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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 8, 2018 10:00pm-10:31pm BST

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tonight at ten, there's widespread condemnation of an alleged chemical attack on civilians in syria, with president trump saying there'll be a price to pay. dozens are reported to have died from poison gas, with the us not ruling out a missile strike on syrian forces. i wouldn't take anything off the table. these are horrible photos. anything off the table. we are looking into the attack at this point. we'll have the very latest from the white house and the foreign office, as the un prepares for an emergency meeting. as the un prepares for syria has denied any involvement, in a chemical attack. also tonight... in a chemical attack. counting is underway after elections in hungary, with the self—styled defender of christian culture, viktor orban, seeking a third term as prime minister. the term as prime minister. dismount. no hesitation. it's gold for rhys mcclenaghan, and the first for northern ireland, at the commonwealth games in australia. # we're gonna rise up! australia. # time to take a shot! australia. # we're gonna rise up...#. australia. and will the us musical phenomenon hamilton sweep the board on british theatre‘s biggest night,
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at the olivier awards? good evening. president trump has warned bashar al assad of syria, there'll be a "big price to pay," for an alleged chemical attack on a rebel—held town outside damascus. medical aid groups are reporting that dozens of people have been killed due to poison gas, in the town of douma in eastern ghouta. in the town of douma there's been widespread condemnation, and the un security council will meet tomorrow to discuss the situation. will meet tomorrow to the syrian government and it's biggest ally russia, deny chemical weapons have been used. this evening, a deal has been reached between the russian military and rebels in douma, to allow them to leave the city. state media is reporting that a bus carrying fighters
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and their families has left the area, heading for opposition—held areas in the north of the country. this report from our middle east correspondent martin patience, contains distressing images from the start. this was the scene at an emergency clinic in douma. medics hosing down children, after an alleged chemical attack. these pictures were filmed by activists on the ground. some children were barely conscious. by activists on the ground. this baby is alive, but struggling to breathe. the medics are doing what they can. but struggling to breathe. but they are overwhelmed, working in a war zone, without enough medical supplies. working in a war zone, we received many patients who suffered from symptoms compatible with exposure to chlorine gas, high concentration chlorine gas. gas, high concentration also, the symptoms were deteriorating in a fashion that is not compatible with pure
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chlorine gas exposure, and that is why our physicians are concerned about exposure to nerve gas in low concentration. are concerned about exposure president trump denounced the alleged chemical attack. on social media he wrote... the alleged chemical attack. president putin, russia and iran are responsible for backing animal assad. and iran are responsible big price to pay. and iran are responsible the white house is ruling nothing out. is it possible there will be another missile attack? i wouldn't take anything off the table. these are horrible photos. anything off the table. we are looking into the attack at this point. the state department put out a statement last night, and the president's senior national security cabinet have been talking with him and with each other all throughout the evening and this morning, and myself included. all throughout the evening and this back in syria, government troops have surrounded douma. it is the last rebel—held town in eastern ghouta. both damascus and its ally russia describe claims of a chemical
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attack as fabrication. describe claims of a chemical and they are prepared to take douma at any cost. this footage was shot by syria's civil defence, known as the white helmets. by syria's civil defence, here, they run in to the aftermath of an air strike. they find an injured man. the aftermath of an air strike. while the politicians talk, this is the reality in douma. martin patience, bbc news, beirut. this is the reality in douma. our diplomatic correspondent james landale is at the foreign office, but first let's go to our north america editorjon sopel at the white house. is at the white house. a military response from the l now is a military response from the us now more than likely given president trump's comments? we have been here before, almost exactly a year ago,
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when we saw the same sort of distressing images coming out of syria. donald trump declared those unacceptable and within three days, 59 cruise missiles landed on a syrian airfield where aircraft had taken off from that had used sarin gas in that attack. and there is every reason to believe donald trump's national security adviser ‘s are considering exactly the same options. furthermore, you have a new national security adviser restarted work this weekend, ambassadorjohn bolton, who is known to be very hawkish when it comes to russia and very hawkish when it comes to iran. so when donald trump says there may bea so when donald trump says there may be a price to pay, you can be certain that is exactly what is being considered. i suppose the one difference from a year ago is you now have russia warning of very diet consequences that us should not use this as a pretext to involved again in the syria conflict. criticism of
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the president as well, with donald trump sending a signal earlier this week when he said he wanted to pull american troops out, that he was no longer interested and the russians can do whatever they like in syria. that has brought criticism. one other thing i thought interesting in what trump said. he said president putin, russia and iran are responsible for backing the animal assad. that's the first time donald trump has directly criticised vladimir putin, and that might be a significant shift. let's turn to james landale at the foreign office. what is the foreign office and international thinking on this? we know the un will be meeting tomorrow on this. there have been a lot of conversations between senior officials at the foreign office with counterparts in paris and washington. the first fruits of those conversations has been the us security council meeting that will happen tomorrow morning. that's significant. there is a sense of wanting to play this by the book.
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the initial focus is on saying, let's find out exactly what happened as much as we can, and then let's also set up a long—term investigation process to make sure the weapons inspectors can get in at the weapons inspectors can get in at the right time and things like that. one official said to me that we want to get it right. we are not yet at the stage of swapping lists of targets. when a security official says nothing can be taken off the table, he means exactly that, diplomatic as well as military options are being considered. there are options are being considered. there a re two options are being considered. there are two schools of thought. one school says, now is not the time to intervene in syria. the conflict is beginning to reach a status quo and if the west was going to intervene over chemical weapons it should have beena over chemical weapons it should have been a long time ago and to do so fiow been a long time ago and to do so now might prolong the conflict. the other school of thought says, just a few weeks after the attack in salisbury when more than 25 countries around the world said, we will take diplomatic action and say to russia that the use of chemical weapons is not acceptable. if you
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say that applies to salisbury, why should that principle of supporting the chemical weapons convention not also apply to syria? so there is also apply to syria? so there is also apply to syria? so there is also a school of thought that says, fiow also a school of thought that says, now is the moment for the international community to once again re—established this idea of the international order saying there are fioi’ttis the international order saying there are norms and the use of chemical weapons should not be one of them. there will be derry to discussions in the next few hours. james landale at the foreign office and jon sopel at the foreign office and jon sopel at the foreign office and jon sopel at the white house. the home secretary amber rudd, has rejected claims that the rise in violent crime in london, is linked to police cuts. the government is preparing to outline a new strategy to tackle the problem, but labour says ministers have their heads in the sand. but labour says ministers susana mendonca reports. but labour says ministers a high visibility police presence on london's streets after a week that has seen a spate of violent deaths. but the home secretary has rejected claims that falling police numbers are to blame. claims that falling police and she is being backed up by cabinet colleagues. go back a decade. by cabinet colleagues.
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serious violent crime was a lot higher than it is today, but so were police numbers, so for anyone to suggest that this is caused by police numbers, it is not backed up by facts. tomorrow the government will launch a serious violence strategy to focus on early intervention. a serious violence strategy to focus it will also unveil a new offensive weapons bill which will further restrict the sale of knives online, make so—called zombie knives and knuckle—dusters illegal to possess, and introduce a new offence of possessing corrosive substances like acid in a public place. corrosive substances the move has been welcomed by police chiefs. this is a really essential piece of legislation for policing and for the public and communities. of legislation for policing it will allow us to control the purchase by people under the age of 18, and it will allow us to have much more control as to who carries it in a public place, and whether they have good reason to or not. ministers here say they are investing more money in policing but they acknowledge the system is stretched. this latest move is an attempt to get the government back on the front foot following criticism that it hasn't been doing enough.
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but the debate over how many officers are needed isn't going away. many officers are needed labour says police officer numbers have been cut by 21,000 since 2010 and it would be naive of the government to argue that this has not had an impact. of the government to argue that this and with many young people involved in recent stabbings and shootings, labour says wider cuts to public funding may also be playing a part. it's notjust about police numbers, funding may also be playing a part. it is about our community services as well, our youth service, children's centres, social workers and local councils children's centres, social seeing significant cuts to their budgets as well. with more than 50 lives lost in london alone this year to violent crime, the mayor of london is calling a summit this week. the mayor of london is calling it is not yet clear whether the home secretary will attend. susana mendonca, bbc news. secretary will attend. police in germany have arrested six people over an alleged plot to carry out what's described as a "violent crime," at the berlin half marathon. what's described as a "violent the german newspaper, die welt, says the accused
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have links to anis amri, who was behind the lorry attack on a christmas market in the city, in 2016, when 12 people died. counting is underway in the hungarian general election, where the right—wing nationalist, viktor orban, is seeking a third consecutive term as prime minister. viktor orban, is seeking a third his fidesz party has portrayed itself as the protector of a christian culture it claims is threatened by muslim immigration. while opinion polls put them in front, allegations of corruption, and the high turnout, could help the opposition. our correspondentjenny hill is in budapest for us tonight. we is in budapest for us tonight. arejust we is in budapest for us tonight. are just getting we is in budapest for us tonight. arejust getting prelii figures we are just getting preliminary figures which suggest that viktor orban has done it, securing himself a third consecutive term in office. but, something has shifted. it looks as if these figures are borne out, that his fidesz party has a majority but it has narrowed. something has
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really shifted here. it has been an extraordinary day, record turnout and some voters queueing for hours to demand change. it's as if a country is holding its breath. tonight could, just could, affect profound change for hungary. not that viktor orban, defiant, divisive, expects to lose. good morning mr orban, bbc news. divisive, expects to lose. are you feeling confident? divisive, expects to lose. europe's watching closely. divisive, expects to lose. mr orban knows how to upset the neighbours. his dream for the eu — closed doors, illiberal values, and most of all, no migrants. closed doors, illiberal values, it's won him elections before and he is hoping it will work again. a simple message, hungary comes first for us. but will mr orban come first for hungary? the opposition here is weak,
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fragmented, but turn—out is much higher than usual. fragmented, but turn—out translation: the stakes are huge. fragmented, but turn—out we will either become an immigrant country or we will stay free. translation: we need change, because what's happening here is chaos. change, because what's translation: the problem? change, because what's everything — corruption, health care in ruins, low wages. viktor orban is perhaps europe's most divisive leader. it is a reputation he has carefully crafted and he is counting on it to win this election. crafted and he is counting on it mr orban, very few migrants are coming into this country, why the focus on immigration when so few people come? there is a question of the future. when so few people come? mr orban, the eu says that you flout its values and laws, is this the direction that hungary should be going in? we are just standing for democracy now. after all, he has powerful friends — russia, poland. tonight, a country awaits
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a result that matters well beyond its borders. a result that matters because the decision hungarians make today will influence europe's course tomorrow. today will influence of today will influence course, that's why the result will of course, that's why the result will be eagerly analysed, scrutinised, in brussels, berlin, paris. because today wasn't only, if you like, a battle for the soul of hungary, it also represents the struggle right within the heart of the european project. jenny hill, thank you, live in budapest. with all the sport, here's ollie foster at the bbc sport centre. here's ollie foster the here's ollie foster final round of the masters has been the final round of the masters has been gripping. rory mcilroy has been slipping down the leaderboard in golf‘s first major of the year. he's currently four shots off the at augusta. our correspondentjoe wilson has been watching the action. here's how and where...
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been watching the action. rory mcilroy began his attempt to win the masters. but, as bad as that looks, he didn't lose it. mcilroy rescued a par on the first and, by the next hole, his aim was back. on the first and, by the next rather better on that. on the first and, by the next listen to the roar! on the first and, by the next mcilroy began this final round in second place. the man in bold pink was in the lead. patrick reed missed some, holed some, and stayed in front. back to mcilroy. holed some, and stayed in front. as a younger man, his game had collapsed on this manicured course when he had a chance to win. collapsed on this manicured course here, solid, and he closed the gap on the fourth. just when you thought it was safe to relax, on the fifth green, mcilroy does this. of course, if the leaders should falter, many others can challenge, and here was patrick reed on the ninth hole, fighting the contours. on the ninth hole, augusta can do this to anyone. on the ninth hole, joe wilson, bbc news. on the ninth hole, highlights from the premier league and the scottish premiership
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follow the news, but if you'd like to know the results now then here they come. like to know the results now celtic beat hamilton 2—1 and are now one game away from making it seven titles in a row. now one game away from making it there were two matches in the premier league. danny welbeck scored twice for arsenal as they beat southampton 3—2. for arsenal as they beat the saints remain in relegation zone. the gunners are two points behind fifth placed chelsea, who drew 1—1 with west ham. fifth placed chelsea, in formula one, ferrari's sebastian vettel made it two wins out of two with victory at the bahrain grand prix the german held off a late challenge from valtteri bottas. lewis hamilton made it on to the podium despite starting from ninth. on to the podium despite he's 17 points behind vettel in the drivers championship. it's been another successful day for the home nations at the commonwealth games, especially northern ireland. they have their first medal and it was a surprise gold in the gymnastics. and it was a surprise gold in from the gold coast, here's our correspondent natalie pirks. a puff of the cheeks,
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a moment to savour. rhys mcclenaghan‘s first commonwealth games couldn't have gone much better. commonwealth games couldn't have commentator: max whitlock. commonwealth games couldn't have he usually performs miracles, but today the olympic floor champion showed he's a mere mortal after all. slight adjustment there. he's a mere mortal after all. his routine was high difficulty, but also high risk. hopped outside of the floor. but also high risk. mistakes meant he knew what was coming. disappointment for whitlock. what was coming. scotland's dan purvis took bronze. what was coming. whitlock could only manage sixth. what was coming. he's upgraded four of the five tumbles that won him gold in rio. it hasn't quite paid off for him today. he now has an hour before he goes into his favourite piece of apparatus, the pommel. into his favourite piece of good dismount. into his favourite piece of no hesitation. into his favourite piece of but first up was an emotional 18—year—old. a hug from rhys mcclenaghan‘s coach told him it was good. but he'd have to wait to find outjust how good. whitlock is the reigning world and olympic champion on the pommel. he was happy, but thejudges marked him
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down for execution. thejudges marked him and northern ireland have their first gold of the games. their first—ever medal in gymnastics. a proud moment for rhys's parents as he beat the pommel‘s biggest star. parents as he beat the he's one of the best gymnasts that ever lived, really, being the double olympic champion. and, of course, i've got a lot of respect for max. but i'm here now! a lot of respect for max. later came more strength in depth from the home team as england's courtney tulloch won gold on the rings and georgia—mae fenton took gold in the uneven bars. on the rings and georgia—mae fenton but today will be remembered for an off day for the pommel king, and a great one for his heir apparent. natalie pirks, bbc news, the gold coast. there was no medalfor the england basketballer georgia jones today, just a ring. basketballer georgia jones her boyfriend, jamell anderson, who had just helped the men's team reach the knockout stages, proposed on court in australia. he said basketball was a big part of their relationship, so it made sense to pop
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the question there. she said yes... the question there. lots of commonwealth games highlights on the bbc sport website, bbc.co.uk/sport, and you'll also find coverage of the final few holes of this year's masters. find coverage of the final few holes holes find coverage of the final few holes running out for stars of british theatre, have been on the red carpet this evening, at the prestigious olivier awards, the stage version of the baftas. at the prestigious olivier awards, this year, hamilton, the us hip—hop musical, had a record 13 nominations. the us hip—hop musical, our arts editor will gompertz‘s report, contains some flashing images. gompertz‘s report, contains for one night only, theatreland's finest are not treading the boards, they are walking a wet red carpet. finest are not treading the boards, the 2018 olivier awards. finest are not treading the boards, the oliviers are of course all about celebrating british theatre, which has had a good year. about celebrating british theatre, ticket sales are up, box office is better, but actually, in reality, what everybody is really talking about is an american blockbuster,
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the musical hamilton. # see if you can spy another immigrant coming...# the rap musical about america's founding fathers had a record—breaking 13 nominations, and it did all right on the night, winning seven oliviers, including best choreographer, best new musical, and best actor in a musical. # i'm the damn fool who shot him.# best actor in a musical. people are talking about, will the british audiences take all the american politics, the american history? i think what lin—manuel did brilliantly was make it about people. did brilliantly was he made it about humans and their relationships with each other, and that will work anywhere, i think. jez butterworth‘s play, the ferryman, which is set in rural northern ireland during the troubles, won in three major categories — during the troubles, best new play, best director for sam mendez, and best actress. for sam mendez, and best laura donnelly, the ferryman. for sam mendez, and best immediate reaction? for sam mendez, and best i'm in shock. i did not expect that.
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a story about 1981 northern ireland is not going to necessarily touch everybody's soul. ireland is not going to but stories about love and loss will. best actor went to bryan cranston for his performance as a news anchorman having a nervous breakdown in network at the national theatre. breakdown in network at the national it's very difficult to be mad as hell when you are holding an olivier. as hell when you are holding an tonight i would like to dedicate this award to the company of network actors and crew who i'm giving a huge hug to tonight, and maybe sometime tomorrow, we'll let go. cranston and hamilton were not the only american winners. roughly the only american winners. half the awards, if you at roughly half the awards, if you look at them, our work of american origin. that's very nice in some ways, we talk about the brits conquering broadway, but we don't talk about the americans coming over here and it's starting to happen. not if james graham here and it's starting to happen. not ifjames graham is anything to do with it. the prolific british
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playwright is enjoying a purple patch, acknowledged my 20 won the best new comedy olivier for labour of 11. expect to see a lot more of him and his work in the future. that's it. him and his work in the future. it's time for the news where you are. hello. this is bbc news with martine croxall. more on our top story tonight — and the un security council is due to meet tomorrow to discuss the suspected chemical weapons attack in syria. medical sources say dozens of people were killed in an attack on the rebel—held town of douma on saturday. both syria and russia deny a chemical attack took place. i've been speaking to the conservative mp tom tugendhat, who's chairman of the commons foreign affairs select committee. i asked him what the response should be from the international community. i think the security council has got a really important role here, and it's really a testing moment, because much of the action that they would have conducted has been blocked by russia. russia has 40,000 troops in syria, backing the assad regime, which hasjust again used chemical
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weapons against its own people. so we've really got to see some proper action by the un, and stop seeing countries like russia blocking the united nations and the international community from stopping one of the most barbarous acts that's going on in this world today. the syrian government, of course, deny any involvement and responsibility for this attack. they would, wouldn't they? for balance, i'm just offering their rejection of the accusation. how different is the climate now then? given that, as you say, russia has stood in the way in the past, why would they not stay in the way now? well, i wouldn't be surprised if they did. we've got to recognise what's going on here. we have a regime that has quite brutally murdered hundreds and hundreds of its own people, and indeed has only recently... this isn't the first of these many chemical attacks, but it's only recentlyjust killed certainly tens today, and possibly hundreds,
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using weapons that are banned under international law and that no responsible government stockpiles. so the very fact that the syrian government has them at all is illegal, let alone that it uses them, and so we've got to see international action to respond. now, in 2013, the uk parliament had a vote, which sadly was for party political reasons used as an excuse not to act, and since then the united states has only acted once, which was under president trump. so now is an opportunity for the international community to come together with the coalition that has so rightly stood up to russian chemical weapons used in the united kingdom, and this time to act where it's being used so much more brutally in syria. i'lljust share a tweet you posted this morning. "we can't act every time and we shouldn't excuse our friends, but standing aside while people are gassed or sharing the murderers' lies doesn't make us safer.
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it creates instability and resentment that will hurt us at home. foreign affairs isn't about foreigners, it's about us." how likely would you be then to support a missile strike that hasn't been ruled out by the white house? look, i think that the government has the right to act. we have a system in the uk called crown prerogative, by which the government can respond to attacks or national emergencies without taking recourse to parliament. in fact, i'm somewhat disappointed that my own government has not decided to respond already, because what we are seeing here is aircraft being loaded with chemical weapons, flying from bases, and we know where these bases are. the united states did respond with a strike on some of these bases a while ago. so i would hope very much that my government and other governments would coordinate and respond to these abuses now. what else then should the international community be doing beyond that, given that, in some ways, it looks like the conflict, as bloody as it still is, is coming to some sort
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of close and conclusion? well, i think we can accept that the syrian regime is likely to in some ways end up as the dominant force, but that doesn't mean we have to stand by when they use chemical weapons. i think we can perfectly reasonably strike the bases that hold chemical weapons and strike the aircraft hangars that hold the aircraft that carry them, without playing a part in the ongoing civil war. i think the use of chemical weapons is just a step beyond any accepted norm and, indeed, is defined very clearly by the international committee of the red cross is a war crime. the chairman of the foreign affairs select committee. time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello.
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quite the range of weather across the country again today. wonderful weekend conditions for some of us. get on that beach in cornwall under the blue sky! one picture from st ives this afternoon. not everyone so lucky, central and eastern parts of england cloudy, some of us wet as well, misty and murky. that zone of cloudy, damp weather stays with us overnight. mild underneath this. elsewhere, clear spells, with some showers today, fading away, but watch out for patchy fog. parts of northern ireland, north—west england, south—west scotland most at risk, and some of it could be quite dense in places. away from the south—east, with the cloud looking like it'll be about 2—5 degrees overnight, but maybe a bit lower, with a touch of frost in clearer parts of north—east scotland. into monday, the cloudy, damp zone takes some of the rain further west across parts of the midlands, fringing to east wales later in the day and parts of south—west england. the western fringes of wales, england, much of northern england away from yorkshire, scotland and northern ireland seeing some sunny spells, but you may catch a shower in scotland and northern ireland, and it may be on the heavy side.
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10-14c. this is monday into tuesday, and the pattern is setting up for the week ahead. low pressure to the south, weather systems occasionally around us. high pressure in scandinavia, and the result will be an easterly flow coming in. look at the colours, though. don't worry about this being bitterly cold. this isn't baltic blue — rather mild—looking colours coming our way. the origin of the air is actually eastern europe and the eastern med. for many of us, we will have temperatures at or above average, with the exception of chilly north sea coasts because of the easterly flow. rain at times, not all the time, some sunny spells, but not plenty of sunshine as the week goes on, i'm afraid. let's look at tuesday. we will see this spell of rain working out of england and wales into parts of scotland and northern ireland during the day. south—eastern areas start to brighten up, with some heavy, possibly thundery showers edging into southern england, especially south—west england and maybe wales later. any sunshine towards the south—east warming up. north sea scoast, a sign of things to come, temperatures in single figures for many of us
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through the week ahead, with that wind coming in off quite a cold sea, of course, at this time of year. plenty of low cloud and mist, that sort of thing. go west for the best of the dry and occasionally bright weather this week.
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