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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  April 11, 2018 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is outside source. president trump warns russia to get ready for missile strikes against syria, after an alleged chemical attack near damascus at the weekend. yulia skripal says she's still suffering from the effects of the nerve gas used against her and her father, and doesn't want help from the russian embassy. a military plane crash in algeria kills more than 250 people. more questions for facebook‘s mark zuckerberg as he admits he was also among the millions of users whose data was improperly shared with cambridge analytica. let's start with syria, and this tweet from the president of the united states. that was in response to this from russia's ambassador to lebanon.
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translation: if there is a strike by the americans, we point to declarations made by president putin and the russian military leadership that the missiles will be downs in an even the sources from which the missiles were fired. syria responded to donald trump's threats with this... russia's foreign ministry spokeswoman, maria zakharova. .. russia is syria's most important ally. at the un on tuesday, moscow blocked a us—backed un resolution to independently investigate the latest alleged chemical weapons attack. they also had their own un proposal
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for russian soldiers to escort scientists to the site vetoed. it's all of course because of this. you're likely to have seen these images. the aftermath of a suspected poison gas attack on the rebel—held town of douma at the weekend. russia says its soldiers examined the site and found no evidence of a chemical weapons attack. the world health organisation disputes that. it says around 500 people had been treated for "signs and symptoms consistent with exposure to toxic chemicals". here's a spokesman for the world health organisation in geneva. according to these reports, more than 70 people died during the shelling and more than a0 people of those who have been killed presented those who have been killed presented those symptoms that are consistent with the symptoms of exposure to toxic chemicals. international chemical weapons inspectors are still seeking assurances from damascus of safe passage to douma. meanwhile, civilians and fighters are fleeing the town. these are pictures of bus loads
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of evacuees heading north. after the attack, the last band of fighters struck a deal with the government to leave the area. they were the last rebel resistance of eastern ghouta. the un says tens of thousands of civilians remain trapped in douma. here's what happened last time the us responded to a suspected chemical attack carried out by the assad regime. it was almost a year ago. 59 tomahawk cruise missiles hit a syrian airbase. this was authorised by donald trump. russia was pre—warned, and didn't retaliate that time. russia's military chiefs have signalled things might be different this time. here's the former us department of defence analyst, melissa dalton. it's clear that the punitive strike taken last april has not deterred the assad regime from continuing to use chemical weapons. in fact, there has been at least 20 reported incidents of chemical weapons used
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since last april, the most latest douma attack perhaps killed more civilians than perhaps it has crushed a certain threshold. the united states will be examining options and not only using the military instrument that also probably a range of other diplomatic and economic measures that could be taken. we know the us has sought the support of britain and france. the bbc understands theresa may is ready to approve the uk's involvement in military action, and may not seek prior parliamentary approval to do so. so what military options do the us and its allies have? it's thought any strikes will target the regime's chemical capabilities. these are two chemical weapons manufacturing sites, one near the town of masyaf, in the north—west, and dummar, near damascus. we know the syrian army has been evacuating key defence buildings in damascus. here's the bbc‘s lina sinjab from beirut. the syrian government, although they
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deny any involvement in any chemical attack, they are worried. support suggest they are relocating personnel and military bases and security bases, especially in central damascus. inside syria, people are split between two views. some are very worried about their life and what's going to happen if they are are targeted in government controlled areas, but the opposition are holding their breasts and wondering if president trump is going to be serious this time. we've also heard from russian president vladimir putin. he presented new ambassadors with their credentials at the kremlin earlier today. he didn't directly refer to the escalating tensions, but said "the situation in the world is becoming more and more chaotic but all the same we hope that common sense will finally prevail and international relations will take a constructive path." i spoke to the bbc‘s barbara plett usher and asked her how imminent any military action seems. the signs are is that it is
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imminent, that it could happen before the end of the week, and the tweet that president trump has issued to date is the clearest signal that specs are in fact being planned. however, his secretary of defence has been more cautious. he has said they are still assessing the intelligence committee are still assessing the allies willingness to do so, so it is still a work in progress, so we know that something seems to be coming but we don't know exactly when. how much concern is there about the fact that russia is still militarily entrenched in syria? it will be quite challenging to not hit any russian targets eventually in the ramifications from that if it were to happen. yes, that's been the challenge for some time of course. and it is true that president trump did say he wanted not only to punish president assad but also the backers of the syrian
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regime, the iranians and the russians. but having said that, if the american military were to deduct and it will be drawn into the serene civil war, something it has worked a rdently civil war, something it has worked a rd e ntly to civil war, something it has worked ardently to not happen. recently, president trump has said he wanted to disengage from seroquel quiet trickling out of the islamic state group has been nearly defeated. so i don't think the americans don't want that to happen. last time, the warned the russians when they give a military strike. a year ago, they board the russians that they were going to hit, so they avoided any casualties. it is not clear if they're going to do that last early mac this time —— if they're going to do that this time. if they do hit russian forces, that could escalate things, so it would not surprise me if there was not some kind of communication going on. let's update
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you on another story relating to russia. we've had a new statement from yulia skripal. she is the poisoned daughter of russian ex—spy sergei skripal. she was discharged from hospital on monday. she said she misses the staff who cared for her at salisbury. and... she goes on to say... simon jones is here. he spent a fair amount of time covering that story. very clear from what yulia says what, she's been through. you get the sense from
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reading this statement a woman who's had her world turned completely upside down. she talks about, although she's getting better, she still needs treatment. she talks about her father still be in hospital and that talks... interesting that she does not want help from the russian embassy. she isa help from the russian embassy. she is a russian citizen. ever since this committee russian authorities, she's a russian, we want access to her. the british authorities, saying when she was in hospital that she is in hospital... she has been made or the russian embassy are keen to offer help to her. she's been given contacts offer help to her. she's been given co nta cts of offer help to her. she's been given contacts of people there but at the moment, she does not wish to avail herself. if that changes, she has the details and she will be in touch with them. simon, you mentioned her father, still in hospital, still receiving treatment. he is still
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going to need treatments for a farewell at. she was released at hospital at the beginning of the week but is going to need ongoing care. as regards to herfather, he is not recovering as quickly but he hospital hopes, in time, he will be able to be released. we've had the chief constable of wiltshire police in the area in the uk that covers, and he's been tweeting... five weeks ago, people were wondering if they would make any sort of recovery at all. simon, thank you very much. simonjones. a military aircraft has crashed in algeria killing all 200 a military aircraft has crashed in algeria killing all 257 people on board, according to the defence ministry. it happened 30 kilometres south—west of the capital algiers shortly after the plane took off from boufarik military airport. the reasons for the crash are still unclear. this footage shows the devastation after the plane crashed into a field. the algerian defence ministry
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says most of the dead are army personnel and their families. ten crew members were also killed. this man spoke to a local news agency after witnessing the crash. translation: i was in my house, and it was around 8am, something like that, we heard a big explosion, and then me and my neighbour drove here by car. there was very heavy smoke, and then we realised it was an aeroplane accident. when we arrived at the spot itself, we found piles of bodies. it's a disaster, an absolute disaster. on twitter, the new york times journalist @declanwalsh says... this is the deadliest accident in a country with a bad aviation safety record. in fact, it's the deadliest air accident in the world since this. you might remember malaysian airlines flight mhi7, shot down over
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eastern ukraine injuly 201a killing 298 people. well, today, the algerian army's chief of staff has ordered an investigation into what caused this crash near algiers and the authorities are now working to identify those who have been killed. here is our north africa correspondent rana jawad. it's a difficult to get updates at the moment, because the system is in the moment, because the system is in the investigation phase. they face again been collecting bodies at the crash sites since this morning. the defence ministry, as mentioned earlier, has launched an investigation to find out what may have caused the crash. we only know that it was a russian—made aircraft, probably purchased from the soviet era, as it were. probably an old aircraft, but certainly there'll be aircraft, but certainly there'll be a lot of questions as to whether it was maintained, for example, that's something for aviation specialist to look into in the next day or so as
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they try to determine what caused it. there have been other crashes of this kind before, but certainly not as big or deadly, but beyond that, generally speaking, although they don't, a jury is not necessarily reputed to have maintenance... there have been some worries over how much they maintain their aircraft, whether they are military or civilian. their track record overall is not as disastrous as some other countries in the continent. stay with us on outside source. still to come: we'll tell you why this ordinary—looking stretch of road is being described as "psychological torture" by people who live nearby. profits at tesco have soared as the uk's biggest supermarket
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continues its revival under boss dave lewis. the group reported pre—tax profits of £1.3 billion for the year to 2ath of february, as uk like—for—like sales rose 2.2%. tesco said the grocery market remained challenging due to ongoing pressure on costs. our correspondent emma simpson explains how the company has overcome a difficult period. it isa it is a remarkable turnaround in fortunes. it doesn't go that long ago we were sitting here talking about tesco's worst results in its history, went back in april 2015 it posted a £6.a billion loss. and i was obviously in the aftermath of the accounting scandal where it said it had overstated its profits by over £250 million, plunging tesco
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into its darkest days, a real crisis. you're watchin outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our top story: president trump has warned russia to "get ready" for missile strikes against syria, after an alleged chemical attack near damascus at the weekend. the stories from around the bbc right now. after nationwide protests in bangladesh, the government has abolished job quotas for government posts. 56% of those jobs were set aside for minorities, which angered students and otherjob—seekers. a court in myanmar has refused to release two reuters journalists, wa lone and jaw soh oo, who were arrested in december while investigating alleged crimes by the burmese army against rohingya muslims. that's on bbc burmese. eight athletes representing cameroon at the commonwealth games in australia have gone missing. team officials say they've
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not been seen since tuesday. one of them, a boxer, didn't even turn up for his quarterfinal fight. the chairman of the organising committee urged athletes to respect the terms of their visas. the us federal reserve is the latest organisation to sound the alarm over the risks of a trade war with china. in the minutes from its latest meeting released earlier, many members of the central bank expressed concerns about the damage that a trade war could do to the us economy. let's go over to new york to kim gittleson. what else did they say about trade? they were not necessarily concerned about the prospects of the aluminium or steel ta riffs prospects of the aluminium or steel tariffs necessarily negatively affecting the us economy. what they are affecting the us economy. what they a re really affecting the us economy. what they are really worried about is the trade war, this idea there is this tit—for—tat that these a minimum —— aluminium and steel tariffs the trump administration has proposed
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could lead to such a cycle it could eventually hurt the us economy. they also said the agricultural sector here in the united states was particularly orderable and all of this together could create some sort of downside momentum for frankly a us economy that's doing quite well. one other interesting thing that came out of these minutes was that the fed basically, the members of this open market committee, think the us economy would actually be drawing above is potential in the next couple of years, suggesting that he could possibly overheat. that's 50 economists prefer when an economy is growing faster, so fast in fact that it leads to price inflation. the only downside defence i with this possibility of trade retaliation, which suggested the something is paying attention to. we heard the chair, jerome powell, mentioned this a little bit but this isa mentioned this a little bit but this is a more clear picture of what exactly concerning fed officials stop what we're seeing oil prices hit a three—year high?
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stop what we're seeing oil prices hit a three-year high? does this have anything to do with what donald trump saying about syria? syria itself is not a big oil producer but anything that suggests there could be geopolitical risk in the middle east can worry investors, particularly if it does start to impact oil production across the opec producing region like saudi arabia, for instance. it was interesting that we saw a post oil prices hit eight two—year high we talk about the oil prices, there are two prices we pay attention to. brent crude and the us... these to be similar but the two prices have diverged, so it was very interesting that we saw both of those prices spike in the wake of president trump's tweets. both of them being a three—year high. it's deathly something that is considering for investors a cross something that is considering for investors across the globe, but oil prices, to be quite honest, are quite volatile so you want to see something that would indicate a trend. if they remain high, and that something that could potentially
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lead to higher prices at the pump for people around the world. tim, thank you very much. kim gittleson there in new york. christine lagarde has also weighed in on the trade issue. the head of the international monetary fund warned that the rules that underpin global trade were "in danger of being torn apart". she used a speech in hong kong to warn against the tit—for—tat trade war that china and the united states have been threatening. governments need to steer clear of protectionism in all its forms. history shows us that import restrictions hurt everyone, especially the poorer consumers. not only do they lead to more expensive products and more limited choices, but they also prevent trade from playing its essential role of boosting productivity and spreading new technologies. it's been two long days for this man, mark zuckerberg.
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facebook‘s boss has been answering questions about the cambridge analytica data privacy scandal for a second day in washington. he told us politicians he himself is one of the 87 million users whose data was obtained by the company. was your day that included in the data sold to malicious third parties ? your personal data ? data sold to malicious third parties ? your personal data? yes, it was. are you interested in... we are making an effort continued to make changes... are you willing to change or business model in the interest of protecting individual privacy? congresswoman, i'm not sure what that means. mr zuckerberg apologised again for the mistakes he and his company made. he agreed that internet companies need some regulation, but he urged caution.
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i think ithinka i think a lot of time regular issue, by definition, places rules that accompany with resources like ours can easily comply with but that might be more difficult for a smaller startup to comply with. i think these are all things that need to be thought through very carefully when thinking through what rules we wa nt to when thinking through what rules we want to put in place. dave lee has been following that on capitol hill in washington. i asked him what, if anything, will come out of these hearings. one of the big criticisms of this is it is political theatre... there could be a few things that do come out of these two sessions we've had here this week. namely, regulation. there's been a lot of talk around regulation because so far, technology companies like facebook are mostly self—regulating when it comes to how they conduct the business, particularly relating to personal data that he collects on people. facebook has said, and mr
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zuckerberg in that clip, they are open to regulation. what they are open to regulation. what they are open to regulation. what they are open to so far is that regulation can bea open to so far is that regulation can be a kind of blanket data privacy law similar to what we have in most parts of europe. that gives users much more control about what data is collected and what control they have over the data. in the us, there is not a law such as that at there is not a law such as that at the moment that covers all kinds of data collection. i think that might be where we are headed but until we get to that point you might think this would be a lot of discussion and lobbying, critically from technology companies, to make sure in their eyes, there is not overreaching. there's been a lot of criticism about the lack of knowledge the politicians who question mr zuckerberg seem to have about facebook. particularly the senators at the hearing yesterday. jonathan freedland has written this opinion piece called "zuckerberg got off lightly. why are politicians so bad at asking questions?" in it, he writes...
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carole cadwalladr is the journalist who first broke this story. i actually think that's brilliant. i think we need people who don't know about tech asking questions. for far, far too long it has been technologists asking questions of technologists. the fact that there are legislators who are asking questions, people are saying "it's like your granddad asking questions." good, that's exactly what we need. this needs to be opened up to everybody. this affects everybody. i actually found a kind of very positive and encouraging. to be fair, the questions today in the house of representatives were much tougher today. let's go back to syria
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and within the last few minutes the white house spokeswoman sarah sanders has been answering questions about the possibility of us military action there. this follows the alleged chemical attack near damascus on saturday. she was asked what should be construed by tweets president trump had made about the matter. i think there's a lot there that you can read from, but at the same time, the president has a number of options at his disposal and all of those options remain on the table. we are continuing to look at each one of them. a strange tale from the netherlands now. a highway that played a tune when you drove over it at the correct speed has struck the wrong note with residents who live nearby. the stretch of road was in the northern province of friesland. there was a noble aim, to improve road safety. you need to listen carefully to this. the sound you hear was produced by strategically—laid rumble strips,
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and the tune, which you may not be familiar with, is the official anthem of friesland. but local residents say it was driving them crazy. so the singing road has now been closed down. let's hear some of the reaction. translation: it goes on 24 hours a day. we don't stir the anthem. it's a whole mix of sounds, it is irritating. on friday, we heard there would be ridges put on the road... it is psychological torture. asa road... it is psychological torture. as a local representative, i want everybody to be happy. especially those living nearby. the road works perfectly, you can hear the anthem in all its glory, but it's bothering people so it has to go. i will be back in the next few minutes. plenty of interesting
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weather stories to guide you through over the next few minutes. the commonwealth games still continues as we head towards the closing ceremony. the weather behaving itself in a perfect conditions, just the risk of a few more showers over saturday. there's a good deal of dry weather across the east. look at the wind. not for long, this waterfront will introduce slightly fresher weather conditions but it is certainly worth bearing in mind. you see the warm spilling out of the interior and that is going to push temperatures into the high 20s for melbourne. a little bit fresher in adelaide with the arrival of this rain. from one extreme to the other, just take a look at what's been happening in the north island of new zealand. a very stormy week of weather and heavy rain and severe gales at times and that's honestly brought some damage with trees down and some destruction to buildings as well. the next area of low pressure
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set to push in during friday. i will eventually bring more wet and windy weather, particularly to the north island. moving away from new zealand, over to north america, where things are relatively quiet but the wind direction is quite interesting. you start to pick up the warm moist southerly out of texas and that's going to drag in some warmer air up texas and that's going to drag in some warmerairup into texas and that's going to drag in some warmer air up into the northeast. a real contrast to the. u nsettled northeast. a real contrast to the. unsettled weather coming in from the pacific northwest and i will bring some snow across the northern half of the rockies as well. but let's ta ke of the rockies as well. but let's take a look at a temperature profile. someone drifts its way up through central and southern plains and moved its way steadily east. let's ta ke and moved its way steadily east. let's take for example new york. at the beginning of the week, it was pretty chilly, only around nine celsius. to have gotten temperatures like that since... warm air set to
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return potentially even some stuff. keep very much a feature into pakistan. the heaviest of rain to be into sri lanka. some of those heavy and sundry. it still stays unsettled across europe as well, with one low pressure moving out of the french riviera towards the alps in central italy, another low pushing and to portugal and spain. it's been a miserable week here, very wet and very windy. and that is set to continue for a few more days. signs of something better into next week. at the same time, the eastern half of europe still keeps that southeasterly flow and still the temperatures about the average for that time of year. mid 20s still possible across southern greece and even up possible across southern greece and even up as possible across southern greece and even up as high as 20 degrees into parts of poland. that's how it's looking. more details coming up in half an hour. hello, i'm karin gionnie, this is outside source, and these are the main stories
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here in the bbc newsroom. president trump warns russia to ‘get ready‘ for missile strikes against syria, after an alleged chemical attack near damascus at the weekend. yulia skripal says she's still suffering from the effects of the nerve gas used against her and her father, and does not want help from the russian embassy. a military plane crash in algeria has killed more than 250 people. there's been more questions for facebook‘s mark zuckerberg as he admits he was also among the millions of users whose data was improperly shared with cambridge analytica. later on the programme, as hungary's biggest independent newspaper shuts down, we'll be speaking to one of its journalists to find out why. paul ryan, the speaker of the us house of representatives, and the third most powerful republican, has announced he will
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not run for re—election in november. his departure follows a wave of retirements of republican members of the house, which throws the contest wide open for a number of seats in the upcoming mid—term elections. here he is making the announcement earlier. i will be setting new priorities. but i will also be leaving incredibly proud of what we've accomplished. some of you know my story, my dad died when i was 16. bh my daughter is. and ijust don't wa nt to my daughter is. and ijust don't want to be one of those people at the back of my life thinking i spent more time with my kids, if i spend another term care, they will only know me as a weekend father. donald trump has tweeted this. here's the bbc‘s jane o'brien from washington on what she made of the decision. paul ryan is probably one of the few people when he says he wants to
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spend more time with his family, most people actually do believe him but that doesn't alter the fact that the timing of this announcement is absolutely terrible for republicans because not only does it leave wisconsin wide open for a democratic challenge, and also risked sending the strongest signal yet that they republicans are in real danger of losing the house to the democrats. and if that happens, then president trump could be in deep trouble because they've already accused him of obstruction - because they've already accused him of obstruction of and because they've already accused him of obstruction of- and that of obstruction ofjustice, and that could their hand if they could strengthen their hand if they choose to go down the road of the political process of impeachment. indian parents often go through intense social pressure to find the perfect groom for their daughters. so much so that some of them in the eastern indian state of bihar end up kidnapping grooms. two victims, roshan and parveen, told a bbc team their experience of forced marriages. the divya arya is our women's affairs correspondent in delhi. she worked on that report and explains what sort of legal
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options these men have available to them. there is no law that makes a forced marriage illegal, there is a law against kidnapping. and that is a lot that these people resort to. when they oppose such a marriage. but i think most important, or rather as important or as difficult it is for the man who is getting kidnapped in this marriage, it is a really ha rd life kidnapped in this marriage, it is a really hard life than for the woman. because it is already being done and her name, even when the man accepts her name, even when the man accepts her in marriage, she goes to the husband's family, couples live with theirfamilies in india, she goes to afamily theirfamilies in india, she goes to a family unwilling to accept her, a man who has accepted her only out of force and this may not be the marriage she would have chosen for the kind of marriage that she would have chosen. she goes into a very unhappy situation and she has to double or triple her efforts to be
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accepted in that family. we talked about the laws that are in place, but what about the cultural attitudes, any sign that these may change? the change really is in the hands of the young people involved. this is something that we sought and the villages come on in the cities and in the villages merit there is very little emphasis on educating young women. girls of bradley com plete young women. girls of bradley complete school education, they do not work or on not living which makes their own say in the family very feeble if i could say so. it is harderfor very feeble if i could say so. it is harder for them very feeble if i could say so. it is harderfor them to very feeble if i could say so. it is harder for them to resist, very feeble if i could say so. it is harderfor them to resist, it seems that if the man would resist such marriages and incest that they would not place family honour at the top, but their own right and the woman's writes to a free marriage choice at a higher premium, and opposed his marriages to go to the police and i succumb to these social pressures, that probably is the way forward and
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that probably is the way forward and thatis that probably is the way forward and that is with the young man whose story you just saw is trying to do. switzerland is currently home to almost a0,000 eritreans. the swiss have traditionally been generous towards eritrean asylum seekers, because of well documented human rights violations in eritrea itself. now, that policy could be about to change. imogen foulkes reports from berne. afamily a family baptism, so slim's eritrea committee down roots. many only have temporary residents but they can work and most believe that they can stay. until now. this woman has received a letter saying it is time to go. translation: i did not understand this letter at first. now i cannot sleep, to think about going back to eritrea makes me sad. everything is dark. i cry a lot. the latest united nations report on eritrea says human
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rights abuses, including forced conscription, continued. so why the change in the swiss policy? and swiss parliamentary fact—finding mission to eritrea said conditions had improved. so slim's immigration office has begun sending out removal orders. that's like switzerland's immigration. translation: ever mobile order informs the affected person they have to leave switzerland within a certain time because they do not have a legitimate reason to stay. so these people are obliged to leave our country. the removal order is that affect more than 3000 people. the celebratory mood — confusion, people don't even know how they would get to eritrea because forced cannot efficiently deport them. they cannot efficiently deport them. they can go back. it is too dangerous. there is no agreement to take them back between switzerland and eritrea. —— they cannot go back. back between switzerland and eritrea. -- they cannot go back. for
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now, there is a determination to carry on with life as normal. but among swiss alim's eritrean community, some now face the very uncertain future. don't forget you can get much more detail on our top stories on our web douma ‘chemical attack‘ and why the area was being bombed in the first place. hungary‘s main opposition newspaper modj—ah nemzet closed today. you can see the front page of its website has the dates 1938—2018 on a black background to mark its 80—year print run. also on its website its publisher says "due to the financing problems of magyar nemzet, the owners have decided to cease media content production activity from april 11, 2018. therefore magyar nemzet and its online version will close." it comes just three days after the right wing nationalist prime minister viktor orban was re—elected for a third
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time in government. the timing is significant as magyar nemzet is owned by this man tycoon loyosh shimishka. he was once an ally of mr orban but fell out with him and became one of his staunchest opponents in the election campaign. mr orban responded by depriving his publications of advertising from state owned firms and companies friendly with the government, which meant it incurred heavy losses. the demise of magyar nemzet is a heavy blow to media diversity in hungary, and critics fear it‘s a sign the country is slipping into authoritarianism. flora garamvolgee worked at the paper, i asked her whether she‘d felt any political pressures while there. rather unfortunate we had free reign to publish as long as this could be supported by evidence, therefore i feel extremely honoured that i could bea feel extremely honoured that i could be a part of it. —— were fortunate. i will always cherish the ethics of dynamism i learned there from my collea g u es dynamism i learned there from my colleagues there. did you get a
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sense that this was the eventual way things were going to go, that the paper would eventually have to close ? paper would eventually have to close? yes. many people are satisfied with the things that are going in the media industry because they believe anything they agree with can only be the truth. u nfortu nately, with can only be the truth. unfortunately, that helps to make people uninformed. on top of that, in the current situation it is hard for any independent media to a to criticise the government on any account. there are millions of people who didn‘t vote on a weekend for victor orban, that wasn‘t enough to sustain an independent opposition newspaper, though. yes. what i can tell you, for me, i lost myjob, but
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asa tell you, for me, i lost myjob, but as a citizen of hungary, it‘s a much more devastating news. in any country, when an objective media that closes its doors, and did it matter if it‘s left wing or right wing, it‘s a tragedy. matter if it‘s left wing or right wing, it's a tragedy. -- it doesn't matter. what will end up in this d riverless matter. what will end up in this driverless and hungry like you do now? —— independent journalist?‘ very good question. unfortunately it is not the first time a major newspaper was closed down. for me personally, i can imagine myself working for a media outlet that is at least trying really hard to be objective, not trying hard to be objective. —— i cannot imagine. many media outlets support the government xenophobic a campaign in i couldn‘t ever identify with that. do you think you‘ll be able to do and carry on with independentjournalism in some i hope so. i really hope so. what do you think, because italian
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newspaper after 80 years says about what the direction hungary is going in? -- what the direction hungary is going in? —— the closing of the newspaper. i agree with what my paper says. i canjust i agree with what my paper says. i can just tell the same to you. in south africa, a memorial service has been held for winnie madikizela—mandela. the anti—apartheid campaigner died nine days ago aged 81. she was one of the leaders in the fight against white minority rule, when her husband nelson mandela was in jail. tens of thousands of people attended the service today at the orlando stadium in soweto. pumza fihlani was there. the mood is a combination of that of revere nce the mood is a combination of that of reverence but also of people that arejovial reverence but also of people that are jovial just before reverence but also of people that are jovialjust before the official proceedings began a short while ago, people were singing and dancing into
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a fight people were singing and dancing into afighti people were singing and dancing into a fight i could also they were singing songs compose to honour her. the memorial is happening, we are in the heart of soweto, which of course area the heart of soweto, which of course are a great deal of when at the height of the fight for freedom here. —— bloodshed. a great time for the people of fear to come out and not relive their time, binary and hunted a woman they see as having glad that very brutal fight for freedom here. a court in myanmar has rejected a motion to halt legal proceedings against two reuters journalists. they were arrested while investigating crimes by the burmese army against rohingya muslims in rakhine state last december. the burmese military announced on tuesday that seven soldiers had been found guilty of the extrajudicial killings in the village. here‘s our myanmar correspondent, nick beake, who‘s in yangon. this is the place where it the reuters journalists or to begin.
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they first appeared in court here backin they first appeared in court here back in december and they been held in prison ever since. we now know they will be back again for more appearances because a judge has thrown out the latest effort to have them set free. while both protested herinnocence them set free. while both protested her innocence as they were given away, they appeal for justice. her innocence as they were given away, they appealforjustice. this urges they were investigating come now been sentenced to ten years each in prison for the murder of an inability in the state but the journalist still face for ten years in jail journalist still face for ten years injailunder journalist still face for ten years injail under the journalist still face for ten years in jail under the colonial era official secrets act if they are convicted and this is the legislation the authorities are relying on. as you can imagine, their wives and families were distraught, they were really hoping for the release. so what are the chances of freedom now? i‘ve managed to speak to one of the lawyers for the journalists. do you think your clients will be free? in my opinion, i believe in them, so i took this
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case. my family believed that lily. —— ifirmly case. my family believed that lily. —— i firmly believe case. my family believed that lily. —— ifirmly believe it case. my family believed that lily. —— i firmly believe it will be released. if there is a fair trial. where to be a fair trial?|j released. if there is a fair trial. where to be a fair trial? i cannot say anything about that. a lot of people are sceptical of this is a fair process. many believe it is journalism in the dock, notjust these two young permits reporters. it was particularly poignant that yesterday was one of their birthdays. friends have bought him a ca ke birthdays. friends have bought him a cake and were desperately keen to see him back at home, a free man. but that was to be no celebration. instead, he and his colleagues spent yet another night imprisoned with no ideas and insight to their ordeal. —— another night imprisoned with no end in sight. for syrian refugees who have settled in the us, this week‘s chemical attack in their country is a chilling reminder of the violence they fled. but enhanced security screening means far fewer refugees are able to start a new life in the us. the trump administration is planning cutbacks in the refugee programme and is on track to admit the lowest number of refugees
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in nearly a0 years. laura trevelyan reports from connecticut. the connecticut shoreline is a world apart from the horrors of syria. here in this tranquil corner of new england, refugees are trying to build a new life. muhammad came here from syria in 2016. he speaks to his mother in jordan daily, desperate for her tojoin him here. and he asks why the us isn‘t doing more to assist syrians given their national nightmare. i think syrians are most people who need help now. they don‘t have time to wait. muhammad‘s mother fled from syria tojordan, and she stuck there. the trump administration‘s travel ban and enhanced security vetting for would—be refugees from syria means her application is progressing slowly. it is not clear when this is going to stop, and when the normal life is going to start. we have got a cluster of refugees
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in the hartford area. for chris george, who runs this refugee resettlement office in new haven, the violence syria underscores why the trump administration should be taking more refugees, not cutting back at a time of such great need. welcoming refugees is probably the best thing this country does. it is our oldest, most noble tradition. it is the statue of liberty in action. despite the efforts to resettle refugees here along the connecticut coastline, and across america, the trump administration says it is too costly, and the money would be better spent helping people fleeing persecution overseas. critics of the white house say the attempt to cut the number of refugees is all part of a wider effort to limit legal immigration. whatever the political environment may be, the peaceful atmosphere of small town connecticut is truly a refuge for muhammad.
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he has a job, and longs to get married. my dream in america is to success in the life, to have a family, to have a normal life that we lost in syria. we are... we are near to my school. america‘s tradition of welcoming the stranger may be redefined by this administration, but here in connecticut, as volunteers teach newcomers english, those fleeing war are grateful for the chance to start over. we all know what flying feels like today, but what about the cabin of tomorrow? the world‘s biggest airline interior show is currently taking place in hamburg, germany. aaron heslehurst is there, taking a look at how robots could transform the flights of the future. i‘m in hamburg germany at the world
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biggest aircraft in reader expo. think everything that goes inside our passengerjets think everything that goes inside our passenger jets from think everything that goes inside our passengerjets from the toilets, they are hereto, to the galleys in kitchens and seats but also asking the question who‘s going to be the crew of the future? hello, me are seven. meet the man behind this robot. your name is hal, you make robots. can i ask you this. is it feasible, could we see these up and down the aisle of the passengerjet? quite. the hardware is there. they operate on a laser cell... they can go back and forth and they can deliver food. amazing. i'm thinking they are not fully, they would be there to fully replace the humans because i‘m thinking of a situation like an emergency landing. you would need every human there. they would bea need every human there. they would be a help. in addition to the crew. is, iwe be a help. in addition to the crew. is, i we there in terms of general robotics? nowadays keep talking
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about artificial intelligence. are we there yet? the hardware is there but the braves are not there yet. what humans do is very hard. —— the brains. the simple things like a toddler to do, recognise the objects in picking it up and on wooded areas in the world, that‘s an amazing thing, people don‘t realise how amazing our brains are. is that hard to tease him about how to do? very hard. who you work for me this robot, japanese company. what is it with japan and their love affairs for robots? they have a different attitude than we do in the west. in the west, is a dangerous thing. in the west, is a dangerous thing. in the west, is a dangerous thing. in the west, they are cute and cuddly and friendly and with people grow old they want to have them help them. we see them as a threat but japan them. we see them as a threat but ja pa n loves them. we see them as a threat but japan loves him. in a making any of these to become a tv news presenter, are you? well, you'll be the last ago. this has gone a bit viral.
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now what could possibly go wrong when a bbc reporter tries to conduct an interview in a swimming pool? our colleague mike bushell was talking to some athletes at the commonwealth games in australia when this happened. a moment this is for me. i‘ll have tojump into the a moment this is for me. i‘ll have to jump into the water. i a moment this is for me. i‘ll have tojump into the water. i have a moment this is for me. i‘ll have to jump into the water. i have to a moment this is for me. i‘ll have tojump into the water. i have to be careful because i have a sound back on. sarah, adam, sean, james, congratulations. i didn‘t see the step. sorry about that. let‘s keep it going. adam is inconsolable. look before you get it to the swimming pool in the future. i hope he can to hear me. i have to get close to mine the step. can‘t you continue? you wa nt to the step. can‘t you continue? you want to talk about me falling in the water. all the people watching here are literally on the floor. i will hold us together, you have to. congratulations. tell us what it was like. some of the races have been so close. yet, it was pretty crazy. i
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knew i was a good good place to do quite well. i was going into the meat and... one of the jamaican girls formerly well. —— swam really well. ok. lestienne this page for a moment. well it‘s late what is going on. if you didn‘t see it, mike is caring, talking, but we can‘t hear him because a moment ago mike fell in the water. his pack one and he doesn‘t know we can hear him now. goodbye, mike. laughter they has not been done. honestly, you would like to leave it mike. they could hear him. he could hearthem. bbc brea kfast him. he could hearthem. bbc breakfast presenters in the studio. let‘s just remind you of the statement we‘ve had from yulia skripal. a statement released by yulia skripal. she‘s the daughter of the former russian spy. they were poisoned by an arab agent.
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and was discharged from hospital on monday. she said she misses the staff who cared for her at salisbury. and "i have left my father in their care, and he is still seriously ill. she says also that she has specially trained officers there to help her and she does not require the assistance of the russian embassy. at the same time tomorrow. we have been exciting weather outlook. i think most of us will be pleased to hear what we have to say for it next week. in the short term, not a lot of change. just a lot of cloud coming in on thursday. in the weather hasn‘t really changed much over all across the uk. because of this rather awkward looking at in the jet stream. one this rather awkward looking at in thejet stream. one bit this rather awkward looking at in the jet stream. one bit of the jet strea m the jet stream. one bit of the jet stream goes to the north, and other of the ghost of the south and when this pattern happens, we get stuck ina this pattern happens, we get stuck in a breath and we keep getting the
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same every of pressure again and it does vary a bit from place to place but on balance, and actually hasn‘t been that much different. just a lot of cloud around the uk, occasional blobs of rain here and there in the clouds clearing from time to time. this pattern will continue into thursday. a lot of cloud across the country, winds blowing out of the southeast, just a few spots of rain there. that is pretty much it. here‘s thursday‘s with a forecast. a bit like on wednesday, clouds break, western and northern scotland, quite possibly southwestern parts of england, one little area of upset here in the far northeast of england, east of scotland could be quite damp and chilly. look at the 7 degrees. that win keeps on blowing off of that cold north to see. then we are watching for another area of weather drifting out and northern france and belgium, holland, these could be heavy showers affecting southeastern parts of the country during the course of thursday night
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into friday. and maybe even wanted to rumbles of thunder for example into friday. and maybe even wanted to rumbles of thunderfor example in london. this is the weather pattern for the end of the week. a weather front here in the northeast bringing some outbreaks of rain, a large area of rain broke coming in but it is still the same era weather, and low pressure just to the bottom of the screen here, it is he sending winds in this fashion and dragging bits of cloud out of the east. you can see of us, it is dry. the sun comes out and it warms up and then a change happens on saturday. it would lose that went to the north sea, this low— pressure that went to the north sea, this low—pressure approaches, low pressure approaches, it is not a great outlook. rain in the way, but on sunday, looks like the strong winds around this area low—pressure will help to break up the clouds a little bit and just shift the weather across the uk. things will start changing and will have to pay for a little because that would there will be cloud and rain in the northwest of the country but overall, what is going to happen to the course of the weekend with that
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low— pressure the course of the weekend with that low—pressure approaching and those winds increase in from the south will start to see temperatures climbing throughout the uk in one place where we really get going to notice is that on the north sea. was that cold went off that chilly water. next week, much warmer and thatis water. next week, much warmer and that is right across the country. fairly confident on that. status the pattern in jet stream, fairly confident on that. status the pattern injet stream, a big appear and it is basically drunk out only the one from the library and francis and again. that‘s been trying out the one. this of the first guest on how woman might get. mid 20s across france, possibly 23 and 2a. —— how warm it will get. even 21 degrees there were 21 in berkshire. just because we are promising high temperatures for the sum of the year doesn‘t mean it will be all that sunday. a snapshot of next week shows quite a bit of cloud but one thing is for sure, shows quite a bit of cloud but one thing is forsure, it shows quite a bit of cloud but one thing is for sure, it does look like it will finally warming up. tonight at ten, the stand—off over an alleged chemical attack near damascus intensifies,
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as president trump warns russia to prepare for us airstrikes on syria. he says moscow should "get ready," as missiles "will be coming," targetting the regime of president assad. theresa may will hold a cabinet meeting tomorrow, as she prepares uk action on syria. we will be working with our closest allies to consider how we can ensure that those responsible are held to account. the use of chemical weapons cannot go unchallenged. russia has warned any us attack on syria will trigger a response. we‘ll have the very latest. also tonight.... facebook‘s mark zuckerberg admits to us lawmakers that he‘s one of the millions whose personal data was harvested by a british company. a military aircraft has crashed in algeria, killing more
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