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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 7, 2018 12:00pm-12:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at midday... 300 extra police will be on patrol in areas of london — after six people were killed in the last seven days. there are a number of things the police have to do to keep us safe. some of it is covert work the police will do. other is relying on the public to give information to the police. they need us to be the eyes and ears. but also stop and search is a valuable tool. russia warns president trump there will be a "tough response" to new us sanctions on businessmen and officials close to president putin. 1a people have been killed in a crash between a bus carrying a junior ice hockey team and a lorry in western canada. an absolutely massive collision and obviously catastrophic outcome. a 25% increase in holidaymakers losing their money to fraudsters — for airline tickets or accommodation that didn't exist. also in the next hour... more gold for team england
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at the commonwealth games. james wilby coming back of the book. gold to adam peaty and silver to james wilby. peaty completes a four—year sweep of major titles. and there's been a gold rush for all the home nations. can pep guardiola's manchester city win the premier league today? his team just have to beat manchester united. and click looks at 5g — and the world of computer robotics. that's in half an hour here on bbc news. good morning and welcome to bbc news. 300 extra police officers are being deployed in areas of london worst affected by a recent increase in violent crime
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among young people. six people have been killed in the last week alone, and more than 50 have died since the start of the year. the move comes as the chair of the national police chiefs' council says officers are reluctant to use their powers to stop and search suspects. andy moore reports. with more than 50 murders in london so far this year, questions are being asked about why violence has increased so rapidly. 0ne claim is that officers are reluctant to use their powers of stop and search. the number has fallen by about three quarters in the last six years. sara thornton, chair of the national police chiefs' council, said such searches were not a silver bullet, but they were an important tool in helping to protect the public from violent crime. writing in the daily telegraph, she said... london's police chief, cressida dick, claimed she was a complete supporter to stop and search, but said it needed to be done in a way that was targeted
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and intelligence—led. you will see that we are seizing more weapons through stop—search and we are continuously doing more stop—searches for weapons, so although the overall number has come down, the weapon searches are going up and they are continuing to go up and the public should expect us to do that. london's mayor sadiq khan said he was doing everything in his power to tackle the scourge of violent crime in the capital. we have got to realise that there are a number of things the police have to do to keep us safe. some of it is covert work the police will do. other is relying on the public to give information to the police. they need us to be the eyes and ears. but also stop and search is a valuable tool the police use. the home office says stop and search is a vital policing tool and reforms are working, with the highest ever stop to arrest rate on record. joining me now is ken hinds who is chair
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of the haringey independent stop and search monitoring group, based in north london. we had that incident that has sparked a lot of this controversy, the stabbing to death of the young girl there. they also perform a similarfunction for the girl there. they also perform a similar function for the british transport police covering a much bigger area. start because it is being talked about now, stop and search, a lot of debate over whether it isa search, a lot of debate over whether it is a useful tool. the mirror says it is a useful tool. the mirror says it is a useful tool. the mirror says it is useful. what is your view?m is useful when it is intelligence led. that means getting the information from community and also looking at evidence, but the evidence shows me at the moment from my research is looking at the figures and a lot of that is under
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the misuse of drugs act, i want to see that this is not a good use of resource, i want to see more blood to detecting knives and guns and i wa nt to to detecting knives and guns and i want to see that evidence. talking to the metropolitan police federation on this programme, they acknowledged the value of it and accepted it often doesn't find weapons and it is not most useful that it has other purposes, but if we are talking about to and make a sustained impact on reducing the amount of violence, much of it fatal, that comes from the use of guns or knives, what do you think would be more effective?” guns or knives, what do you think would be more effective? i like to look at the money spent on prevent, government spent between a0 and £50 million a year on their anti—terrorism, but what is happening here, young people are getting radicalised by social media
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and other events, and what that has led to is more people in the community being scared and frighten and some arming themselves and saying they want to protect themselves and it isn't working, but i would like to see that sort of money being spent on knife and gun prevention, so that means... what form would not prevention take? prevention, so that means... what form would not prevention take ?|j prevention, so that means... what form would not prevention take? i am a community relations person that works closely with the police and the community affected by knife and gun crime and i would like to see better use of that resources, meaning targeting the areas affected by this. that simply means, i work with charity groups such as abandoned brothers, community against violence, and father needs family, father to father groups, these groups are doing immense work in actually tackling these young people who are struggling with the
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emotional... you are talking about mentoring and an almost individual relationship one—on—one with some of these youngsters to try and have but somebody who dick and sick advice from an innocent somebody who give them support when they are —— who they can seek advice from. not only they can seek advice from. not only the young people affected but also the young people affected but also the family to try and improve the relationship between, it is no point working in isolation, but we have to working in isolation, but we have to work to support the family unit to make it stronger and that can only happen by more people in our community stepping up to support the effo rts community stepping up to support the efforts we are making. do you think it's possible to persuade young people to stop carrying names, —— knives, it seems in some parts of london now, when you talk to youngsters they say they carry a knife and when you ask them why they say because i don't want to be
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confronted by somebody and unable to defend myself. with the group i am working with we have managed to get six young people to give up six names in the last eight months so it shows you that you can —— six names. hide you do that? give us a sense of how you overcome the fear and scepticism to get them to do that. you tell them the honest truth, which is by you arming yourself, you can make yourself possibly more of your target, secondly, if you do use oi’ your target, secondly, if you do use or have one, self defence, you will use it in may be cases of rage were not the person you intended to but because you are guarded around you and you call it a perfect storm and somebody who is the basic argument but your emotional rage. and thirdly you could possibly get arrested and sent to jail. because you are carrying it. each of those things are the honest conversation we have
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with these young people who may not factor that in their thinking. even though they might say to me i prefer to be caught with my note than be caught without it, you say do you really feel that? even if you feel not so in a situation, don't go there. they have that option. ken hinds, good to speak to you again. thank you very much. russia's foreign ministry has warned there will be a "tough response" to new us sanctions on businessmen, companies and government officials close to president putin. the white house has imposed sanctions on seven russian oligarchs and 17 senior government officials, accusing them of "malign activity around the globe". 0ur correspondent chris buckler reports. the wealth of russian oligarchs does lie in business. 0leg deripaska became a billionaire from his dealings in aluminium, but like many of russia's super rich, he's benefited from a relationship with the kremlin. he's just one of a long list of individuals close to vladimir putin targeted by these us sanctions,
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actions intended to financially punish them and intended to send a message to moscow. in a statement, mr deripaska said... but the white house insists russia has been abusing its power internationally, as well as meddling inside america. as the president has said, he wants to have a good relationship with russia, but that's going to depend on some of the actions by the russians. however, at the same time, the president is going to continue to be tough until we see that change take place. the sanctions are in response to claims that russia interfered in america's presidential election, and in retaliation for the way the country has used its influence in syria and ukraine. but despite the tough actions, some observers believe donald trump has been relatively quiet, perhaps protecting his own relationship with the russian president.
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the rhetoric coming out of the president's mothers different. each don't hear him criticise russia or vladimir putin. never taking don't hear him criticise russia or vladimir putin. nevertaking him don't hear him criticise russia or vladimir putin. never taking him to task but the aggressive behaviour. vladimir putin was chairing a meeting of the russian security council when details of those affected by the sanctions were released. the list included individuals inside the room.|j released. the list included individuals inside the room. i don't mean now learn from your reporters that i have been included in the us list. it appears as though they have just made it. i am list. it appears as though they have just made it. lam in list. it appears as though they have just made it. i am in other lists as well. that means i exist. we are active. we are internationally active. these sanctions were used by america to deliberately target vladimir putin's inner circle. after days of tit—for—tat expulsions
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and diplomatic disputes, the kremlin will once again be considering its response. chris buckler, bbc news, washington. some breaking news on that story, we are hearing that the russian embassy in london has now made a request for a meeting with borisjohnson, the foreign secretary, that is alexander litvinenko, the envoy at the embassy who has asked for an investigation into the poisoning of sergei skripal and his daughter yulia skripal. also to try and find more about their condition. the agency is reporting, it is quoted as saying it has been told by a spokesman for the embassy. we hope from a constructive response to the british and are counting on
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such a meeting in the very near future. no word from the foreign 0ffice future. no word from the foreign office as to what that response will be likely to be. we hope to hear from a correspondent who is in salisbury for the latest. police in canada have confirmed that ia people were killed when a lorry and a bus carrying a junior ice hockey team collided on friday evening. the humboldt broncos were travelling on a highway in the province of saskatchewan. police said 28 people were on the bus, ia of whom were killed, including the driver. the other ia aboard the bus have been taken to hospital. three are in critical condition. the team tweeted this image of the players and staff after a recent victory. that is a poignant picture of course per minute of the families who are waiting to hear news of their loved ones. the texas national guard has begun deploying a team of 250 troops to the us border with mexico. the state of arizona is planning to deploy a further 150. president trump wants up to a000 military personnel
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stationed on the border until his proposed wall is built. syrian activists say that heavy airstrikes on the last rebel—held town in eastern ghouta have killed at least 32 civilians — including five children. douma is surrounded by government forces — and the syrian army says the rebels still holding out there should leave, orface destruction in a full—scale military offensive. thousands of prisoners are being rated according to their chances of being involved in violence, in an attempt to tackle safety in jails. staff can then use the data to inform decisions — such as which wing an individual is placed in. the system is being piloted at i6 prisons in england and wales. here's our home affairs correspondent tom symonds. the new system has beenjokingly nicknamed "i predict a riot" by data experts. each time an incident like this happens, it's logged by prison staff. the number—crunching software produces a score of each inmate's likelihood of becoming violent.
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as well as informing prison governors under pressure to maintain order, it can also be linked to the system of privileges which reward prisoners for good behaviour. the data can map gang affiliations and it can also spot those at risk of self—harm. violence in prison is growing. there were 28,000 assaults in the year to last september, that's up i2%. self—harm is up also i2% to nearly a3,000 incidents. the ministry ofjustice said it will do whatever it can to help ha rd—pressed governors. it's not collecting more data than before, just using it in clever ways, and the government says monitoring prisoners is vital to protecting them. the plan is to roll out the system across england and wales after talks with prison unions. tom symonds, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... 300 extra police will be on patrol in areas of london —
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after six people were killed in shootings or stabbings in the last seven days. russia warns president trump there will be a "tough response" to new us sanctions on businessmen and officials close to president putin. there's been a 25% increase in holiday makers losing their money to fraudsters — for airline tickets or accommodation that don't exist. holidaymakers are being warned about fraudsters who place false adverts on accommodation websites, conning them out of £i,500 each on average. last year, there was a 25% increase in the scams, which included fake airline tickets. our business correspondent nina warhurst reports. when georgia was looking to take her boyfriend to amsterdam, she thought she'd seemed the perfect apartment online. after transferring more than £900, she realised there was no record of payment and no apartment. your heartjust drops and it's like this panicjust comes over you,
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it completely takes over your body. it's, like, "what have i done?" iran out from my desk and i called my mum and i was, like, "what do i do, what do i do? i've made this payment, it's all my fault." she's not the only one. last year, georgia was one of a,700 holiday—makers who reported fraud, losing an average of £1500. fake flights are the most common trick with fraudsters targeting peak periods when travellers are trying to see friends and family. a lot of the statistics from the report shows a big spike around september, and what does that say to you? it's people going home for christmas. that's certainly our experience from people phoning us saying just that. something they've been looking forward to for quite some time just isn't going to happen. it can be extremely, extremely disappointing. losing a holiday hurts. more than a tenth of those who made complaints said the impact was so severe they'd had to receive medical treatment or were at risk of bankruptcy. the advice for holiday—makers
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is to thoroughly research websites before booking and check they're part of a recognised trading body. nina warhurst, bbc news. the foreign office have now responded to the report from the request by the russian super meeting with borisjohnson. they have confirmed they will respond to the request in due course. the mother of the murdered black teenager, stephen lawrence, has suggested the police inquiry into his death should be closed. in an interview with the daily mail, lady lawrence, said she wanted to "draw a line" after a memorial service and concert to mark the 25th anniversary of the killing, on 22 april. two men were jailed for murder in 2012. the number of exclusions from schools for assaults using weapons in scotland is the highest it has been for five years. latest figures show there were more than 300 instances of a pupil being excluded for using a weapon to assault another pupil
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or member of staff. the scottish government says it is working with schools to address the issue. the former president of brazil, luis inacio lula da silva, has defied the deadline set by a court for him to surrender to police. his lawyers are in negotiations with the authorities and have filed a motion to the supreme court to suspend a prison order. lula was sentenced to i2 years for corruption — although he says the charges against him are politically motivated. katy watson reports from sao paulo. a criminal or a saviour? to his supporters, the answer was clear — as the deadline loomed, the crowds got bigger. five o'clock came and went and the party got louder. chanting lula's name, the crowd said they wouldn't give up the fight to keep him out ofjail. translation: lula was the best president we ever had, i'm from the north—east and lula was able to feed people there with his social welfare policies. today, nobody goes hungry any
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more in the north—east. for hours we were told lula would address the clouds, but nothing. instead his party faithful stepped in. translation: here we are with the world looking at us, everyone is watching us closely. closely monitoring the situation that threatens our democracy. this is the unchartered territory in brazil — in a country known for its soap opera politics this is perhaps the most dramatic chapter. it felt less dramatic at the federal police headquarters where officers were standing by for his surrender. despite, the no—show, his supporters turned out to make their views heard. "lula, thief, you belong in prison," said this demonstrator. translation: we are here to prevent another convict from getting sick and being unable to serve his sentence. he can't get away with it.
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he can't make fun of us. from the very start this trial has divided brazil. lula, his lawyer and his supporters have claimed it is politically motivated — designed to get him out of race for the presidential elections in october. his critics say they just want justice, he needs to serve time for his corruption conviction. but how that happens — through peaceful negotiation or confrontational arrest — is what everyone here is watching. this is one of those stories pareja to make a declaration before i read it and that is that my brother helps to build the airbus. if you're building wings for planes in wales, the fuselage in france, and the engines in germany, how do you get all the pieces together in the right place? the answer is an even bigger plane. they're known as super—transporters, and growing demand for brand new airliners mean they're getting busier, and bigger, than ever. our business reporter theo leggett has more. this is the airbus beluga. as the name suggests,
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it looks a bit like a whale, but it has an importantjob. it carries wings from airbus's factory in broughton in north wales and takes them to assembly lines in the south of france. it also carries other aircraft parts across europe. but airbus is increasing production and it says these days the beluga just isn't big enough, so now it's building a bigger one. and here it is, the beluga xl — it is longer, wider and taller than the current model. it will be able to carry two wings for the airbus a350 at a time — the current model can take only one. so how do you go about building something like this? well, what airbus has done is take a perfectly normal aircraft design, this was once an airbus a330, they chop the roof off and now they're in the process of putting new structures in place to create that cavernous cargo area. it is an animal. it is a massive bubble on the front... airbus needs a bigger transport plane, because it's increasing production,
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particularly of the new a350. the beluga is a vital link in its supply chain. we can carry more, we are carry two wings at a time instead of one wing at a time. so it means now the wing leg coming from the uk to broughton and there from broughton to toulouse will double the productivity of the aircraft. the beluga xl is due to go into service next year. but it won't be the biggest beast in the skies. boeing, for example, has its own transporter — the dream lifter, a 7a7 on steroids and it's even larger than the european giant. let's return to the latest developments on the poisoning of sergei skripal and yulia skripal. we
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speak to our correspondent. the good news is seeming to have sparked another dispute over what happened in salisbury a month ago. yes, we arejust in salisbury a month ago. yes, we are just hearing in salisbury a month ago. yes, we arejust hearing in in salisbury a month ago. yes, we are just hearing in the last 20 minutes or so reports that the russian embassy in london has requested a meeting between the russian ambassador alexander ya kove n ko russian ambassador alexander yakovenko the foreign secretary borisjohnson to discuss the investigation here in salisbury. they say they are hoping for a constructive response from the british and that they wanted meeting in the near future. british and that they wanted meeting in the nearfuture. as i say british and that they wanted meeting in the near future. as i say that this just reports in the near future. as i say that thisjust reports coming in the near future. as i say that this just reports coming from a news agency at the moment. the foreign office says it is aware of those reports and it is preparing some kind of response, some kind of statement that will be available at some point hopefully soon. this has come presumably off the back that we had yesterday the news from the
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hospital that says sergei skripal has made a recovery absorbed, maybe not a complete recovery, whitehall cautioned singh that are cautioning against the brave a full recovery, they say they will have ongoing medical needs but he is certainly not ina medical needs but he is certainly not in a critical condition any more and they may be able to exist police with their enquiries. his daughter attempt to regain consciousness and has but that the statement by the police saying she is growing stronger every day. these latest developments seem to have provoked this response from the russian embassy in london and we wait to hear a response from the foreign office. they were pushing that they we re office. they were pushing that they were in critical condition, may be pushing for consular access and if yulia wants us to get involved we are here to get involved: the view that came back from the british is that came back from the british is that we have filled but she doesn't wa nt that we have filled but she doesn't want that just yet. resume and
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that we have filled but she doesn't want thatjust yet. resume and we now there is going to be pressure not just from russians now there is going to be pressure notjust from russians but also the british and the media as to what to hear and see from the skripals, particularly from yulia. absolutely. everyone is interested to hear what these two key witnesses in this investigation have to say about what they were doing on the afternoon of sunday the ath of march, why they may have been targeted and the major thing to talk about heroes well is that russia, it says it is not possible, it has denied the poisoning right from the beginning and one of the points of that denial is that if it was the nerve agent robert rock that was used, they have said this would not be the outcome and that the something that has been reported widely in russia and
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television networks as well, a lot of scorn being shown to the uk government position that this must have been russia and that it is novichok, they say show us the proof. pressure is building from all quarters to maybe say why it is so certain that this is novichok and the skripals are key witnesses. many thanks. time for a look at the weather. a springlike appeal to the weather. a springlike appeal to the weather today. some pretty mild conditions and at times it will look like spring as well with some spells of sunshine but not all the time. quite a lot of glen durrant. some outbreaks of rain. parts of wales, the midlands, northern ireland into scotland. some of that rain in the heavy side. further north and south of the brighter glances as temperatures up to i3 in aberdeen and maybe i6 or i7 down to with east
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anglia and the saudis. this evening and denied the rain will do across tending to fizzle away. a few showers in before south—east. elsewhere largely dry conditions. some mist and fog patches and certainly not the golden night. lows of the london temperatures. tomorrow this rain will continue to drift across the far north of scotland. some showers for the southeast and a few breaking out across northern ireland. elsewhere largely dry with some sunshine and still to be mild. this is bbc news, our latest headlines: 300 extra police will be on patrol in areas of london this weekend. it comes after six people were killed in shootings or stabbings in the last seven days, and over 50 since the start of the year. russia warns president trump there will be a "tough response" to new us sanctions on businessmen and officials close to president putin. washington says it's targeting those
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involved in what it called "malign activity" around the world. there's been a 25% increase in holiday makers losing their money to fraudsters. officialfigures suggest nearly £7 million was paid for airline tickets or accommodation that didn't exist. sport now and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's adam wild. that start on australia's gold coast where the medals keep coming for our home teams on day three of competition at the commonwealth games. there was an english i—2 in the men's gymnastics and it has been a golden day in the men's and women's pa ra—triathlon. the success hasn't stopped there. adam peaty won calls a short time
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ago. he held onto the wing. we'll be got a second silver to add to his goal. outside his own world record but relieved to hang on for that gold medal. wales were celebrating gold. eleanor ba ka gold medal. wales were celebrating gold. eleanor baka powered through the pain barrier to see of scotland's katie archibald. finished on a0 points and won two of ten sprints. scotla nd scotland added a second gold to their collection. they broke the world record in the heat before beating the welsh pair in the visually impaired sprint final. they won the time trial earlier in the week. let's get a round—up of the action and from alex.

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