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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 18, 2018 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 8pm. more than a hundred so called windrush cases have now been reported to the government, with theresa may saying she's "genuinely sorry" for the anxiety caused by threats of deportation. she's denied she ordered the destruction of thousands of immigrant landing cards. did the prime minister, the then home secretary signed off that decision? no, that the decision was taken in 2009 under a labour government. one man in his 90s who arrived nearly 70 years ago, tells us of his disappointment at his treatment by the british government i feel quite dejected, i am disappointed. i am mystified. i don't know why and the thing i would love to know, what is the reason for my refusal? inflation falls to its lowest level for a year
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amid expectations that interest rates will rise next month. the government has suffered its first defeat in the house of lords over the centrepiece of its brexit legislation. could we be seeing a thaw in relations between the us and north korea after secret talks were held in pyongyang. i'm and in the next hour, a passenger dies after being almost sucked out of a plane window when one of its engines exploded midair. mother of two jennifer riordan was from new mexico and was on a work trip. it's the first fatal us airline attack in 10 years. and temperatures soar across parts of the uk on the hottest day of the year so far. good evening and welcome to bbc news.
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the prime minister has hit back after labour accused the government of being "callous and incompetent" in its treatment of the so—called windrush generation. in the commons this lunchtime theresa may again apologised to those wrongly threatened with deportation. during an exchange with the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, she said she wouldn't take lessons from a leader who, in her words, "allows anti—semitism to run rife in his party". the comments came as it emerged that a total of 113 people have called a government hotline for people with concerns about their migration status. our political editor laura kuenssberg reports. that was a long time ago. yeah, it was. that veranda, i used to slide down there. jamaica, country of his birth, britain, country of his home. mick broderick came to london as a toddler with his mother and sister in the late 1950s, but decades later, he says he was threatened with deportation and even lost hisjob. one a minute, i'm going back to a country, when i was a little boy,
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i know nothing about. as far as i know this is my home. all because under tightened immigration rules he couldn't prove he had the legal right to live here. i don't think people have realised the mental pressure it puts you under to have this on you. you feel like a criminal. it's awful, it really is awful. i've always worked and looked after my family, that's what a man does. not like this. especially when you think there's no one there and i couldn't afford a lawyer. are you to blame for the windrush fiasco prime minister? she was at the home office figures when the laws became stricter. the prime minister apologises once more, the windrush generation should never have been caught up in the changes. these people are british, they are part of us. and i want to be absolutely clear. i want to be absolutely
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clear that we have no intention of asking anyone to leave who has the right to remain here. but what happened to records that could have avoided at least part of the problem? in 2010 the home office destroyed landing cards for a generation of commonwealth citizens. and so have told people, we cannot find you in our system. did the prime minister, the then home secretary, sign off that decision? prime minister? no, the decision to destroy the landing cards was taken in 2009 under a labour government. the decision was taken by officials not ministers yet the anxiety of those affected goes beyond paperwork. the windrush generation can to our country after the war to rebuild our nation that had been so devastated by war. isn't the truth, isn't the truth mr speaker that under her the home office became heartless and helpless?
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was that theresa may? good morning. this home secretary has to do with an accidental mass, the overall crackdown under the former home secretary was entirely deliberate. we want to ensure only legal migrants have access to the labour market, free health services, housing, bank accounts and driving licences. this is notjust about making the uk are more hostile place for illegal immigrants, it is also about fairness. the intense push by the government had eyebrow raising tactics. but ministers believed the home office had hefty public support. if you haven't got the right paperwork basically you are a bad guy and have a culture of disbelief and the absolute and commitments is 2010 has been to cut immigration and drive as many as they can out of the country. it is not cultural
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assumption that has driven many of the problems we seen around the windrush generation. consequences that were not intended but not random either. anxiety for thousands of people for whom britain was and is a place called home. our political editor, laura kuenssberg, reporting there. and we'll find out how this story, and many others, are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10.1i0pm this evening in the papers. our guests joining me tonight are polly mackenzie, who's the director of the think—tank, demos, and steve hawkes, the deputy political editor at the sun. inflation has fallen to its lowest level for a year. the consumer prices index stood at 2.5% in march, down from 2.7% in february. meanwhile, wages continue to rise. so could the squeeze on uk households' budgets be coming to an end? our consumer affairs correspondent, nina warhurst, has been to preston to find out. how long have you been
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coming to steve thenjohn? a barber since 1970. must be about 20, 30 years. wow. yeah. is he any good yet? no, he's still learning! steve has seen out his share of storms. he had noticed prices creeping up, but business stayed buoyant. it's been fairly steady, definitely. so it doesn't even compare to how bad things were ten years ago? no, nothing like. it was playing spot the customer at one time. was it? yes. but now, you've just a steady flow. but across the road to years of growing costs have been tough on the meat business. now the markets had a face—lift and things are looking up. the last ten weeks, we've done well. we've noticed that people who are in here, they've got smiles on their faces. you know, people look a bit more confident. it seems pretty vibrant. this new boys opening up left right and centre, cafes, take aways. so you're feeling quite optimistic about this? money? and that optimism could be growing. cut—price womenswear has helped inflation come down further
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than expected and that has implications for the bank of england, who are likely to raise interest rates next month in order to help slow down inflation. but seeing as that's happening anyway it might be that we only see one small rate rise this year. combined with small wage increases its good news. if these trends continue, the squeeze should be easing. if we have been very mindful about what we've got to spend, as we start to feel a bit better off we may be more excited about that and willing to spend and more on things that make us happy. if this trend continues are we likely to become a little bit more frivolous, carefree with our cash? we could be, yeah, we could. but not yet. in the travel trade at least holiday—makers are still playing it safe. i would say over the past couple of years there's more all—inclusive holidays being booked, especially by families.
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because they know exactly how much the holiday is going to cost then and they don't need to however spending money. so it's important to them to feel in control of the spend? yes, they want to know how much the holidays going to cost them, and they don't want any unexpected expenses whilst they are away. it is too soon to say with certainty how the coming months will play at but for most, while things might not be getting lots easier, they don't look set to be getting harder. nina warhurst, bbc news, preston. students in england, wales and northern ireland are facing a rise in the cost of their loans, with interest rates up to six—point—three percent from september. the government says very few people would be affected by the change, which is due to a higher rate of inflation since last year. but the national union of students said the loan system continued to be a bad dealfor students, their families, and the taxpayer. the government has lost a key vote in the house of lords this evening over brexit. a cross—party group of peers is pressing for the uk to remain in a customs union after it's left the european union. our deputy political editor, john pienaar,
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has been at westminster for us this evening. brexit has become a trial of strength, a test of the government and the brexiteers and the opponents and the brexiteers and the opponents and here in the house of lords just and here in the house of lords just a short while ago the government came off worse when peers voted for britain to explore continuing to be a member of the european customs union. now, that would mean no customs checks, it would mean no customs checks, it would mean no customs duties but it would also mean having to follow eu laws and it would stop britain from exploring and striking its own trade the old around the world. so there will be another struggle as the government seeks to persuade mps just along the corridor in the house of commons to overturn this defeat, this evening. and that's not because they think it would necessarily force them to change policy. inside government, they are saying that having to explore membership of a customs union is so vague that it will probably practically mean very little. but there were more
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struggles still to come. about the terms of brexit and the terms of a final deal on leaving the european union and the government does not wa nt to union and the government does not want to give any ground if they can avoid it to their opponents here at westminster. so you may have thought about the brexit have gone rather quiet but there are penty of battles still to come. and the shape of brexit and the authority of the government under prime minister rests on the outcome. a team of international weapons inspectors have delayed their visit to the site of a suspected chemical attack in syria after a united nations security team on the ground were targeted by gunfire. it's now unclear when the fact—finding mission to douma will begin. the alleged attack led to us, french and british air strikes on saturday. the syrian government denies it used chemical weapons. the us defence secretary james mattis has blamed the syrian government for the delay. we are very much aware of the delay that this regime imposed on that delegation, but we are also very much aware of how they have operated in the past to see what they have done using chemical weapons and using the pause after a strike
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like that to try and clean up the evidence before the investigating team gets in. so it's unfortunate they had the delay. president trump has confirmed that the head of the cia, mike pompeo, travelled to north korea last week to hold secret talks with the country's leader, kim jong—un. the meeting has raised hopes of a breakthrough over north korea's nuclear programme. meanwhile, south korea says it's considering how to change a decades—old armistice with the north into a peace treaty. laura bicker‘s report from seoul contains some flash photography. south korea never feels like a country still at war. instead, the young claim the streets after work and ignore any threat from their neighbour to the north. now after 65 years, this generation may have a chance at peace.
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but they can't do it without the help of the president of the united states. i like what donald trump's doing with this peace... i think rather than donald trump's doing it was kim jong—un's change of attitude that led to this. at a press conference with the prime ministerjapanese prime ministers shinzo abe donald trump doctor hint at the diplomatic bombshell that was to come. we've also started talking to north korea directly. we have had direct talks at very high levels, extremely high levels. it turns out those talks were carried out by cia director mike pompeo who met kimjong—un in north korea. all confirmed in a presidential tweet. the meeting went very smoothly, he said, and a good relationship was formed. details of the summit are being worked out now, denuclearisation will be a great
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thing for the world but also for north korea. so did kim jong—un tell mike pompeo he is ready to give up nuclear weapons, some doubt it. it's not clear to everyone that what he wants is simply denuclearisation of north korea or denuclearisation of the korean peninsula which will require that the us also give up its alliance with south korea and the nuclear umbrella that comes with that. officials in seoul are making it clear that no peace treaty would be on the table unless kim jong—un agreed to give up his nuclear weapons. and that is something many believe he will never be willing to do. however a peace treaty is something that his father and his grandfather never achieved. it might prove quite tempting to the young leader. the leaders of the two koreas will come face—to—face at the heavily fortified border next week. but the power to forge any lasting agreement lies with the us. the hopes of many on this peninsula are in president trump's hands. laura bicker, bbc news, seoul.
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let's hear what he had to say. he just left north korea, had a great meeting with kim jong and just left north korea, had a great meeting with kimjong and got just left north korea, had a great meeting with kim jong and got along with really well, really great and he's that kind of a guy, he's very smart but he gets along with people. so, ithink smart but he gets along with people. so, i think we will be in good shape, we will see what happens. many people are predicting other things but i have a feeling it's going to work out very well. the presidents beating in the last couple minutes or so. and we can speak to jim hoare, who set up the british embassy in north korea and worked across asia for the civil service before that. very good to see you, thank you for being with us was, the president
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said he was a good meeting, it was a meeting venue —— no one knew was taking place, it was held in secret and so on. it'd make sense you?m made sense, it also gave a sense of relief. it's very rare indeed for two lea d e rs relief. it's very rare indeed for two leaders to meet in such circumstances without any preparation. which seemed to be the case up till now. when two leaders meet it could cause a lot of behind—the—scenes work, nothing special in that and it also requires afairdegree of special in that and it also requires a fair degree of confidence and secrecy on a fair degree of confidence and secrecy on both sides. mr trump accepted an oral invitation without a p pa re ntly accepted an oral invitation without apparently any consideration or any planning cell the fact that they are 110w planning cell the fact that they are now talking at this level about the things that will happen at the meeting assuming it takes place i think it's important. the president is meeting a prime minister ofjapan
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at the moment. what do you think their concerns are? they would even consulted that there was the possibility of a meeting between the leader of north korea and the united states. indeed not. ithink the japanese are concerned, they look upon the united states as the guarantee or of the existence, that any threat to them given the theoretical nature of the self—defense forces it's something that they would need outside assistance with and if they find that they are great allies, negotiating with what they see as their great enemy, north korea, i think that was actually a very worrying moment. and i think he is doing his best to try and claw back. south korea and the united states a more important position forjapan. on this issue. we know what
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president trump thinks of the around nuclear deal which took years to get off the ground. and he could possibly pull the united states out of that as early as may. if he was to do that would use nine as nuclear treaty with the united states?|j think treaty with the united states?” think if i was north korea i would not sign a nuclear treaty at all. i'm afraid, i think the north koreans this is the guarantee of their continued assistance and i'm afraid events over the last few days in syria would not have made them any in syria would not have made them a ny less in syria would not have made them any less determined to keep their nuclear capabilities. that does not mean to say they will go on developing things in quite this same way up till now. but it does mean that they are willing to discuss matters, to get the concerns, their
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issues on the table and that i think it's as far as they'll be prepared to go. don't think they will be giving up their nuclear programme, whatever the americans may think or hope. so you think this is a pr stu nt? hope. so you think this is a pr stunt? no, i think it's hope. so you think this is a pr stunt? no, ithink it's more hope. so you think this is a pr stunt? no, i think it's more than that. i think the north koreans are concerned that there international isolation, they are concerned the effect of sanctions i think mr trump is right there, but on the other hand, they know what happened to gaddafi, they know what to saddam hussein and if they, their argument would be and it is there argument andi would be and it is there argument and i thought it presented to me many times. if we give these up we are vulnerable and looks what has happened to other vulnerable states, the west generally does not like so i can't see them just saying oh yes, of course he will trust you and he will give up
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of course he will trust you and he willgive up our of course he will trust you and he will give up our nuclear weapons. they will stop maybe but they won't do the sort of thing that the americans keep talking about, com plete americans keep talking about, complete verification, complete dismantling. sure, but they could say yes we will do all that, but you need to get rid of your nuclear weapons first, you need to take away the nuclear umbrella from japan and germany south from south korea. i mean it sounds as if you're suggesting that the stocks are a nonsta rter suggesting that the stocks are a nonstarter really. no, ithink suggesting that the stocks are a nonstarter really. no, i think that we are not a nonstarter but i think it's important both sides except the other has issues they want to raise, concerns they want to raise and it is after all legitimate for north korea to raise what they see as a threat to them from the united states. which is not so much troops in the region, those are an irritant there and an annoyance but it's really the fact that the united states can target north korea with rockets from the mainland or from
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other parts of the united states that use the imponderable. and that's why they developed this nuclear programme they would argue in order to make it costly for the americans to attack them and so they will not be attacked and if you go into the talk thinking we will win anything, they should accept the other side has concerns that the other side has concerns that the other side has dealt with or on the table, they will get progress. it won't be as sure as grand as some people hope either in pyongyang or washington but it could be progress. it could be a step towards defusing the peninsula and i think the south korean talks with the north are also important. because, if those two we re important. because, if those two were able to reach some form of
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long—term agreement i think that will have an affect on us thinking as well. ok, thank you for your analysisjim. as well. ok, thank you for your analysis jim. thank you. the headlines on bbc news... more than a hundred so called windrush cases have now been reported to the government, with theresa may saying she's "genuinely sorry" for the anxiety caused by threats of deportation. she's denied she ordered the destruction of thousands of immigrant landing cards dating as far back as the 1940s. the rate of inflation slowed last month to the lowest in a year. the cost of clothing and footwear was partly responsible. the government has suffered its first defeat in the house of lords over the centrepiece of its brexit legislation. sport now...and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's azi farni. manchester united are looking to keep a firm grip on second place in
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the premier league, they are in action right now against bournemouth. jose mourinho has made several changes from the team that beat, were beaten by west brom over the weekend and it's made an impact on the last few minutes, they have taken chris on the last few minutes, they have ta ken chris kerr on the last few minutes, they have taken chris kerr tapping in from jesse lingard, 1—0 the score with just under seven minutes left to play in the first half. jolie is backin play in the first half. jolie is back in football, he has been announced as the new head coach, the former burnley and manchester city midfielder currently serving an 18 month ban for gambling offences, and that end on june month ban for gambling offences, and that end onjune the 1st, he will start his new role the next day. he signed a three—year deal. you know a complex character and he's a very intelligent chap as well and he's also very madly involved in football. that's one thing people get excited about that. to be honest it's just as it relates someone said to him if i passed my driving test
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all tell you what to do that's put a new coach is like trying to tell everybody else what to do. you need to get out a bit more behind you but he needs to start very well when he gets into it. sergio has been named for the first time since he moved to england, he's one of five manchester city players included in the 11, he scored 21 goals and 28 games this season helping city to the premier league title. kyle walker, nicholas, david silva, and kevin de bruyne also been selected. mohamed salah and tottenham striker harry kane are also in. defender says his conscience is clear after his claim of racial abuse against west bromwichj rodriguez was found not proven. the cumberland —— he insisted he had never seeks to bring a false charge against a fellow professional. he said please let me be clear, i know what i heard, and i
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did not miss here is read as has a lwa ys did not miss here is read as has always denied that he used racist language. cricket now, england bowler says he can't be sure that i was julia ward bowler says he can't be sure that i wasjulia ward ball bowler says he can't be sure that i was julia ward ball tampering bowler says he can't be sure that i wasjulia ward ball tampering during their defeat in the winter as ashes. steve smith, david warner, and cameron have now been banned by cricket australia for their part in ball tampering again south africa. overton says there were some signs of the boulders were getting more out of the ball over the winter. obviously it was interesting that the god the conditions without one, but we do not think too much was going on and you can't really change it now so we just cracked on with it and didn't think too much of it really. following cameron's nine—month ban ball tampering in south africa mop thoroughly —— that all of the batsman has replaced him as somerset overseas player this season. he spoke to us a little earlier. yeah, i think
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season. he spoke to us a little earlier. yeah, ithink you season. he spoke to us a little earlier. yeah, i think you have to try and look at the positives and the opportunities that i've got from this, it's obviously a tough scenario and i feel for cameron this, it's obviously a tough scenario and ifeel for cameron but i think now we have got to try and ta ke i think now we have got to try and take that opportunity and i think you'll be back at some point, he's a really good bloke under review good player so hopefully he will be back bigger and stronger. finally, we could see a rafa nadal novak djokovic quarterfinal at the monte carlo masters after both men wanted it. djokovic is still finding his feet. this is only his fourth tournament since wimbledon last year. an elbow injury mostly keeping him out. he beat croatia borna coric in straight sets but wasted nine points. he will play dominic thiem next and if he wins that he will face a ten time monte carlo champion nadal. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on those stories on the bbc‘s website, that the bbc .co.uk/ on the bbc‘s website, that the bbc .co .uk/ sport. the father of the terminally ill toddler alfie evans has met pope francis and begged him to save his son. tom evans has flown to rome to ask the pope to intervene in the legal battle over switching
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off life support for the 23—month—old. it comes after alfie's family lost the latest appeal for his treatment to continue at alder hey children's hospital in liverpool. a hairdresser who said he was "riddled" with hiv and convicted of trying to infect 10 men has beenjailed for life with a minimum term of 12 years. daryll rowe, who's 27, infected five men with whom he'd had unprotected sex. he also sabotaged the condoms of anotherfive in brighton and northumberland. the bbcjournalist who broke the story about a police investigation into sir cliff richard has told the high court that he acted in a "professional and fair" way. danjohnson said he was sorry that sir cliff had been "through such a difficult time". the bbc says its report on south yorkshire police's
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sexual assault inquiry was of public interest. sir cliff was not arrested or charged. our special correspondent, lucy manning, was in court. sir cliff richard finally heard from the bbcjournalist who broke the exclusive story that the singer was being investigated and his flat searched by police in 2014. yes, this lunchtime the searches are still going on. police officers from south yorkshire police have been in this gated, private estate for more than two hours now... dan johnson reported from outside the singer's home. in the witness box it was put to him that he didn't care a fig for sir cliff richard, that he was desperate not to lose an exclusive story. mrjohnson was asked by sir cliff richard's barrister if he accepted his story had caused the singer massive damage and distress. i accept he was upset and distressed, he said. the barrister then asked, would you apologise to sir cliff? mrjohnson replied, i'm sorry he went through
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such a difficult time. he was then asked, sir cliff is in court, would you apologise to him? the judge then stepped in to end this line of questioning. he later added, i accept the distress he feels, i don't accept it was caused by me uniquely. obviously south yorkshire police were part of that and my colleagues at the bbc who were part of the story as well. i don't believe i was at fault. i just reported the facts of the story. mrjohnson denied the bbc‘s use of a helicopter to take pictures of the police searching sir cliff richard's flat was intrusive. i thought it was useful to tell people what was going on. but he was pressed by the singer's barrister about why there hadn't be more discussions about sir cliff richard's privacy. the barrister asked him about an e—mail he wrote referring to the singer as a celebrity paedo. mrjohnson said it was just shorthand to a close colleague and he had always been professional and fair when reporting this story. sir cliff richard listened closely
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in court to the man who had broadcast details about him to the world. the singer is claiming very substantial damages from the bbc for invading his privacy but the bbc insists the story was accurate and in the public interest. lucy manning, bbc news. more than a hundred or so called windrush cases have now been reported to the government, with theresa may saying she's "genuinely sorry" for the anxiety caused by threats of deportation. she's denied she ordered the destruction of thousands of immigrant landing cards. mike granatt mike gra natt has mike granatt has been the press secretary to five prime ministers and hejoins secretary to five prime ministers and he joins us secretary to five prime ministers and hejoins us from tunbridge wells. good to see you. amber rudd blame civil servants for this mess and the civil servants looking against the boss and everybody blames theresa may. have you seen
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any debacle as bad as this in the home office? i cannot remember one recently. back in the days of disputes between michael howard and derek lewis, the head of the prison service, there were things like this but not as bad as this, no. who would have come to the decision to destroy these landing cards dating back as far as the 19a0s? destroy these landing cards dating back as far as the 1940s? somebody must have decided to put that proposal forward. presumably, as must have decided to put that proposalforward. presumably, as i understand it, because the building was being emptied and they didn't wa nt to was being emptied and they didn't want to move these things. it must have been far up the chain because his records of fact and would normally be in the national archives but they thought they were informed enough so at the least a senior official in the home office, if not ministers, would have seen this. theresa may, when she became home
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secretary, this idea to get rid of these landing cards was perpetuated through her time at the home office. would she have signed off on it? through her time at the home office. would she have signed off on it7m the decision was made by a labour minister in the previous administration they would not have revisited the idea. it is very difficult to tell if somebody asked the question, who signed off on the final disposal? it is quite revealing. we are seeing a little window into the way that perhaps the home office works and these huge areas of lives that are affected by these departments. one suspects there is a sense of confusion and disbelief among ordinary members of the public that this is how things are conducted. members of the public are conducted. members of the public are quite right. at the end of the day, ministers are elected to get a
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job done and a task civil servants with helping to formulate policy and they agree on policy and the ministers should supervise the policy and that seems to have broken down here. with ministers blaming civil servants for a policy that ministers should have supervised and it looks like civil servants are saying we were just doing what we we re saying we were just doing what we were told but the fact is the minister carries the can and there we re minister carries the can and there were none too ministers, the home secretary and immigration minister, who should have had a grip on this. was it possible to foresee this com plete was it possible to foresee this complete mess as a result of desperately trying on the part of the government to bring down net migration tojust tens the government to bring down net migration to just tens of thousands? is it possible to have foreseen people who would have been in this country for many years who would get caught up in this? of course. the immigration department and the home office has huge experience over many yea rs, office has huge experience over many years, decades, of what happens when
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you start to impose these things and the home office as a department normally has a good grip on the fact that politicians have an effect and individuals because that is what they deal with so i cannot imagine somebody did not say this might go wrong. it might have been put into place harriet lee and the objections might have been overwritten but the whole business of turning the employers and nhs into policemen for the home office, that perfect must have been foreseen and if not, what of the ministers been doing over the past few weeks? the press cuttings have been full of theirs and out of the blue, on the eve of the government conference, we have a sudden reversal of policy. we will leave there. mike granatt, thank you for joining leave there. mike granatt, thank you forjoining us. now the weather with helen willetts. good evening, it's been a long time in coming but many
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enjoyed some sunshine, some warm if not very warm sunshine today we saw temperatures reach 25 celsius in greater london but many parts of england and wales have temperatures towards 20 degrees and even northern ireland and scotland saw temperatures into the high teens but this weather front is close by and as we go through the evening and overnight it will introduce more clouds once again across northern ireland and western regions of scotland. not a cold night but it still could be a little murky first thing in the morning but i think it will clear quite quickly. so for many of us a repeat performance of anything temperatures will climb just a little higher to take into the afternoon and a decent day here along with scotland, a possibility ofa little bit more cloud around across the western side of england and wales and temperatures might not be quite so high here but for many it looks a little warmer to say that stretching up into many northern areas as well. it does start to change as the end through the weekend. this is bbc news. our latest headlines... more than 100 so—called
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windrush cases have now been reported to the government, with theresa may saying she's "genuinely sorry" for the anxiety caused by threats of deportation. she's denied she ordered the destruction of thousands of immigrant landing cards. did the prime minister, the then home secretary, sign off on that decision? no, the decision to destroy the landing cards was taken in 2009 under a labour government. the year—long squeeze on wages is showing signs of coming to an end. official figures show the gap between inflation and wages narrowed between december and february. president trump has confirmed that the head of the cia, mike pompeo, travelled to north korea last week to hold secret talks with the country's leader, kim jong—un. the government has suffered its first defeat in the house of lords over the centrepiece of its brexit legislation. after two decades of global decline,
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malaria cases are on the rise and the microsoft founder bill gates has announced nearly $4 billion of funding to help stop the disease spreading. an airline passenger has been killed in america after she was almost sucked out of a plane at 32,000 feet when one of its engines exploded. the southwest airlines boeing 737 was flying between new york and texas. the blast shattered the window she was sitting next to. nick bryant has the story. imagine the relief of the passengers on board after this southwest airlines boeing 737 landed safely on the ground. they had heard the engine explode at 32,000 feet. they had seen a window smashed open by the debris. they had watched as a fellow passenger was partially sucked out of the cabin after the rapid depressurisation. one of the 149 people on board, marty martinez captured the high altitude drama.
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first there was an explosion and then almost immediately the oxygen masks came down. and then probably within a matter of ten seconds, the engine then hit a window and busted it wide open. it felt like it was freefalling and of course everyone was freaking out. everyone was crying. at the controls, captain tammiejo shults, a highly experienced former top gun navy pilot. she radioed for help, showing extraordinary calm. ok, could you have the medical meet us there on the runway as well? we've got injured passengers. injured passengers, ok. and is your aeroplane physically on fire? no, it's not on fire. but part of it's missing. they said there's a hole and someone went out. i'm sorry, you said there was a hole and somebody went out? airport, there is a hole in the side of the aircraft. passengers managed to pull the woman sucked out of the window back into the cabin, but she died from her injuries. she has now been identified as jennifer riordan, a bank executive from new mexico.
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a 42—year—old mother—of—two who had been on a business trip to new york. investigators are looking into what is the first fatal us airline accident in almost a decade. the early signs point to metal fatigue, causing a fan blade to break off. even before this incident, european authorities have called for non—urgent inspections of these american and french made engines that are a workhorse of the global aviation industry. us authorities are now likely to follow suit. this could been a catastrophic accident and the pilot who landed this stricken aircraft is being hailed as a heroine. nick bryant, bbc news, new york. as you've been hearing, the cost of living has fallen to its lowest level for a year. the uk inflation rate has dropped from 2.7% in february to 2.5% in march. joining me now is personal finance analyst sarah coles from hargreaves lansdown.
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good to see you, thanks forjoining us. good to see you, thanks forjoining us. it would seem this is good news on both fronts, inflation is down and inflation, i mean wages going up. wages going up faster than inflation means that there is more money in the pockets of people and since january 2017, wages have been growing more slowly than inflation so growing more slowly than inflation so prices have been rising faster and people have had to spread their income over more expenses. that is a fundamental problem, the problem with wages not rising as fast as perhaps people would have wanted and certainly would perhaps expect? this is something that we have to bear in mind looking at these figures, this is great news on the face of it because yesterday the figures showed wages were increasing at 2.0% and prices are going up 2.7%, which does sound like money in the pocket but
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when you go into this, everything is different, depending on personal circumstances so different, depending on personal circumstances so if you are public sector worker and their pay rises have been frozen at 1%, any inflation above that will hit you hard. all we need is for inflation to go upa hard. all we need is for inflation to go up a little bit higher and beerin to go up a little bit higher and beer in the same problems we were 24 hours ago? i think one of the things, it is difficult to predict how these things will change in such an unpredictable environment but the bank of england is confident that we are looking at these inflation figures coming down so they have come down from, they were at 2.8% and then 2.7% and now 2.5%, so they are keeping the hopes up and that we're getting closer to that 2% they have targeted. and for quite a while. what about the possibility of an interest rate rise as soon as next month? it has been priced into the market and there has been a lot
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of comments saying that we were expecting this rise and that is very much still in the minds of people and widely predicted and what people are looking at is being less confident about the rise further in the year and there was talk around another rise in november and there is disquiet as to whether or not it is disquiet as to whether or not it is right time be rising. there is still overwhelming support for the idea that there will be interest rate rises in may but we will have to wait and see. your prediction is just one of them this year? it is impossible to guess!” just one of them this year? it is impossible to guess! i want to get you back on the show to talk to you about that! thank you. stu d e nts students in england, wales and northern ireland are facing a rise in the cost of loans with interest rates up to 6.3% from september. in the studio is our education editor,
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branwen jeffreys. was this expected? every year when we get the march inflation rate, the retail price index measure, including housing costs, that is used to set the interest rates for the coming academic year starting in september, using a simple formula, it is rpi plus 3%. because rbi in march was 3.3%, adding 3% that is 6.3%. every student starting university this autumn will pay that from the moment they start studying on everything they start studying on everything they borrow up until one year after they borrow up until one year after they graduate. when a sliding scale kicks in which means only the highest earners pay the top part of interest rates. it will be more expensive to get a higher education and this was expected and is it going to be the kind of thing that will put people off? there is no sign of that as yet butjust will put people off? there is no sign of that as yet but just the psychological figure that interest
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rate, that headline figure, has been a major part of the debate about the cost of going to university and how much students are borrowing because in england, it is the poorest stu d e nts in england, it is the poorest students that live with the biggest debts because they don't have the bank of mum and dad to pay for those living costs so this is a major factor in the government review which is under way already and which we expect might come back with some recommendations or some early thoughts later this year before a final report early in 2019. thank you. branwen final report early in 2019. thank you. bra nwen jeffreys. a bouncy castle which blew across a fairground — leading to the death of a seven—year—old girl — was loaded into a trailer before police arrived, a court has heard. seven—year—old summer grant was admitted to hospital but died from her injuries. one witness told chelmsford crown court that a truck—type car arrived after the incident and about half a dozen people packed the inflatable away. two fairground workers, william and shelby thurston, deny a health and safety offence and manslaughter by gross negligence. after two decades of global
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decline, malaria cases are on the rise again. nearly half the world's population is at risk, with young children the most vulnerable. now the philanthropist and founder of microsoft, bill gates, has announced nearly $4 billion of new funding in an attempt to stop the disease spreading further. he's been speaking to the bbc about the challenge, as rebecca kesby reports. it's one of the oldest diseases in the world but malaria still kills nearly half a million people a year. most of them children under five. and half of them in commonwealth countries. entrepreneur and philanthropist bill gates says it's urgent to keep up the fight. our goal is to over the next five years cut the death in half again and this is mostly young children in africa. so it's an awful disease, but unless we rededicate ourselves, the money for the research and money for the delivery, the deaths could go all the way back up to a million
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which is where it was when we started this a little over ten years ago. drug resistance, climate change and a drop in internationalfunding are all factors that may have contributed to an increase in the number of malaria cases over the past two years. it's an uphill battle, isn't it? is it one you can win? well, it's not easy. malaria, you know, the mosquitoes change, the parasite changes. the world has been a bit naive about how hard it is to get rid of malaria. if we don't stay focused on it, no, we will lose. a vaccine is in development, research into the gene editing of mosquitoes may also help. new bed nets are planned and improved technology to map outbreaks will enable experts to track the disease. historically it was more at country level so you would see a map of africa and each country would be shaded. now we are trying to get down
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literally to the one square kilometre level and say, ok, how many cases either in each of those little squares. bill, you and melinda deserve particular praise... theresa may says britain will contribute half £1 billion every year until 2021 to tackle the disease. bill gates is also pledging a further billion dollars from his foundation and with one child dying every two minutes of malaria, they both hope they can persuade commonwealth leaders to do the same. rebecca kesby, bbc news. the former us first lady, barbara bush, has died at the age of 92. she was first lady from 1989 to 1993 and a wife and mother to two us presidents, george hw bush and george w bush. she was also a prominent literacy campaigner establishing a foundation to help parents and children from disadvantaged communities to read and write.
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the headlines on bbc news. more than 100 so—called windrush cases have now been reported to the government, with theresa may saying she's "genuinely sorry" for the anxiety caused by threats of deportation. she's denied she ordered the destruction of thousands of immigrant landing cards dating as far back as the 1940s. the rate of inflation slowed last month to the lowest in a year the cost of clothing and footwear was partly responsible. the government has suffered its first defeat in the house of lords over the centrepiece of its brexit legislation. an update on the market numbers for you. here's how london's and frankfurt ended the day. both up and a mixed bag with the dow jones and the nasdaq in the united states with 12 minutes before the closing bell on wall street. let's return to the government's treatment of the so—called windrush
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generation, which was branded as "callous" and "incompetent" during prime minister's questions today. hundreds of west indian immigrants were facing threats of deportation, despite living here for decades. as the blame game bounces between westminster and whitehall, how has the controversy affected afro—caribbean communities in the north west of england? yunus mulla has been finding out. here at the stjohn centre in old trafford, most of this lunch group from the over 50s can be described as the windrush generation but for some it has also proved to be a struggle to be accepted. dick norman. he had a british passport when he arrived in 1952 but it was not renewed and he has only been allowed to stay here on a spice visa. but it this way, he told me, i thought this was the mother country but my mother did not treat me very well. i feel quite dejected. but my mother did not treat me very well. ifeel quite dejected. iam disappointed. i am well. ifeel quite dejected. iam disappointed. iam mystified, i don't know why. and the thing i
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would love to know is what is the reason for my refusal? may have come to seek work in britain and are willing to do any kind ofjob that willing to do any kind ofjob that will help the mother land along the road to prosperity... but after 1971, a british passport holder overseas could only settle here if at first they had a work permit or had certain documents. now he is 91 yea rs had certain documents. now he is 91 years old. and he has had to produce his grandfather's birth certificate. his father's birth certificate. his father's marriage certificate. and his grandfather's marriage certificate. that is really ridiculous. the prime minister has apologised over the deportation threats to children of commonwealth citizens. all them people. that was called to come into the motherland,
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the mother country, to clean it up... the mother country, to clean it why the mother country, to clean it up... why do they want to send them back? and 2% device came here in the 60s and they came here legally. so go find the paperwork and put the situation right. the government is looking at a number of cases relating to the windrush generation. ifi relating to the windrush generation. if i tried to retract that spice, he will still become illegal in the country. that is the frightening. this is my british studies and why ami this is my british studies and why am i being refused at?” this is my british studies and why am i being refused at? i have to live with my family. here they said the windrush controversy has focused attention on some of the wider problems that have been experienced. prince harry and meghan markle have been meeting delegates at the commonwealth youth forum, in central london. they were introduced to young leaders debating the challenges facing their generation. a number of events are taking place in london and windsor this week as part of the commonwealth heads of government meeting.
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ministers have warned that the nhs was not prepared for last year's crippling cyber attack and has shown an alarming failure to tackle internet security despite growing concerns about threats to the uk. a government report into the wannacry hack which left 20,000 cancelled appointments and operations criticised the health service's response and called for better safeguards. our health correspondent dominic hughes reports. around the world, any organisation that relies on the internet is having to come to terms with the possibility of a cyber attack. that threat became real in may of last year when the nhs found itself to be one target among hundreds around the world attacked by malicious software that became known as wannacry. when the scale of the attack became clear the scale of the attack became clear the nhs declared a major incident but it still affected 80 nhs trusts
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in england, around a third of the total, and led to the consolation for most 20,000 hospital appointments and operations. nearly 600 gp practices also had their computer systems infected. today's report says the nhs remains vulnerable to another, more sophisticated, attack. one of the key concerns is that every small nhs organisation is a back door to hackers and very many of them just did not have the resource or the capability to patch or make sure they were safe so everything in the nhs isa they were safe so everything in the nhs is a weak link and this is something we are critical of because the department needs to have oversight to make sure every small nhs organisation are prepared for future attacks. in many ways the nhs was lucky. wannacry head on a friday afternoon at the beginning of summer when the nhs was generally quieter. the department of health in england says it has invested and improved cyber—security but there is more work to do. that is illustrated by a
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recent assessment of security measures at 200 nhs trusts that saw eve ryo ne measures at 200 nhs trusts that saw everyone failed to meet the required standard. it was only a few weeks ago that large parts of the country were covered in snow as the beast from the east swept in. but today britain has been basking in the hottest day of the year so far, with the temperatures expected to remain high well into the weekend. london marathon runners are being warned sunday could be the warmest race day for more than 20 years. sima kotecha is in birmingham and sent us this report. finally, spring has properly sprung. in parts of the country, temperatures reached up to 25 degrees today. london, norwich, lincoln and birmingham have all been on the receiving end of glorious weather. really good, i booked the day off work, so i'm just out enjoying it with my friends. went to a concert last night, so just relaxing, it feels really luxurious, actually. relaxed, happy and excited for the summer.
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this morning when i woke up and the sun was shining, ijust knew that i actually did want to get out of bed and have, like, a really nice day. so yeah, really happy. and on the beach injersey, they made the most of it. absolutely superb. we have been waiting for this for a long time. it has been a never—ending winter. it is lovely, just really nice to have the sun out and no clouds. nice to bring the kids down to the beach and hopefully it continues for the rest of the summer. the change in weather is down to a change in wind direction. warm air is being pushed northwards from the mediterranean and central europe, lifting temperatures for many of us. and for the next few days, even more spells of sunshine are to come. however in western parts of scotland, some showers are possible. the plans for tonight, some family time in the outdoors. as long as the sun lasts. sima kotecha, bbc news, in birmingham. it has been a lovely day, let's get
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more of the weather with helen willetts. .. today more of the weather with helen willetts... today showed what more of the weather with helen willetts. .. today showed what a difference the sun makes at this time of year, it is strong so when we see this the temperatures really climb and they have reached 25 degrees in central london today but as we collate figures, receive a link somewhere will have reached 26 degrees, one par with iberia, spain, the alpine regions and low countries. even sunny across parts of northern ireland and scotland with the high teens, 18 and 19 here but more cloud around because of the proximity of this weather front which this evening returns eastwards, bringing some splashes of rain to northern ireland and west of scotland, but as much as we have seen scotland, but as much as we have seen but that tempers the skies and the amount of sunshine tomorrow. under clear skies, like wind and east, mist and fog first thing. that
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should clear quickly tomorrow and we still have this south—easterly feed, pollen levels high time of year the song is as strong as strong as august so pretty lively affair. for most of us it is another one day, warmer than today with the potential for warmth spreading northwards but more cloud in the north and west and perhaps other parts of western wales and south—west england it should burn back to the coast and with onshore breezes it could be brought onshore. through friday we start to see the south—easterly flow and pick up see the south—easterly flow and pick up more of an atlantic influence so things feel cooler and fresher but lots of sunshine around, perhaps more mist and fog in the morning and for the english channel coast it could come onshore at times with those sea breezes but for most of us, lots of lovely sunshine to enjoy with strong sunshine even though the winds are hired and the temperatures lower with a few showers in the north and west. a decent day and what is happening is a higher pressure is really wishing its grip
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and allowing this cold weather front so and allowing this cold weather front so cooler air coming from the atla ntic so cooler air coming from the atlantic and with that so moisture and after the heat that will be released with some showers. sharp showers by sunday and it could be heavy showers with thunder around and look at that depth in temperatures as we returned to average for the time of year. the of on sunday we could have real warmth for the london marathon runners and spectators, one of the warmest marathons so far but there is a risk weight of heavy showers. stay tuned... hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. nearing the end of the castro era in cuba as raul is about to step down. members of the national assembly name the next president, it's miguel diaz—canel. turkey's president erdogan brings forward by more than a year elections that are expected to consolidate his power. we will be in istanbul to hear about that. we'll be live in westminster.
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the british government has suffered its first defeat in the house of lords over the centrepiece of its brexit legislation — we'll get the details from westminster. one of the suspects behind iceland's big bitcoin heist escapes prison, and boards a plane with the prime minister.
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