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tv   The Papers  BBC News  April 13, 2018 10:45pm-11:01pm BST

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broke with the convention and said i will see parliament approval for this, that then set the precedent which happened with every camera when he saw parliament approval for the libya bombings and again he thought parliamentary approval for intervention in syria and lost, david cameron. it is a difficult one. other countries have a slightly different system. the united states is still an executive power which lies with the president. you have to get some approval from congress for military action. that may be the path we will go down. there are other pressures at the moment but this is the situation for seven yea rs. this is the situation for seven years. precisely. this is the 34th chemical weapons attack. so there needs to be a very considerate response because there has to be what happens next. yes, and in some instances... and we have not, it has not been clear what that plan is and what that strategy is. i think that is the context within which this debate needs to happen. jason, staying with the telegraph. and staying with the telegraph. and staying with the telegraph. and staying with certainly russia, but
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going to the skripal case. russia was hacking skripal‘s colter. this isa was hacking skripal‘s colter. this is a reference to the contents of a letter that has been written by the uk's national security adviser to nato. —— russia was hacking accra one's daughter. adjusting timing. nato. —— russia was hacking accra one's daughter. adjusting timingm goes on a number of questions, one is windy we find this information out. were we monitoring the safety of the skripal family adequately? if it is new information that has come to light, why had to come to light now? it is clear that we have been struggling in the propaganda war with russia on this one. that they are much more adaptive, kind of muddying the waters sewing this information. and we are almost playing catch with this. even as putting aside the syria question, well, i think they are strictly linked, but theresa may started off
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well on skripal, came out and blamed russians and then found herself slightly on the back foot probably because of the head of porton downs saying in a hazard the word interview... well, he couldn't say who it was. but the way he frees his may be as clear as it should have been. borisjohnson, may be as clear as it should have been. boris johnson, kind may be as clear as it should have been. borisjohnson, kind of inept in saying that type told me it was definitely russia. i think this is worth getting an certain element here of the government trying to get back on the front foot on this one. what he is saying there is potentially very significant. our e—mails may have been looked at for five years. a further reference to nerve agents and the work that might have been going on as well. significant content there. as the report says, it is very unusual for this kind of information to be released by the national security. so it must be part of a broader strategy. it is a very deliberate
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decision to release this information. and it is trying to tell that story in a more compelling fashion then, till now, the government has been able to do. the times, still talking about syria but with a particular line. yes. rather more particular than perhaps you we re more particular than perhaps you were expecting, i don't know. to put the focus on academics in british universities, which the times has called apologies for assad, taking some of the lines to come back from russia and syria themselves in terms of certainly the chemical attacks and where they originated from. but with so much going on on the syria issue and so much going on with russia, this seems like quite a narrow angle to take the lead of the story. investigation included clearly a lot of work that has gone on. by proud of it because they put
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type of investing —— ties of investigation in red ink with a huge numberof investigation in red ink with a huge number of bylines investigation in red ink with a huge numberof bylines in investigation in red ink with a huge number of bylines in response to this story. as far as i can see from reading it is that the evidence amounts to one academic who reads we did something that was slightly suspicious. —— one academic who retweeted it. academics are allowed freedom of speech the last i looked. you may find it deplorable but i don't think it is a sense of national pride. let's move other things in that case. the front of the expressed, clearly a lot of coverage today of what has been said in court, the expressed devoted an entire front page do it with a picture of him and a quote from him as well. —— the express. picture of him and a quote from him as well. -- the express. we leaders has been extremely distressing. he had had his day in court. describe in what seems like tremendous detail the exact impact of watching his own
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being rated without knowledge that that was going to take place. and the impact that he had on it. obviously very distressed, broke down in court and the daily express has covered this in some detail. yet to hear the bbc‘s side of the story. that will have their day in court, but for him this is obviously extremely traumatic. and come the time, whatever the decision of the court eventually is, it will raise an interesting question about ardussi and what the press can say at certain points, during particularly the early stages of a police investigation. of course in this case it can go anywhere anyway. i was going to be slightly cynical. he is trying to win a court case and therefore the language is going to be perhaps deliberately emotive in certain aspects because that is going to help this case in front of the court. you are right. as a
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journalist, i would like as much access as possible and i am always wa ry access as possible and i am always wary of any law that says you cannot do this or that, because they often have consequences of closing down and it is for an investigation. so that does worry me. i think the bigger question is about the operation itself. it had put some people behind bars who should have been behind bars, but it will cost a lot of trauma to a lot of innocent people and i think that is an issue that should be addressed. we will await developments. we will obviously get to the end of that because the case is continuing. we will follow in the coming week or so. the ft, jason, this isjlr and cuts injobs. we are not buying diesel cars any more. are we? do you have a diesel? no. i don't either. thank god. it is partly brexit on this. it is disaster is forjlr. the
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question here on the one point, the government was urging people to buy diesels because it cuts the emissions, the next moment they're going all know, they are terrible for the environment and that is to la st for the environment and that is to last anyone. they have not yet come up last anyone. they have not yet come up with his game. it has been slightly badly handled. if you are an owner of slightly badly handled. if you are an ownerofa slightly badly handled. if you are an owner of a diesel car you can feel slightly hard on by your manufacturer — — feel slightly hard on by your manufacturer —— or if you are a manufacturer —— or if you are a manufacturer you can deal burrow feel very hard done by. manufacturer you can deal burrow feelvery hard done by. it manufacturer you can deal burrow feel very hard done by. it shows how quickly now businesses have to respond to regulatory environments and these big changes in policy. they can impact absolutely on your business and your business model. there is some talk of not having reacted quickly enough on that diesel issue. but the jobs reacted quickly enough on that diesel issue. but thejobs being talked about our contract workers, so those contracts are not going to be continued and it is interesting the emphasis on recruiting engineers
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and high quality graduates, innovators. they know they have to change. they have to find a new solution. let me stay with you, helen, two stories we are going to ta ke helen, two stories we are going to take from the mirror. let's take their bleak first, driven from his home. this is the story of richard osborne brooks. in southeast london. it all seems very tragic. the stress for everyone involved and everyone left behind. the fact that you cannot live comfortably in your home any longer. it will be distressing for anybody, and somebody who is 78, you know, it is a horrible situation to be in. this is the fear of revenge attacks over the death of henry vincent? yes, he has a disabled wife. you saw those pictures of people putting out flowers outside his front door,
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turning into a shrine. this is a guy you will probably argue is the real victim here. the fact he has been put through this turmoil leads people wanting to avenge. let's end ona people wanting to avenge. let's end on a more up people wanting to avenge. let's end on a more up the note and talk about the grand national. not only does it appear on the front of the mirror, but there is a distinct quite likely possibility of a woman winning the grand nationalfor the possibility of a woman winning the grand national for the first time, the odds of 8—1, lowest they have ever been. well, that will be great fun. i think we see women in so many sports, i have been watching the commonwealth games and getting really into that. it will be fantastic to see a woman tried the match i am here. i think when you hear them all talking they want to bejudged on hear them all talking they want to be judged on an hear them all talking they want to bejudged on an equal hear them all talking they want to be judged on an equal basis with the male jockeys, but 8—1 be judged on an equal basis with the malejockeys, but 8—1 is be judged on an equal basis with the male jockeys, but 8—1 is the be judged on an equal basis with the malejockeys, but 8—1 is the best the odds have ever been. so the three women who are writing there,
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we three women who are writing there, we hope to see them go. three women who are writing there, we hope to see them golj three women who are writing there, we hope to see them go. i am still going to choose by course by its name, not by its colour or a jockey. the grand national is the one race where you just do not bother. it is so unpredictable. see you at midnight. that is not a date, that isa tip. midnight. that is not a date, that is a tip. fair enough. 5:30pm tomorrow. we shall see. thank you both for having a look at those front pages for us. that's it for the papers tonight. don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. it's all there for you, seven days a week at bbc dot co uk forward slash papers, and if you miss the program any evening you can watch it later on bbc iplayer thank you helen and jason. goodbye. good evening, grey and gloomy
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weather has become all too familiar for any of us over the last few days. that was how it looks for a weather watch in edinburgh a little earlier on. quite typical it seems in many eastern areas but for skies began to brighten this afternoon. that is a sign of what is to come. satellite pictures shows the extensive cloud that affected the uk today, but notice a few bricks that appeared in the crowd down towards the south later in the day. as we go through what is left of the evening and tonight, we will move those clearer skies and will be further northwards, still a fair amount of cloud hanging around scotland and northern england, a few mist and fog patches developing elsewhere. those temperatures around 5—7d. we go into the weekend and it is an improving story. things will warm up. we will see some spells of sunshine, it will however turn increasingly breezy. we can expect some outbreaks of rain at times. so let us take it day by day. saturday is probably the dryer of the days for most of us. with spells and sunshine developing after what
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the ba slightly grey and murky start in places. could be one or two showers down store the south. most places will stay dry. hattie grant hanging around across shetland. the best of the sunshine, we are not going to feel the difference. temperatures up as high as 15, i6, maybe 18 degrees temperatures up as high as15, 16, maybe 18 degrees and temperatures up as high as 15, 16, maybe 18 degrees and certainly warmer than it has been for these north sea coastal areas. where the grand national ill—defined. there will be spells of sunshine i suspect perking through the clouds. temperatures around 1a degrees for the big race. then into sunday, low— pressure the big race. then into sunday, low—pressure and trying to squeeze its way in from the atlantic. that was the wings, particularly in western areas. we'll also see this frontal system drifting in from the west. i will take some of rain and erratically northward and eastward. it will not be raining all day long in any given location, there will be dry spells as well. all the while for north east scotland and some eastern part of england, is to stay dry with a good deal of sunshine and temperatures in the sunny spots for the east again up to 17, possibly 18 degrees. those temperatures will continue to climb as we go on into
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next week. particularly once we start to tap into this very warm air across the near continent. converters across some southern areas, up converters across some southern areas, up to 122 but perhaps 2a degrees for the middle part of the week and further north closed at 20. spring weather on the way. this is bbc news, i'm julian worricker. the headlines at eleven: the us raises the tension with syria and its ally russia, saying it has proof the syrian government carried out a suspected chemical attack in the town of douma. britain claims russia had been spying on sergei and yulia skripal, at least five years before they were poisoned in salisbury.
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sir cliff richard breaks down in court as he gives evidence in his case against the bbc, which he claims breached his privacy during coverage of a police raid on his home in 2014. and newsnight, is it worse to remember a speech like enoch powell's rivers of blood, or worse to forget? debate.
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