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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  April 5, 2018 11:00am-1:00pm BST

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this is bbc news — and these are the top stories developing at 11am. two men are killed in separate attacks in east london — as concern rises over the number of murders in the capital. it is impossible to deal with gang crime, knife crime, gun crime, u nless crime, knife crime, gun crime, unless you have the right level of neighbourhood policing. mark zuckerberg admits mistakes but says he won't step down from running facebook. a former consultant is jailed for possessing firearms, including three sub machine guns — and planning to kill colleagues. the russian foreign minister, sergei lavrov, accuses the uk of telling "fairy tales" over the poisoning of former—spy sergei former—spy sergei skripal. it's the first day of action in the commonwealth games on australia's gold coast... disappointment for the brownlee brothers but a better time for scotland's marc austin and england's jessica learmonth. yes, join me on the gold coast for the very latest on this opening day
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of action. a very busy evening here in nepal, the velodrome and the gymnastics hall. i will have more for you at half—past. calls for fridges and freezers with plastic backing to be removed from sale — after an investigation by consumer watchdog, which? good morning. it is thursday the 5th of april, welcomed the bbc newsroom live. police are investigating the deaths of two men in separate attacks in hackney in east london last night. the first saw a man, believed to be in his early twenties, die from stab wounds despite the efforts of ambulance crews. a few hours earlier, a man in his fifties died after a fight outside a betting shop. the deaths take the number of suspected murders in the capital
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so far to more than 50. our correspondentjohn mcmanus is in hackney for us now. it was just before 8pm last night that officers on patrol were packed —— flagged down by motorist who donated directed them to this spot, where they found an 18—year—old man suffering from stab wounds. the officers administered first aid and called in the london air ambulance but unfortunately they were unable to save him. in the last half an hour, police say that to i7—year—olds have been arrested on suspicion of murder. they haven't named the victim though until the next of kin have been informed. meanwhile, on the same day yesterday, less than two miles from here, a 53—year—old man was found injured outside a bookmakers. police say he had been involved in an
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altercation. again, the london air ambulance was called but they were unable to save his life and he died at the scene. he has not been named either. police are waiting to speak to his next of kin and no arrests have been made in that case yet. many, many people being affected by what seems to be a spate of violent attacks in london leading to people's deaths. the metropolitan police say that more than 50 people have now been killed in london since the beginning of the year and they say that 3a of those deaths whereby stabbings, seven by gunshot weans and they say that 11 teenagers were victims and at least ten people in their 40s. so a wide range of people being affected by this. the local mp and shadow home secretary diane abbott says this is a problem that must be sorted and she says that perhaps believe that that have happened in the past three years may have played a part. it's been quite terrific, this spate of knife and gun crime and all over london mothers must be waking up thinking they could say goodbye to
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their son this morning but will they see them later on in the day? there are a whole series of things that need to happen. first and foremost, we need more police officers on the street. here in hackney, we have lost one in four police officers since 2010. it is impossible to deal with gang crime, knife crime, gun crime unless you have the right level of neighbourhood policing. but loren thorson and can't sell things oi'i loren thorson and can't sell things on their own. —— law—enforcement console things on the rain. we also need to work with schools and social workers. 50, more need to work with schools and social workers. so, more than 50 murders in london so far this year, attacks that diane abbott wants something done about. these are tearing families apart. i told you about the attacks in hackney yesterday. earlier in the week, a 16—year—old was killed. a teenager who was shot inafaith was killed. a teenager who was shot in a faith in walthamstow, dying the next day. and a 17—year—old girl was
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gunned down in what appears to be a drive—by shooting in tottenham. a vast amount of people from different backgrounds being affected by this. the authorities say this is a london wide problem which requires a london wide problem which requires a london wide solution. john, thank you. a 78—year—old man, who was arrested over the fatal stabbing of an intruder during a burglary at his home in south—east london, has been bailed until may pending further inquiries. the man, named locally as richard osborn—brooks, discovered two men in his kitchen. detectives say one was armed with a screwdriver and a struggle ensued. a 38—year—old man was stabbed. he was taken to hospital but later died. the creator of facebook, mark zuckerberg, says he takes personal responsibility for its failures to protect the data of users and to remove provocative content. facebook says the number of its users whose information was improperly shared by political data consultancy firm, cambridge analytica, may have been as high as 87 million. the bbc understands more than one million british
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users were affected. our north america technology reporter dave lee has more. in a conference call lasting almost an hour, mark zuckerberg admitted that he had been too idealistic in the past, putting too much trust in third—party companies that went on to abuse the system he created. but, despite calls questioning his ability to continue as the leader of the world's most powerful social network, mr zuckerberg insisted he would not be stepping down. he said the company was putting in place stricter controls on what data can be accessed by third—party apps. next week, mr zuckerberg will head to washington to face congress, appearing in person for the first time to answer questions about now the firm handles the public‘s data. within the 87 million accounts are thought to have been shared with cambridge analytica, the bbc understands around i million
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were users in the uk. despite requests from british politicians, mark zuckerberg will not appear before parliament, instead sending a deputy. since the cambridge analytica scandal broke last month, there have been many calls for people to boycott facebook altogether. however, it doesn't seem like they have been being too effective. mr zuckerberg said he had seen no meaningful impact on his business. dave lee, bbc news, san francisco. ivana bartoletti joins me now. she is an expert on privacy and data protection. good morning, thank you for coming in. this figure of 87 million will cause a view raised eyebrows, went it? it does, buti cause a view raised eyebrows, went it? it does, but i suppose many of us, the scale of it really surprising, but i think for some of us, and those of us who use facebook, other social media, there
quote
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was the feeling for a long time that things were getting a little bit out of control and if there is one positive thing that is happening now, it is that there is a lot of attention to this and a lot of people, organisations are coming to terms with the fact that we need to bet data and privacy at the heart of what we do and offers individuals need to demand for our rights to be respected. if people were to use the words you did, getting out of control, do you sense that marks the bird has now got that had he is acting upon it? it seems there is a sense of that. when we live in a world where massive organisations have access to so much personal data, then of course something was bound to go wrong at some point. as he said, there are things you are going to mess up. absolutely, but the question now is how do we move
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forward as citizens, businesses and organisations? it is whether we are ready to change the way we have been doing things so far because to an extent, technology has changed over the last few years so much and there has always been a settlement between us as has always been a settlement between us as users, having access to platforms for free, in exchange for giving data, for that nice user experience. but that settlement has never been discussed. i think this is the time we need to talk about data ethics. what new data protection legislation coming into force in may will be very helpful. it was a little bit disappointing yesterday when facebook and its chief executive said yesterday that he was reluctant
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to implement this regulation and pa rt to implement this regulation and part of it is because only i7% of users are within the eu. after what is going on, i think the question is, how do we make sure that we step up is, how do we make sure that we step up the way we protect privacy and of course, it is a matter of regulation andi course, it is a matter of regulation and i am demanded, and so are my clients, they are so interested in this legislation. they want to do the right thing. so you would say to him, this only applies to eu citizens but why don't you take the initiative and applied this more widely? it is important that businesses take their part, that they step it up and say, we want to do the right thing. personal data is not just something that do the right thing. personal data is notjust something that people own and they can sell and if. personal data constitutes what we are so they need to be treated with utmost respect. thank you for coming in. a former a&e consultant has been
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jailed for 12 years for possessing firearms with intent to endanger life. dr martin watt, who worked at monklands hospital in airdrie, was sacked in 2012 following disciplinary proceedings. catriona renton is in glasgow for us with the latest. well, as you can imagine, this was a very unusual case. doctor watt‘s own lawyer said this morning he was an unusual person to find himself in the dock at the high court hearing glasgow. this morning, he was sentenced for possessing an arsenal of weapons. he had three submachineguns, to self loading pistols and over 1500 live rounds of ammunition in his home near cumbernauld in glasgow. thejury found him guilty of possessing these weapons and ammunition with the intention of endangering life. he
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was sentenced to 15 years, meaning 12 years injailand was sentenced to 15 years, meaning 12 years injail and three was sentenced to 15 years, meaning 12 years in jail and three years supervised when he is released. how did this doctor turn into a potential mass murderer? it was only when police received a tip—off —— a tip—off that they found the arsenal he possessed. a white envelope revealed his plans. bad guys, bitten on the front. inside, a list of people he believed were involved when he lost his job. people he believed were involved when he lost hisjob. doctor people he believed were involved when he lost his job. doctor watt was a consultant in the accident and emergency department here. back in 2005, he appeared in a bbc panorama programme about the horrors of violent crime. he worked in the nhs for 32 years. martin watt had been
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ina campaign for 32 years. martin watt had been in a campaign to fight hospital cuts in his department, something he said did not help his career. he then became ill and was off work for over a year. during a phased return, there were complaints about him and he was eventually dismissed. doctor watt devised his plans to assassinate his colleagues based on assassinate his colleagues based on a film. he made his own gunpowder, lord dear divided weapons and used guides to reactivate them. in the months before his arrest, martin watt told the court that he would come to a wooded piece of land and practice shooting targets. bullets every day, five days a week, monday to friday. martin watt, a man whose job was devoted to saving lives, now faces yea rs job was devoted to saving lives, now faces years in prison for
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endangering others. martin watt gave a thumbs up to the gallery. two of the people there shared a house with him and said they had no idea the weapons were there. the judge told him it was sad to find a man in the position he had held in the situation here then but she had a duty to protect the public. his use of the internet and his phone is restricted and he is banned from attending any nhs premises unless he has a valid reason to be there. thank you. you are watching bbc newsroom live. two men have died in hackney in london, including a man in his 20s who was stabbed to death. marks ago berg says he is still the best person to lead facebook despite
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criticism of the way they're protected data. and a former amd co nsulta nt protected data. and a former amd consultant who stockpiled weapons and drew up a hit list has been jailed for 15 years. and in sport, max whitlock got the first medal for england in the commonwealth games. swimmer amy will not got the number three. good news for scotland as well, with a bronze in the triathlon and a medal in the cycling. and liverpool dominate manchester city by 3—1 in the first leg of the champions league semifinal. the next leg is at the etihad next week. russia will use a special meeting of the united nations security council later
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to try to challenge britain's claim that it was responsible for the nerve agent attack in britain. it comes a day after russia was denied a request by the world's chemicals weapons watchdog for a new investigation — involving its own experts — into the salisbury poisoning. caroline rigby reports. a month since the former spy and his daughter were found unconscious, slumped on a park bench in salisbury, as the police investigation continues, so too does the political row. the poisoning has lead to weeks of worsening relations between russia and the west, even talk of a new cold war. the war of words, at least, increasingly frosty. we know that russia has been stockpiling amounts of this. investigating ways of delivering it. we know that russia has previously been willing to poison outside its own borders, including in the united kingdom. we know that it regards ex—agents as being candidates for assassination. this is a situation that is really poisoning our relations. and this as something we should
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jointly find an antidote to. the british are good at creating antidotes, aren't they? on wednesday, the world's chemical weapons watchdog rejected moscow's request for a joint investigation into the poisoning. russia as always denied any involvement in what it now suggests was a terrorist attack. it hopes to use a meeting of the united nations security council to challenge britain's version of events. but growing isolation internationally makes that a tough ask, meaning little end in sight to the ever—growing diplomatic divide between russia and the west. speaking at a security conference in moscow a short while ago, the russian foreign minister, sergei lavrov, said russia had been judged unfairly — and the accusations were being used
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as a pretext to expel the country's diplomats. translation: in order to further demonise russia, provocations are being arranged in circus crippa's case, a staged pretext for unprecedented mass expulsion of russian diplomats not only from britain and the united states but from other countries that were made to do so and it is an open mocking of diplomatic ethics. we have not seen it for a long time. i would like to stress that we will continue responding with friendly steps but at the same time, i would like to find the truth and we insist that there, unbiased investigation be held in line with all the principles of the convention of the prohibition of the convention of the prohibition of chemical weapons and we maintain that they will not be able to ignore
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our attempts at a special session of the organisation on the prohibition of them at all and is proved that. it is unacceptable to continue with such acts as salisbury case and instead of decent investigation, just an unsubstantiated accusations put forward. it is in the book that the accused first be sentenced and then thejury will give the accused first be sentenced and then the jury will give their verdict. (sot) for more on this cross over to our oxford studio and speak to james sherr. he's an associate fellow at the international affairs think tank chatham house and former head of the russia and eurasia programme is there anything new brum sergey lavrov in your opinion this morning? surprisingly not. the wind has been
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in russia's sales since the statement from portadown and i think it is important to understand the significance of what mr aitken said. porton down is basically like the home office pathologist. it is not within their remit, skills or capacity to identify an actor, they identify the weapon. what they have said is that this particular type of nobbyjock is so —— novichok could only be presented bya —— novichok could only be presented by a sophisticated actor. the evidence which has been presented to britain's closest allies have come
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from intelligence from a number of agencies and it is that which has persuaded them and the eu to respond as they have. in other words, you put the porton down evidence alongside the intelligence evidence that you have just alluded to and conclusions are arrived at based on both of those? of course, the dots have to be connected. in order to present a coherent picture, they have to be. you are then left with very few options. even so, the government has been prudent enough to say in all probability this comes from russia. now, it strengthens that conclusion that even in private channels, the russians have said nothing to arouse doubt on the part of anyone who is remotely expert in this. and their public information
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campaign has been full of contradictions. president vladimir putin himself a few days ago said publicly neither the soviet union nor russia ever produced novichok. well, if that is the case, why do they want a joint investigation? they have already told us that if it is novichok, it is not us. this doesn't seem to bother them. they go from one version of events and one accusation to the next. in which case, take us forward to this un security council meeting which will ta ke security council meeting which will take place at russia's request to discuss this more. realistically, what will that shed light on?|j doubt if it would shed any more like at all except perhaps give western powers on the security council another opportunity to present the coherence of their case. it will also demonstrate that outside teu and nato, there are some other countries that for one reason or another would be inclined to support
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russia or back off and abstain. it is interesting, yesterday in the vote at the opcw, russia's request foran vote at the opcw, russia's request for an independent investigation, of 22 present, 17 voted against russia. soi 22 present, 17 voted against russia. so i don't think this meeting at the security council will change anything. a word briefly about the political debate in this country about it, because clearly, you know, there have been figures, principally within the opposition who haven't said we don't think it's russia, but who has said there are still some questions to be answered. we are rightly braving this perhaps more than others have. how does that play out into this, do you think? there have been lasting effects in this country and the west as a whole because of the whole wmd episode
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over iraq. great sensitivity about that and therefore an enormous amount of scepticism on the part of some parts of the political spectrum and public have a hole about anything government says. that is pretty much our default position. seu pretty much our default position. self doubt and scepticism. the russians know that and they are pushing those buttons very vigorously. we must leave it there. thank you very much for your thoughts. the supreme court in brazil has ruled that the former president must begin serving his twelve—year prison sentence for corruption. mr lula is in the process of appealing that sentence but after hours of legal arguments, the judges ruled six—to—five that he should not remain at liberty pending any further decisions. the left—wing leader had been considered the favourite for october's presidential election. earlier, the bbc‘s katy watson in sao paulo told us more about lula's conviction. well, thejudges
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well, the judges have well, thejudges have decided well, the judges have decided that he needs to spend his time in prison whilst he applies to the high court. there are too high court he can apply to. when he goes to prison is still unknown. the feeling if it could be in the next few days unless his lawyers find another reason to try to keep him out ofjail. brazilian politics is notoriously complicated, long winded, praying to delays. but this decision has been seen as very historic, very important, because the judges seen as very historic, very important, because thejudges have ruled that he doesn't need to go behind bars. up to 1000 "sure start" centres, which provide support for families with young children in england, may have closed in the past 8 years, double the government's estimate. research by the sutton trust, which campaigns to improve social mobility, says cuts to local authority budgets have led to the closures. the department for education says it is investing more in childcare support than any other government. we've found that there has been a
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30% cut in the number of early years centres across the country. we also found that in particular areas, there have been bigger cuts than elsewhere, so there is a lottery, actually. if you have a young child, where you live determines whether there is a good centre near you. there is the lottery now that exist in this country. so—called "sin taxes" on soft drinks, alcohol and tobacco are more beneficial for low income families, even though most of the tax revenues come from higher income households. a global study, published in the lancet medicaljournal, found that the levy influenced consumer behaviour and could help to reduce cancer and type 2 diabetes. the findings come ahead of a sugar tax on soft drinks which comes into force tomorrow. north korean missiles could be able to reach the uk in months according to mps — who also said a strike seemed "highly unlikely"
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describing kim jong—un, as "ruthless but rational". the commons defence committee heard evidence that kim jong un is expected to be able to produce nuclear weapons, but won't be able to place them on to long range rockets. the committee chairman, julian lewis, says north korea's nuclear capability is limited. buckingham palace says the duke of edinburgh is in good spirits after a successful hip replacement operation. prince phillip, who's 96, had the planned procedure on wednesday after suffering with a hip problem for about a month. he is likely to remain in hospital for a number of days. now, that is the latest news. let's bring you the latest weather now with lucy martin. a brief ridge of high pressure bringing many of us some sunshine today. some sunshine across much of england, wales and northern ireland. a little bit more cloud across north—west scotland, perhaps, but still some sunshine. perhaps one or
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two showers in scotland and slightly hazy sunshine in western areas. top temperatures, 13 celsius. this evening and overnight, we see the cloud increasing in the west, where outbreaks of rain moving into the south—west and perhaps parts of wales as well as northern ireland. further east, drier weather and a cloudy day tomorrow with the potential for snow in the north of scotland. rain to begin with for northern ireland, behind it, dry weather. eastern england starting to see dry weather again with outbreaks of rain in the west later on. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: two more men have been killed in separate attacks in east london. police have arrested two men, and are appealing for witnesses.the number of killings in the capital has now risen to more than 50 — amid calls for a crackdown on knife crime.
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facebook‘s founder, mark zuckerberg, has said he takes personal responsibility for its failures to protect users' data — but insisted he was the right person to continue running the social media giant. a former nhs consultant who stockpiled weapons and drop a hit list of former colleagues have been jailed for 12 years. he was found guilty of possessing firearms with intent to endanger life. the russian foreign minister, circular frog intent to endanger life. the russian foreign minister, circularfrog has dismissed claims that russia was behind the nerve agent attack. he has called for a fair and unbiased investigation into what happened. the uk government says it stands by its belief that the nerve agent was made in russia. consumer watchdog which? has called for plastic—backed fridges to be "urgently" removed
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from sale after finding they pose a fire risk and could even speed up the spread of a blaze. it says a major investigation showed that nearly half of the most popular appliances used plastic. now to bring you all the action from the commonwealth games. we can cross now to mike bushell at the gold coast. mike. yes, thank you very much. good evening from the gold coast. it is a very windy evening here. very high up on the second floor in our studio, hence the very obvious wind buffer there to stop the wind noise after a very dramatic morning, we are right slap bang in the middle, of a very hectic evening. 15 gold medals being handed out this evening. already we have seen gold for scotland and england in the velodrome and a gold for
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england in the swimming pool asjoe lipsky reports now. take people out doors at it makes an unpredictable arena. in the night air, scotland hannah's miley was going to make history. commentator: aimee willmott is going to win the 400 medley! if there was ever was a time that i was good to haveitin ever was a time that i was good to have it in me, it was after all i've been through the last 12 months, i may be believed that this was my time. england's james guy is going for seven medals this fortnight. he was beaten into bronze in the 400 freestyle, but in front of him was the olympic champion. guy has six more races to recover from. after miley‘s disappointment, scotland's first gold came from neil fachie. this visually impaired time trial gold was just as special as four yea rs gold was just as special as four years ago. it didn't go entirely to
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plan, but it was good enough to win. just getting thejob plan, but it was good enough to win. just getting the job done, and the crowd were amazing. not quite as good as glasgow, butjust about. sophie thornill also found her way to gold, england running on the track. few predicted yorkshire blue, it's so often is a setup for the brownlee brothers, only hours before alistair had carried the english flag, but they fell away on two feeds, beating them to the medals we re feeds, beating them to the medals were scotland's mark austin, he was outside the top 24 years ago. were scotland's mark austin, he was outside the top 24 years agom were scotland's mark austin, he was outside the top 24 years ago. it is such an honour all the time, and la st such an honour all the time, and last time i have even got close to them today. i think they were both struggling just coming in, them today. i think they were both strugglingjust coming in, so them today. i think they were both struggling just coming in, so that pay to my favourite in little bit. the first gold of this game gave bermuda theirfirst the first gold of this game gave bermuda their first ever. flora duffy was followed to the finish by england'sjessica duffy was followed to the finish by england's jessica lamont. duffy was followed to the finish by england'sjessica lamont. these gains aren't always about the medals, wales were breaking new ground in the tennis table arena,
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11—year—old anna hersey, the youngest competitor, winning her first match. this was her proudest win. incredible, iwonderwhat first match. this was her proudest win. incredible, i wonder what her secondary school would make of that. in the last hour, there have been medals for the home teams in the gymnastics hall, which is where we canjoin our gymnastics hall, which is where we can join our correspondence there. hi, mike. it has been an exciting first match here. the favourites won it. england's men's team really dominated here in the final session winning well ahead of the competition, claiming gold, led of course by double olympian max whitlock, him dominating the field on the floor and on the pommel horse, but the whole team put in incredible performances, not just
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max whitlock, but actually three of them finished in the one, two and three category for the individual all—rounders. only two of them can go through, so it shows you england's dominance. canada came second, but a great performance to buy scotland who onlyjust managed to grip that bronze medal for the last few performances, they had a difficult start, but they came through it all. quite a young team, but really showing that they were worth that bronze medal. you can tell that they are just packing up the man's operators, because we expect the women's teams in tomorrow. a good atmosphere, people staying for the ceremony, but of course australia wasn't involved. great stuff, thank you. that is 20 miles north of here with the gymnastics. just before i go, a couple of little surprises from today, you might not have heard of us today, you might not have heard of us dumb axis. wales beating india 2-1 us dumb axis. wales beating india 2—1 in the hockey. you know the differences in size between australia and the island ofjersey.
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jersey beat australia in the polls. that is all from me for now. —— in the balls. let's return to our top story — the deaths of another two men in separate attacks in hackney in east london last night. the first saw a man, believed to be in his early twenties, die from stab wounds despite the efforts of ambulance crews. a few hours earlier, a man in his fifties died after a fight outside a betting shop. the deaths take the number of suspected murders in the capital so far to more than 50. the shadow home secretary, diane abbott, who is also the mp for hackney says more needs to be done and that police cuts may have played a part... it has been quite horrific, this spate of knife and gun crime. mothers thinking that they would say
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goodbye to their sons of this morning, but will they see them later on today? there i number of things that it happen. first and foremost, we need more police officers on the street. we have lost many police officers on the street. it is impossible to deal with gun crime and knife crime unless we have the right level of police. but, law enforcement cannot solve things all around. we have got to work with mental health services and schools and social workers. i do think that with some of these young people, by the age of 11, it is too late, so we do have to have goals and social work and youth projects engaging with these very young people before it becomes too late. that was diane abbott. there has been an alarming rise in murders in london, but the mail ‘s office says the capital is still one of the safest cities in
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the world. helen has been taken a closer look at the crime. statistics. there are calls for fridges and freezers with plastic backing to be "urgently" removed from sale after an investigation by consumer watchdog, which, found they pose a fire risk. all plastic—backed fridges and freezers, currently on the market, pass existing safety standards but testing found that some flame—retardant products could speed up the spread of a fire. for more on this i'm joined by alex neill, who's managing director of home products and services at the consumer advice service which? we've got the tests in place, so what are you looking at which will tell us a different story. we need to look at what a real fire might produce forfridges to look at what a real fire might produce for fridges and freezers. we have found that there are hundreds of potentially unsafe fridges and freezers on the market, which is why we are saying that these patent plastic backed fridges must be
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removed from sales. we have looked at and hundreds of models, and we have found 250 don't buy s today. our message to consumers is do not buy one of his static act fridges. from our testing, we found that when he holed a flame to the back of them, they burst into flames within 30 seconds. this is a different test of the current standard which is that they only produce a warm glow. but when we tested things that were made of metal and aluminium, days don't burn at all. it is clear effo rts don't burn at all. it is clear efforts that —— evidence that they are potential fire risk. they are not an everyday occurrence, but you're still saying that this is dangerous. absolutely. our advice is that they should not be on sale. why have that risk? they could be manufactured in a different way, why
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have actress? you are right, the risk is quite low. the only looking at 8%, of potentially thousands of still too many. interesting what the manufacturers are saying, the manufacturers are saying, they manufacturers are saying, they are manufacturers are saying, they arey are talking manufacturers are saying, they are talking about the current 50 levels, they also talking about standards being continuously revised the latest revision, now being rolled out the world is to improve. max deegan sense from that that they are on board and looking to change, as well? i think there are moves to change the standard two more likely testing that we have done today. i think that our point of that is that that can take a very long time. manufacturers and retailers have the power to do that right away. our advice is to say to consumers, vote with your feet, do advice is to say to consumers, vote with yourfeet, do not advice is to say to consumers, vote with your feet, do not buy this product. if you stop buying them, the manufacturers will more quickly moved to not using plastic backing. the bollywood star salman khan has
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been found guilty of an historic poaching offence dating back 20 years. khan killed two blackbuck antelope, a protected and rare species while shooting a film in 1998. four other actors who starred alongside him were also charged but have now been acquitted. khan could now face between one and six years injail. our correspondent yogita limaye is in mumbai. tell us a bit about salman khan, and what he has done here? irma this goes back 20 years, when he was on a film shoot in the west indian state of rajasthan. he has been accused and now convicted of going on a hunting trip and shooting down two b;aclbucks. —— blackbucks. he was
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acquitted of all those cases early on, but today were specifically the case pertaining to the killing of those blackbucks, and a judge in the state of rajasthan has found him guilty. the charge could have attracted a maximum sentence of six yea rs. attracted a maximum sentence of six years. he has been given five years. he is of course one of the biggest guards in india. he has been acting for nearly ore decades, now. he has got a superstar status here, and a cult—like following, but also a bit ofa cult—like following, but also a bit of a bad boy image, because he has had many run—ins with the law. i am sensing that this would have been followed closely by the indian public. yes, that is right. we have been covering this case now for so many years. it has gone on and on. outside of that court today, a local community that worships these
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blackbucks, they were celebrating outside the court. we have had their fa ns outside the court. we have had their fans gathered outside his house, and any time you go out his house, there isa any time you go out his house, there is a crowd of people waiting to catch a glimpse of him. those people, as well as some of his friends, from the film fraternity, think that the punishment is simply too harsh. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live: two men have died in separate attacks in east london. they included a man in his twenties who was stabbed to death. mark zuckerberg insists he is still the best person to lead facebook despite failures to protect customers data. a former nhs consultant who stockpiled weapons and drew up a hit list of former colleagues has beenjailed for 12 years. in the business news:
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mac worrying ruth news for the automotive industry. —— worrying news for the automotive industry as new figures show that the uk new car market declined in march. according to the society of motor manufacturers, registrations fell 15.7% compared with march last year. more on that in just a moment. the final gender pay gap figures in the uk have revealed than men are paid on average 9.7% more than women. the deadline for companies to reveal their pay figures expired on wednesday evening. overall more than 10,000 companies reported their numbers, which indicate 78% of firms pay men more than women on average. activity in the uk services sector in march fell to 51.7 from 54.5 in february according to the markit/cips purchasing managers' index. it says: "usually bad weather had disrupted business operations and contributed to subdued consumer spending in march." car registrations plunged in march —
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that's according to latest figures from the society of motor manufacturers and traders. the smmt says the uk new car market shrank by 15.7% last month compared with march 2017. demand for diesel vehicles also suffered a dramatic fall of 37%, but demand for petrol was flat while the numbers of alternative fuel models registered rose by 5.7%. however, it's worth noting that march 2017 was a record month as customers bought new vehicles ahead of a change in vehicle excise duty. joining us now is mike hawes, chief executive of the society of motor manufacturers & traders. many thanks for joining many thanks forjoining me. not surprising that we have seen a big slump, because march 2017 was a
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bumper month, so not surprising that we have seen a slump competitor lasted? absolutely. we have been expecting that. what we had was the all—time record. invariably, this was going to be done on that. in the interim, we have seen continuing decline in consumer and business confidence, which is hitting the market, and the market is having a natural readjustment, really. but that drop off in diesel car sales, that drop off in diesel car sales, thatis that drop off in diesel car sales, that is dramatic. yes, that has been significant. if i was a diesel driver at the moment, i would not be surprised that given there has been confusion about the future taxation about diesel cars, what is clear is that the new vehicles on the market today will not be subject to any of those restrictions. because, they recognise that the technology is there to improve the air quality, and to help with climate change. we need to get more of those on the road. i mentioned the rise in demand, albeitjust
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road. i mentioned the rise in demand, albeit just 5.7% road. i mentioned the rise in demand, albeitjust 5.7% for alternative fuel models, which of course includes electric cars among others. that is a rise, but could be of perhaps expected a bigger rise? to be honest it is disappointing. the industry is putting a lot of investment behind these technologies, and there is about 70 different types in the market. it has been slow. consumers want to be sure that what they are buying is going to be there for the future, government could help with long—term incentives, because there is still a price premium with these technologies, because they are so new. so, taking march 2017 out of the equation, as a bit of a blip, if you like, how would you describe the overall trend of the car market, when it comes to buying nude cars, alternative fuel cars and diesel cars? definitely not doom and gloom. although it was down lasted, it was that the fourth best month ever. we
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are right level of relatively high demand, but what matters is trying to sustain that demand. when the market is down, that is the time to buy something, because the competition to get the consumer is at its most racist. certainly more confident and opportunity of the year goes on. very good point. thank you very much forjoining me here. the work and pensions select committee has made a raft of recommendations following their investigation into the current system. one of the key suggestions from the pensions freedom report is for the creation of a single pension dashboard by 2019, which would allow savers to see their savings pots in one place. earlier we spoke to nathan long from hargreaves la nsdown. it is principally involved with making sure people don't run out of money in retirement.
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it all stemmed from three years ago to a big change in pension rules giving people a lot more freedom and flexibility in how they take their money from their pension, so no longer that we expect to have a secure income in retirement, it is more likely that we draw ad hoc from our pension to suit our more flexible needs in retirement. these changes have been really popular amongst people coming up to retirement, but the risk and worries are that people might not manage to get their pension to last the whole of their retirement. today we've been talking a lot about the gender pay 93p- what is it? well, for starters, it's not the same as having unequal pay — by law, men and women with the same jobs have to be paid the same wages. a gender pay gap — that can arise if there are more highly paid men than women in a company, or if women are deemed to be less experienced than their male counterparts, or if women take a hit to their salary after taking maternity leave. firms with more than 250 staff were required to publish data on the average difference between male and female employees —
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by midnight yesterday. more than 10,000 companies complied — and the numbers reveal that more than three—quarters of uk companies pay men more on average than women for more on this — and other business stories — head to our website: bbc. co. uk/news/business. all of europe's major stock markets have rallied in opening deals on thursday, after a bounce on wall street and across most of asia, as fears of a trade war between the us and china eased. in london, shares also rose with a a number of analysts now believing that current valuations make british stocks worth buying. citing " recent underperformance and cheap valuations", citi upgraded uk equities to "overweight". facebook‘s share price has dropped sharply in the weeks since the cambridge analytica scandal erupted, and the downward trend continued.
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they ended wednesday's session down 1.1% before rising in after hours trading but they're on the slide again. pharmaceutical stocks shire and glaxosmithkline are among the biggest gainers on the ftse today. a police male voice choir is changing its name and distancing itself from its force after being told it went against equal opportunities policies. derbyshire constabulary male voice choir was asked to become a mixed—voice group in september last year. but chairman kevin griffiths said it would be "difficult" to hire the 50 women needed to balance the sound. derbyshire police chief constable peter goodman said the group was "incompatible" with force policies. a short while ago, my colleague victoria derbyshire spoke the choir‘s made up of about 35
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ex—officers and has raised three quarters of a million pounds for charity since it was founded. it will now be known as the derbyshire community i was approached and told that they could not accept a male only choir. we fully understood that. i tried to look at it, and we found that the logistics were unfeasible. what do you mean? we are a choir of about 30 male voices. to balance that with female voices, we would have to recruit about 50 ladies. did you not wa nt to recruit about 50 ladies. did you not want to do that? that wouldn't happen overnight. it is the logistics of doing it. it would have taken logistics of doing it. it would have ta ken about logistics of doing it. it would have taken about ten years. we would have probably taken about ten years. we would have pro ba bly lost taken about ten years. we would have probably lost some of our existing
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members, and we felt that the process would probably have destroyed what we origi had. i actually sing with a local mixed choir, ifully enjoy actually sing with a local mixed choir, i fully enjoy seeing within a mixed choir, but the male voice choir, it radars have a particular sound, and it is a sound that we all enjoy hearing and performing, as a male voice choir. right, and did you think the request from the chief co nsta ble think the request from the chief constable was fair enough or not? the considered it, we actually suggested to him that the way forward would have been to have formed a ladies choir, to see if there was some interest within the co nsta bula ry there was some interest within the constabulary for a ladies' choir. the loss of —— we offered to facilitate that and support them. and then once there was a sufficient population of ladies involved, we
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could have then considered by coming in mixed voice choir. that was a more practical approach. but, u nfortu nately, more practical approach. but, unfortunately, the chief constable wasn't prepared to consider that option. and very briefly, mr griffiths, to those who say, it's because you're sexist, what you say? i'm absolutely not. i have already tried to say that myself and a number of my colleagues, we act to sing with exploits quires, and we really enjoy that, as well. but, it is for anybody within a call environment, they know that a male voice choir has a specific sound. griffiths talking to victoria earlier. the headlines are coming up at the top of the hour. let's take a look at the weather with lucy martin. a chilly start, but plenty of
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sunshine. this photo was sent in in kingston earlier, if you wispy clouds, but a lot in the way of blue sky. not here as well in keswick, cumbria. it does look it will be short lived. that will gradually work its way in as we move through this evening and into tomorrow. a lots of dry and bright weather as we move through this afternoon, holding onto move through this afternoon, holding o nto ple nty move through this afternoon, holding onto plenty of sunshine. the sunshine turning a bit hazy, and just the risk of one or two showers. temperatures 30 celsius, a touchdown to what we saw yesterday, but still feeling pleasant. that error of low pressure pushes them from the west. it will bring outbreaks of rain and more in the way of cloud. the wind picking up as well. outbreaks of rain setting into northern ireland into western parts of scotland, and perhaps into the file west of wales,
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as well. the rain perhaps falling as snow across the high ground in scotland. haemorrhages in the east slightly cooler, where we have got the cool skies. —— blue skies. that rain could fall as rain on friday, as well. drier in the east. the rain working its way east across scotland, behind it, so, sorry, across northern ireland, behind it a mix of sally ‘s mother showers. largely a dry and writes dave at the centre of england and east, and with plenty of sunshine around, we could see highs around 17 celsius. holding onto that milder air in the south east, as we move into saturday, symantec t —— some uncertainty on saturday. if it does go to the west like it will do —— likely expect it will do, because he temperatures reaching 18 degrees. without the risk of a heavy or thundery shower.
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as we move on sunday, one or two batches of mist of fog to begin with. there will be some sunshine at times, but also some cap patchy outbreaks of rain. temperatures and a little bit down of what we were looking at on saturday. if we do get the sunshine, temperatures reaching 11 celsius. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at midday. two men are killed in separate attacks in east london — as concern rises over the number of murders in the capital. it is impossible to deal with gang crime, knife crime, gun crime, unless you have the right level of neighbourhood policing. a former consultant is jailed for possessing firearms, including three sub machine guns — and planning to kill colleagues. mark zuckerberg admits mistakes but says he won't step down from running facebook. the russian foreign minister, sergei lavrov, accuses the uk
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of telling "fairy tales" over the poisoning of former spy sergei skripal. it's the first full day of action in the commonwealth games on australia's gold coast. max whitlock wins england's first gold medal — with sophie thornhill and pilot helen scott also winning gold in the blind and visually impaired sprint in the velodrome. and bollywood star salman khan has been found guilty of an historic poaching offence dating back 20 years. good afternoon. it's thursday 5th april. welcome to bbc newsroom live. police are investigating the deaths of two men in separate
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attacks in hackney in east london last night. the first saw a man, believed to be in his early twenties, die from stab wounds despite the efforts of ambulance crews. a few hours earlier, a man in his fifties died after a fight outside a betting shop. the deaths take the number of suspected murders in the capital so far to more than 50. it was just before 8pm last night when officers on patrol were flagged down by a motorist who directed them to this spot where they found an 18—year—old man who was suffering from stab wounds. the officers administered first aid and also called on the london air ambulance but unfortunately they were unable to save him. in the last half an hour, police say 217—year—olds have been arrested on suspicion of murder. they haven't named the victim though until the next of kin have been informed. on the same day
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yesterday, less than two miles away, 53—year—old man was found injured outside a bookmakers. police say he was involved in an altercation. again, the london air ambulance was called but they were unable to save his life and he died at the scene. he hasn't been named either. police are waiting to speak to his next of kin and no arrests have been made in that case it. many, many people being affected by what appears to be a spate of violent attacks in london leading to people have now been killed in london since the beginning of the year and they say that 34 of those deaths were by stabbings, seven by gunshot wounds and they say that 11 teenagers were victims and at least ten people in their 40s. so at least ten people in their 40s. so a wide range of people being affected by this. the local mp here for hackney and the show don't —— shadow home secretary diane abbott says this is a problem that must be
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sorted and she says that perhaps police cuts that have happened in the last few years may have played a part. it's been quite terrific, this spate of knife and gun crime and all over london mothers must be waking up thinking they can say goodbye to their son this morning but will they see them later on in the day? there are a whole series of things that need to happen. first and foremost, we need more police officers on the street. here in hackney, we have lost one in four police officers since 2010. it is impossible to deal with gang crime, knife crime, gun crime unless you have the right level of neighbourhood policing. but law enforcement and can't sell things on their own. we also need to work with schools and social workers. so more than 50 murders in london so far this year. these incidents
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really tearing families apart. i told you about the attacks in hackney yesterday. earlier in the week, a 16—year—old was killed, a teenager shot in the face in waltha mstow, teenager shot in the face in walthamstow, dying a late —— a day later. and a 17—year—old girl was gunned down in what appears to be a drive—by shooting in tottenham, so a vast amount of people from different backgrounds being affected by this. the authorities say this is a london wide problem which requires a london wide problem which requires a london wide solution. john mcmanus reporting. a 78—year—old man, who was arrested over the fatal stabbing of an intruder during a burglary at his home in south—east london, has been bailed until may pending further inquiries. the man, named locally as richard osborn—brooks, discovered two men in his kitchen. detectives say one was armed with a screwdriver and a struggle ensued. a 38—year—old man was stabbed, he was taken
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to hospital but later died. a former nhs consultant has been jailed for 12 years for possessing firearms — including three sub—machine guns — with intent to endanger life. martin watt, who's 62, drew up an assassination list of former colleagues after he lost his job in the accident and emergency department of monklands hospital in airdrie. catriona renton is in glasgow for us with the latest. tell us a bit more about the case. tell us a bit more about the caselj think it would be fair to say that this was an extremely unusual case. in fact, dr watt‘s own lawyer said it was unusual to find a man like dr watt in the dock here in glasgow. this morning, he was sentenced for possessing three submachineguns, to self loading pistols and more than 1500 rounds of ammunition. he was sentenced this morning to 15 years,
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12 years injailand sentenced this morning to 15 years, 12 years injail and three sentenced this morning to 15 years, 12 years in jail and three years under supervision. how did this doctor turn into a potential mass murderer? it was only when detectives received a tip—off about a parcel addressed to martin watt‘s home in cumbernauld near glasgow that they discovered the cache of arms he had amassed. he had three submachineguns, two pistols and over 1500 live rounds of ammunition. a white envelope reveals his plans. bad guys, written on the front. inside, a list of people whom he believed were involved when he lost hisjob from he believed were involved when he lost his job from monklands hospital. we have had 14 assaults in before midnight... dr watt was a co nsulta nt before midnight... dr watt was a consultant at the accident and emergency department there. back in 2005, he appeared on the bbc panorama “— 2005, he appeared on the bbc panorama —— panorama department about the horrors of violent crime. he worked in the nhs for 32 years. martin watt had been involved in a
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campaign to fight hospital cuts in his department, something he said did not help his career. he then became ill and was off work for over a year. during a phased return, there were complaints about him and he was eventually dismissed. dr watt devised his plans to assassinate his collea g u es devised his plans to assassinate his colleagues based on the film, killer elite. he made his own gunpowder, bought deactivated weapons and used diy eight —— bought deactivated weapons and used diy eight -- diy bought deactivated weapons and used diy eight —— diy guides to reactivate them and he would practice in the woods near his home is. martin watt told the police he would come to a wooded piece of land, take one of the machine guns out of his rucksack and practice shooting targets, monday to friday, every week. martin watt, a man whose job was devoted to saving lives, now faces many years injailfor intending to endanger the lives of others. dr watt gave a thumbs up to some of his supporters in the public
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gallery as he was led away. two of those people who wearing court had shared that house with him in cumbernauld near glasgow and one of them had previously told the court that he had no idea the guns were in the house, that he had been very shocked. sentencing, thejudge told dr watt it was sad to find a man who'd held a position such as you have defined yourself in the situation you are in but she said she had a duty to protect the public. he was also given a serious prime prevention order —— crime prevention order, restricting his views on the internet, banning him from ever owning firearms and from certain uses of his fame. it also bans him from attending any nhs premises unless he has a very good and valid reason. thank you. russia will use a special meeting of the united nations security council later to try to challenge britain's claim
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that it was responsible for the nerve agent attack in britain. it comes a day after russia was denied a request by the world's chemicals weapons watchdog for a new investigation involving its own experts into the salisbury poisoning. speaking at a security conference in moscow a short while ago, the russian foreign minister, sergei lavrov, said russia had been judged unfairly — and the accusations were being used as a pretext to expel the country's diplomats. translation: in order to further demonise provocations are being arranged in skripal‘s case, a staged pretext for unprecedented mass expulsion of russian diplomats not only from
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britain and the united states but from other countries that were made to do so and it is an open mocking of diplomatic ethics. we have not seen it for a long time. i would like to stress that we will continue responding to those unfriendly steps but at the same time, we would like to find the truth and we insist that fair, unbiased investigation be held in line with all the principles of the convention of the prohibition of chemical weapons and we maintain that they will not be able to ignore our attempts at a special session of the organisation on the prohibition of chemical weapons proved that. it is unacceptable to continue with such acts as salisbury case and instead of decent investigation, just unsubstantiated accusations put forward. it is in the book that the accused first be sentenced and then thejury will
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make their verdict. i spoke to an expert who told me there was nothing new in sergey lavrov‘s comments. there was nothing new in sergey lavrov's comments. it is important to understand the comment of what they said at porton down. it is not within their remit or skills capacity to identify an actor. they are the people who identify the weapon. what they have said is that this particular type of novichok is so sophisticated and its delivery so difficult that this could only be
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done by an experienced state actor, so the question then becomes hugh has reason experience and proficiency in conducting this type of operation? the copious and detailed intelligence that has been presented to britain's closest allies have come from abroad intelligence assessment of foreign intelligence, defence intelligence and other agencies, and it is that which has persuaded them and the eu to respond as they have. in other words, you put the porton down evidence alongside the intelligence evidence alongside the intelligence evidence that you have just alluded to and conclusions are arrived at based on both of those? of course. the dots have to be connected for the picture to present a coherent picture. you are then left with very few options. even so, the government
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has been prudent enough to say in all probability this comes from russia. now, it strengthens that conclusion that even in private circles the russians have done nothing to aroused out of anyone who is remotely expert in this and the public information campaign has been full of contradictions. president putin himself a few days ago said publicly that neither the soviet union nor russia ever produced novichok. well, if that is the case, why do they want a joint investigation? they have already told us if it is novichok, it is not us. avast doesn't seem to bother them. they go from one version of events to another. in which case, ta ke events to another. in which case, take us forward to this un security council meeting which will take place at russia's request to duck about this more. what realistically will that shed light on?|j
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about this more. what realistically will that shed light on? i doubt if it will shed any more like a tall except perhaps give the western powers on the security council and other opportunity to present the coherence of their case and it will also demonstrate that outside the eu and nato, there are some other countries that for one reason or another would be inclined to support russia or back off and abstain. it's interesting yesterday in the opcw on russia's request for a joint investigation that of 21 states signatories who are present, 22 who are present, 17 voted against russia. so i don't think this meeting of the security council will change anything. a word briefly about the political debate in this country about it, because clearly
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there have been figures, principally within the opposition who haven't said we don't think it's russia but there are still questions to be answered. we are rightly probing this perhaps more than others have. how does that play out into this, do you think? there have been lasting effects in this country and the west asa effects in this country and the west as a whole because of the whole wmd episode over iraq and great sensitivity about it and therefore an enormous about scepticism —— amount of scepticism in areas of the political spectrum and the public of a hole about any pin the government says. that is pretty much out of vault position, self doubt and scepticism. the russians know that and they are pushing those buttons vigorously. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. two men have died in separate attacks in east london. they included a man in his twenties
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who was stabbed to death. mark zuckerberg insists he is still the best person to lead facebook despite failures to protect customers data. a former nhs consultant — who stockpiled weapons and drew up a hit list of former colleagues — has been jailed for 12 years. now it is time to bring you the latest sports news with hugh ferris. quite unsurprisingly, it is already developing into something of a battle between australia and england at the top of the medals table for the commonwealth games. the other home nations are also contributing ona home nations are also contributing on a fascinating day one, with max whitlock earning their first gold medalfor england whitlock earning their first gold medal for england of the commonwealth games with victory in the men's gymnastics team event. he top scored with the floor and also this pottable routine to clinch the win alongside his team—mates. they
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finished ten points clear of canada who claimed the silver. in the swimming pool, amy will not beat hannah miley to win a gold medal. miley one gold in this event in the last two games but wilmot came in just a quarter of a second ahead this time. elsewhere, a bronze for james guy in the 400 metres freestyle. and big olds havejust kept coming over the course of the last few hours or so. scotland's neil fachie set a come slot games record and the gold. the manchester city coach has posted a video from inside the team bus as they arrived at anfield before their
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defeat against liverpool. the bus was attacked by fans throwing cans, bottles a nd was attacked by fans throwing cans, bottles and players. liverpool have called the behaviour completely unacceptable and have apologised. two police officers were hurt and the coach was left unsafe to be driven. we arejust moments driven. we are just moments away from jack nicholas and gary player teeing off the 82nd occasion of the masters in augusta. the two will be the honorary starters with some interesting pairs in the draw. tiger woods is looking for his fifth title. he is grouped with marc leishman and tommy fleetwood. sergio garcia is the defending champion while rory mcilroy is looking for his first green jacket and he plays along adam scott and jon rahm.|j his first green jacket and he plays along adam scott and jon rahm. i am looking forward to it. i'll will relish it. i don't want to put as much pressure on it as i have done the last be years. enjoy the opportunity to do something that very few people in this game have
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been able to do. and that is all your sport now. thank you very much indeed. we are just going to show you a little bit more now about events in hackney in east london in the last 24 hours or so with particular reference to this image which hasjust so with particular reference to this image which has just emerged of one of the victims of the violence. this is an 18—year—old man. we had previously been suggesting that one of the victims of these violent attacks was in his early 20s. we are now told that he was 18. he is known locally as israel and that is the first image that has been aired of him. he is one of two victims of violent acts in hackney overnight. this particular individual, he approached officers just after 8pm last night. he was given first aid at the same but then died later. in
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at the same but then died later. in a separate incident about two miles away, a man in his 50s was pronounced dead outside a bookmakers in clapton. the image you saw there was by an 18—year—old stabbed to death in hackney. he is known locally as israel and busily we will bring you more information on that when it comes in. —— obviously we will bring you more information. facebook‘s chief executive, mark zuckerberg, has said he should have done more to monitor apps on the network, like the one at the centre of a major data breach. the company says the personal details of 87 million people may have been shared — including a million in the uk. our north america technology reporter dave lee has more. in a conference call lasting almost an hour, mark zuckerberg admitted that he had been too idealistic in the past, putting too much trust in third—party companies that went on to abuse the system he created. but, despite calls questioning his ability to continue as the leader of the world's most powerful social network, mr zuckerberg insisted
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he would not be stepping down. when you are building something like facebook which is unprecedented in the world, he said, there are things that you are going to mess up. what i think people should hold us accountable for is if we are learning from our mistakes. he said the company was putting in place stricter controls on what data can be accessed by third—party apps. next week, mr zuckerberg will head to washington to face congress, appearing in person for the first time to answer questions about how the firm handles the public‘s data. within the 87 million accounts now thought to have been shared with cambridge analytica, the bbc understands around 1 million were users in the uk. despite requests from british politicians, mark zuckerberg will not appear before parliament, instead sending a deputy. since the cambridge analytica scandal broke last month, there have been many calls for people to boycott facebook altogether. however, it doesn't seem like they have been being too effective. mr zuckerberg said he had seen no meaningful impact on his business. dave lee, bbc news, san francisco.
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the supreme court in brazil has ruled that its former president must begin serving his 12—year prison sentence for corruption. mr lula is in the process of appealing that sentence but after hours of legal arguments, the judges ruled six—to—five that he should not remain at liberty pending any further decisions. the left—wing leader had been considered the favourite for october's presidential election. earlier, the bbc‘s katy watson in sao paulo told us more about lula's conviction. well, thejudges well, the judges have well, thejudges have decided well, the judges have decided that he needs to spend his time in prison whilst he appeals to high courts. there are two higher courts he can appeal to and when he goes to prison, that is still unknown. the feeling if it could be in the next few days unless his lawyers find another reason to try to keep him out of prison. brazilian politics is notoriously complicated, long winded, prone to delays. this
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decision has been seen as very historic, seen as very important because the judges have historic, seen as very important because thejudges have ruled historic, seen as very important because the judges have ruled that he does need to go behind bars. the bbc says a scene in its human planet series — which featured a tribe from west papua, indonesia — is inaccurate. in an episode broadcast in 2011, the korowai people were shown moving into a treehouse as if it were their real home. but during recent filming for a different programme, the tribe say the houses were "commissioned for filming". the bbc have confirmed the segment "breached editorial standards" and say they have since revised their guidelines. the scene was shown in the fourth episode of human planet series, entitled jungles: people of the trees.. it is time to move on. —— move in.
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as always, modesty dictates a strict entrance policy. everything must be carried up, even family pets. and it is a long way back down if you forget something. the first fire is ceremonially lit, an interesting way to bless a wooden tree house. our entertainment correspondent lisa is both is here. spectacular footage, clearly, correspondent lisa is both is here. spectacularfootage, clearly, but not quite as it seems? no, absolutely. the audience relies on
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these programmes to 100% picked what is going on and when they saw that segment back in 2011! am sure they we re segment back in 2011! am sure they were as impressed as we were with the superhigh tree houses, the effort that went into putting them back, the fact people were actually going to live in these. and then seven going to live in these. and then seve n yea rs going to live in these. and then seven years later, they discover this wasn't the truth. one of the factors that has led up to this is that a new programme, within that programme, the tribespeople told the presenter that they don't live in these tree houses, they will put up for the benefit of overseas broadcasters. this led to an investigation into the veracity of that originalfootage investigation into the veracity of that original footage and concluded that original footage and concluded that there has been a deception of the audience. it also points out that since 2011, it has strengthened its editorial guidelines and factual guidelines for producers in these kind of areas, but still the kind of error that the audience expects the
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bbc not to make. as you say, since then, the bbc with say lessons have been learned, people are now trained ina been learned, people are now trained in a different way. absolutely. there are some areas where to a lot of the audience there is a grey area, perhaps, some natural history programmes where there is a balance to be struck between showing 100% exactly what has happened a shooting something in the way that gives the audience an insight into how various animals and creatures actually behave, even if it is not exactly the way you assumed it is depicted in the programme. this is not one of those cases. this is a clear case of factual error, of these people going to live in the tree houses which we've done them building. that does not appear to be the case. the tree houses would not have been built in this way and depicted as the tribespeople going to live in them if it hadn't been for them being filmed by broadcasters. so
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naturally, the bbc very apologetic about this, saying that it came about this, saying that it came about because a new programme uncovered the error and they launched an investigation. still, as i say, the kind of error that people expect the bbc factual department not to make. indeed. thank you very much indeed. so—called "sin taxes" on soft drinks, alcohol and tobacco are more beneficial for low income families, even though most of the tax revenues come from higher income households. a global study, published in the lancet medicaljournal, found that the levy influenced consumer behaviour and could help to reduce cancer and type 2 diabetes. the findings come ahead of a sugar tax on soft drinks which comes into force tomorrow. buckingham palace says the duke of edinburgh is in good spirits after a successful hip replacement operation. prince phillip, who's 96, had the planned procedure on wednesday after suffering with a hip problem for about a month. he is likely to remain in hospital for a number of days. let's get the weather now with ben.
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thank you. good afternoon. after everything weather has flung at us recently, we would take a day like today, because for the vast majority, it is beautiful blue skies. that picture was from guernsey. plenty more sunshine to come as well as we had read the rest of the afternoon. a bit more clout streaming into the west the sunshine turning increasingly hazy but temperatures doing very well, up to 13 or 14 degrees. this evening, we keep hold of some of that sunshine and once it gets dark, eastern areas will keep some of that cloud. out west, strengthening breeze, outbreaks of rain as well. tomorrow, a mix of fortunes. you can see outbreaks of rain here, further east, some sunshine. it will be breezy with that breeze coming from
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the south, a mild direction, so if you get sunshine, look at these temperatures. 17 degrees in london but double digits just about where ever you are with the mild field to the weather hanging around us we go into the weekend. this is bbc newsroom live. our latest headlines: one of the men killed last night in hackney as been named as israel. the 18—year—old is one of two men have been killed in separate attacks in east london. two 17—year—old boys have been arrested.the number of killings in the capital has now risen to more than 50 — amid calls for a crackdown on knife crime. a former nhs consultant, who stockpiled weapons and drew up a hit list of former colleagues, has been jailed for 12 years. martin watt, who's 62, was found guilty of possessing firearms with intent to endanger life. facebook‘s founder, mark zuckerberg, has said he takes personal responsibility for its failures to protect users' data — but insisted he was the right person to continue running the social media giant. the russian foreign minister,
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sergei lavrov, has dismissed claims moscow was behind the salisbury nerve agent attack as "fairy tales". he has called for a "fair and unbiased" investigation into what happened. the uk government says it stands by its belief the nerve agent was made in russia. consumer watchdog which? has called for plastic—backed fridges to be "urgently" removed from sale after finding they pose a fire risk and could even speed up the spread of a blaze. it says a major investigation showed that nearly half of the most popular appliances used plastic. a 78—year—old man, who was arrested over the fatal stabbing of an intruder during a burglary at his home in south—east london has been bailed until may, pending further inquiries. the man, named locally as richard osborn—brooks, discovered two men in his kitchen. detectives say one was armed with a screwdriver and a struggle ensued.
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a 38—year—old man was stabbed, he was taken to hospital but later died. but what are your rights if someone breaks into your home? joining you now from our cambridge studio is jerry hayes, he's a criminal barrister. good afternoon. let's deal with the bail issue first of all. how are unusual is it for bail to a cup in these circumstances? it is very unusual in any murder. usually you have to undergo psychiatric tests as well. but, i imagine they came on to the conclusion that this is a home invasion. we have got to look at it very carefully. is he acting in lawful self defence, and here's a 78 old man and he will not be a threat to anybody. i think a very sensible decision by the police. pied take us forward to how the investigation might develop, what will the priorities be others looking into this more detail. obviously, the man
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has been questioned. the police will move on to finding out about the background of the person who died, what he has been doing in the past, and then the cps will receive all the permission, all the evidence from the police, and they will make a decision whether to charge this man, and what to charge him with? and what are the householder‘s right in these circumstances? very clear indeed. it is like anybody‘s right. we all have the right to lawful self—defence. it means simply this, ifiam self—defence. it means simply this, if i am about to be attacked, what i honestly believe that i am about to be attacked, i can strike the first blow. it has to be reasonable force, it cannot be retaliation. it becomes a bit more understandable if you are at home, if it is at night, and someone breaks into your home, you're going to be confused, you're going to be scared. you have the
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right to lawful self—defence. this is what the police are going to have to decide on the evidence from the campus and in service to make a decision. what you can't do, is you can't chase after somebody and kill them. or assault them. you can protect yourself. and the force has got to be reasonable in this matter for the jury. the law is actually very, very clear indeed. but that word reasonable is where people start to raise questions, don't stay? what is reasonable meaning the circumstances? it is common sense. if someone comes at me the break, andi if someone comes at me the break, and i get out a semiautomatic weapon and i get out a semiautomatic weapon and shoot him 15 times, that is not reasonable force. if someone attacks me with a knife, and tears down on the floor, i've got on the floor, and have disarmed him, and then get the knife and start stabbing him, thatis the knife and start stabbing him, that is retaliation. that is not reasonable. juries have been dealing with reasonable force with self defence for many years and by and
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large they get it absolutely right. that was going to be my last question. how often do cases like this arrive? difficult to say. what is really alarming is that we have been reporting the last few days, the murder rate in london is higher than new york, particular denied. it is good to see that police under cressida dig, now saying that we have got to have more stops and searches, to stop people carrying knives. he made reference to the main story, the death of another two men in hackney last night. one of the men killed last night in hackney has been name locally as israel. the eighteen—year—old died from stab wounds despite the efforts of ambulance crews. a few hours earlier, a man in his fifties died after a fight outside a betting shop. the deaths take the number of suspected murders in the capital so far to more than 50.
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the shadow home secretary, diane abbott, who is also the mp for hackney says more needs to be done and that police cuts may have played a part. it has been quite horrific, this spate of knife and gun crime. all over london, there must be mothers thinking that they would say goodbye to their sons this morning, but will they see them later on today? there are a number of things that need to happen. first and foremost, we need more police officers on the street. we have lost many police officers on the street. it is impossible to deal with gun crime and knife crime unless we have the right level of policing. but law enforcement cannot solve things all around. —— cannot solve things on their own. we have got to work with mental health services and schools and social workers. i do think that with some of these young people, by the age of 11, it is too late,
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so we do have to have goals and social work and youth projects engaging with these very young people before it becomes too late. the met police say that twelve of those murdered in london so far this year have been teenagers. my colleague victoria derbyshire has been talking to a people trying to reach out to young people caught up in gangs. first, jedi from the group ‘guiding a new generation' told me the problems young people say they're facing. the kids are disempowered. they are scared. of what? of each other. because there has been a lot of sensationalism reported in the news about postcode wars, knife crimes, and these kids are scared, and they believe that they have two on themselves from each other. and i feel like maybe the style of the reporting, is just feel like maybe the style of the reporting, isjust helped feel like maybe the style of the reporting, is just helped to compound the symptoms, and on a self—destruct mode. right about now, people need them to believe in, and
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i suggest that they need to believe in themselves. that has just not happened in a lot of communities at the moment. 0k. happened in a lot of communities at the moment. ok. so, so no one is going to disagree with people believing in themselves, but that is not enough to stop people sticking knives into each other, is it, respect? obviously guiding a new generation, i think that is a big pa rt of generation, i think that is a big part of the solution. it is about the community, the people at the coming from those backgrounds, and actually coming out. i had diane abbott saying stop and search, but i hope the police officers say that they can't solve the situation. it is an —— they can't solve the situation. it isan ——i they can't solve the situation. it is an —— i heard a police officer say. even if i have a knife, not good to hide it. if it is in my mind, ican good to hide it. if it is in my mind, i can use something else. we have got to deal with the mindset. if you deal with the mindset, then you've got the knife no longer becoming a problem. see you have
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beenin becoming a problem. see you have been in hackney, you're try to change the mindset. how do you do that, what are you actually saying? that is where the community, that is where we need to support from the people, the community, you know what lam saying, people, the community, you know what i am saying, in order to... i've just come back from hackney, i've literally had two hours sleep, before that we were in north london. i literally haven't slept. we are running up and down, but we can't do it on our own. what we are saying, is that people like us, who want to support that movement, people professionals, then she do this on a larger scale. do what? outreach. take these youth out of these situations, and do action project search to give them that elf self help and hope. we have got a holistic problem, a community issue, like the young men have just been
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saying, there needs to be more outreach, but i do believe that similarto outreach, but i do believe that similar to what diane abbott said, as if we don't start at a younger age with prevention, by the time it gets to the stage of gang wars, by the time it gets to the stage of prison issues, it is almost too late. we have got young people as young as eight and seven holding knives to each other. if we don't have a collaborative and holistic approach, working with community organisations, on a grassroots level, this problem will not get solved. patrick, what is your view? iam going solved. patrick, what is your view? i am going to agree with everything that has been set, and the importance working with young people ata importance working with young people at a very early age. we are working about 3000 schoolchildren every year. and the majority of those young people are carrying good values and good behaviours, but even so, we pick up a small number of young people who are influenced by other peers and older brothers and sisters are starting to think maybe a knife will protect me. and
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starting to develop the mentality that these gentlemen are doing such good work with. we need to start earlier. the challenge with knife crime and youth violence, it's not just one thing that is happening, it isa just one thing that is happening, it is a whole series of things that is going on. that issue of youth i lived in london in the light of those two most recent deaths. that was part of recent discussion. before we move on to other matters, you will be aware of the political argument going around over the poisoning of sergei skripal and his daughter. a line is now a magical russian state television, and we have got to be more cautious about what has been broadcast, and how verifiable it is, but russian state television is reporting that the contents television is reporting that the co nte nts of television is reporting that the contents of a phone conversation that they took place between yulia skripal and a cousin of hers. she
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was specifically asked about her father, and in response to that question she said, this is how they are reporting it, he is resting and sleeping everyone is fine, he is resting and sleeping and everything is fine. her health is said to have improved in recent days, but much less has been said about her father's state of health. that is what russian state television has been said, reporting accommodation that they are saying to raise between yulia skripal, and her cousin over the phone in russia. we will find out more on that subject in the coming hours. the bollywood star salman khan has been jailed for five years after being found guilty of an historic poaching offence dating back 20 years. khan killed two blackbuck antelope, a protected and rare species, while shooting a film in 1998. four other actors who starred alongside him were also charged but have now been acquitted.
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from mumbai, our correspondent yogita limaye has more: this is a case that dates back 20 years. in 1998 when salman khan was ona years. in 1998 when salman khan was on a film shoot in the western indian state of rajasthan. he was accused and has now been convicted of going on a hunting trip and shooting down to black bucks. they are an endangered species here in india. they are protected under law. this is a case with many twists and turns. there were a number of cases filed against him, which included possessing unlicensed arms. he was acquitted of all of those cases earlier on, but today, it is this specifically was the case pertaining to the killing of those blackbucks, and a judge to the killing of those blackbucks, and ajudge in to the killing of those blackbucks, and a judge in a state of rajasthan has found him guilty. the charge could have attracted a maximum sentence of six years. salman khan has been given five years. he is of
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course one of the biggest stars in has been given five years. he is of coursn hé—ofthe—ta 21”?! for rs in g? gfifig in "2"; yes, amongst the public in india. yes, that's right. we have been covering this case now for so many years. it has gone on and on. outside that court today, a local community that worships these black box —— blackbucks, they were salivating outside court. that is not the only reaction. we have also had his fans at fettes has. any time you go there, there is a crowd of people waiting to catch pagans of him. those people as well as some of his friends, think that the punishment is imputed harsh. —— is simply too
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harsh. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: two men have died in separate attacks in east london. they included a man called israel who was stabbed to death. fiéffa §géfiéffiéfg "7955 t"”"’ w "7 up the spread of a fire. alex neill from which? joined me earlier to explain the work they've been doing. we've actually tested to a higher standard, one that represents what a real fire would actually produce for these fridges and freezers, and we found that there are actually
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hundreds of potentially unsafe fridges and freezers currently on the market. that's why we are saying to manufacturers, the static backed bridges must be removed from sale, and we have found that with our bridges must be removed from sale, and we ha' 500 jnd that with our
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