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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  April 18, 2018 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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today at 5 — the prime minister apologises again — this time to mp5 — for the government's treatment of caribbean migrants. they came to britain between the 19405 and ‘70s, but some have faced the threat of deportation because of government action. the prime minister has hit back at claims that a decision to destroy landing records was made when she was home secretary. did the prime minister, the then home secretary, sign off that decision? no, the decision to destroy the landing cards was taken in 2009 under a labour government. we'll have the latest — and we'll be talking to one woman who came here when she was a baby. she's just lost herjob with the nhs because of the controversy. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. the rate of inflation slowed last month to the lowest in a year — the cost of clothing and footwear was partly responsible. sir cliff richard continues his legal action against the bbc — alleging a serious invasion of privacy — as corporation staff are questioned in court. more details emerge
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of the emergency landing at philadelphia — in which a passenger died — after an engine explosion. it's not on fire, but part of it's missing. they said there's a hole and someone went out. and tributes to the former first lady barbara bush — whose family included two us presidents — she's died at 92. it's 5 o'clock. our main story is that theresa may has apologised once again, this time to mp5, for the government's mistreatment of caribbean migrants who came to britain between the 19405 and 19705.
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some have been wrongly threatened with deportation, despite living in britain legally for decades. labour says they've been treated like criminals and blamed mrs may. but the prime minister said that a decision to destroy landing cards, showing when people first came to britain, was taken under the last labour government. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake reports. are you to blame for the windrush fiasco, prime minister? stepping out into the spring sunshine there was no hiding from a question still facing theresa may and her government, on how migrants with every right to live in the uk were threatened with detention and deportation. at prime minister's questions this lunchtime, she again apologised. we have no intention of asking anyone to leave who has the right to remain. and for those who have mistakenly received letters challenging them, i want to say, to apologise to them, and i want to say sorry to anyone who has been caused...
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..who has confusion or anxiety felt as a result of this. jeremy corbyn raised the issue of documents destroyed which could have helped people prove their status. yesterday we learned that in 2010 the home office destroyed landing cards for a generation of commonwealth citizens. and so have told people "we can't find you in our system." did the prime minister, the then home secretary, sign off that decision? no, the decision to destroy the landing cards was taken in 2009 under a labour government. that was a revelation he wasn't expecting. but the labour leader kept up his attack. isn't the truth, mr speaker, that under her the home office became heartless and hopeless, and doesn't she now run a government that is both
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callous and incompetent? this political row was sparked by the revelations of people like nick broderick who came to the uk as a baby in 1962. he's been fighting for the past four years to prove his legal status and like many he feels let down by the way he has been treated. i thought this was my home. i don't know jamaica, i came over as a baby. i love england. it's really shaken me, you know. knowing what my family has gone through and thousands of other people as well. some relief for amber rudd perhaps that it was labour who took the decision to destroy documents. but still this morning a call for the home secretary to take full responsibility. i think this incident is so shameful and has caused such distress to so many people that she really needs to consider her position. in brussels, officials are watching with concern. the government's handling
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of the windrush fiasco has not filled them with confidence about how eu nationals will be treated in the uk after brexit. even with the withdrawal agreement now things are not over. we need to still to have the citizens‘ rights completed. because certainly after the windrush scandal in britain we want to be sure the same is not happening to our european citizens, and that there is no bureaucratic nightmare there. meps will meet home office officials next week to discuss that process. officials say a task force set up has dealt with around 50 cases so far, though the number is relatively small, more damage will be done with every case that comes to light. jonathan blake, bbc news, westminster. with me is glenda caesar — who came to the uk with her parents from dominica aged just six months. her rights are now under threat as she was unable to provide
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the home office with the correct papers. glenda lost herjob of 16 years with the nhs as she was unable to provide the right documentation — and without these documents she also cannot claim any benefits. basically i was in a position as pratt as administrator and i was told i could not work here any more because they could be fined £10,000 because they could be fined £10,000 because i'm not british. i said that i was but they said you do not have a british passport. but i have been here all my life, my children are here, they're in their 30s. i went home and i was screaming, my children have never seen me so angry, i was crying, i children have never seen me so angry, iwas crying, i had children have never seen me so angry, i was crying, i had done everything. and after that i said 0k, everything. and after that i said ok, i have no more wages underwent to try to apply the benefits and was told i could not get any threats. how are you coping? family and
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friends, that is all i can do, rely on them. and by the grace of god they have been very good at i have lost my independence. christmas, i cannot buy my grandchildren anything. lots of people will be watching you will be so sympathetic to your plight. just to go back a bit, you came to this country at six months old. from america. you were at school here and you started working with the nhs. when did you first get an inkling about this?m was actually after my mother died in 1998, she died abroad on holiday in dominica so i wanted to get over there as soon as possible and i applied for a british passport. and they said no and i was asking why
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and they said because you're not british. but i have been there all my life. so i said ok what do i need to do, they told me get documentation. so i tried to accumulate as much as i could but when i did apply for right of abode i was turned down because i did not have enough documentation on my father. entitlement certificate, no, british daters letter, no. so i tried to find information on my father and there was nothing. everything has gone. so this thing went on for some time but did not come to a head until this cool that you had. that is when i realised it was serious. i nearly gave up, just had no money to fight. i even tried to raise the money for citizenship 01’ to raise the money for citizenship or naturalisation as the cold but where could i find that money. so as
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$0011 where could i find that money. so as 50011 as you where could i find that money. so as soon as you say that you have got to spend it again. and your sister is ina spend it again. and your sister is in a different position, why is that? she actually had her old british passport when dominica was ruled by britain so she found her old passport. she was going through the same process as me but they gave her a biometric card just because she had that passport. she worked for british transport police as well so for british transport police as well so she was coming at up against the same thing as me. but they were watching will think you know, one rule for one sister and one rule for the other, it makes no sense. rule for one sister and one rule for the other, it makes no senselj think it is because of the passport that she had but i have nothing. i came as a baby on an old passport and that is gone. what is your next step? the home office has offered me an appointment for tomorrow morning. ido an appointment for tomorrow morning. i do not know. what are you going to
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say? i do not know. what are you going to i i do not know. what are you going to say? i'm going to see what they've got to say because right now i have done my work and they have to do their work. they must have a trail on me, i have got national insurance andi on me, i have got national insurance and i have paid taxes and national insurance contributions, i worked for the nhs. what is your sense of how the situation has come about, we've heard several apologies from the prime minister and the home secretary, talking about terrible m ista kes secretary, talking about terrible mistakes being made. do you believe the apologies and take them at face value, what is your sense of how ministers have responded to this? i'm happy to get the apology but i'm not the only one going through this. there are plenty of others out there going through it. i was persistent, i was merely going to give up but then i thought no, after seeing other people coming out and people approaching me and saying i'm going through this, within our west in june and caribbean community we have
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pride and do not like to talk about oui’ pride and do not like to talk about our problems. wejust pride and do not like to talk about our problems. we just keep quiet. pride and do not like to talk about our problems. wejust keep quiet. —— west indian. but now i say to not be embarrassed, come forward. i'm a shy person but i said no, i need help and i'm happy for theresa may and her apology but not until i have got that paper in my hand that says you area that paper in my hand that says you are a citizen. we will look forward with interest to see what goes on tomorrow. and maybe you will tell us tomorrow. and maybe you will tell us tomorrow. i will do, tomorrow. and maybe you will tell us tomorrow. iwill do, definitely. thank you. 0ur chief political correspondent vicki young is at westminster. and there was an exchange in parliament today. tell us more about that. there has been a row about the destruction of these landing slippers. i do wonder if that has just become a bit of a distraction. in the theatre of prime minister ‘s questions, it took the rug from underneath jeremy corbyn questions, it took the rug from underneathjeremy corbyn because he
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was trying to see if two is a may had signed off at night, the argument being they destroyed documents that could have helped people. but the government has said it was under a labour government. but i wonder whether actually what is more important is about whether the home office is able to get on top of the issue and help people like glenda. can they get to people and help them with these documents for the problem seems to have been vastly that it has been going on for yea rs vastly that it has been going on for years and the government did not pick up the warnings and try to do something about it. the other issues that people have been asked to take responsibility and they have got to prove their right to be here. when it seems there are many people who had jobs here for years and there must be some record, some official record held by different government agencies. but the government and the way they have done this, it is not for them to chill through the computers and paper records. that has been issued and the question now is whether two is a and that apology, i think people will only
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accept that if it is sorted out and quickly. and she is promising that cases will be sorted out within two weeks. it will be interesting to see whether that can actually happen. many thanks. the rate of inflation slowed last month. consumer prices rose by 2.5% in the 12 months to march — the lowest rate in a year — with the cost of clothing and footwear partly explaining the change. the figures will complicate the task of the bank of england, which had been expected to raise interest rates next month. 0ur correspondent nina warhurst has been speaking to shoppers in preston. how long have you been coming to steve, then, john? a barber since 1970... about 20, 30 years. wow. is he any good yet? no, he's still learning! ..steve's seen out his share of storms. he had noticed prices creeping up but business stayed buoyant. it has been fairly steady, definitely. it doesn't even compare to how bad things were ten years ago? no, nothing like it. we were playing "spot the customer" at one time. but now, you have just a steady flow.
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but across the road, two years of growing costs have been tough on the meat business. now the market has had a face—lift and things are looking up. the last ten weeks we have done well. we have noticed that people in here have got smiles on theirfaces. you know, people look a bit more confident. it seems pretty vibrant. there are new bars opening up right, left and centre and cafes, takeaways. so you're feeling quite optimistic about the future? very optimistic. otherwise, at my age, i wouldn't have spent all this money. and that optimism could be growing. a slowdown in costs of womenswear has helped inflation come down while wages have been going up. these are small changes and it is unlikely that many people will feel a big difference at the end of the working month. but if this trend continues it means that the squeeze will be easing for millions of families. which could mean a move away from cautious spending. we have been very mindful
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about what we have got to spend, as we start to feel a little bit better off, we may be more excited about that and willing to spend it more on things that make us happy. if this trend continues, are we likely to become a little bit more frivolous with our cash? we could be, yes. we could. but not yet. in the travel trade at least, holiday—makers are still playing it safe. i would say over the past couple of years there are more all—inclusive holidays being booked, especially by families, because they know exactly how much the holiday is going to cost and they don't need to allow for spending money. so it's important then to feel in control? yes, they want to know how much the holiday is going to cost them and they don't want any unexpected expenses whilst they are away. it is too soon to say with certainty how the coming months will play out but for most, while things may not be getting lots easier, they do not looks set to be getting harder. nina warhurst, bbc news, preston. a bbc reporter who broke a story about sir cliff richard's home
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being searched by police following an allegation of sex assault — has told the high court how he guessed the singer's name after a contact told him police were looking at a ‘major figure'. sir cliff is suing the bbc over coverage of the police search of his home in august 2014 — and alleges a serious invasion of privacy. sir cliff was never arrested or charged. 0ur correspondent helena lee is at the high court. what has happened today? well dan johnson as you mentioned is the bbc news reporter and he was the one who had dealings with south yorkshire police over the investigation into sir cliff richard. he was the one who reported on this story and confirmed the court that he was 29 and at the time in 2014 and he told the court he reported on the facts of the story. listening to his evidence this afternoon, sir cliff richard who was sitting next to his barrister, he was looking down
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throughout the whole time of the evidence. and then sir cliff richard his barrister asked dan johnson evidence. and then sir cliff richard his barrister asked danjohnson if he would apologise. he said to him are you prepared to apologise to sir cliff for what you inflicted on him and your team with your story. dan johnson replied, i'm sorry that he went through such a difficult time because of that investigation. those allegations. the barrister went on, he is in court, are you prepared to apologise to him? then the judge, he is in court, are you prepared to apologise to him? then thejudge, mr justice mann, said i do not think that this line is going to help anybody. we are trying the issue not extracting that sort of confession. they then went on to question then johnson about the helicopter shots, that footage that was filmed from a helicopter used by the bbc. and it is those shots in particular about cliff richard says was a breach of his privacy. dan johnson cliff richard says was a breach of his privacy. danjohnson in his evidence to court this afternoon
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said at no time did anyone from south yorkshire police question the presence of the helicopter or object to it being used. i took from their helpful aerial photograph which they had sent the previous day, and the suggestions that there would not be much to see on the street, that there were content for the helicopter to be used. now dan johnson is going to continue to be cross examined here" tomorrow morning from 10:30am. we know sir cliff richard is seeking damages at the very top end for a breach of his privacy but the bbc says they defend their coverage and say they reported it in good faith, it was accurate and they say they broadcast a denial from sir cliff richard at every opportunity. thank you very much. this is bbc news at five — the headlines:
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the prime minister apologises again — this time to mps for the government's treatment of the caribbean migrants. but she denied the decision to destroy landing records — was made when she was home secretary. sir cliff richard continues his legal action against the bbc — alleging a serious invasion of privacy —— as corporation staff are questioned in court. the rate of inflation slowed last month — to the lowest in a year — the cost of clothing and footwear was partly responsible. and joey barton is back in football, the former manchester city midfielder will become the new head coach for fleetwood town on a three—year deal in june. and coach for fleetwood town on a three—year deal injune. and after seven seasons in the premier league said john claro has finally been named in the pfa team of the season, w011 named in the pfa team of the season, won a five manchester city players included alongside mohamed salleh of liverpool and harry kane of time. and mark cavendish will make his return from injury next month at the
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tour of yorkshire after recovering from breaking ribs in highest read crashes. —— high—speed crashes. a woman has died after she was nearly sucked out of the window of a plane when an engine exploded in mid—air. fellow passengers battled to pull the passenger back into the aircraft after the explosion, which smashed the window causing a dramatic loss of cabin pressure. the plane was a southwest airlines flight from new york to dallas with more than 140 people on board and made an emergency landing in philadelphia. 0ur correspondent james cook reports. radio: airport, it is a hole in the side of the aircraft. with a huge bang and a sharp drop, a terrifying ordeal began. 0n—boa rd southwest flight 1380, passenger martin martinez started a facebook video. it felt like it was freefalling and of course everyone was freaking out. everyone was crying. the left engine had apparently blown up, sending shrapnel into the fuselage and smashing a window. first there was an explosion
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and then almost immediately the oxygen masks came down and then probably within a matter of ten seconds, the engine then hit a window and busted it wide open. in the cockpit, the pilots, preparing for an emergency landing, radioed for help. 0k, could you have the medical team there on the runway as well, we've got injured passengers. injured passengers, ok. and are you, is your aeroplane physically on fire? no, it's not on fire, but part of it is missing. they said there's a hole and someone went out. i'm sorry, you said there was a hole and somebody went out? 1380, it doesn't matter, we'll work it out. so the airport isjust off to your right. report it in sight, please. survivors say one woman was sucked halfway out of the cabin before they manged to pull her back. other passengers desperately tried to block the hole with their coats. the passenger who died was jennifer riordan, a mother of two from new mexico. she was on a business trip for her employer, wells fargo bank.
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we're taking this event extremely seriously. this should not happen. and we want to find out why it happened so that we can make sure that preventative measures are put in place. an investigation is now under way into what is the first passenger death in a us airline accident since 2009. james cook, bbc news, los angeles. the director of the cia, mike pompeo, has made a secret visit to pyongyang to meet the north korean leader, kim jong—un. it's emerged the meeting took place over the easter weekend, shortly after mr pompeo was nominated by the president as america's top diplomat, or secretary of state. so how have we arrived at this point. towards the end of last year — when north korea held a number of weapons tests — including one on the 29th of november — which it claimed was its ‘most powerful‘ to date.
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north korea claims it is capable of hitting the us mainland. in response, president trump called the north korean leader kim jong—un ‘little rocket man.‘. north korea‘s attitudes started to change this year — saying it was ‘open to ending the nuclear programme‘. 0ne symbol of change was in february — when north and south korea competed under one ‘unified‘ flag at the winter olympics in south korea. a month later — north korea invites the us president for talks with its leader kimjong—un — an offer which donald trump accepted. last month north and south korea announced their leaders would meet on april 27 — with some talk of a possible peace treaty. 0ur north america correspondent, barbara plett usher is in mr trump‘s resort of mar—a—lago. can you talk us through the kind of
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thinking behind this initiative and what is being said about the visit of mike pompeo to pyongyang customer --?.i of mike pompeo to pyongyang customer --?. ithink of mike pompeo to pyongyang customer --?. i think people expect that this kind of senior visit with the north korean counterpart because they do need to have high—level contacts in order to set the groundwork for this summit. no one was expecting it to have already taken place in this kind of cloak and dagger way. mike pompeo having made the trip com pletely pompeo having made the trip completely secretly and i think donald trump relished his role in revealing that, that is his sense of drama. but it seems to be the main goal of the trip was to hear from self from kim jong—un that north korea was willing to negotiate the
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possibility of giving up its nuclear weapons because that was something that america wanted to be sure of before going ahead to the gaffer that meeting with mr tran. it seems as if that is clear the way and it seems the planning now is much more advanced than many thought. many thanks for that. we‘rejoined now by adam mount, director of the defense posture project at the federation of american scientists. thank you forjoining us, your thoughts on what has been revealed about the visit of mike pompeo question mark it is a pretty dramatic development, in the past visits from senior us officials have sometimes been able to create breakthroughs on the international dramatic second. it is not unprecedented for an intelligence official to go but normally it is
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for secretary of state. so every day we are not shooting at one another isa we are not shooting at one another is a small success at this stage. and so hopes are high that donald trump can achieve some kind of breakthrough on the peninsular and make progress towards denuclearisation. but personally i‘m sceptical that this meeting from mike pompeo has laid a firm foundation for that rate through to a car. what other reasons for your scepticism? a car. what other reasons for your scepticism ? 0ne a car. what other reasons for your scepticism? one is for example that the united states is not operating with the full range of foreign policy. the new nsc director, the national security adviserjohn bolton has cut the nsc staff. rex tillerson slashed state department funding and many staff members have not been replaced. and some preparation has been taking place at a breakneck pace so it is not to me
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that the us arthritis has had time to really plan out a complete negotiating strategy and ways to cou ntera ct negotiating strategy and ways to counteract all of the likely traps and gambits of kimjong—un counteract all of the likely traps and gambits of kim jong—un with full—back positions. fully coordinated with the allies. so far it looks like donald trump has been overconfident on twitter and on public saying for example but the relationship has an improving and denuclearisation would be good for the world. if he expects north korea to surrender their weapons wholesale in the next year i think he will have to think again. would it be fairorunfair have to think again. would it be fair or unfair to suggest that this meeting should come with some published concessions or would that have been too early? absolutely before accepting the invitation i think that the lowest bar they could ask for is the release of three american prisoners still in north korean prisons. now i think it is incredible to see the nominees for the us secretary of state come and
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go from pyongyang without securing the release of those prisoners. the fa ct i the release of those prisoners. the fact i think there‘s a lot more that could have been achieved in terms of setting conditions before accepting the invitation. i think the prisoners will eventually be released, but it is not something the united states should negotiate for. actually been a condition for engaging in this outreach. mike pompeo has a rather curious status here, he has not been confirmed as new secretary of state and to what extent would that colour the status of his visit and doesn‘t complicate matters for you in terms of his relationship with the president?m does, the us senate is still considering the nomination of mike pompeo, it is not certain that nomination will come out of committee and that leaves the door open for north korea to question his credibility and credentials. it is not clear to me that mike pompeo had the kind of tenure at the cia that
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is really suited to these kind of international negotiations. for example he has exhibited personal loyalty to donald trump do not think he has got where is by giving it to donald trump straight. so there is also serious questions about whether state department expertise has really been included in the planning for this summit meeting. i think mike pompeo is not well disposed to make that kind of connection either. soi make that kind of connection either. so i have hopes that the united states can fully prepare for this summit but so far early indications are that it is being rushed. thank you very much. time for a look at the weather and matt taylor is here. more sunshine and warm weather
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tomorrow. temperatures peaking at 25 degrees in the south east this afternoon. we have not seen that for quite some time. across england and wales this afternoon the skies where clear. remaining cloudy tonight across the hebrides with outbreaks of rain. but most places staying dry and clear. and temperatures dropping into single figures for some. so a bit call tomorrow morning before the sun gets up. thicker cloud across the west of scotland and northern ireland first thing but brightening up ireland first thing but brightening up in northern ireland and scotland as well. a bit more cloud around the western fringes of england and wales. but the most and afternoon of sunshine and clear blue skies. not quite as warm going through friday
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and into the weekend, a small chance of some thundery showers on sunday. this is bbc news — the headlines. the prime minister has apologised to mps for the government‘s treatment of the caribbean migrants who came to britain between the 19405 and ‘705. but she denied the decision to destroy landing records — was made when she was home secretary. did the prime minister, the then home secretary, sign off that decision? no, the decision to destroy the landing cards was taken in 2009 under a labour government. the rate of inflation slowed last month to the lowest in a year — the cost of clothing and footwear was partly responsible. sir cliff richard continues his legal action against the bbc — alleging a serious invasion of privacy — as corporation staff are questioned in court. a passenger has died after being
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sucked out of a plane on one of its engines exploded in midair. the airline was travelling from new york to dallas. some breaking news from the house of lords because peers have in the past few minutes heavily defeated the government on the issue of the uk staying in a customs union after brexit. that vote taking place in the house of lords, some conservative peers combined with the opposition to 348 in favour of a proposal from the independent peer lord kerr requiring the government to report on negotiating a continued customs union between the eu and the uk. speaking against the move lord lawson, the former chancellor called the proposal a wrecking amendment saying it was nonsensical to claim you cannot trade without a free—trade agreement. these are the
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live images from the house of lords. this vote came through just a few minutes ago and this is what happened. my my lords, they have voted content 348, not contents 225 so the content habit. so, there we have the vote happening a while ago. that vote to reca ptu re happening a while ago. that vote to recapture peers voting heavily against the government, defeating the government on the issue of a customs union after brexit, the majority of peers wanted britain to stay in a kind of customs union, 348 to 225. i mentioned lord lawson but
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lady hayter said remaining in a customs union would be good for the uk government and allow full access to european markets with no impediments. it means the issue will return to the house of commons, mps will be asked to vote on it and they‘ll be an attempt in the commons from the government to overturn this defeat so that is the next parliamentary step but a defeat for the government at that point on that element of the brexit debate. sport now with azi farni. joey barton is back in football. he‘s been announced as the new head coach of league one side fleetwood town. the former burnley and manchester city midfielder is currently serving an 18 month ban for gambling offences but that ends onjune the 1st and he‘ll start his new role the very next day. he‘s signed a three year deal. sergio aguero‘s been named in the pfa team of the year for the first time since he moved to england.
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he‘s one of five manchester city players included in the eleven... aguero scored 21 goals in 28 games this season, helping city to the premier league title. kyle walker, nicolas 0tamendi, david silva and kevin de bruyne have also been selected. liverpool forward mohamed salah and tottenham striker harry kane are also in the side. manchester united‘s david de gea is included along with liverpool‘s mo salah, chelsea‘s marcos alonso and three spurs players including harry kane. to tonight‘s action then and manchester united manager jose mourinho is expected to make changes to his side for their prmier league trip to bournemouth. united were beaten by bottom side west brom at the weekend and mourinho criticised some of his players, saying they‘ll have to earn their place in the line up for saturday‘s fa cup semi final against tottenham. victory this evening will see them move four points clear of liverpool in third place. what is the criteria, i only know
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one criteria, it is the way you play. it is the way you play. it is the only way i can select players. 0rdo you want the only way i can select players. or do you want me to go for the price they cost or their salary or the beautiful face, the price they cost or their salary or the beautifulface, the only price they cost or their salary or the beautiful face, the only way is to go with performance. the director of the london marathon says they are ready to deal with any medical issues that may arise next sunday. temperatures are expected to exceed twenty degrees the last time it was that hot, during the 2007 race, 5000 runners needed medical assistance. calum hawkins announced during the end of the gold coast marathon. hugh brasher insists that sunday‘s race, the 38th london marathon, will be prepared for anything. i have no idea at this stage what went on on the gold coast. i do know
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it was disturbing to watch. what i also know is we have an amazing team of doctors of medics who as you say have been doing this for a long period of time and i have absolute confidence in them that they will do an amazing job on sunday. mark cavendish will make his return from injury at next month‘s tour de yorkshire. the former road race world champion has been involved in a number of crashes in a frustrating start to the season, but will be on the start line in beverley. cavendish says he‘s not quite sure how his form will be after recovering faster than expected from rib and ankle problems. england bowler craig 0verton says he can‘t be sure that australia weren‘t ball tampering during their series defeat in the winter‘s ashes. smith, david warner and cameron bancroft have now been banned by cricket australia for their part in ball tampering against south africa. 0verton says there were some signs the aussie bowlers were getting more out of the ball over the winter. it was interesting they were getting
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through reverse swing and we did not think too much was going on and you can‘t change it now so we just cracked on with it and didn‘t think too much of it, really. that‘s all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. the prime minister‘s flagship brexit bill has just begun detailed scrutiny in the lords — with opposition peers hoping to force major changes. one of the biggest fights is expected to be over government plans to leave the customs union, which a cross—party group of lords hopes to stop. the issue will now return to the house of commons. lots of reaction to that vote because it is a pretty
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big majority against the bill at this point in the house of lords, 0ur chief political correspondent vicki young is at westminster. some thoughts on the outcome, we know it is a stage, this is not definitive but it is quite significant it tells us something about the state of opinion in the house of lords. yeah, it is a sign of trouble ahead for the government over this. not so much in the house of lords although although the government were prepared to defeat this is huge, a majority of 120 and that dangerous cocktail that the government of tory peers joining with crossbenchers, opposition mps, in order to try and force this issue of the uk staying in a customs union something the government has very clearly ruled out. there has been heated exchanges in the house of lords, one brexit peer saying what is going on as an exercise by remainders in the house of lords refusing to accept the verdict of
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the british people and playing with fire, on the other side, people are saying if we lead —— leave the union it will cost billions we need to stay in. the crucial thing now with this bill has to return to the house of commons in the next few weeks which means mps will have to reverse that so mps will now get a vote on that so mps will now get a vote on that issue broadly of the uk, the government negotiating to stay in a customs union said conservative mps who so far have said they do understand the union will come under enormous pressure from the government to support theresa may in this, it is now labour‘s policy to remain in the customs union, the response from kia starmer in the last few minutes he says it is an important step forward and that the prime minister has to listen to the growing chorus of those who want the government to drop the red line on leaving the customs union. the big question when it returns to the commons are those conservative mps who have been in the remaining side of the argument, do they see this as
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their moment to try and push and defeat their own government? they‘ll be underan defeat their own government? they‘ll be under an awful lot of pressure. a bouncy castle which blew across a fairground, leading to the death of a 7—year—old girl — was loaded into a trailer before police arrived — a court has heard. seven year—old summer grant was admitted to hospital, but died from her injuries. 0ne witness told chelmsford crown court that a ‘truck—type car‘ arrived after the incident — and about half a dozen people packed the inflatable away. two fairground workers, william and shelby thurston, deny a health and safety offence and manslaughter by gross negligence. 0ur correspondentjo black joins us with the latest from chelmsford crown court. what else has been said? the prosecution case is that the defendants, the married couple, they failed to adequately and the
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inflata ble failed to adequately and the inflatable in question to the ground that day and they failed to monitor weather conditions and ensure they we re weather conditions and ensure they were suitable for the inflatable to be in use. but the prosecution case. we have heard in court about the weather that day, it was wet and windy, we were told. we have been hearing from eyewitnesses, a lady called karen hughes who works at pets corner and open farm near the park who said she was using a gazebo that day that was weighted down, it was like an easter attraction showing off some animals but she said she packed up early because of the weather and when the prosecution asked her if you could describe the wind with one being i still day and ten being a howling gale, how would you describe it and she replied about seven because the wind was getting up. we also heard in a statement from a colleague of hers, a man called kyle who said he saw the bouncy castle blowing down the hill, i could see there were people
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from the fair chasing it, one of them unzipped the castle before going in and coming out with the young girl. they then placed her in the recovery position and shouted call an ambulance. he went on to say i saw people from the fire had started to load the castle up onto a trailer and shortly after the castle was removed police arrived and appeared to be crossed that the castle has been removed. both defendants deny manslaughter by gross negligence and a health and safety offence. tributes have been paid to the former first lady of the united states, barbara bush, who‘s died at the age of 92. president trump said she would be long remembered for her strong devotion to country and family. barbara bush was the wife of president george bush senior and mother of president george w bush and during her life she created a charity foundation to promote literacy. especially among members of families
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in disadvantaged areas. 0ur correspondent laura trevelyan looks back at her life. barbara bush was a commanding matriarch. only the second woman in american history to be both the wife of the president and the mother of one. she was married to the 41st occupant of the white house and raised the 43rd. born barbara pierce, she met george bush at a school dance and they married in 1945 after his service as a navy pilot in world war ii. barbara was credited with helping his political career by keeping a cardfile of everyone he ever met. it all paid off when george bush was elected first vice president to ronald reagan and then president. the office of president of the united states... barbara wore her trademark pearls at his inauguration, confiding they hid the wrinkles in her neck. it was this honesty which helped endear her to the american public. as first lady, she focused on promoting literacy, helping the most disadvantaged americans. if more people could read, write and comprehend,
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we would be that much closer to solving so many of the problems that plague our nation. during the first gulf war in 1990, barbara bush spoke for the nation in calling for a speedy end to the conflict. we are all wishing for peace. we want our people home. when her son george w bush decided to run for president... i, george walker bush, do solemnly swear... ..barbara was back in the spotlight once again. after his two terms in office, she was regretting the lack of civility in public life. ijust hate it, i hate the fact that people think compromise is a dirty word. it is not a dirty word. by the time her sonjeb made his unsuccessful run for president in 2016, barbara bush was a national icon. vote forjeb. oh, yes. barbara bush was smart, tough and often plain—spoken. an influentialfigure in a political dynasty. barbara bush who has died at the age of 92.
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this is bbc news at five — the headlines: the prime minister apologises again — this time to mps for the government‘s treatment of the caribbean migrants. but she said the decision to destroy landing records was made under a labour government. sir cliff richard continues his legal action against the bbc — alleging a serious invasion of privacy as corporation staff are questioned in court. the rate of inflation slowed last month — to the lowest in a year — the cost of clothing and footwear was partly responsible. an update on the market numbers for you — here‘s how london‘s and frankfurt ended the day. and in the the united states this is how the dow and the nasdaq are getting on. there are some 60,000 homeless people in los angeles and many of them live in ‘skid row‘
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— an area well known for being impoverished and facing major social problems. when craig mitchell a superior court judge was invited to visit the midnight mission in los angeles by one of those who‘d appeared before him in court he decided to start a running club to help those struggling with drugs and addiction. 6 years on, their story is being told in an award—winning documentary called ‘skid row marathon‘ which follows the lives of members of the club. it explores how and why they ended up living on skid row and the difference the running club has made to their lives. in a moment i‘ll be talking to craig mitchell and his producer gabriele hayes and from los angeles one of the runners ben shirley but first let‘s take a look at part of the documentary. the commitment from mr williams is
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71 yea rs, the commitment from mr williams is 71 years, four months to life. my involvement with the running club gives me the ability to impact lives ina way gives me the ability to impact lives in a way that i cannot as a judge. i started out with just a few bonus, a few mornings a week and they learned very quickly that you do not run a full marathon without a lot of training. i came into the mission £300, and the judge said he was starting a winning club. i could not waddle down the street. i waddled further every day and kept on doing that. no matter how bad what is going, show up, things will happen.
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show up, things will happen. giving someone from skid row an opportunity to come to a glorious city as incredibly empowering. it is such a big deal to be here. whatever sacrifices i have made to make this possible is worth it. there is an emotion and intensity but really it isa emotion and intensity but really it is a very uplifting experience to see that and congratulations to you all. craig, where did the inspiration come from? ch, all. craig, where did the inspiration come from? oh, boy. the inspiration come from? oh, boy. the inspiration was somewhat spontaneous. long before i was a judge i was a high school teacher for 17 years and so much of my life has been spent working with people, trying to encourage and help people realise their dreams. and so it was a natural. but in this form, this
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precise form of help, hard to come up precise form of help, hard to come up with the notion of helping in this particular way? i had read of a woman on the east coast of the united states who started running clu b united states who started running club for ex—felons and so when i considered recovering addicts, ex —felo ns, considered recovering addicts, ex—felons, close enough. considered recovering addicts, ex-felons, close enough. it seemed a good match. the challenge of telling what is a remarkable story, how did you approach it? it wasn't easy, we read an article in the la times in 2013 and we were intrigued by the story ofjudge mitchell and i am a runner myself and i thought let‘s meetjudge mitchell and see what it is about and we came down skid row and he said you cannotjust put cameras in the faces of these runners because they are at their lowest point. so we went with them for six weeks and surely and slowly
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gained their trust. trust is a big word and then, tell us something about the relationship of trust and you‘re back story, how did you come to this, what is your background? my background is professional musician for most of my life and at the end i drank and used in a way that i lost everything and it is interesting that you use trust because that is one thing that when ijoined a running club being homeless at the midnight mission i had found something i had rediscovered love for running and this bond with the judge and i did not trust anybody andl judge and i did not trust anybody and i did not want this innocent thing ripped from me. we are looking
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at images of you running because i‘m expecting to viewers that they are seeing you running as part of a group which is great to see, tell me a little more about the way new formed the bond and what it meant you, how did this deliver results?|j formed you, how did this deliver results?” formed the bond by following what was taught me recovery, you show up andl was taught me recovery, you show up and i had to give judge mitchell a chance, did not like him at first or the film—makers and just because i did not trust anyone so i opened up andl did not trust anyone so i opened up and i found some really good people who are in my life today. bear with us because i‘m moving back to craig, he is commendably candid, how typical is he? quite typical. judges are not perceived in a positive
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light, we are the folks who send them to prison and make their lives miserable so for them to with an open mind and consider spending three days a judge requires some trust. how does that spread because they are seeing a group here, not just one or two people, and extended group so hard you go about extending that trust, how does it work, is it word—of—mouth, how much reach out to have to do? in any relationship you spend time with people commute engage in long runs, you did little a cts engage in long runs, you did little acts of kindness for instance gabby on birthdays will bring birthday ca kes on birthdays will bring birthday cakes down to skid row, if i can help somebody by making a phone call toa help somebody by making a phone call to a potential employer, if i can write a letter of recommendation to
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get somebody into a programme, those other little things but i‘m sure i talked about amongst the members who say mitchell is ok. they are not little things. they‘re quite big things potentially. yes, and it is really important to be with them, it is notjust really important to be with them, it is not just taking really important to be with them, it is notjust taking cameras in their faces. many times on skid row running at the club without cameras to get the stories and getting to know them and sometimes people fall by the wayside, they relapse and you never see them again and that breaks your heart. i'm bound to mention, ben isjoining us from la but craig i should reveal to viewers you are running in the uk. this sunday i will be one of the many participants in the london marathon and umbro much looking forward to it and i met some young people in london who are involved in the programme where i got this t—shirt and they‘ll be out
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there as well so i‘m looking forward to it. it is a lesson, what do you wa nt to it. it is a lesson, what do you want them to take away from what she did, what is the message want people to ta ke did, what is the message want people to take away? verratti macro messages, one message is give people a second chance. the second message be inspired. then, to what extent are you inspired? to what extent we re are you inspired? to what extent were you inspired and how can you inspire others? i was inspired by the commitment of judge inspire others? i was inspired by the commitment ofjudge mitchell and by his friendship and being open so we can see he's notjust a judge, a figure but a compassionate man and i think i need showing up would be inspiration and it is trying to set
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an example to someone right behind me to see i show up every day and can share my story with them and know that i and you and we are all in this together and there was a second shot at life and it is a beautiful life outside of what we we re beautiful life outside of what we were in the middle of skid row, there was a big beautiful world as long as we let it happen, get out of our own way. and does that allow you to reconnect with the music you are telling us about, your musical background? i am doing things in music now that i could not wrap my head around. lam i am involved with streets and three in los angeles, a composer fellow who take music down to the skid row area, that is i feel most comfortable at is being involved in
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the skid row community with this wonderful music organisation, street symphony and running and being available to be down there and there isa available to be down there and there is a lot of work to be done down there. that is such an impressive list, i was waiting for the list to end which is impressive. thank you, a quick word from both of you, good luck in the marathon. lots will be wishing you well. a quick last word, if this were replicated in cities across the us, the potential is huge so what is your message? it all ready have started, we have other cities in the united states that have started running clubs inspired by the film and we are so happy about it. and i'm not an exceptional run, not exceptional in many many respects but i‘m willing to put the time and, i deeply care about other people and if you have some basic
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qualities such as those you can really help people. ben, thank you for your story and well done what you have achieved, really impressive and to you two, a terrific and congratulations. thank you very much. time for a look at the weather. it is hot and sunny and hot tomorrow for some parts of the uk. not all of you saw sunshine today, there was cloud across northern ireland and scotla nd cloud across northern ireland and scotland but notice in the fast two hours it has been breaking up and it was safe very cloudy into the night across the hebrides, heavy bursts of rain never too far away, that what then edge in, and cloud returns to northern ireland by the end of the night with a few spots of rain. most, clear skies and a fresh night, temperatures in single figures for most as we start the day but warming up most as we start the day but warming up under sunshine, plenty of it
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around. western scotland and northern ireland, cloudy start, the cloud breaks, sunny spells developing with more cloud through tomorrow afternoon compared this afternoon on western fringes of england and wales, misty for one or two spots. temperatures down a touch but the most a warmer date right to come, 21 degrees 2728 in the london area was the cooling down a touch into friday plenty of centring around but by sunday a greater chance of a few showers. full details next. the prime minister hits back as labour accuses the government of being callous and incompetent
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over its treatment of windrush migrants. theresa may apologises again after many who came here as children from commonwealth countries are mistakenly threatened with deportation. people in the windrush generation who came here from commonwealth countries have built a life here, they have made a massive contribution to the country. these people are british, they are part of us. one man who arrived here from jamaica in the 19505 tells us of the stress he‘s been under. i don‘t think people have realised the mental pressure it puts you under, to have this on you. you feel like a criminal. also on the programme tonight. inflation falls to its lowest level for a year amid expectations that interest rates will rise next month.

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