leadership but this story keeps on running. but every day something else is coming up. and to be clear she supported a councillor who had been forced to resign who had supported something on facebook and then she said she had not seen
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it. but still she is being asked to step down. it all comes back to social media. the guardian, their front page is looking at what it calls the scale of the public sector gender pay gap. some interesting figures, 59p it says was what women we re figures, 59p it says was what women were paid for every £1 that men received at one hospital trust. what is interesting, many things interesting about this, pressley and scale of the data collection that is being undertaken. public sector organisations had a deadline to provide information on the gender pay gail provide information on the gender pay gap. public sector organisations, around 16% of the workforce they employ and findings are not good. in the university said that you find in every single university group women are paid less than men. i suppose the first way to make progress is to get the figure is out there and to know what the data is. the danger is that one was
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a small pay gap would say at least it is not as big as others and that is ok. itjust should be equal. absolutely, many different facets to this. a few weeks ago on commons committee said we need to change the structure of parental leave to try to get more men to take parental leave. that is one of the ways indirectly of targeting the gender pay gail indirectly of targeting the gender pay gap. well we're going to talk about the conservative party in the next hour when you come back. thank you very much. when nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was arrested trying to leave iran in april 2016, her family thought she'd be released after a few months. almost exactly two years later, nazanin is still in jail. her husband, richard radcliffe, is launching a new campaign which uses comedy to demand her freedom. we'll speak to richard in a moment, but first here's a reminder of nazanin's story. nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe has been in jail in iran
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nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe has been injail in iran for almost nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe has been in jail in iran for almost two yea rs. in jail in iran for almost two years. she had been visiting family with her young daughter when she was arrested as she tried to board a flight back to the uk. her daughter and her passport confiscated. british man has described imprisonment of his wife by the iranian revolutionary guard as outrageous and... after 150 days she was sentenced to five years in the notorious prison on secret charges. 800,000 people signed an online petition calling for her release. a month before she was eligible for early release, nazanin was summoned to court in iran. looking at what nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was doing, she was simply teaching people journalism as i understand that the foreign secretary made comments that we re foreign secretary made comments that were used as evidence against her and she was told that she could face and she was told that she could face an extra 16 years injail.
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and she was told that she could face an extra 16 years in jail. days later her husband richard met with borisjohnson. it later her husband richard met with boris johnson. it was later her husband richard met with borisjohnson. it was a positive meeting. the family and friends of nazanin hoped she would be at home for christmas. all mothers do. but they are still waiting. we'rejoined now in the studio by nazanin's husband, richard ratcliffe. last time i spoke to you you were in london and we spoke to you and boris johnson was about to make his way to iran. and your helpful you made very clear you did not think nazanin would be really straightaway but you thought it could be a good move towards easing the way for her release. it just towards easing the way for her release. itjust seems to have gone a bit cold. exactly right, we were hopeful before christmas and there was a lot of momentum, we were on the news a lot. but the foreign secretary went to iran to try to solve the case and we felt positive. we thought it might be christmas, a
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delayed christmas present or west case the iranian new year a couple of weeks back. then things happened around demonstrations and things and it got a bit late but we were hopeful. and what happened was talk of release became talk instead of temporary release, like a holiday from prison and then talk about house arrest and then nothing. with borisjohnson say house arrest and then nothing. with boris johnson say anything house arrest and then nothing. with borisjohnson say anything to you after that meeting? well we had a debrief and he basically said he is doing his best and will creep making sure no stone is unturned. and it was proving tricky. but that was three months ago. and you have had quite positive statements from the prison itself that something was imminent orshe prison itself that something was imminent or she had been cleared for release. so what is holding it up but you mark the head of the prison said he had approved her release four months ago but so just before christmas. we had various messages, thejudge in charge of all said there was a problem between the two
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governments and until that was resolved she was stuck behind bars. for you personally knowing interest rate arrangements are holding up potentially the release of your wife for the family, wider family, potentially the release of your wife for the family, widerfamily, what is it like to be caught in the middle of this diplomatic dispute. all along we have been out of our depth and this big international politics going on and is now it has gone through ups and downs. and they're just an ordinary family stuck in the middle. it has been a long lesson in the power of what ordinary people can do but also limits you fit up against. when we spoke you said nazanin was extremely distressed and upset. distressed about not being able to see her daughter and not having any kind of clarity as to what was happening. what is her state of mind now but you might! what is her state of mind now but you might i think the uncertainty has been very tough and for her, just for me christmas was very tough. so two weeks ago she thought
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she was going to be released, the head of the prison said yes, i would prove it but i cannot. many of her cell—mates were released and it is tough. she's back in a space where she is not sleeping and having panic attacks at like. -- at night. what has she said to you about her day—to—day life? has she said to you about her day-to-day life? when she was in solitary it was awful but now she is a normal prisoner cell there are people she can talk to who have been through similar experiences. fundamentally it is prison and that is horrible. you are trying to use comedy now to help yourcampaign? you are trying to use comedy now to help your campaign? we were hoping this could be a celebration and we
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thought if we got to this part and she was still interred, we would need cheering up. so we have shafiq sandy comparing a comedy event for us, the british iranian comedian, and we are asking people to send in jokes and tell us what makes them laugh. we need to draw on the energy and support that people happens —— have been providing in this country. we have a petition on changed at all and people can send in theirjokes, we can send them to have. what is your favourite joke? why does the scarecrow your favourite joke? why does the scarecrow win an award? because he was outstanding in his field. you should be part of the stand—up crew. i don't think i am quite ready for the professionals yet. thank you for
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coming in. coming up on the programme. beauty-queen maria mahmood is here to tell us about preparing to become the first muslim woman to wear a hijab while competing in miss england. stay with us, headlines coming up at eight thirty. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. the australian cricketer david warner has spoken publicly for the first time about his role in the ball—tampering scandal, saying he takes "full responsibility" for his actions. in a tearful news conference, david warner said he would regret his involvement for as long as he lived. he's been banned from international and domestic cricket for a year. in the back of my mind, i suppose there is a tiny ray of hope... that i may one day be given the privilege of playing for my country again. but
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iam of playing for my country again. but i am resigned to the fact that that may never happen. the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell has called on lord sugar to "delete and disown" a tweet depicting jeremy corbyn sat in a car alongside adolf hitler. lord sugar, a former labour peer, shared the image with his 5.5 million twitter followers and responded saying the post was "a joke". mr corbyn has faced increasing pressure to stamp out anti—semitism within the party. two british men believed to have been members of the islamic state cell known as "the beatles", have complained they can't have a fair trial because the uk government has stripped them of their citizenship. alexander kotey and el shafee elsheikh, whose group are thought to have murdered more than 20 hostages, spoke to reporters in northern syria after being detained by kurdish fighters in january. they described the execution of hostages as "regrettable". more than 100 flights from stansted airport were cancelled last night after a shuttle bus caught fire outside the terminal building.
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a normal service has resumed this morning but some passengers are unsure when they may be able to fly. earlier, the chief 0perations 0fficer explained why they had to make the decision to send travellers home. smoke was blowing into and across the terminal and it was very difficult to see where it was coming from when you were inside. it went very dark and obviously their first thought, as it always is, is the safety a nd thought, as it always is, is the safety and security of our passengers and we were immediately thinking, where is the safest place we can get them to in the terminal? that happened to be as side, causing conflict between people who had been properly screened through security and people who hadn't, meaning we couldn't let anyone fly if we were unsure if they had been nixing with people who have not gone through proper security protocols. the russian embassy in london has complained that border force and customs officers searched a passengerflight from moscow at heathrow airport. the embassy claimed the officials refused to give a written explanation for their actions on board
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the aeroflot plane and called the search a "blatant provocation". there hasn't been a response from the british government as yet on this story. arnold schwarzenegger is recovering in hospital after undergoing emergency heart surgery in los angeles. a spokesman for the actor, who's 70, said the operation had been a success and he is awake and joking. that's the news for now. a big day in sport, easter saturday, loads going on. we start with boxing. a big fight and a big breakfast for anthony joshua. you feeling hungry this morning? i have had eggs and hot buns. i think this will make your brea kfast i think this will make your breakfast look pathetic. this is a standard breakfast for anthony joshua, gearing up towards his fight againstjoseph barker. he often has
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seven eggs. he also has a quite fun, muffin, cereal, fruit. and this is a man who has lost weight. you wouldn't think that looking at this next picture, the strength of the man. i thought we had put that on screen the wrong way round. he is six at six, 17 stone, you think it is all about strength, but it is actually about flexibility. he has been training in sand. the other key thing is sleep. he have to have eight to ten hours sleep a night. he is smiling boughs well. he is smiling boughs well. he is smiling boughs well. he is using the same mattress in newport before his fight as he has been sleeping in sheffield in his training camp. how do you feel all —— how do you find all of this out?
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no stone is unturned. steve, have you had your breakfast this morning? we all live like champions in the boxing business. did i only counted five eggs that plate? that must have been the warm up before he went to the ball breakfast. i am disappointed in the lab. he has actually slimmed down a lot, hasn't he? he is lighter than his previous fourfights. he? he is lighter than his previous four fights. why is that important? he is £12 in weight lighter than he was and he admitted in cardiff that he got a bit that when there was a switch of opponents from a tall guy he might have djs to a short guy. he said he spent a week in cardiff a couple of miles away from here eating, gaining £12. believe it or not, it seems odd, but he managed to
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have a potbellied six—pack. i have never seen have a potbellied six—pack. i have never seen it before. for this fight, he has slimmed down, he is leaner, because he believesjoseph barker is going to move, he will run around. that is why he has dropped the wait. and of course he is sleeping on the same mattress that he has been sleeping on in his training camp in sheffield. are all these things important? is sleeping on the same mattress every night going to help joshua on the same mattress every night going to helpjoshua in this fight? it is, because in his head, this is a big mattress, obviously, and it's a big mattress, obviously, and it's a mattress he has had notjust that his training camp in sheffield, but he has had it sincejust after the 0lympic he has had it sincejust after the olympic games. every single thing aboutjoshua's olympic games. every single thing about joshua's life when olympic games. every single thing aboutjoshua's life when he is preparing for a bite, 12 weeks in shepherd, is exactly the same. he gets up in the same room, he mixes with the same amateur boxers, he makes the same walk to the gym, the
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same guy prepares his speed, the same guy prepares his speed, the same mattress, the same pillow. he likes everything to be the same. lennox lewis used to travel with the same pillow and he never used to ta ke same pillow and he never used to take the pillowcase off, so he would travel with this flowery pillowcase. it was really weird but it worked for him. steve, it is naga. one of the things we talk about with anthonyjoshua, when we see him talk outside of the ring, he seems like a really well brought up young man, really well brought up young man, really polite and lovely. he is. he is decent. everyone keeps looking for a problem with him and there is not. he holds his hand up. when he first went into a boxing gym, he had a tag on his ankle, he had run—ins with the police. that is behind him, he has talked openly about that, he has changed his life, grab the chance to go to the olympics, won
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the gold medal, then grabbed the chance to turn professional. what most of you guys do not see is what he does in private, that some of the people close to him don't even see. he does so much stuff away. as for decent, when he gets to a press conference, it might take him 20 minutes to work the room. down here in cardiff, 36 minutes of shaking hands and kissing babies heads after the formal work—out. he stayed until he had signed something for everyone who wanted it. he is used to the media and plays it very well. he has suggested that parker might be overwhelmed by the media attention he will get tonight. do you agree? we have been looking for problems with parker. will he be overwhelmed by coming to cardiff and seeing joshua's face everywhere? will he be overwhelmed by the way in? it looks like this kid parker has got ice in his veins. he has got a great poker
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face, a big lump. iwas his veins. he has got a great poker face, a big lump. i was really close tojoseph barker yesterday face, a big lump. i was really close to joseph barker yesterday and face, a big lump. i was really close tojoseph barker yesterday and i can assure you , tojoseph barker yesterday and i can assure you, his heartbeat was just going to take... take... i don't think parker will be awed by 70,000 people. the men in the ring are walking to the ring like they are going for a sunday stroll with their cocker spaniel whilst i'm taking deep breaths! we know that parker has his wbo belt which is on the line and joshua's two boats as well. there is one belt remaining, held by deontay wilder, the american boxer. joshua wants to unify the whole division. if he can do that, goes on to beat parker and deontay wilder, from sporting perspective, how significant would that be?m from sporting perspective, how significant would that be? it would be the first time that someone has held all of the recognised belts since the wbo came around in 1988. more than that, if he were to do
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that, that would be another stadium fight. he has already fought in front of a quarter of a million people in 11 months. 240,000 people have paid to see him in a flash. no other boxer in history, forget all the other names you can trawl up over the last 120 years, no other boxerin over the last 120 years, no other boxer in history has been watched by so many people in such as short space of time. anthonyjoshua has become a superstar. is he the best heavyweight at the moment? maybe not. maybe deontay wilder all tyson fury are better. but he is on the way to becoming the biggest star in sport. and it is lucrative. £80 million we think he will pocket later. not bad for a night's work? -- £18 later. not bad for a night's work? —— £18 million. later. not bad for a night's work? -- £18 million. lovejoy used to have a great line. he would do and it
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would only take two minutes to make £5,000. the woman with him would say, how did you do that, it was only two minutes. he would say two minutes and 20 years up here. only two minutes. he would say two minutes and 20 years up herem only two minutes. he would say two minutes and 20 years up here. it is the same for anthonyjoshua. steve, many thanks indeed for all of your insight. i think we are all off to have eggs for breakfast. easter eggs, yes. after an excellent start, england's bowlers have been frustrated by new zealand's batsman on day two of the send test in christchurch. jonny bairstow reached his fifth test century at the start of day two. england all out for 307. he was the last man out for 101. but he was soon straight back into the action taking a catch off stuart broad to dismiss tom latham without new zealand getting off the mark. they were 36 for 5 but england's bowlers weren't been able capitalise on that start as the hosts finished the day on 192 for 6. dan is here with us to talk about
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football focus this lunchtime now. in case you wondered where the easter eggs were? that is a fantastic shirt! i had that naga wasn't feeling well and i thought i would try to lift your spirits.|j wait where it for football focus. i think it is too much for an hour. i have just remembered, think it is too much for an hour. i havejust remembered, i haven't got a lottery ticket! now, come on, it has put a smile on your face! got a lottery ticket! now, come on, it has put a smile on yourface! we are interviewing jesse lingard today who has had a great few weeks, breakthrough season at manchester united and scored goals for england ina united and scored goals for england in a recent international break as well. really good access at manchester united, walking around the training academy... it is not often you get that, is it? no,
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normally it is quite sterilised but this is a proper walk—through with pictures on the walls and he talks about coming through the academy at manchester united. here is a clip. lot of what you do now on the big stage, you have done it on this pitch behind us? definitely. a lot of practice. you can see the red dots. a lot of time spent trying to hit the red dots from very young. dots. a lot of time spent trying to hit the red dots from very youngfl all stemmed from there. your grandad used bring new? yes, he used to stand here and shout at me. a bit embarrassing. he was always taking me to matches and i can only thank him for that. potentially a big summer him for that. potentially a big summer ahead for him, trying to get himself into the england squad as well. oh, are you all right? this is why you need the shirt! an interview with rafael benitez today as well, doing well with newcastle considering they haven't spent very
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much money this season. they take on huddersfield will stop marquise is on the programme, looking for his first win at southampton boss in the premier league. we also have petr cech on the programme looking forward to tomorrow. and we would talk about england's first game in the world cup as well, against tunisia and then panama. we are ramping upforthe tunisia and then panama. we are ramping up for the world cup already. and of course we will talk about ray wilkins who is in a critical condition in hospital after a suspected heart attack yesterday. we really hope people screwed. we have got leon osman on the programme later. apologies for copying. -- for coughing. the world is going to want that shirt. sometimes you need to release the power of the polka—dots. today is
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that dave. sometimes you need to put them back in the ox. today is the day. we need to get the weather now. iam we need to get the weather now. i am trying to blend in with the map here so that you don't see me telling you about the weather. we have got several flood warnings that because of all the rain we had yesterday. this is how it looked this morning in north yorkshire. the weather watcher shots are very similar across many areas. we do have some sunshine, this was the 0rkney have some sunshine, this was the orkney islands in saint mary ‘s. this is to the north of our web fad. but that is chilly wind is dragging moisture around our area of low pressure, cloudy and damp picture. hill snow across the pennines and parts of scotland. north west of scotland, parts of northern ireland and western fringes of england and wales will be dry up. the rain takes much of the day though to ease away
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for much of the midlands, south and eastern england. with the breeze, it will feel chilly, temperatures below parfor will feel chilly, temperatures below par for the will feel chilly, temperatures below parfor the time of will feel chilly, temperatures below par for the time of year. through the evening and overnight though, the evening and overnight though, the continuation of that easing of the continuation of that easing of the rain and that means that in eastern areas, although we have the cloud and rain, it won't be that cold. elsewhere, it will be, with some areas waking up to miss dad for bodies today. actually, there is a bit of a lull in whether for most of us bit of a lull in whether for most of us tomorrow, with weather fronts to the south, north and east. i expect there will be some good sunshine to come across the likes of scotland and northern ireland and initially wales and the south—west. then the rain will push in later. at the same time, the remnants of the rain in the east should break up and allow some sunshine. still not as cold as today tomorrow, as we may enjoy a
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bit of that strengthening much sunshine. but, it holds that. through tomorrow night and into easter monday, the next weather fronts starts to come, slowly pushing into our cold air turning into snow over heels quite readily and continuing as snow as it kind of grinds to a halt on easter monday, very slow movement, and clearly there will be a lot of traffic on there will be a lot of traffic on the raids during easter monday as those who have been able to get away for the easter break start to get back. with a forecast of five to ten centimetres of snow across the pennines, a view through the midlands and the district, there is a tricky looking travel forecast. we will, as ever, keep you updated. thank you, helen. if you have been dreaming of a white
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easter, you might be lucky. students from around the world are being put through their paces in cornwall this weekend, in a competition designed to test their strength and technique in some of the oldest skills in mining. competition is fierce at the international mining games, which are an opportunity for students to learn traditional methods whilst also sharing new skills. dan johnson has been for a look around. it's the toughest test in a difficult, dirty business. the mining games is all about teamwork, skill and strength. getting stuck in, definitely. hard draft —— hard graft, getting dirty and doing the ha rd graft, getting dirty and doing the hard work before you climb the ladder. there are seven different events, everything from laying tracks, panning for gold, digging
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and hammering. it's about keeping traditional mining skills alive. we need to drill a hole to fill it full of explosives to blast it. before you had mechanical air drills, you had to do it by hand. there are 40 teams here from mining schools around the globe. competition is certainly this. these montana mining stu d e nts certainly this. these montana mining students have been training for months. the important skills are communication, being able to not get in each other‘s way, stay in good spirits. so, inevitably, the time has come for me to have a go. you have got to run 25 metres there and back, tippett, then run it again fall. they call this marking and they are not mucking about. the support from the crowd is helpful. i think. 0h, support from the crowd is helpful. i think. oh, that is hard work.
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# can you understand me now... # not doing badly, to be honest. # can you dig it? # can you dig it? # can you dig it? # can you dig it, oh yeah? # can you dig it, oh yeah? # can you dig it, oh yeah? # can you dig it? oh yeah. # can you dig it? oh yeah. # can you dig it? oh yeah. # can you dig it, what i'm saying... # keep that weight on, keep that weight on. it is competitive. keep that weight on, keep that weight on. it is competitivem absolutely is. with the boys, more so. absolutely is. with the boys, more so. with the girls, we are just trying to support each other. this
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is tough and its technical. if there was ever any doubt, mining is a toughjob. it's was ever any doubt, mining is a tough job. it's got to was ever any doubt, mining is a toughjob. it's got to be was ever any doubt, mining is a tough job. it's got to be time for a cornish pasty. dan johnson, tough job. it's got to be time for a cornish pasty. danjohnson, bbc news, in cornwall. that is exactly what pasty is —— pasties were made for, miners. that makes thejoshua fight tonight look like a walk in the park. yeah, all right, you go and square up yeah, all right, you go and square up to him. when it was announced that a muslim beauty queen will be the first contestant to compete in ‘miss england' wearing a hijab, there was a mixed response. maria mahmood will compete in the semi—finals of the competition injuly. shejoins us now.
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i think you are a bit overwhelmed by the attention you have had from this, aren't you? yes, it has been missed. —— mixed. i have had some m essa 9 es missed. —— mixed. i have had some m essa g es of missed. —— mixed. i have had some messages of support and there is a lot of fact shaming as well. i thought i would get negativity to the hijab, but it's mainly fact shaming. you are too fat, you are to this to be in a beauty pageant. the fa ct this to be in a beauty pageant. the fact that they think that but i am still here in it shows that it is not just about how you look, still here in it shows that it is notjust about how you look, it's about how you are, how you are with intelligence, europe charitable personality. ok, i'll tell you what surprised me about it, was the hijab pa rt surprised me about it, was the hijab part of it, because my memories of
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beauty contests a re part of it, because my memories of beauty contests are of flowing long—hair in bikinis, perfect bodies of the time, whatever that may have been. miss world now, two years ago, they got rid of the swimwear brand. the current miss england hasn't worn a swimmer outfits and she was crowned in july. a swimmer outfits and she was crowned injuly. even the swimwear round, it is one of ten rounds and it is optional. and with that you only submit a picture, and you only submit that if you want to. if you wa nt submit that if you want to. if you want a shout at the prize, you submit one, if you don't want to, you don't have to. how did you come to enter the competition? well, i was inspired by a pageant contestant in america. i used to talk about it with my friend, how great it was that she did that, and my friend
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sent me a link saying, this is miss birmingham, you should try this. so i went for it. you said you have been surprised by the extent of the media coverage and upset by the extent of trawling on social media, but you really didn't expect social but vou really didn't exgect social i wondered whether —— you media? i wondered whether —— you really didn't expect this much attention? i wondered really didn't expect this much attention? iwondered if really didn't expect this much attention? i wondered if this was your way of spreading a message. initially, i did it for myself, for my confidence. then when i got to the final, i had a lady come up to me and say, i would never have been able to think about doing something like this but now, seeing you do it, i would definitely pursue this. i realised it is inspiring a lot of women out there, so that's positive. what do family and friends think? they are very happy, very proud. and knowing the classic stereotypes of
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beauty pageants, did they not have any concerns? no, because it really isn't like that any more. the charity that we work with, the main focus is to prove that you are a charitable person, you are a kind person and raise money for people with a purpose, helping children from around the world. it has raised more money than band—aid. it has raised billions around the world. miss singapore recently built a bridge for children he found it difficult to get to school, a lot of children were hurting themselves trying to cross a pond, so she built a bridge. the charity does a lot of amazing work, also helps children with cleft palettes, and as an ambassador you have to contribute towards that. what happens next in the competition now? it is the semifinals injuly the competition now? it is the semifinals in july and the competition now? it is the semifinals injuly and then the finals. i don't know, i am not too sure about the dates of the finals, but... think about the semifinals,
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have that as your target and feel positive. are you enjoying the whole process? yes. that is the main thing. maria, thank you forjoining us. good luck. maria mahmood, miss england contested. coming up in the programme, we are going to introduce you to somebody who will make you smile. learning to ice skate, see the northern lights and swimming with dolphins are just some of the things 8 year old alexa wants to do before she loses her sight. we have met her already, she is great fun, we have met her already, she is greatfun, and we have met her already, she is great fun, and she will tell you all about digging things of her bucket list. —— ticking things off her bucket list. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and jon kay. more tears as the australian cricketer david warner breaks his silence over the ball tampering scandal. the former vice—captain has apologised and says he accepts he may never play for his country again. right now it is hard
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to know what comes next. but first and foremost... sobs. is the well—being of my family.
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