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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 11, 2018 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. don't bomb syria — russia warns the united states not to launch military strikes. but military action over the alleged chemical weapons attack seems one step closer after deliberations at the un ended in a russian veto. good morning, it is wednesday 11 april. also this morning: has facebook‘s dream of connecting people become a privacy nightmare? mark zuckerberg faces a second day of questions over the misuse of users‘ data. we didn't take a broad enough view of our responsibility, and that was a big mistake. and it was my
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mistake, and i'm sorry. drugged and vulnerable — we hear concerns that too many people with learning disabilities in england are being medicated to control their behaviour. bills for british gas customers are going up. it has raised the price of its most popular tariff for the second time in eight months. i will be looking at why, and whether others will follow. and good morning from the gold coast, where the band is playing and england are celebrating an early medal in the diving on day seven of these commonwealth games, and also celebrating back home are liverpool fa ns after celebrating back home are liverpool fans after they beat manchester city once again to reach the semifinals of the champions league at the etihad. and carol has the weather. good morning, are cloudy, murky start to the day. patchy rain around as well. that will clear, leaving a lot of cloud in its wake with limited amounts of sunshine and still cold along the east coast. i will have more in 15 minutes. good morning.
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first, our main story: russia has urged the united states to hold back from carrying out military strikes in syria in response to president assad's alleged chemical attack on a rebel town. moscow used its un security council veto to block a us resolution calling for an independent inquiry into saturday's attack. the prospect of air strikes has prompted the european air traffic control organisation eurocontrol to warn airlines of possible missile launches in the next 72 hours. here is our north america correspondent david willis. with a show of hands at the un, the security council failed to agree on a global response to the attack on douma, making the prospect of a military strike on syria all the more likely. america's call to set up an investigation was blocked by syria's closest ally, russia, to the frustration of other council members. britain's foreign secretary boris johnson tweeted: but russia's
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representative at the un urged the west to abandon plans for military action. translation: you do not want to hear anything. you do not want to hear the fact that no traces of a chemical attack were found in douma. but president trump has vowed to respond forcefully, we have had a number of conversations, both the president with president macron, prime minister may, and not just with president macron, prime minister may, and notjust with those but at an administration level and we are going to work with a number of our programmes and allies as we determine what the next step is. but as more displaced people
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were bussed out of douma, the question was how should the west respond. the situation in syria is complicated by the presence of russian forces on the ground and by the possibility that russia might choose to defend syrian airspace. facebook‘s founder, mark zuckerberg, will face a second day of questioning by us politicians about his company's handling of personal information. he spent five hours being interrogated by senators in washington yesterday, following a data breach affecting 87 million users. here is our technology reporter dave lee. mark zuckerberg's first ever appearance in congress was a five—hour slog. as senators, 43 of them, grilled the 33—year—old about the slew of scandals facing his social network. we didn't take a broad enough view
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of our responsibility. it began with questions about cambridge analytica, the firm that is alleged to have fraudulently obtained data about 87 million facebook users, something it denies. mr zuckerberg's goal in coming here was to assure senators he could guide facebook out of the mess it is currently in, and that it is capable of handling data. mr zuckerberg, would you be comfortable sharing the name of the hotel you've stayed in last night? one note. i think that might be what this is all about. he said it would be more difficult in future to spread misinformation on facebook and again apologise for being caught mostly unawares when the russians target of the platform in 2016. we expected them to do a
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number of more traditional cyber attacks which we did identify, and notify the campaigns, but we were slow to identify the type of new information operations. mr zuckerberg made some interesting concessions. notably he said that members of this team had been interviewed by the office of special counsel robert mueller, and also mr zuckerberg didn't rule out the possibility that facebook would one day be a paid service, although he did say there would always be a free version of the site available to uses. the health regulator says it has found that nearly a third of private hospitals in england require improvement. the care quality commission said most private hospitals provide high—quality care, but its inspectors identified concerns over the safety and leadership of some services. the nhs partners network, which represents private providers, said more than half had improved their ratings after follow—up inspections.
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in some of the hospitals we found a rather old—fashioned in some of the hospitals we found a rather old —fashioned approach to governance, which really hasn't caught up with the best quality control, quality at assurance, that we see in nhs care, and we had challenged hospitals to improve. and i have to say i am impressed with the response to our inspections with independent hospitals rising to the challenge, and they have improved their governance processes. an independent inquiry is to be held into child sexual exploitation in telford. last month, the sunday mirror claimed 1,000 children may have been abused in the town since the 1980s. yesterday councillors voted unanimously to set up an investigation, having previously called on the government to take the lead. flowers left near to the site where a burglar was stabbed to death have been branded as an insult. floral tributes and balloons for henry vincent have been repeatedly attached and removed from a fence opposite a home in hither green, in south—east
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london, where he was killed. 78—year—old richard osborn—brooks was initially held on suspicion of murder, but released without charge. a council in west london has become the first in the country to ban protesters from standing outside an abortion clinic. councillors in ealing voted to introduce a safe zone around the site, following complaints that women were being intimidated as they tried to enter. it is being described by pro—choice campaigners as a landmark decision for women. jessica parker reports. calling on the council to set up a buffer zone outside a nearby west london abortion clinic. that is agreed, and we will... applause calls that were met in an unanimous decision by ealing council's cabinet. but passions on this issue run high. campaigners now won't be
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allowed to do this within ioom of the clinic. it is after vigils by anti— abortion processes led to complaints of intimidation. claims rejected by those who say women are being offered to few alternatives. isabel says she was helped by a campaigner who approached her as she went for an abortion. that led me to change my mind. i have got someone to support me, so i don't want to terminate my pregnancy any more. but the council says the vigils were causing harm to the community. the new buffer zone has been welcomed also by the clinic. this will mean that our patients can come forward without fear of intimidation, without fear of intimidation, without fear of being shamed, medically misinformed. but it also means it is just a start. medically misinformed. but it also means it isjust a start. the government is conducting its own review into this divisive issue.
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lots of young football fans dream of being a mascot, but how about at the age of 34? kevin stuart was on his stag do when he was tricked into being blackpool's mascot. he walked out with the players ahead of their match against bradford city on saturday, and as you can see, he didn't quite have the footwear to match his kit. and we go live now to australia to getan and we go live now to australia to get an update on the commonwealth games. and mike has found some shade. and mike has found some shadelj will let you see me fully why do the sport at least. you can see how hot it is, loads of people taking a dip in the water in the huge pacific
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ocean in the water in the huge pacific o cea n waves in the water in the huge pacific ocean waves behind me. and we are going swimming on breakfast this morning, gold—medallists including the big names like adam peaty coming up the big names like adam peaty coming up at 6:30 a.m.. in the football, liverpool beat manchester city once again. liverpool are through to the semi—finals after they came from a goal down to beat manchester city 2—1 on the night, 5—1 overall. city manager pep guardiola was sent to the stands after marching onto the pitch and questioning the referee when a goal was disallowed. and a big shock in rome. barcelona, who had led 4—1 after the first leg, knocked out by as roma. a 3—0 win enough for them to send lionel messi and co packing. england's women are top of their world cup qualifying group, thanks to a 2—0 win away to bosnia & herzigovina, toni duggan and jodi taylor with the goals. there was also a win for scotland against poland, while northern ireland lost to norway. back here at the commonwealth games, alicia blagg and kat torrance have won silver for england in the women's synchronised
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3m springboard event. the pair only dived together for the first time in january. and it will be either gold or silver for northern ireland's kristina o'hara in the boxing. she beat tasmyn benny of new zealand in the semi—finals of the 45—48 kg event. o'hara will face indian legend mary kom in the final. and one of the story from here this morning. i went to the netball earlier and saw england for the first time in commonwealth games history beating new zealand. that means england are through to the semifinals where they will face either australia orjamaica. semifinals where they will face either australia or jamaica. good news from the england netball camp as well. i will be back at 6:30am with all those swimmers. united states senators have
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completed a heated five—hour interrogation of the facebook founder mark zuckerberg. he was called to washington after 87 million people had their data accessed by the political consultancy firm cambridge analytica. let's talk to the washington post columnist christine emba who was watching events on capitol hill. first of all, give us a sense of the occasion. what was it like as a set piece event? well, it was a big deal. facebook has been questioned before congress for other misdeeds, but this was one of the first times its ceo had showed up to be grilled bya number of its ceo had showed up to be grilled by a number of senators, by a joint committee hearing. he was on the hill forfive committee hearing. he was on the hill for five hours today, committee hearing. he was on the hill forfive hours today, and is due back to be grilled by the house of representatives tomorrow. so it was a busy day, surrounded by cameras and press. it was naturally a lot of interest, because after all facebook is something that we all
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use. and some of the senators clearly were grandstanding a little bit, but the suggestion from many of them was the danger, the risk from facebook now is that our privacy is over. how do you think that zuckerberg responded?” over. how do you think that zuckerberg responded? i was surprised by how well he did. i think there's a lot of pressure going into the senate hearings about how composed he would be —— question. whether he would be able to clearly answer questions, whether he would be defensive. even facebook‘s stocks fluctuated before the hearing but eventually the stock market closed up on facebook because zuckerberg seemed to be doing well. he did address the questions but he was probed in a number of interesting ways on the question of privacy, whether he would allow his own privacy to be, as, i would say, exposed, as were his customers on facebook, and what he would do next.
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he didn't give clean answers but it wasn't clear the senators believed him that he did give clean cut a nswe rs. him that he did give clean cut answers. there were times when he was asked whether it was ok for him to provide details at a later date. he didn't have that much information to hand in connection with the specifics to do with how many times facebook had had to find out information about third parties. was that satisfactory or was he playing for time? a number of the senators responded by saying they were disappointed, not happy with what they were hearing. it was almost like they were chastising a young son of theirs. that was also a recurring theme during the congressional hearing. zuckerberg tried to explain facebook‘s proposals, facebook‘s business model, the way facebook operated as
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clearly as he could to the senators but the generational gap was obvious. even as they were asking questions, it wasn't clear they totally understood the technology. there was a moment where senator orrin hatch asked how facebook made money, and mark zuckerberg said, well, we sell ads. he's providing as much information as he was likely to and as much as these senators could digest in the moment. thank you for your time this morning. very interesting about the tone as well, isn't it? as you might expect, mark zuckerberg's appearance in front of the congressional committee captured the attention of social media across the world. this gives you an idea of the number of photorgraphers trying to get the perfect picture of the facebook founder. and with that many cameras it was guaranteed that they would get pictures from all angles, including the angles showing the cushion, or as some dubbed it booster seat.
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you can see it. they have a few breaks. there was percussion, clearly he wanted to have the right height relative to the desk that there was the caution. understandable. —— there was the cushion. let us know your thoughts on that. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. this morning it is a cloudy, murky, grey start to the day and we have some patchy rain around. most of which will clear but the cloud will be thick enough with drizzle here and there through the day. interestingly, we've had over 16,000 lightning strikes in the far
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west of germany, belgium, the netherlands through the night but the whole system weakened as it went across the north sea and we've got what's left, some patchy rain. you can also see there's not much of a breeze but the breezy as conditions we have today will be in the east and it's an easterly wind, so that nagging wind will make it feel cold and eastern scotland and north—east england —— breeziness conditions. it will do for much of the rest of the week. cloudy start, the rain moving away from wales and northern scotla nd away from wales and northern scotland but a few showers behind. where we see the sunshine today, likely in southern counties of england, also north—west england, western and northern england, is where we will see the highest temperatures, we're looking at between 12, 13 or 111. as we had through the evening and overnight, we still have that easterly wind coming in from the north sea —— head. the cloud being broken is where we have the lowest
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temperatures but not expecting any issues with frost. a general mistiness and some hail and coastal fog tonight, rather like the date. tomorrow, a bit more of the same, if you like the cloud you're in for a treat this week —— rather like today. showers in northern england moving across the irish sea into northern ireland, a few in the south—west as well. omitted brightness tomorrow, any sunshine will be in parts of the south wheezed and southern england and the far north of scotland —— limited —— south—east. temperatures limited to what we had today and only a high in north—east england and scotland of seven. by friday we have more persistent rain coming in from the north sea across northern england and scotland. most of that will tend to be light in nature, but you could get the odd heavy burst. moving northwards. but behind it, we are left with a lot of cloud. by friday, it is southern england, parts of
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east anglia seeing the sunshine with highs of 17. on saturday, still more cloud around. again we have showers spurting across the far north east of scotland, brighter breaks developing in england and wales with sunshine. again the odd shower here and there but temperatures starting to climb, so we could have 18, for example, in the south—east and sunday will be very similar. but getting warmer into the early part of next week. that's why i'm wearing my very yellow jacket. thanks very that's why i'm wearing my very yellowjacket. thanks very much, carol! every day, tens of thousands of people in england living with learning disabilities or autism are given medication they don't need just to control their behaviour. that's in spite of an nhs pledge to stop the misuse of such treatment, known as psychotropics. that campaign's now being extended, but charities representing those most at risk say progress is too slow, as breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has been finding out. most of the times i see stephen he's
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totally catatonic. he started jumping on tables, saying he wants to pull his teeth out, saying he wants to pull his hair out. two families describe the impact was psychotropic drugs on their sons, drugs designed to treat specific conditions but too often given to people with autism and learning difficulties who don't have those conditions, drugs that are sometimes referred to as a chemical cosh. see, that's not a life. leo's son, stephen, lives a six—hour round trip away from his family and while here he's had his collarbone broken in an incident investigated by police. a carer was sacked. ever since stephen has increasingly self harmed, tried to harm others, and in response, he's faced more restraint and more medication. no one seems to be understanding that it's his way of showing how hurt he is. i'm anxious,
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i'm sad. are you scared? i'm scared. and when i see him crying, he will scream, money, no go, money, no go. it breaks my heart. the priory group tell us restraint is always a last resort and they a lwa ys is always a last resort and they always aim tojuice is always a last resort and they always aim to juice medications to the lowest possible dose is to keep people safe. two years ago a study found as many as 35,000 people with learning difficulties were given psychotropic medication every day. in response nhs england launched stomp, a campaign to stop over medication. someone with a learning difficulty can't always express what's going on for them and what might happen will come out in their behaviour and then the response that's needed is understanding. the campaign extends later this month. they're also collecting new data on
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those being medicated. but charities have raised concerns. they say progress is too slow, that the data being gathered is no when you're wide enough. and that is an area that does need addressing? and you would like to see this data collection for all people with learning difficulties? that would be fantastic, yes. the aim of this is to improve lives but also prevent premature deaths. so make sure you do it... oliver mcgowan was a talented sportsman who had autism and epilepsy, but antipsychotics given in the past have made him worse, not better. in october, 2016 he was taken to hospital in bristol after seizures. he was extremely agitated. page after page of oliver's care notes in hospital show his intolerance to these drugs yet doctors still prescribed. there's no consideration of his autism. it's awful because for a mom to turn around and said, i told you so, i told you so. we both told them so,
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and he's not here. a postmortem found a contributing factor in oliver's death was mms, a reaction to antipsychotics. the hospital said staff were deeply saddened and while we maintain support of the treatment we maintain support of the treatment we provided, we are committed to how we provided, we are committed to how we ca re we provided, we are committed to how we care for people with learning difficulties. an inquest begins next week. there's no doubt in some insta nces week. there's no doubt in some instances these drugs are necessary but in others the need for them could be removed with far greater understanding of learning difficulties and autism. jayne joins us now on the sofa. it is harrowing hearing what happened to oliver and his family, the doctors giving out this medication, though, they are under the impression they are doing the right thing at the time. there are clinicians making difficult decisions in difficult circumstances to keep people safe. equally we've been told by inspectors of places
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where the use of these metastases goes up at the weekend just to keep a lead on things were maybe staffing ratios are low. the really important message of stomp, and they are raising awareness, is that the use of these medications could and should be avoided with better understanding of the triggers of the behaviour they are drugging. this is why the challenge and behaviour foundation and mencap have told us this must go hand—in—hand with having the right staff on the ground. iwant having the right staff on the ground. i want to give you two stats. one, there's been a near 40% decreasing the number of specialist learning disability nurses since 2010 and two, there's been a near 70% decrease in learning disability support staff in the community and this is a problem. but the problem of metastases is being looked at in scotland, where they are starting to gather data —— of metastases is. this is an issue everywhere. can i enter... —— maids. if you are
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watching this and you are concerned don't tell your loved ones to stop taking the drugs without medical advice. a really important message. and if you've been affected by anything raised in this story, details of organisations offering information and support are available at bbc.co.uk/actionline. still to come this morning on breakfast: crime novels are now the most popularfiction stories, topping the book chart bestellers for the first time. we'll be looking for clues to find out what makes the genre so appealing and setting our own puzzle for you to solve. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we good morning from bbc london news, i'm katharine carpenter. motorcyclists in the capital have told bbc london they are having to police bike—theft hotspots themselves to stop thieves stealing high value motorbikes and scooters. the metropolitan police say there's been a decrease in this type
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of theft since the beginning of the year and they're using new tactics to fight it. but the groups, who deny being vigilantes, say they've had enough. we all have great respect for the police but the resources they have to combat motorcycle theft is zero to combat motorcycle theft is zero to nine. we've seen a few bikes that have got security on them, or not adequate security, so we're going to hang around and basically make our presence known. a woman from greenwich has thanked doctors at guy's and st thomas's as well as her baby son for saving her life. a 14—centimetre mass was found on one of susan o'flanagan's kidney‘s while pregnant and she says because of the baby that the tumour was found at all. put the paper clip ends and things like that so i can show him later to show how special he is, so if it wasn't for him i don't know what
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would have happened. nearly a year on, my ct scans are clear, just got to hope it stays away now. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning delays and cancellations on c2c services following signal problems in the limehouse area northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from blackwall lane. in perivale, there are lane restrictions on the westbound a110 just after the medway underpass, following a collision. in sutton cheam road is closed btw sherwood park road and st nicholas way for roadworks near the high school let's have a check on the weather now with lucy martin. hello, good morning. a misty and murky start to the day today with a few patches of fog and also some early rain which will claye and a gradual brightening up, bright intervals or sunny spells beading in from the south. this is the pressure charts, high pressure over scandinavia, low pressure in the south, this easterly north—easterly wind. this morning a great start, a
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few patches of mist and fog, early rain clearing to the west and a few showers after that and then gradually bright intervals and sunny spells is spreading in from the south. the further north you are, holding on to edit more in the way of cloud, temperatures today a maximum of of cloud, temperatures today a maximum 01:14 and an easterly north—easterly wind. through the evening and overnight, a few clear spells to begin with will tend to increase as we move through the night. perhaps the odd isolated shower and a few patches of mist and fog developing, temperatures falling to an overnight low of eight or nine. as we move into tomorrow, a bit of a grey start to the day again, plenty of cloud around and the chance of seeing a shower, bright intervals developing with temperatures of a maximum of 16. a cloudy start on friday, again the risk of a shower but brightening up with some sunny spells in the afternoon and as we move to the end of the week and the weekend, we are going to see the temperatures rising with highs of 20 possibly by tuesday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. it is 6:30am. we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. but also on breakfast this morning: as facebook‘s boss, mark zuckerberg, apologises for data breaches, we will discuss if he has done enough to restore confidence in the social network. england's adam peaty had to settle for a shock silver medal at the commonwealth games. he will bejoining mike on the gold coast beach in the next few minutes. that has got a pluck, a big chestnut with a pluck. —— plaque. that has got a pluck, a big chestnut with a pluck. -- plaque. plundered by myself, i think. ——
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with a pluck. -- plaque. plundered by myself, ithink. —— planted by myself, i think. and we will get the inside story on the conversation between sir david attenborough and her majesty, from the director of next week's itv documentary the queen's green planet. good morning. here is a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: russia has urged the united states to hold back from carrying out military strikes in syria, in response to president assad's alleged chemical attack on a rebel town. moscow used its un security council veto to block a us resolution calling for an independent inquiry into saturday's attack. the prospect of air—strikes has prompted the european air traffic control organisation eurocontrol, to warn airlines of possible missile launches in the next 72 hours. the founder of facebook, mark zuckerberg, will face a second day of questioning by us politicians about his company's handling of personal information. mr zuckerberg spent five hours being interrogated by senators in washington yesterday. 87 million users had their personal information accessed in a data breach involving the consultancy firm cambridge analytica, which denies any wrongdoing. we did take action. we took down the
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app, and we demanded that both the apps developer and cambridge analytica delete and stop using any data that they had. they told us they did this. in retrospect it was clearly a mistake to believe them. an investigation has been launched into save the children over how the charity handled allegations of misconduct and harassment against senior members of staff. the inquiry will consider the response to claims such as those made against the charity's former chief executivejustin forsyth, and brendan cox, husband of the murdered labour mp jo cox. both men have issued apologies. the health regulator says it has found that nearly a third of private hospitals in england require improvement. the care quality commission said most private hospitals provide high quality care, but its inspectors identified concerns over the safety and leadership of some services. the nhs partners network,
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which represents private providers, said more than half had improved their ratings after follow—up inspections. a council in west london has become the first in the country to ban protesters from standing outside an abortion clinic. councillors in ealing voted unaninmously to introduce a protest—free safe zone around the site, following complaints that women were being intimidated as they tried to enter. the decision means both anti—abortion and pro—choice campaigners cannot stand within100m of the clinic. the abortion charity marie stopes described it as a landmark decision for women. flowers left near to the site where a burglar was stabbed to death have been branded as an insult. floral tributes and balloons for henry vincent have been repeatedly attached and removed from a fence opposite a home in hither green, in south—east london, where he was killed. 78 year old richard osborn—brooks was initially held on suspicion of murder, but released without charge. those are the main stories this
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morning. lots of young football fans dream of being a mascot, but how about at the age of 34? kevin stuart was on his stag do when he was tricked into being blackpool's mascot. he walked out with the players ahead of their match against bradford city on saturday, and as you can see, he didn't quite have the footwear to match his kit. it probably wouldn't be very fast, would it? no, it is not appropriate, but he blended in quite well. and on the subject of appropriate outfits... do i see knees on the gold coast? well, there we go. he is finally appropriately attired. is it the first time the legs have been on show? it is, and i wasn't really keen, but there is a good reason, as
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you will see. we have come inland from the beach and will interview five medal winning swimmers from the team, and we have to be in the swimming pool to do that. the sea is rather rough to swim in, to be fair. i have our special breakfast towel, we have booked a place near the pool we have booked a place near the pool, and the only way to interview five swimmers at the same time, because i haven't got the biggest arms, is to walk along in the water. i have had to resort to the shorts, but i do apologise. it is very early and you might be eating your brea kfast. all the action from here on the gold coast to come. but let's start with the champions league, and liverpool are through to the semi—finals after a night of drama at the etihad. they led manchester city 3—0 from the first leg. but they went behind last night afterjust two minutes, when gabrieljesus gave city hope of getting back into the tie. but, after pep guardiola was sent to the stands for questioning a disallowed goal, mo salah and roberto firmino took liverpool through, 5—1 overall. and what a shock there
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was in the other tie. barcelona are out. they had a 4—1 lead from the first leg of their quarter—final against roma, but the italian side overturned it to go through on the away goals rule. "debacle", "ridicule" and "fall of an empire" were some of the headlines in the spanish papers this morning. england's women won 2—0 away to bosnia and herzegovina, to go to the top of their world cup qualifying group. they were up against a very defensive side. you have heard the phrase "parking the bus"? well, manager gary neville said the home side parked three or four buses, but toni duggan and jodie taylor managed to score. northern ireland lost at home to norway. but scotland's campaign is back on track after they beat poland 3—o in paisley, to move into second place in their group, behind switzerland. back here at the commonwealth games, northern ireland are guaranteed
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at least a silver in the boxing, while england have an early medal in the diving. ben croucher rounds up all the action so far. when the weather on the gold coast is this good, head for the water. headfirst. alicia blagg and katherine torrance have only had about three weeks to prepare together. not perfect when you have together. not perfect when you have to test every tuck a twist, turn and tumble. still, as their solid routine captured a podium place, other more fancied countries took the headfirst mantra of it too literally all fell flat on their backs. we both haven't trained together. this is the only time we have been training, so we won't really expecting anything. and to come away with a silver medal is kind of like... oh, my god! we are happy, really happy. breezing into this morning's final was jack
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laugher. there was clear water between him and his rivals, but he has to reproduce it all again just after 10am, along with four other brits. such moves were a dream for linda pearson as a kid. she wanted to bea linda pearson as a kid. she wanted to be a journalist but found explosives instead. a bronze in the double tap has equalled scotland's rest tally at the commonwealth games. kristina o'hara has a shot for gold in the boxing ring. england we re for gold in the boxing ring. england were targeting another kiwi defeat on the netball court. they are rare commodities but trace tracey neville's side had turned full—time since the last games and you win would have them on top. the first time england have beat new zealand ona time england have beat new zealand on a commonwealth court. their record win sets up a saturday semi against either australia orjamaica. remember anna hursey, the 11—year—old table tennis sensation from wales? well, she won her first singles match here 4—o yesterday, but then lost by the same scoreline
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in the second round. so her games are now over, but no doubt she will be back again in four years' time. probably still going at the 2020 and following games. i willjump into the water, and i have to be careful because they have my sound pack on. but adam peaty, james guy, ben proud, congratulations. i didn't see the step! look before you get into the step! look before you get into the swimming pool in future. i have to get rather close. can you continue, sarah? you don't want to talk about me falling in the water. all the people watching are literally on the floor. i will hold it together, you don't have too. congratulations. tell us what it was
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like. some of the races have been so close when you touched the wall, and you got the gold medal. close when you touched the wall, and you got the gold medallj close when you touched the wall, and you got the gold medal. i knew i was in good stead to do quite well, fastest ra n k in good stead to do quite well, fastest rank is going into the meat and into the heat i was fastest, and the jamaican and into the heat i was fastest, and thejamaican girl swan and into the heat i was fastest, and the jamaican girl swan really well... inaudible. 0k, we the jamaican girl swan really well... inaudible. ok, we will stay on those pictures for a moment. if you didn't see it a second ago, mike is carrying on talking but we can't hear him because a moment ago mike fell into the water and his pack went in. he doesn't know we can't hear him now, but goodbye mike. it has been... it has not been dull. honestly, goodbye, mike. mike, i mean... if you were going to set that up, you might imagine that might happen, and it did happen live on actual national television. mike fell in the pool. we will compose
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ourselves, check everything is ok. what has happened is the mike has obviously got wet. and his audio pack so he can hear us has got wet. and there they are, all lined up, our fabulous swimmers. so what we need is calm, measured words. carol. thank you, charlie. well, this morning is a fairly cloudy, murky start to the day. some of us have rain and drizzle, and we carry on with that nagging easterly wind across parts of eastern scotland, and also north—east england. so for you it is going to feel cold today. you can see in the satellite picture a lot of cloud around. this area here has come from the near continent. interestingly, it produced over 16,000 lightning strikes across the far west, with germany, the netherlands, belgium, but as it crossed the north sea it weekend. there is not much in the way of wind, as you can see from the isobars, but we do have that wind
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across the east which will make it feel cold. again, across eastern scotla nd feel cold. again, across eastern scotland and north—east in that there will be a lot of cloud around, producing some spots of drizzle here and there. but through the morning we lose the rain from the south of england and wales. and as you can see in the chart there will be a lot of cloud left behind. the southern england, parts of north—west england, parts of north—west england, parts of northern ireland, western scotland and the far north of scotland, we should see some sunshine breaking through. and despite the temperatures you can see in the charts, we could get up to 16 celsius somewhere in the south. but still, only seven where we have the cloud and the wind coming in from the north sea. now, through the course of the evening and overnight there will still be a fair bit of cloud around. whether cloud remained roque and is where we will see the lowest temperatures, but it means we will not have any issues with frost. one or two showers but nothing too significant. so our overnight lows, fourin significant. so our overnight lows, four in aberdeen, two to about nine in london. spot the difference. if
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you like it cloudy this is the week for you, because there is a lot of it around. showers across parts of england and also wales. still storms coming in from the north sea and the wind making it feel cold across eastern scotland and north—east england. temperatures again tomorrow very similar to what we are looking at today, with some cloud breaks across north—west scotland. a beautiful week across many parts of north—west scotland in the northern isles. the friday, more rain coming our way, this time across northern england and scotland. most of that will be like that we could see the odd heavy bursts coming out of it. come south of that and it is another cloudy day. some showers dotted here and there but in the south we are looking at some sunshine. temperatures starting to climb. by the time yet to saturday, some rain across the far north—east, a fair bit of cloud but on saturday the cloud will break up more readily. so more of us will see some sunshine and asa more of us will see some sunshine and as a result the temperatures will scoot up to 18. similar
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conditions on sunday and the new working week the temperatures will continue to climb. by midweek some of us could be seen temperatures into the low 20s. what don't you want to do when you are about to interview five medal winning swimmers? fall into the pool winning swimmers? fall into the pool, mike did that but he has composed himself. i thought it was a little jacuzzi or a kids' pool, i was looking at the swimmers, distracted by the medals. we have heard from sarah, congratulations, let's speak to adam peaty, you defended your 100 and title but you we re defended your 100 and title but you were disappointed. you were crossed with yourself? obviously the 100 for me was a slow time —— 100 and title. awin isa a win is a win and a gold is a gold but at the same time i'm obsessed self—improvement and the performance and come to keough i can't afford to
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make a mistake like that. i'm disappointed with that —— come tokyo. or have to see where i went wrong. you have transformed the standards of the breaststroke, it shows how close the margins are, sometimes a fingernail —— i'll have to see. you win and lose races, like la st to see. you win and lose races, like last night, 0.09. it is literally that much, ridiculous. that is the thing, you live and learn, that is what i have done this week, have learned more these past few days than the last few years and that's the most important thing for me, come out here, keep learning, and in professional sport when you stop losing you are exposed and then you lose and i'm a firm believer in that. hopefully i can enjoy it and continue to learn over the next few years. i lost the enjoyment over the la st years. i lost the enjoyment over the last couple of months, took it too seriously when i was training around the group, around my teammates and i have to loosen up a bit and enjoy it
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and have a laugh. it's early in the season, where do the commonwealth games set for you, a different spirit because team england rather than team gb, does it make it extra special, you have the olympics and the world is in the bag already? being team england... it is easy to be scottish and welsh, you have an identity, when you are english it is like you are british. we can't get our kilts on or anything like that. it is good but obviously i love racing under the gb flag as well so when you come to the olympics we are all together anyway and that's our main focus. it is great to go with these guys and be under pressure from the australians last night but when it comes to when we are team gb, we will smash them.|j when it comes to when we are team gb, we will smash them. i love that. your grandmother has tweeted ? gb, we will smash them. i love that. your grandmother has tweeted?m gb, we will smash them. i love that. your grandmother has tweeted? it was her birthday the other day, the day i got gold. you have radio commitments but be careful as you get up, you don't want to go in for a second time. let's enjoy long and
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speak to siobhan, congratulations, what was going through your mind when you defended your title? really pleased. such an amazing event, the stadium is incredible. the australians have put on an amazing shows i really pleased to retain the title in the 200 medley. it gave me my confidence back again, which is great. you can see the team spirit, can you enjoy some of australia and the gold coast before you move on?|j think so, we have until the closing ceremony so think so, we have until the closing ceremony so hopefully we can enjoy ita ceremony so hopefully we can enjoy it a bit and see a bit of the gold coast, it's a beautiful place. i talking about close finishes, ben, you had the amazing finish last night but on the tv it looked like you had done it. what was going through your mind? obviously the team put me in a good position. i gaveit team put me in a good position. i gave it my best as far as i could but it's unfortunately not what i train for, the 100m. in the last five metres it was tunnel vision, my body and mind was out of it and my
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body and mind was out of it and my body took over. unfortunately i missed the touch but in situations like that you have to use it as fuel for the fire and in four years we will be stronger in birmingham. but you still have a gold! james guy, silvers and a bronze, do you put them in hand luggage? how do you reflect on your games? it was an ok games, i was trying to get seven medals, that was my target, the first day was a bronze, can't complain, but the rest of the week i was sick and i kept vomiting so not very nice. the butterfly, i felt so rough, but to get five medals, spectacular. and a day with mum and dad before the games started as well touring the hinterland. i am touching the walls so i don't go in again but congratulations, enjoy the rest of your time in australia and sorry about the spectacular dive. you can do much better dives like that at the start of your races! an absolute classic, mike, thanks very
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much, go and get a dry. restore your dignity and well done for carrying on. it's impossible! we're going to talk about our bills now. millions of us are facing bigger gas and electricity bills after british gas said it was putting up prices. steph‘s got more on this. british gas is the uk's biggest supplier of gas and electricity so whenever it puts up its prices it hits a lot of people. the energy provider has said that from the end of may it's standard tariff will rise by an average of 5.5%, that works out about £60 on the average dual fuel bill. 4.1 million people will be hit by this and it means the average annual dual—fuel bill is now £1,160. and it's the second price hike from british gas in eight months. so why are bills going up? claire osborne is from uswitch and shejoins me now. what is the reason british gas has
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given for why they put up prices ain? given for why they put up prices again? the reason they've given is the increase in policy costs and the increase in wholesale costs, but why is an important question to ask. this tariff is now £369 more than the cheapest deal in the market, and the cheapest deal in the market, and the price change is adding £246 million to the cost for households already struggling with energy bills. i think it's important to ask why and i think the energy minister yesterday came out and said they felt the reasons british gas had given were unjustified and it is fairto given were unjustified and it is fair to look at things like the introduction of a price cap and the way that is providing both incentive and also protection for british gas as competition reduces in that area and they suffer less from the threat of people leaving. they are saying they are paying more for the energy,
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they are paying more for the energy, the fact they have green taxes to pay for and the roll—out of smart metre is, that's the reason they are giving. do you think, given that affects all companies, we will see others increasing their prices? affects all companies, we will see others increasing their price57m affects all companies, and we see a pattern of companies rising their prices together, using the pr cover of one company having put their prices up so i think it's difficult to predict but i wouldn't be surprised if we didn't see more price rises. we already saw dion reduced the discounts on its standard variable tariff and those are the tariffs you want to get off. —— eon. those are what we should look out for. it is interesting, it annoys people when their bills go up, but looking at the money towards the bill, not much of it is profit. it's relatively small compared to other industries but looking at british gas and their results last year, it is significantly above what
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the competition and markets authority recommended. they lost 750,000 customers last time around and their profits were still rising so for customers, i would be upset, especially when there are such great alternatives out there. there are £369 cheaper products and better service and quite often renewable. taking ten minutes to compare and look around is really valuable. are we getting better at that? i have talked about that many times, people not switching. yes, we are seeing record man months of switching, we are seeing good green shoots in that area. with 60 energy companies in the market, there's so many great options so people are increasing in their confidence to make that choice and that's three important because consumers should be under no illusion the british gas standard variable tariff is a poor deal ——
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really important. you really should be comparing. interesting. thanks for your time this morning. i wouldn't get later with the results from tesco and 7am. —— i will be back later. —— at 7am. if you like getting lost in a good whodunnit, you're not the only one, crime fiction's now the most popular genre in the uk. we bought more than 18 million crime and thriller books last year. but what's behind their rising popularity? graham satchell investigates. a violent murder, a devastated family, and of investigation begins. —— an investigation. a truly great crime novel looks you in and plays with time. the suspense can make the world race by. at its most harrowing it can slow time to a stop. they ta ke it can slow time to a stop. they take us to the most darkest and
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traumatic areas of peoples lives. is someone being chased through an alleyway or a knock at the door and the police are telling you your child isn't coming home. those are just huge and very human situations. cath stink live is an award—winning writer, her latest book tells the story of the murder of a transgender girl. her novel isn'tjust whodunnits but a way to make sense of the world. whether it's trafficking or violence in the street or trans— phobia, you know, it's a way of looking at those sorts of issues and humanising them and testing out my own fears and nightmares as well. for the first time, crime novels are now more popular than any other form of fiction. 18.7 million crime and thriller novels were sold last year, up thriller novels were sold last year, up19% on thriller novels were sold last year, up 19% on 2015. what's going on? why is that person being secretive? what is that person being secretive? what
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is that person hiding? it does make you question people in reality a little bit more. so why has crime but come the most popular form of fiction? i love the mystery element of it, the suspense and the idea of a puzzle that is waiting to be solved. modern crime books a lot of the time now the women are the people who are the detectives. i imagine that what it's done is it has encouraged a lot more women to pick up the book and start reading what seems the traditional female literature. things aren't politically may be as calm as it has been over previous years and i think when you see a kind of politically unstable situation, maybe you get a rise in things like crime novels, horror films, where you're trying to contain that fear in something that's a bit more safe. whatever the reason, more and more of us it seems are reason, more and more of us it seems a re lost reason, more and more of us it seems are lost in the pages of dark worlds hoping perhaps for truth, justice,
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redemption. graham satchell, bbc news, manchester. on the theme of detectives... we've got a puzzle for you to try and solve this morning. we asked some book lovers to describe four famous fictional detectives in one word. but can you identify who they're talking about? take a look. perceptive. classic. stodgy. intellectual. lewis. clever. thoughtful. mysterious. victorian. inquisitive. addict. posh. sarcastic. sarcastic. tea. old. older. unexpected. shrewd. quirky. intriguing. moustache. belgian. intriguing. moustache. belgian. intriguing. moustache. some of those were immediately
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obvious. others not quite so much. we will play it again. if that all seems straightforward and you've solved the puzzle with no trouble whatsoever you can email us your answers at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk. and you can tweet us using #bbcbrea kfast. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. lots of other things on our social media sites, including something that happened in the last half an hour involving mike and the pool. not to be missed. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm katharine carpenter. motorcyclists in the capital have told bbc london they are having to police bike theft hotspots themselves to stop thieves stealing high value motorbikes and scooters. the metropolitan police say there's been a decrease in this type of theft since the beginning of the year and they're using new tactics to fight it. but the groups, who deny being vigilantes, say they've had enough. we all have great respect for the police, but the resources they have to combat motorcycle theft is zero to none.
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we've checked bike bays. we've seen a few bikes that have'nt got security on them, or not adequate security, so we're going to hang around and basically make our presence known. a woman from greenwich has thanked doctors at guy's and st thomas's woman in her 40s has been critically injured after falling from a ride at afunfair in injured after falling from a ride at a funfair in west london. it happened last night at phil box farm in cowley. police are still investigating the circumstances and the health and is safety executive has been informed —— health and safety. the brighton belle has taken passengers from victoria from the south coast until 1972. restoration of the carriages and art deco interiors has taken nine years but should be completed this autumn. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. delays and cancellations on c2c
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services following signal problems in the limehouse area. clockwise delays on the m25 following a collision afterjunction 94 leatherhead. delays back to junction 8 for reigate. in borehamwood the a1 barnett bypasses blocked northbound between the holiday intern and junction 23 for the m25 at south men's following an accident. let's have a check on the weather now with lucy martin. hello, good morning. it's a misty, murky start to the day today with a few patches of fog and we've also some early rain which will clear and gradually brightening up, bright intervals or sunny spells feeding in from the south. here's a look at the pressure charts, high pressure over scandinavia, low pressure in the south, we've got this easterly north—easterly wind. this morning a bit of a grey start, a few patches of mist and fog, early rain clearing to the west and a few showers after that and then gradually bright intervals and sunny spells spreading in from the south. the further north you are, always holding on to a bit more in the way of cloud,
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temperatures today a maximum of 14 and an easterly north—easterly wind. through the evening and overnight, a few clear spells to begin with but the cloud will tend to increase as we move through the night. perhaps the odd isolated shower and a few patches of mist and fog developing, temperatures falling to an overnight low of around eight or nine. as we move into tomorrow, a bit of a grey start to the day again, plenty of cloud around and the chance of seeing a shower, a few brighter intervals developing with temperatures a maximum of 16. a fairly cloudy start on friday, again the risk of a shower but brightening up with some sunny spells into the afternoon. and as we move to the end of the week and the weekend, we are going to see the temperatures rising with highs of 20 possible by tuesday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. don't bomb syria — russia warns the united states not to launch air strikes. but military action over the alleged chemical weapons attack seems one step closer, after deliberations
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at the un ended in a russian veto. good morning, it is wednesday 11 april. also this morning: has facebook‘s dream of connecting people become a privacy nightmare? mark zuckerberg faces a second day of questions over the misuse of users' data. we didn't take a broad enough view of our responsibility, and that was a big mistake. and it was my mistake, and i'm sorry. drugged and vulnerable — we hear concerns that too many people with learning disabilities in england are being medicated to control their behaviour. the uk's biggest supermarket, tesco, which employs nearly 500,000 people, is about to tell us how it did over the last year. i will have all the details shortly.
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and good morning from the gold coast on day seven of the commonwealth games, where england are celebrating winning a silver earlier on in the diving. also celebrating back home are liverpool fans after their side beat manchester city for a second time to reach the champions league semifinals at the etihad. and carol has the weather. good morning. cloudy, murky start to the day. there is some rain around, that will clear, and still cold in the north sea coastline. the best of the north sea coastline. the best of the brightness will be in the south and the far north—west. i will have all the details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: russia has urged the united states to hold back from carrying out military strikes in syria, in response to president assad's alleged chemical attack on a rebel town. moscow used its un security council veto to block a us resolution calling for an independent inquiry into saturday's attack.
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the prospect of air strikes has prompted the european air traffic control organisation, eurocontrol, to warn airlines of possible missile launches in the next 72 hours. here is our north america correspondent david willis. with a show of hands at the un, the security council failed to agree on a global response to the attack on douma, making the prospect of a military strike on syria all the more likely. america's call to set up an investigation was blocked by syria's closest ally, russia, to the frustration of other council members. britain's foreign secretary, boris johnson, tweeted: but russia's representative at the un urged the west to abandon plans for military action. translation: i would once again ask
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you, translation: i would once again ask you , once translation: i would once again ask you, once again beseech you, to refrain from the plan is that you are currently, currently developing for syria. but president trump has vowed to respond forcefully. we've had a number of conversations, both the president with president macron, prime minister may, and at various other levels, notjust with those countries but others at an administration level, and we're going to continue to work with a number of our partners and allies as we determine what the next best steps are. but as more displaced people were bussed out of douma, the big question was how should the west respond. the situation in syria is complicated by the presence of russian forces on the ground, and by the possibility that russia might choose to defend syrian airspace. the us has said it has a lot of options militarily, but they have to be carefully calibrated to avoid
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escalating the conflict. david willis, bbc news. we are joined now by our middle east correspondent martin patience, who is in beirut. we have been speaking to you over the last few days and it seems every day in some ways the situation gets more serious. it is more serious, and there is growing nervousness in the region. what we have heard thereabout perhaps america taking military action, the big question here is when is that going to come, and whether or not france as well as britain will be on board. the other question is how big would any possible military response be? what we saw a year ago was a limited strike, but as time goes on, more people are becoming more worried that what we are potentially going to see is a wider strike hitting large areas across syria, perhaps military infrastructure, perhaps airfields. and the danger of that is
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that it could perhaps draw a response from russia. russia has been very strong on this issue, warning that any military adventure by america would be very dangerous indeed. thank you very much indeed, and later on breakfast we will speak toa and later on breakfast we will speak to a former head of the british army about that as well. facebook‘s founder, mark zuckerberg, will face a second day of questioning by us politicians about his company's handling of personal information. he spent five hours being interrogated by senators in washington yesterday, following a data breach affecting 87 million users. here is our technology reporter dave lee. mark zuckerberg's first ever appearance in congress was a five—hour slog, as senators, 43 of them, grilled the 33—year—old about the slew of scandals facing his social network. we didn't take a broad enough view of our responsibility. and that was a big mistake, and it
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was my mistake, and i'm sorry. i started facebook i run it, and i'm responsible for what happens here. let me just cut to the chase... it began with questions about cambridge analytica, the firm that is alleged to have fraudulently obtained data on around 87 million facebook users — something it denies. mr zuckerberg's goal in coming here was to assure senators he could guide facebook out of the mess it has found itself in, and that it is capable of handling data. mr zuckerberg, would you be comfortable sharing the name of the hotel you've stayed in last night? uh...no. i think that might be what this is all about. he said it would be more difficult in future to spread misinformation on facebook, but again apologised for being caught mostly unawares when the russians targeted
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the platform in 2016. we expected them to do a number of more traditional cyber attacks, which we did identify, and notify the campaigns that they were trying to hack into them. but we were slow to identify the type of new information operations. mr zuckerberg made some interesting concessions. notably, he said that members of this team had been interviewed by the office for special counsel robert mueller, in his ongoing investigation into russian meddling, and also mr zuckerberg didn't rule out the possibility that facebook would one day be a paid service, although he did say there would always be a free version of the site available to users. dave lee, bbc news, in washington. the health regulator says it has found that nearly a third of private hospitals in england require improvement. the care quality commission said most private hospitals provide high—quality care, but its inspectors identified concerns over the safety and leadership of some services. the nhs partners network, which represents private providers,
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said more than half had improved their ratings after follow—up inspections. flowers left near to the site where a burglar was stabbed to death have been branded as an insult. floral tributes and balloons for henry vincent have been repeatedly attached and removed from a fence opposite a home in hither green, in south—east london, where he was killed. 78—year—old richard osborn—brooks was initially held on suspicion of murder, but released without charge. in the last few minutes tesco, the uk's biggest supermarket chain, has published its annual results. steph is here with more. yes, their full—year results, yes, theirfull—year results, and they have skyrocketed. it is a real turnaround story but i think we forget sometimes how big tesco is and has been for a long time. we talk a lot about aldi and lidl doing well, but they are nothing like the
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size of tesco. tesco has 28% of the market, so it £1 in every £4 we spend on groceries goes to tesco. they have been hit by problems. i have talked for a long time about the accounting scandal, where they overstated their profits. that really hit them hard, wiping £2 billion from their share price at the time, various managers got into trouble for it. they have also been hit the rising cost of food that a lot of supermarkets have been hit by, and the fact that the discounters have slowly been eating away at their market share. today things are definitely looking much better for them. things are definitely looking much betterfor them. their things are definitely looking much better for them. their sales are up 2.296, better for them. their sales are up 2.2%, that is when you compare the same shops, like—for—like sales as we call it in the uk. and they have been on a turnaround plan, as well. it has been a big thing for them to try and bring down their debts, cut icons spending, and that is what they seem to be doing. finally working. thank you. for a man whose multibillion—dollar business was built on encouraging us to tell others our thoughts
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and feelings, mark zuckerberg looked decidedly uncomfortable when answering questions from us senators yesterday. he was in front of a committee to say what facebook will be doing to protect our privacy after the cambridge analytica scandal. questions lasted for five hours, with one particularly revealing moment, when mark zuckerberg was unwilling to disclose his own personal information. would you be comfortable sharing with us the name of the hotel you've stayed in last night? um... no. if you have messaged anybody this week, would you share with us the names of the people you have messaged? senator, no, iwould probably not choose to do that here. senator, no, iwould probably not choose to do that herelj senator, no, iwould probably not choose to do that here. i think that maybe what this is all about. your right to privacy, the limits of your
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right to privacy, the limits of your right to privacy, and how much you give away in modern america in the name of, quote, connecting people around the world. a question basically of what information facebook is collecting, who they are sending it to, and whether they ever asked me in advance my permission to do that. is that a fair thing for a user of facebook to expect? so many questions asked, and some of them answered. jamie bartlett is a journalist who specialises in the political impact of social media. first of all, i suppose the question is what did you make of what he had to say? well, he was obviously suitably contrite about it. it was in parta suitably contrite about it. it was in part a pr exercise, damage limitation. but i think the general tone was a company that accepts it has far more responsibility than it once thought, that it is going to be more proactive in trying to resolve some of the problems that happen on the platform, using more artificial intelligence to try and identify and
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misinformation, policing more heavily the hate speech that takes place, but stepping away slightly still from the possibility of legal changes, of formal legal regulation. watching the ebb and flow of the questions, it is interesting that some areas it was much more co mforta ble some areas it was much more comfortable with, going back over the history of his product. the invention itself, what it is for, the ethos. the areas where he was least comfortable were on some of the specifics, for example about cambridge analytica, the questions about whether he knew when the data had been deleted, had been deleted at all? did he know for sure? and off in his response in those questions about specifics about people's data was it should have been deleted, we should have asked those questions. now, given the scrutiny he is under and the big issues at stake here, was at ok to say that? is that enough, for the boss to say that? it is a difficult
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one, that. because on the one hand it is such a big company that one person can't be across every single thing that happens on the platform. and i think there are still some u na nswered and i think there are still some unanswered questions, and it can be very, very technical. when you are trying to figure out exactly how particular data was taken and used and shared and who has it now, it is very ha rd to and shared and who has it now, it is very hard to follow that data trail. and one thing you properly noticed watching it was the number of times he said! watching it was the number of times he said i will let my team get back to you later. there were clearly a lot of areas where he wasn't sure about the details, and he has a big tea m about the details, and he has a big team which will look into it and provide the senators with the information they need. let's talk about the two things going on here, the possible impact on democracy, which he addressed in some ways, and also on personal privacy. do you think there will be changes made, and who is in charge? is it facebook do other people using facebook response that is, what do you think? this question about data and
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personal privacy has become so important and it's notjust the cambridge analytica stuff, it's broader than that. the big question here is whether there needs to be a change in the law in america. this is about the us, might be slightly different in the uk, we have laws coming up soon. whether there needs to bea coming up soon. whether there needs to be a formal law that protects user privacy on data. there are things on facebook and other platforms. i think the senators and the political mood is towards more regulation, citizens have the right to data protection, for example. there are questions about the things you sign up to, either knowingly or otherwise, when you go on facebook in this case, but other social media too. is there any way round that? it seems accepted that if you go on there, to a degree, your information is out there that. i think this is the big question of all. it's about the big question of all. it's about the relationship between the services we use and what we get
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in... the deal that we sign up to. i've got a book coming out soon about this question, called the eagles versus tech, out next week, and there's a great tension at the heart of democracy —— the eagles. there's all these companies that operate on the same model. your data in exchange for free services —— the people. we have all signed up to that but in many ways that harms democracy because we lose control over our personal information. the basic business model is your attention in exchange for free services, and that can mean serving you up things that aren't helpful for democracy but there's no easy way out. on that, zuckerberg hasn't ruled out, and he was questioned about it quite a bit yesterday, the idea of a paid version of facebook with presumably different parameters? he didn't rule it out and that was really interesting but
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he did say there would always be a free version. as more people get worried about data, and we will see more people trying to prevent their data being shared, the business model of facebook might have to slightly change and you might have something where some of it is paid for and you don't give up your personal information, but some of it for some people is still free and they will willingly enter into that agreement that my data is what i give in exchange for a free service. one last thought, were the wrong people asking the questions? some people asking the questions? some people have said some of these interviewers didn't really appear to know anything about it. it was a really mixed bag, wasn't it? ifelt some of the questions were really sophisticated and on point and you could tell when he was struggling... some of the senators, i'm afraid, demonstrated a real lack of knowledge about how facebook works. that's important because we need politicians who understand this technology so they can better hold
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it to account. good to talk to you, this is a conversation that will continue. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. this morning it's a fairly cloudy, murky, damp start to the day for some, we have rain that will clear to the west as we go through the next couple of hours. it will still be cold along the east coast. you can see on the radar picture the bright lights are the street lights, all the rain that's been coming into southern counties of england, the midlands and wales generally this morning, that will carry on and push away into the atla ntic carry on and push away into the atlantic in the next few hours. also from the spacing of the isobars you can see it's not really breezy, the strongest breeze will come from the north sea, it's an easterly, draw the east coast of scotland and the north—east coast of england it will bea north—east coast of england it will be a cloudy day with drizzle in the north and feeling cold. for the rest, a cloudy day. cloudy showers or the midlands through the day, the
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brighter skies in southern england, into the channel islands, north—west england, western and northern scotla nd england, western and northern scotland and later in the day we could see brightness in north—east of northern ireland. temperatures despite what you can see on the charts could get up to 16 in the sunshine, especially in the south today, but feeling cold elsewhere. our maximum in aberdeen and newcastle, only seven. through the evening and overnight, a fair bit of cloud around and where the cloud remains broken, that's where we'll have the lowest temperatures but even so we're not expecting issues with frost. also showers dotted around coming in across england, wales and northern ireland at times. the temperature range, 4—9. tomorrow once again we start with all this cloud, if cloud is your bag then you're in for a treat because there's a lot around this week. further showers in england, wales and northern ireland and some breaks in the cloud, again particularly in northern and north—western scotland, including the islands. beautiful
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sunshine to look forward to here with temperatures in stornaway up to about 12 and we could see cloud brea ks about 12 and we could see cloud breaks in the south through the latter pa rt breaks in the south through the latter part of the day. generally again down the east coast with a nagging easterly wind it will feel cold, with showers or drizzle coming out of the lower cloud here. by friday, more rain coming in across northern england and scotland. most of it will be light but we could see the odd heavy burst and as you can see in the charts, once again, there will be a lot of cloud around. likely to break in southern parts of england into east anglia, temperatures here could get up to 17 in any prolonged sunshine, but the temperatures are set to rise by the time we get to saturday, although it will start a cloudy day with rain, in the north—east of scotland, the cloud will more readily breakup and more will seize onjoint. cloud will more readily breakup and more will seize on joint. we could see a few showers dotted here and there —— more will see sunshine. hit and miss but temperatures rising. 18 likely in parts of the south—east,
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12, 13 and likely in parts of the south—east, 12,13 and 14 as we go further north. sunday will be a day of sunshine and showers, similar temperatures to saturday, but as we go through the early part of next week the temperatures will rise once again. i've been hearing that good news and that's what i'm taking away from the broadcast at the moment. carol, thank you! every day thousands of people in england, who are living with learning disabilities or autism, are given medication they don't need, just to control their behaviour. that's in spite of an nhs pledge to stop the misuse of such treatment, known as psycho—tropics. that campaign's now being extended, but charities representing those most at risk say progress is too slow, as breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has been finding out. most of the times i see stephen he's totally catatonic. he started jumping on tables, saying he wants to pull his teeth out, saying he wants to pull his hair out. two families describe the impact of psychotropic drugs on their sons, drugs designed to treat specific conditions but too often given
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to people with autism and learning difficulties who don't have those conditions, drugs that are sometimes referred to as a chemical cosh. see, that's not a life. leo's son, stephen, lives a six—hour round trip away from his family and while here he's had his collarbone broken in an incident investigated by police. a carer was sacked. ever since, stephen has increasingly self harmed, tried to harm others, and in response, he's faced more restraint and more medication. no—one seems to be understanding that it's his way of showing how hurt he is. i'm anxious, i'm sad. are you scared? i'm scared. and when i see him crying, he will scream, "mummy, no go, mummy, no go." it absoloutely breaks my heart. the priory group tell us restraint is always a last resort and they always aim to reduce
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medications to the lowest possible doses to keep people safe. two years ago a study found as many as 35,000 people with learning difficulties were being given psychotropic medication every day. in response, nhs england launched stomp, a campaign to stop over—medication. someone with a learning difficulty can't always express what's going on for them and what might happen will come out in their behaviour, and then the response that's needed is understanding. the campaign extends later this month. they're also collecting new data on those being medicated. but charities have raised concerns. they say progress is too slow, that the data being gathered is nowhere near wide enough. and that is an area that does need addressing? and you would like to see this data collection for all people with learning difficulties? that would be fantastic, yes. the aim of this is to improve lives but also prevent premature deaths. so make sure you do it...
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oliver mcgowan was a talented sportsman who had autism and epilepsy, but antipsychotics given in the past had made him worse, not better. in october, 2016 he was taken to hospital in bristol after seizures. he was extremely agitated. page after page of oliver's care notes in hospital show his intolerance to these drugs, yet doctors still prescribed. there's no consideration of his autism. it's awful because for a mom to turn around and say, "i told you so, i told you so." we both told them so, and he's not here. a postmortem found a contributing factor in oliver's death was mms, a reaction to antipsychotics. the hospital said staff were deeply saddened and, "while we maintain support of the treatment we provided, we are committed to how we care for people with learning difficulties." an inquest begins next week.
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there's no doubt in some instances these drugs are necessary but in others the need for them could be removed with far greater understanding of learning difficulties and autism. jayne joins us now on the sofa. those words, we told you so and he's not here from a grieving family, that cuts to the chase, they don't think drugs is the answer to the challenges. let me say, it's for the coroner next week to decide what happened with oliver and whether anything could have been done differently, we can't call that. but you're right, it's the main aim of stoimp, and they are doing good work to raise awareness among health professionals to say drugs can be avoided if you get the care right —— stomp. sometimes they are needed, they aren't bad in themselves, but
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if they're being used in a way that isn't on the box, if you get the ca re isn't on the box, if you get the care right it shouldn't be necessary. this is why the challenging behaviourfoundation necessary. this is why the challenging behaviour foundation and mencap say it is grew sure to go hand—in—hand with stomp and you have the care right on the ground. here are two important statistics. there's been an almost 40% drop in specialist nursing since 2010 and a 70% drop in community care staff for people with learning disabilities and this needs action and is being reviewed. i have to say this broader issue of medication is being looked at not just issue of medication is being looked at notjust in england, in scotland they are gathering data, wales are doing a review, northern ireland are thinking of doing their own stomp campaign. but on twitter this morning families are concerned. if they are concerned, don't do anything without taking medical advice, don'tjust anything without taking medical advice, don't just taking anything without taking medical advice, don'tjust taking the drugs but get help and advice and you can
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point people in the right direction. thanks very much. desperate to hear from those families. and if you've been affected by anything raised in this story, details of organisations offering information and support are available at bbc.co.uk/actionline. lots of information for you there. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm katherine carpenter. a group of motorcyclists say they're having to police the capital's bike theft hot spots themselves to stop thieves stealing high value motorbikes and scooters. the met says it's been using new tactics to fight this type of theft and it's gone down since the beginning of the year, but the bikers say that's not enough. we all have great respect for the police, but the resources they have to combat motorcycle theft is zero to none. we've checked bike bays. we've seen a few bikes that have'nt got security on them, or not adequate security, so we're going to hang around and basically make our presence known. a woman in her 40s has
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been critically injured after falling from a fairground ride in west london. it happened last night at philpot‘s farm in cowley. police are still investigating the circumstances and the health and safety executive has been informed. a train once advertised as the most luxurious in the world is finally being brought back to life after a long campaign. the brighton belle took passengers from victoria to the south coast until 1972. restoration of the carriages and art deco interiors has taken nine years but should be completed this autumn. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tube this morning. on the trains there are delays and cancellations on c2c services following signal problems in the limehouse area. on the roads there's been an accident on wandsworth high street near the town hall. it's causing delays westbound on the a3 back through wandsworth common onto battersea rise.
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there are clockwise delays on the m25 from j8 for reigate towards j9 leatherhead following an earlier collision. in borehamwood, the a1 barnet by—pass is slow northbound heading towards elstree lane at the holiday inn turn following an accident earlier. let's have a check on the weather now with lucy martin. hello, good morning. it's a misty, murky start to the day today with a few patches of fog and we've also some early rain which will clear and gradually brightening up, bright intervals or sunny spells feeding in from the south. here's a look at the pressure charts, high pressure over scandinavia, low pressure in the south, we've got this easterly north—easterly wind. this morning a bit of a grey start, a few patches of mist and fog, early rain clearing to the west and a few showers after that and then gradually bright intervals and sunny spells spreading in from the south. the further north you are, always holding on to a bit more in the way of cloud, temperatures today a maximum of 14 and an easterly north—easterly wind. through the evening and overnight, a few clear spells to begin with but the cloud will tend to increase as we move through the night.
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perhaps the odd isolated shower and a few patches of mist and fog developing, temperatures falling to an overnight low of around eight or nine. as we move into tomorrow, a bit of a grey start to the day again, plenty of cloud around and the chance of seeing a shower, a few brighter intervals developing with temperatures a maximum of 16. a fairly cloudy start on friday, again the risk of a shower but brightening up with some sunny spells into the afternoon. and as we move to the end of the week and the weekend, we are going to see the temperatures rising with highs of 20 possible by tuesday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. russia has urged the united states to hold back from carrying out military strikes in syria in response to president assad's alleged chemical attack on a rebel town.
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moscow used its un security council veto to block a us resolution calling for an independent inquiry into saturday's attack. the prospect of air strikes has prompted the european air traffic control organisation, eurocontrol, to warn airlines of possible missile launches in the next 72 hours. translation: i would once again ask you, once again beseech you, to refrain from the plan is that you are currently, currently developing for syria. the founder of facebook, mark zuckerberg, will face a second day of questioning by us politicians about his company's handling of personal information. mr zuckerberg spent five hours being grilled by senators in washington yesterday. 87 million users had their personal information accessed in a data breach involving the consultancy firm cambridge analytica, which denies any wrongdoing. we did take action.
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we took down the app, and we demanded that both the apps developer and cambridge analytica delete and stop using any data that they had. they told us they did this. in retrospect, it was clearly a mistake to believe them. tescos, the uk's biggest supermarket, has reported a pre—tax profit of £1.3 billion this morning. that is up from £145 million last year. it said its fresh food business had helped increase sales across the uk. the health regulator says it has found that nearly a third of private hospitals in england require improvement. the care quality commission said most private hospitals provide high—quality care, but its inspectors identified concerns over the safety and leadership of some services. the nhs partners network, which represents private providers, said more than half had improved their ratings after follow—up inspections. a council in west london has become the first in the country to ban protesters from standing outside an abortion clinic. councillors in ealing voted unaninmously to introduce a protest—free safe zone around the site, following complaints that
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women were being intimidated as they tried to enter. the decision means both anti—abortion and pro—choice campaigners cannot stand within1oo metres of the clinic. the abortion charity marie stopes described it as a landmark decision for women. flowers left near to the site where a burglar was stabbed to death have been branded as an insult. floral tributes and balloons for henry vincent have been repeatedly attached and removed from a fence opposite a home in hither green, in south—east london, where he was killed. 78—year—old richard osborn—brooks was initially held on suspicion of murder, but released without charge. an hour ago if you are watching bbc brea kfast, an hour ago if you are watching bbc breakfast, you have seen something that you weren't really expecting. mike has been making a splash. we
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will come to that in a few moments. before that, we will talk about the actual sport. good morning. it is all frenetic when we get to talk to the athletes. and what do cycling medallist do when their games are finished? they get involved in competitive sa ndcastle get involved in competitive sandcastle building, representing tea m sandcastle building, representing team scotland, and we will talk to them when they have finished making those very important sandcastles in a moment. the trouble is the sea is coming in and might wash them away. they are works of art, i think you will agree. a lot to round you are born, including a medalfor scotland in the last few minutes. all the action from here on the gold coast to come. but let's start with the champions league, and liverpool are through to the semi—finals after a night of drama at the etihad. they led manchester city 3—0 from the first leg. but they went behind last night afterjust two minutes, when gabrieljesus gave city hope of getting back into the tie.
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but, after pep guardiola was sent to the stands for questioning a disallowed goal, mo salah and roberto firmino took liverpool through 5—1 overall. so liverpool have reached their first champions league semi—finalfor 10 years. and this is what it meant to them afterwards. sadio mane posted this picture on social media of the dressing room after the game. and what a shock there was in the other tie. barcelona are out. they had a 4—1 lead from the first leg of their quarter—final against roma, but the italian side overturned it to go through on the away goals rule. "debacle", "ridicule" and "fall of an empire" were some of the headlines in the spanish papers this morning. england's women won 2—0 away to bosnia and herzegovina, to go to the top of their world cup qualifying group. they were up against a very defensive side. you have heard the phrase "parking the bus"? well, manager gary neville said the home side parked three or four buses, but toni duggan and jodie taylor managed to score. northern ireland lost
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at home to norway. but scotland's campaign is back on track after they beat poland 3—o in paisley, to move into second place in their group, behind switzerland. david mcmath has taken gold for scotland in the double trap. mcmath is a 21—year—old civil engineering student, and came tenth in the world championships last year. tim neal of the isle of man got silver, theirfirst medal of these games. back here at the commonwealth games, northern ireland are guaranteed at least a silver in the boxing, while england have an early medal in the diving. ben croucher rounds up all the action so far. when the weather on the gold coast is this good, head for the water — head—first.
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alicia blagg and katherine torrance have only had about three weeks to prepare together. not perfect when you have to test every tuck, twist, turn and tumble. still, as their solid routine captured a podium place, other more fancied countries took the head—first mantra of it too literally, or fell flat on their backs. we both haven't trained together. iam i am still in miami, she is in leeds. this is the only time we've been training, so we weren't really expecting anything. and to come away with a silver medal is kind of like — oh, my god! we're happy, really happy. breezing into this morning's final was jack laugher. defending his individual title, there was clear water between him and his rivals. but he has to reproduce it all again just after 10:00am, along with four other brits. such moves were a dream for linda pearson as a kid. she wanted to be a gymnast, but found an explosive sport
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instead. her bronze in the double tap has equalled scotland's best tally at a commonwealth games. kristina o'hara has a shot for gold in the boxing ring. she will go for gold in the women's flyweig ht she will go for gold in the women's flyweight final. england were targeting another kiwi defeat on the netball court. they are rare commodities, but tracey neville's side have turned full—time since the last games, and a win would have them on the podium. the first time england have beat new zealand on a commonwealth court. their record win sets up a saturday semi against either australia orjamaica. so on the beach here, after making their sandcastles, let's have a look at your creations. who won the sa ndcastle at your creations. who won the sandcastle making competition? well, it was a team effort. of course. i think everyone contributed. john has
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done a lovelyjob. and the housing development for caty is lovely. and congratulations on your gold early in the game is. what did it mean, in front of the aussie crowd? yes, it was an australian two, three and four. it was very special, the conditions were fantastic in the velodrome. and just to do it all on the one day. and the individual pursuit is not an olympic sport, so this is special. it is, and team england won it last time around in glasgow. it feels nice to continue on that trend. we didn't have any of the home nations in the team pursuit, so kind of shows the aussie dominance, that they can occupy every other place. was that the plan
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to give her a head start and slowly real her in? yes, so they will go off what your planned schedule is and in the last kilometre... i almost don't want to know when i am down. people think it will give you that kick, but i would rather go faster when i am winning. and followed up byjohn, and how special was that to see the result? it was a shock for me, a big personal best for me on the day. i got the gold, and yes, it was a spectacular day. how much has it helped you getting into the sport? you have only recently ta ken into the sport? you have only recently taken it up, and having such a successful sister? it is a big motivator. we had the same scenario in the british championships early in the year when we turned up, and one medals in the british championships. it is also
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crazy the support you get back home. a lot of people up early watching these races, and lots of feedback and support from them. it makes it a special event. it was an amazing story. what made you give up your job and follow your sister?” story. what made you give up your job and follow your sister? i walked into it by accident. i had been swimming competitively for a long time, and saw occasional success. it wasn't what drove me into the sport, but i started doing some local races asa but i started doing some local races as a hobby and it progressed from there to the point where i saw that there to the point where i saw that the pursuit was something that physiologically i thought i would be good at. and it is interesting him being new and the sport. but we have been riding bikes since we were tiny tots, he wasjust been riding bikes since we were tiny tots, he was just slow to be competitive about it. congratulations on winning the gold, and yourface congratulations on winning the gold, and your face is congratulations on winning the gold, and yourface is one congratulations on winning the gold, and your face is one of the congratulations on winning the gold, and yourface is one of the iconic images shared on social media. what was going through your mind? there wasn't a lot going through my mind.
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my wasn't a lot going through my mind. my head fell off with a few laps to go. it was all heart and lungs. i can't really remember much of the end of it, to be honest. as it is one of the most gruelling physical... talk us through the pain you had to go through, because it is so tactical. well, these guys were stealing the thunder, so i thought i would switch my attention to the points race, and it worked out. i am standing on the beach with his absolute celebrities, so i have done 0k. it absolute celebrities, so i have done ok. it was a hard race and we knew going in that it would be a hard race. we expected the aussies to give us a bit of a kicking, and for some reason i thought i willjust make it hard for myself. and it worked, so somehow it worked. and hearing the scottish anthem, what was that like, with so many people watching back home? was that like, with so many people watching back home ?|j was that like, with so many people watching back home? i wish i was in a better condition and could enjoy ita a better condition and could enjoy it a bit more, because i was still let it gone, to be honest. but it was nice. enjoyed a medals, and thank you forjoining us. you had better build a bit of a wall between
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the sea in the sandcastles, because i think there might be washed away pretty shortly. i will give them a hand. and we can't really let you know without. .. many hand. and we can't really let you know without... many of hand. and we can't really let you know without. .. many of you hand. and we can't really let you know without... many of you saw hand. and we can't really let you know without. .. many of you saw this a little bit earlier, but for those of you who didn't... mike took a bit of a tumble while interviewing members of team england's commonwealth swimming team earlier. here it is again. congratulations. i didn't see the step! sorry about that. that has given you all a good laugh. i was inconsolable that. what before you get into a swimming pool in the future. we believe that, but are you drive now? i am dry now, and adam peaty kept telling me afterwards that i had carried on speaking as if nothing had happened. that was what tickled him so much. as if i will just carry on, but i then i u nfortu nately had just carry on, but i then i unfortunately had to apologise to the cameraman or getting his
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microphone wet. of course i will pay for any damage. he is drying out, and you dry out pretty quickly in these conditions because of the window in the sunshine. so it is all fine apart from the humiliation and damage to pride. oh no! the sea is coming in. ishould have damage to pride. oh no! the sea is coming in. i should have helped them. and i think we willjust get everybody out of the sea, because you are not meant to swim in the spit. this is a dangerous bit. i am not getting wet again.|j spit. this is a dangerous bit. i am not getting wet again. i have a sense, the first time i saw you this morning, knowing you as i do, when i saw your hawaii 5—o shirt i had a hunch something might happen. well, we didn't know we would be by the swimming pool until the last in it. the swimmers got stuck in traffic so the first place we could get two was the first place we could get two was the swimming pool. so it was very last minute, that is my excuse. i didn't have time to study the contours and the depth of that
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swimming pool orjacuzzi or contours and the depth of that swimming pool or jacuzzi or whatever it was. sometimes when you are in sand you have to stop digging. it was. sometimes when you are in sand you have to stop digginglj will give you that one. many of you saw this earlier, but for those of you who didn't, or for those of you who'd quite like to see it again, mike took a bit of a tumble while interviewing members these things happen, you know what it feels like. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. what a trooper, well done for carrying on! the weather is the same as the last couple of days and will have in the next couple of days, cloudy for many parts. we have rain in southern parts of england and south wales clearing, for some it will brighten up but we have had the rain through the night. there were over 16,000 lightning strikes in the far west of germany, the netherlands and belgium and as that system crossed the north sea into southern england, it weakened so we haven't seen the lining strikes but we have
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had fairly persistent rain. it will move away through the next couple of hours. the other persistent thing with the weather is we still have the nagging easterly wind across the east coast of scotland and north—east england. here too a lot of cloud, some fret and harp, with that combination it feels cold. the cloud cover across the rest of the uk, through the afternoon a few showers in central parts but for southern england, the channel islands, the north—west, western scotla nd islands, the north—west, western scotland and also northern and western isles, some sunshine once again today and in the sunshine, temperatures could get up to about 16. if you're in the wind, and the fog, we're looking at about seven as the maximum. through the evening and overnight we carry on with a lot of cloud, but the cloud remains broken causing lowest temperatures. not expecting much of a frost. they will bea expecting much of a frost. they will be a few showers here and there. generally our temperature range will
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be 4—9. tomorrow we start on a cloudy note, still some showers around, especially in parts of england, wales, some getting into northern ireland as well. again, the best of the weather likely to be in the north and north—west of the, including the islands. here we see some sunshine and temperatures in stornaway up to 12, but we could see some breaks developing in southern counties of england and the south—east and by then temperatures up south—east and by then temperatures up to 15 or16 south—east and by then temperatures up to 15 or 16 again, but still the nagging easterly wind. some showers and drizzle here with that as well. on friday, we've got rain coming in to northern england and scotland, most of it will be light but the odd heavy burst. another cloudy day. some breaks in the cloud across southern counties of england, perhaps into east anglia as well, but the rain moving across northern ireland and out of northern england and across scotland. in any prolonged sunshine we could have highs of 17. into the weekend and early pa rt highs of 17. into the weekend and early part of next week it will turn
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that bit warmer. thank you very much, see you later. tesco has results out this morning and its profits are up substantially. steph‘s got the latest. tesco is a huge retailer, the biggest in the uk, but it's been a tough few years for them. for lots of different reasons. interesting to see what happens when their share price opens at 8am. a few years ago tesco was regularly reporting huge profits. its record was nearly £4 billion back in 2012. but that all came to a halt in 2014 after an accounting scandal. tesco revealed it had mis—stated its profits, which led to an investigation by the serious fraud office. by 2015, tesco reported a pre—tax loss of £6.4 billion, the biggest loss suffered by a uk retailer. about £4 billion of that was down to the fall in property value of its uk stores, especially the out of town superstores. since then the boss dave lewis has stuck to a turnaround plan, he's sold off overseas divisions
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and cut 10,000 jobs, a lot of them in management. tesco employs about 300,000 people overall in the uk. this morning it has announced a pre—tax profit of £1.3 billion. let's talk to retail analyst bryan roberts. good morning, brian. morning. this is an interesting story but they will be pleased about the result today? solid set of numbers, driven by food, the core part of their business. it is easy to forget three yea rs business. it is easy to forget three years ago tesco was in trouble when dave lewis arrived, the basic in—store experience was appalling, lack of availability and staff and service and since then he has stuck to the basics, getting people onto the shop floor and making sure products are available and shoppers
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are responding favourably. lots of recent innovation in terms of own brand products and the big news over the last year has been the acquisition of booker and a lot of eyes a re acquisition of booker and a lot of eyes are on what dave lewis has in store for bringing those two businesses together. explain booker. for shoppers it is unfamiliar, it is a cash—and—carry business available to members, independent shopkeepers or restaurants, so there might be a bit more integration so that... in cambridge a store that has a mini booker in it, called chef's celek, open to the public so we could see more visible signs of integration —— select. but they will probably remain relatively separate. sometimes with tesco you can forget how big it is with 28% of market share and we often talk about aldi and lidl, but they are tiny. they
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are around 30% of the market. as an industry we are getting used to discounters doubling in size. they are doubling the number of stores they open each year, every time they open they take away market share from tesco. tesco has resigned itself to the fact there's big structural change on the more people shopping at discounters, along with the big four. it isn'tjust tax code. we shouldn't take away from a brilliant set of numbers from tesco, which is firmly back on the recovery —— just tesco. which is firmly back on the recovery -- just tesco. we've been talking about food prices going up, what does the future look like for the customer? tesco mentioned this morning it has worked hard with suppliers to keep a lid on inflation, collaborating with big suppliers to keep price rises to a minimum and taking some of that on the chin in terms of low profits for
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themselves. overall we're looking ahead to brexit and the cost pressures coming for non—food and food, it's likely we will see prices creeping up over time. we have seen some big hikes already in certain categories. hard to predict the future. of course, you would be a rich man if you could. but with brexit on the way... it is the uncertainty, isn't it? about the supermarkets and big suppliers are working hard to make sure we feel less pain. working hard to make sure we feel less pa i n. factory working hard to make sure we feel less pain. factory much. that's it from me for now. if you like getting lost in a good whodunnit you're not the only one as crime fiction's now the most popular genre in the uk. we bought more than 18 million crime and thriller books last year. but what's behind their rising popularity? graham satchell investigates. a violent murder, a devastated family, an investigation begins. a truly great crime novel looks you in and plays with time. the suspense can make the world race by. at its most harrowing it can slow time to a stop. they take us to the most darkest,
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most traumatic areas of peoples lives. someone being chased through an alleyway or a knock at the door and the police telling you your child isn't coming home. those are just huge and very human situations. cath staincliffe is an award—winning writer, her latest book tells the story of the murder of a transgender girl. her novel isn'tjust whodunnits but a way to make sense of the world. whether it's trafficking or violence in the street or transphobia, you know, it's a way of looking at those sort of issues and humanising them and testing out my own fears and nightmares as well. for the first time, crime novels are now more popular than any other form of fiction. 18.7 million crime and thriller novels were sold last year, up 19% on 2015.
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what's going on? why is that person being secretive? what is that person hiding? it does make you question people in reality a little bit more. so why has crime become the most popular form of fiction? i love the mystery element of it, the suspense and the idea of a puzzle that is waiting to be solved. modern crime books a lot of the time now the women are the people who are the detectives. i imagine that what it's done is it has encouraged a lot more women to pick up the book and stop reading what's been seen as traditional female literature. things aren't politically may be as calm as it has been over previous years and i think when you see a kind of politically unstable situation, maybe you get a rise in things like crime novels, horror films, where you're trying to contain that fear in something that's a bit more safe. whatever the reason,
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more and more of us it seems are lost in the pages of dark worlds hoping perhaps for truth, justice, redemption. graham satchell, bbc news, manchester. very moody piece. i love the film nor are very moody piece. i love the film norare in very moody piece. i love the film nor are in that. i love the crime fiction and the sense of anticipation. do you always guess who it is? mean either. -- me neither. coming up on breakfast: we'll chat to the inspirational clare lomas, who's paralysed from the chest down, and currently on course to complete the manchester marathon in nine days using a special bionic suit. she did the london marathon using a special bionic suit. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm katherine carpenter.
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a group of motorcyclists say they're having to police the capital's bike theft hot spots themselves to stop thieves stealing high value motorbikes and scooters. the met says it's been using new tactics to fight this type of theft and it's gone down since the beginning of the year, but the bikers say that's not enough. we all have great respect for the police, but the resources they have to combat motorcycle theft is zero to none. we've checked bike bays. we've seen a few bikes that have'nt got security on them, or not adequate security, so we're going to hang around and basically make our presence known. a woman in her 40s has been critically injured after falling from a fairground ride in west london. it happened last night at philpot‘s farm in cowley. police are still investigating the circumstances and the health and safety executive has been informed. a train once advertised as the most luxurious in the world is finally being brought back to life after a long campaign.
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the brighton belle took passengers from victoria to the south coast until 1972. restoration of the carriages and art deco interiors has taken nine years but should be completed this autumn. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tube this morning. on the trains, there are delays and cancellations on c2c services following signal problems in the limehouse area. on the roads, there's been an accident on wandsworth high street near the town hall. it's causing delays westbound on the a3 back through wandsworth common onto battersea rise. there are clockwise delays on the m25 towards j29 for the a127, following an earlier collision and southbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel northern approach is slow from the bow flyover following an earlier broken down lorry. let's have a check on the weather now with lucy martin. hello, good morning. it's a misty, murky start to the day today with a few patches of fog and we've also some early rain which will clear and gradually
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brightening up, bright intervals or sunny spells feeding in from the south. here's a look at the pressure charts, high pressure over scandinavia, low pressure in the south, we've got this easterly north—easterly wind. this morning a bit of a grey start, a few patches of mist and fog, early rain clearing to the west and a few showers after that and then gradually bright intervals and sunny spells spreading in from the south. the further north you are, always holding on to a bit more in the way of cloud, temperatures today a maximum of 14 and an easterly north—easterly wind. through the evening and overnight, a few clear spells to begin with but the cloud will tend to increase as we move through the night. perhaps the odd isolated shower and a few patches of mist and fog developing, temperatures falling to an overnight low of around eight or nine. as we move into tomorrow, a bit of a grey start to the day again, plenty of cloud around and the chance of seeing a shower, a few brighter intervals developing with temperatures a maximum of 16. a fairly cloudy start on friday, again the risk of a shower but brightening up with some sunny spells into the afternoon. and as we move to the end of the week and the weekend,
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we are going to see the temperatures rising with highs of 20 possible by tuesday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. don't bomb syria — russia warns the united states not to launch air strikes. but military action over the alleged chemical weapons attack seems one step closer after deliberations at the un ended in a russian veto. good morning, it's wednesday 11th april. also this morning: has facebook‘s dream of connecting people become a "privacy nightmare" ? mark zuckerberg faces a second day of questions over the misuse of users' data. we didn't take a broad enough view of our responsibility, and that was a big mistake. and it was my mistake, and i'm sorry. good morning.
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the uk's biggest supermarket tesco — which employs nearly half a million people — says it made £1.3 billion last year. this is quite a turnaround for the retailer — i'll be explaining why. good morning from the gold coast and the seventh day of the commonwealth games, as scotland celebrates shooting gold, and also pretty jubilant liverpool supporters after their team beat manchester city again, this time at the etihad, to convincingly put their team in the semifinals of the champions league. it doesn't seem to be doing very well fully you stop —— very well. you sure it is meant to like that?l walkabout. the queen gives sir david attenborough a tour of her garden. we will speak to the director of that programme. and carol has the weather. a cloudy murky start to the day. the
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rain left behind that will clear but a lot of cloud left behind. best of the breaks in the north and the south—west. more details in about 15. thanks, carol. good morning. first, our main story. russia has urged the united states to hold back from carrying out military strikes in syria, in response to president assad's alleged chemical attack on a rebel town. moscow used its un security council veto to block a us resolution calling for an independent inquiry into saturday's attack. the prospect of air strikes has prompted the european air traffic control organisation eurocontrol, to warn airlines of possible missile launches in the next 72 hours. david willis has more. with a show of hands at the un, the security council failed to agree on a global response to the attack on douma, making the prospect of a military strike on syria all the more likely. america's call to set up an investigation was blocked
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by syria's closest ally, russia, to the frustration of other council members. britain's foreign secretary, borisjohnson, tweeted: but russia's representative at the un urged the west to abandon plans for military action. translation: i would once again ask you, once again beseech you, to refrain from the plan is that you are currently, currently developing for syria. but president trump has vowed to respond forcefully. we've had a number of conversations, both the president with president macron, prime minister may, and at various other levels, not just with those countries but others at an administration level, and we're going to continue to work with a number of our partners and allies as we determine what the next best steps are. but as more displaced people were bussed out of douma, the big question was how should the west respond.
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the situation in syria is complicated by the presence of russian forces on the ground, and by the possibility that russia might choose to defend syrian airspace. the us has said it has a lot of options militarily, but they have to be carefully calibrated to avoid escalating the conflict. david willis, bbc news. we're joined now by our middle east correspondent, martin patience, who is in beirut. let's pick up that point about escalation, because we havejust heard from russia's ambassador to lebanon on. yes, he was speaking on tv late last night to the channel owned by his brother, the lebanese militia group operating in syria on the side of the syrian government and he put out very strong comments on that tv show. he warned that
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russia would shoot down any missiles fired into syria and he then went on to say they would even try to attack the sources from which these missiles were fired, suggesting they could perhaps go after aircraft carriers, or planes firing these rockets. i think these comments — it is not clear whether the ambassador is freelancing or whether this is the official position of the russian military, but it illustrates and underscores the dangers of any possible american action in syria, that it could prompt response from russia and you could have confrontation between these two world powers on the ground. martin patience, from beirut, thank you very much. facebook‘s founder, mark zuckerberg, will face a second day of questioning by us politicians about his company's handling of personal information. he spent five hours being grilled by senators in washington yesterday, following a data breach affecting 87 million users. here's our technology reporter, dave lee. mark zuckerberg's first ever
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appearance in congress was a five—hour slog, as senators, 43 of them, grilled the 33—year—old about the slew of scandals facing his social network. we didn't take a broad enough view of our responsibility. and that was a big mistake, and it was my mistake, and i'm sorry. i started facebook, i run it, and i'm responsible for what happens here. let me just cut to the chase... it began with questions about cambridge analytica, the firm that is alleged to have fraudulently obtained data on around 87 million facebook users — something it denies. mr zuckerberg's goal in coming here was to assure senators he could guide facebook out of the mess it has found itself in, without seemingly inevitable regulations on handling data. mr zuckerberg, would you be comfortable sharing the name of the hotel you stayed in last night?
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uh...no. i think that might be what this is all about. as part of that effort he said it would be more difficult in future to spread misinformation on facebook, but again apologised for being caught mostly unawares when the russians targeted the platform in 2016. we expected them to do a number of more traditional cyber attacks, which we did identify, and notify the campaigns that they were trying to hack into them. but we were slow to identify the type of new information operations. mr zuckerberg made some interesting concessions. notably, he said that members of his team had been interviewed by the office for special counsel robert mueller, in his ongoing investigation into russian meddling. and also, mr zuckerberg didn't rule out the possibility that facebook would one day be a paid service, although he did say there would always be a free version of the site available to users. dave lee, bbc news, in washington.
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so many questions to ask still about that and we will speak about it in a few minutes. in the last hour tesco, the uk's biggest supermarket chain, has announced a substantial rise in profits. steph‘s here with more. it really is substantial, isn't it? yes, they announced they made £1.3 billion last year and there are sales are up as well. profits and sales are up as well. profits and sales up, but just sales are up as well. profits and sales up, butjust to give you the context, it has been a really tough time for them so over the last few yea rs time for them so over the last few years they have had problems, such as an accounting scandal where they overstated their profits so it ended up overstated their profits so it ended up with the serious fraud office investigation which cost them a lot of money. also, they have a lot of property and lost quite a bit of money because the value of that property fails all of those big out—of—town stores, and the way we shop was changing, so going a lot to do shopping online instead of one big shot, so they were making about
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£4 billion in profit, 2012, then they went through a really tough time where they ended up making a loss of £6 billion, so the reason this is good for them now is they are back up there, £1.3 billion, is not quite where they were back in 2012 but certainly going up again and that is reflected in the share price this morning which has gone up 396. price this morning which has gone up 3%. again, still not where it was in 2012, but certainly for the chief executive who came in at a time when it was a mess, for him the turnaround is starting to come through and it is seeing sales and profits go up as a result. quite a change. thank you, steph. the health regulator says it's found that nearly a third of private hospitals in england require improvement. the care quality commission said most private hospitals provide high quality care but its inspectors identified concerns over the safety and leadership of some services. the nhs partners network, which represents private providers, said more than half had improved their ratings after follow—up inspections.
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flowers left near to the site where a burglar was stabbed to death have been branded as an "insult". floral tributes and balloons for henry vincent have been repeatedly attached and removed from a fence opposite a home in hither green, in south—east london, where he was killed. 78—year—old richard osborn—brooks was initially held on suspicion of murder, but released without charge. a council in west london has become the first in the country to ban protesters from standing outside an abortion clinic. councillors in ealing voted to introduce a safe—zone around the site, following complaints that women were being intimidated as they tried to enter. it's being described by pro—choice campaigners as "a landmark decision" for women. jessica parker reports. calling on the council to set up a buffer zone outside a nearby west london abortion clinic. that is agreed, and we will... applause calls that were met in a unanimous decision by ealing council's cabinet.
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but passions on this issue run high. babies are going to die, because... campaigners now won't be allowed to do this within100m of the clinic. it is after vigils by anti—abortion processes led to complaints of intimidation — claims rejected by those who say women are being offered too few alternatives. isobel says she was helped by a campaigner who approached her as she went for an abortion. that led me to change my mind on getting this. i've got someone to support me, so i don't want to terminate my pregnancy anymore. but the council says the vigils were causing harm to the community. the new buffer zone has been welcomed also by the clinic. this will mean that our patients can come forward without fear of intimidation, without fear of being shamed, medically misinformed. but it also means it'sjust the start.
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the government is conducting its own review into this divisive issue. jessica parker, bbc news. 11 past eight. let's take you back to one of our main stories. you're watching bbc breakfast. mark zuckerberg looked decidedly uncomfortable when answering questions from us senators yesterday. he was in front of a committee to say what facebook will be doing to protect our privacy, after the cambridge analytica scandal. questions lasted for five hours. carole cadwallader is the observer journalist who broke the story about facebook and the british data firm. we can speak to her now. good morning to you. looking at that moment of that image in time. the image of that moment. someone who hasn't done a great deal of that kind of thing before, mark zuckerberg. i actually think that
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image is one of the most important things that has come out of the whole five hours of questioning yesterday. december olic. it shows facebook is actually no longer unaccountable. zuckerberg is being forced to answer questions, and that is the first time in its history where we have really seen that. let's drill down some of the detail, carole, or privacy. he seemed to fall back on the history of this book a lot, started in my dorm, the nature of that material, but he seemed to struggle with some of the detailed questions about what information had or had not been deleted and where it was now. yes, some very deleted and where it was now. yes, some very easy get out clauses, "my tea m some very easy get out clauses, "my team will come back to you, senator." so a lot of that and some really straightforward questions which he must really know the answer to. so that was very unsatisfying. on the other hand, there are more
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questions today, so i hope the next round two, maybe the next set of senators will have a chance to digestive things, but this has got to be just the digestive things, but this has got to bejust the beginning. there is so much more we need to know. my big beef, why is zuckerberg not coming to britain? three times he has been asked by the uk parliament to come and answer questions about the company's and answer questions about the compa ny‘s role and answer questions about the company's role in the referendum, fa ke company's role in the referendum, fake news, all the rest, and three times he has turned it down and i just really don't think that is good enough. carole, you mentioned there we re enough. carole, you mentioned there were questions you thought he had not been asked or hadn't been a nswered not been asked or hadn't been answered correctly, and i know you are deep into the story, but can you give the outsider‘s view about what areas we just haven't found out enough about yet? one question, he sent one of his senior executives to speak to the mpes to answer questions, from mps, about facebook
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and data. this executive was asked specifically, does cambridge analytica have facebook data? and he said, no, it doesn't, which is incredibly misleading, from six weeks ago, and nobody has answered about that. this question, it is one thing for zuckerberg to face questions in the us from us legislators, but facebook affects the entire world. there are 2 billion people globally now on its platform and the rest of us need a nswe rs platform and the rest of us need answers as well so this is a great start, here years, facing questions from congress, but what about the rest of us? my question. a lot of people have raised the issue is whether these were the appropriate people to take him to task, because there were several occasions and a degree of mirth in the room, whether that was appropriate or not, about the basic levels of knowledge that some of these interrogators had
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about the facebook product?” actually think that is brilliant. i think we need people who don't know about tech asking questions. for far too long it has been technologists asking questions of technologists. the fact there are now legislators who don't know all that much about the intranet, who are saying, actually we do need to know about this and we do need questions, and people are saying, oh, it is like your grandad asking questions about a vcr. good, that is exactly what we need. this affects everybody and needs to be open to everybody so i found that positive and encouraging. do you think we are any closer to establishing whether or not facebook broke any laws in relation to our data? people's data? by allowing it, unwittingly or whatever, to pass on to third parties? i don't think they've broken any laws. i don't think that is the issue. one thing i think that is the issue. one thing i
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think they facilitate, though, i think they facilitate, though, i think they facilitate lawbreaking, saw an example i will give is that there is a firm in canada, and they we re there is a firm in canada, and they were suspended from facebook last week because of their connection to cambridge analytica, that canadian company, aggregateiq, which played a pivotal role in the referendum. there are data, our data, it went through that firm. if those campaigns coordinated in any way, if that data was intermixed, that is against our laws. it has been very frustrating. the uk authorities have not been able to get to the bottom of this because it has all happened inside this closed box of facebook. facebook has the answers to this and thatis facebook has the answers to this and that is why it is really vital, as i said, that mark zuckerberg comes to britain and answers these questions,
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opens the platform and starts to give some of these answers. thank you very much for your time this morning. carole is one of the observer journalist in on morning. carole is one of the observerjournalist in on the original information being released about cambridge analytica. moron that the next days and he is due to be questioned again, as you mention, so more tomorrow “— be questioned again, as you mention, so more tomorrow —— more on that. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. floods next weekend but today temperatures could reach 16 in the south although —— that is next weekend, it should remain fairly cloudy along the north sea coast line especially eastern scotland and north east england we have low cloud and drizzle and an onshore wind so it feels chilly. but the rain across southern england counties will clear, it's been coming in from the near continent overnight but will push off in the direction of
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south—west england and south wales and in the next hours we will lose it all together. the rain across scotla nd it all together. the rain across scotland has already gone. you can see from the isobars it won't be windy, the strongest wind and easterly from the north sea which will accentuate the chilly feeling. we do start the day with rain across southern england and south wales and the midland pushing off to north sea and leaving cloud behind it, the cloud will be thick enough for drizzle and also showers developing across east anglia, the midlands through the afternoon. they will be some breaks in the cloud, the channel islands, southern counties of england, north—west england, also western scotland and the north including the islands. here, temperatures in the sunshine could reach 12, london could reach 16 but on the east coast we are looking at seven or eight at best. as we had through the evening and overnight will hang on to the cloud, where it brea ks will hang on to the cloud, where it breaks is where temperatures will be lowest, and once more we will see a
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field showers dotted around here and there. still nagging easterly wind, so temperature wise, four in aberdeen to about nine as we pushed down towards london. tomorrow, more of the same with a lot of cloud around, still some pesky showers coming in from the north sea, moving across england and wales, getting into northern ireland, some could put the south coast but generally speaking it will be dry for many, just cloudy with breaks across southern counties of england but the lion's share will be across the north and west of england including the islands. temperatures 16, still called in the wind around the north east coast of england and on friday we should see rain, most of it light with the odd heavy burst which will eventually push out of northern england through parts of northern ireland and scotland. and yes, friday will also be cloudy, temperatures in any sunshine coming out in the south up to about 17,
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that will be the exception, we are generally looking at around nine to 13. for saturday and other cloudy day for most, on saturday it looks very much like we could see breaks in the cloud developing, more of us will see sunshine with a couple of showers around and we'll have rain across the north—east of scotland. temperatures climbing up, we could see a team in the south—east on saturday and we are looking at 12 or 13, quitea saturday and we are looking at 12 or 13, quite a change to the south—east coast line by saturday. sunday, bright spots, sunshine and showers, similar temperatures, bright spots, sunshine and showers, similartemperatures, it's bright spots, sunshine and showers, similar temperatures, it's the early pa rt similar temperatures, it's the early part of next week into the middle of next week where some areas will see temperatures in the low 20s so if you like it a bit warmer that's something to look forward to. be prepared for a really inspiring story now. claire lomas was left paralysed from the chest down after a riding accident in 2007
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and since then she's completed the london marathon, the great north run, and has cycled 400—miles across britain. she is amazing. and now claire — who uses a bionic suit — is on course to complete the manchester marathon in nine days. we'll chat to her in a moment, but first, let's see some of her achievements. the marathon was tough, mentally exhausting. every step i had to focus on, the amount of times i looked at the map to see how far we had gone, i was going at a snail ‘s pace, i felt we had gone, i was going at a snail ‘s pace, ifelt we had done a mile and it hadn't been that far! allow! well done. really great job.
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well done. really greatjob. the clutch is slipping on the time! and on top of that i have to wear these things. and look like this! i hope we can get these off soon and get back to normal and start feeling a bit better. but look about support, you can't grumble. —— look at that support. how good is that! you can't grumble. —— look at that support. how good is thanm you can't grumble. —— look at that support. how good is that! it is good, claire is amazing. we can now speak to claire, who has reached the eight—mile point in the manchester marathon. lovely to see you, how are you doing? morning, i'm doing quite well, it always seems tough at this point into a challenge, the soreness and stiffness is kicking in that i am pleased with my progress so far. you are so inspirational, my goodness. tell us about your bionic
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suit, how does that help you? claire, iam suit, how does that help you? claire, i am not sure you heard suit, how does that help you? claire, iam not sure you heard me, i'll ask again, tell us about your bionic suit, can you hear me claire? how does it help you? oh, no. that's very disappointing. she is absolutely amazing. she is into the eight mile of the marathon, i think it is going to take claire nine days. can you hear me? she can't. i would love to go back to claire a little later. standing behind her, i will let them sort that out, it's a husband, dan, he helps her every step of the way because she is paralysed from the chest down so it's incredibly difficult, the suit helps to walk but he needs to be with her as well. a truly remarkable story. i can see they are trying to sort it out. there's something about
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microphones this morning! we had an issue earlier, the mike bushell moment. if you weren't familiar with it, mike is reporting on the commonwealth games for us. while we sort out this microphone lets see if we can show those pictures once more. let's set the scene. the microphone is the link. mike bushell was talking to an array of our best, north swimmers. he made the wise, or rather dangerous decision to do the interview in the pool without checking it! this is what happened. have to be careful because i've got a sound on but sarah vaizey, adam peaty, congratulations! sorry about that! that's giving you a good laugh. adam is inconsolable, look before you get into the pool in future. can you carry on, sarah? you
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don't want to talk about me falling in the water! everyone watching here is literally on the floor. congratulations. that was mike in his hawaiian shirt and shorts and also in the drink. as the second thomas in that clip and it gets funnier every time. let's go back to the bionic woman, claire. we lost you there, we were too busy looking at mike doing silly things. tell me about the bionic suit, how does it help you? yes, i first used it six yea rs help you? yes, i first used it six years ago. it has improved since then. this is a newer version of the suit. it straps a little better on me and the backpack is lower down so it isn't over my shoulders. so it's enabling me to walk the greater manchester marathon by shifting my pelvis with every step it senses where i am so it doesn't walk for me, i have to give it instructions every step. every bump as an obstacle. and the camber and using
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touches makes it more challenging but i am driven because it is helping to cure paralysis for the spinal injury foundation. you are doing such an amazing job. tell us about your assistant, it's your husband, dan. dam, my husband, is behind me. if! husband, dan. dam, my husband, is behind me. if i lose my balance or the clutch slips i don't fall flat on my face which i have done before. i have a great team with me. their generosity has been amazing, donations keep me going and it was very ha rd donations keep me going and it was very hard when i had my accident and it has devastated, i was a chiropractor and an event rider, i couldn't do it any more. i've found new things, i've got two little girls, iam new things, i've got two little girls, i am a motivational speaker and ado challengers. life hasn't stopped. i do feel lucky that i have the use of my arms, some people in hospital have neck injuries so i
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thought i would do what i could to help cure paralysis. it's not all about walking. when you have a spine injury you lose the use of most things below injury level, bowel and bladderfunction, i below injury level, bowel and bladder function, i can't feel the ground beneath me. it is hard to trust that my legs are there when i cannot even feel them. claire you're an absolute inspiration. thank you brother so much. i know that you will be setting off along the marathon route today. enjoy the day andi marathon route today. enjoy the day and i know you will get lots of support. thank you and thank you to down as well. thank you so much. see you. and they set off. a really inspiring story. absolutely. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello, this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. round two — the facebook boss gets ready for another grilling from us politicians after admitting his firm made mistakes over privacy. we're live from london, and that's
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our top story on wednesday the 11th of april. mark zuckerberg said he'd be open to the "right regulation" — without giving specifics. his performance added $17 billion to the company's market value. also in the programme: praise from president trump over china's market reform pledges. we'll have reaction from asia.
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