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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 26, 2018 6:00am-8:30am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. bosses at the hospital treating seriously ill alfie evans defend their staff after what they call a barrage of abuse. last night, judges again rejected a bid by his parents to take him abroad for care, protesters calling themselves alfie's army have been gathering outside alder hey. good morning, it's thursday the 26th of april. also this morning: a pledge to cut plastic pollution. more than a0 major companies sign up to rid the uk of throwaway packaging. from coca—cola to asda, i'll be finding out if some of the countries biggest firms can put plastics before profits. forcing the debate. mps will question the governments decision to leave the customs union after brexit. in sport, it's advantage real madrid in the champions league semi—finals as they come from behind
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to win their first leg against bayern 2—1 in munich. and carol is at arundel castle this morning. good morning. i'm here for thejulep festival and if you want to come here and see the chew lips, they won't be lasting much longer so turn up won't be lasting much longer so turn up fast. we have them on my right and on the other side, aaron bill cathedral. a beautiful start but a chilly one. chilly in most of the uk this morning. for most, sunny and showers, the most heavy and prolific will be in scotland and northern ireland. more details in 15 minutes. carol, thank you. good morning. first our main story. bosses at alder hey hospital in liverpool say staff have endured a barrage of abuse since the decision to withdraw life support from the seriously ill toddler, alfie evans. supporters of the boy's family have been protesting outside the hospital. last night, appeal court judges rejected a further legal bid
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to allow alfie's parents to take him abroad for treatment. keith doyle reports. at the centre of this long protracted legal battle is little alfie evans, doctors withdrew life—support from him on monday. since then his parents have tried but failed to overturn a court ruling preventing them from moving him toa ruling preventing them from moving him to a children's hospital in italy. there doctors offered to continue his care, although they agree with medical teams and the courts hear that his condition cannot be reversed. outside alder hey hospital, supporters of the family, calling themselves alfie's army, have been a constant presence. there's also support for the family from around the world, including the pope and the polish who tweeted: alfie evans must be saved. the staff at the hospital says staff have been subjected to unprecedented
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abuse. in an open letter, they have said: alfie's father, tom evans, has initiated a private prosecution against three doctors for conspiracy to murder. alfie is said to be struggling, now off life—support for a third day, with his parents by his side. alder hey hospital soap said its staff felt deeply for alfie and shared its hearts heartbreak when a child can be cured. keith doyle, bbc news. more than a0 companies responsible for about eight out of io plastics sold in uk supermarkets have signed up to a new pledge to reduce pollution. the firms are promising to make all plastic packaging suitable for recycling or composting within seven years.
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victoria is here to explain how it will work. this is a big move, we have been calling for this and finally action is being taken. finally, and this was stemmed by some of those shocking images we saw if you saw the blue planet to series that was out a little while ago. this has been spurred by consumers and businesses have been pretty quick to react to this and the big pledges to aim for70% of react to this and the big pledges to aim for 70% of all packaging to be able to be recycled or compost it by 2025. we think at the moment the uk recycles less than 50% of all the plastics we use and we are big consumers of lustig. people say this isa consumers of lustig. people say this is a good thing, the war on plastic, for our bodies, health and oceans —— consumers of plastic. but perhaps we need a more blended approach. all
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the supermarkets are certainly on—board. the supermarkets are certainly on-board. at the moment it is less than 50%, that will go up to 70%? yes, 46% to 70%. they are only little changes but they add up to a big difference, things like selling fruit and paper loose rather than selling them in packages, so hopefully you won't get slices of half avocados, all sliced separately, you should be able to walk in and get an avocado in the morning if you want to. do it yourself! victoria, thanks very much. bbc news has seen evidence which suggests that immigration enforcement teams were set targets to remove people regarded as having no right to stay in the uk. yesterday the home secretary, amber rudd, told mps that wasn't how her department operated. a target of 12,000 voluntary departures, of people with no right to remain, was in the most recent inspection report into removals, published in december 2015. the nhs in england will need another £50 billion a year by 2030 according to a review by two
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former health ministers. labour's lord darzi and conservative lord prior carried out the review with a panel of experts convened by the institute for public policy research. the report also says further efficiency savings will be needed, to meet the anticipated growth in demand for care. officials in seoul say kim jong—un will be the first north korean leader to officially set foot on the south's side of the military demarcation line when he attends a summit tomorrow. mr kim is due to meet the south korean president, moonjae—in, at the first inter—korean summit in over a decade. the government's decision to leave the customs union after brexit will be debated by mps today. while the outcome won't be binding, it will show the strength brexit votes. our political correspondent, jonathan blake, is at westminster. how much pressure could the governemnt come under today? this shows where the lines are being
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drawn in terms of how clear theresa may has been making the uk position on the customs union? when mps gather in the house of commons later to discuss the issue, what it will be asa to discuss the issue, what it will be as a chance for them to bear their views and maybe put pressure on the government into thinking about changing course —— air. but it won't be a binding boat forcing ministers into action. but a lot of interest in this because it's around a key area of government brexit policy, the customs union, the government said it should leave it, and it allows an import with a single tariff and transferred around freely. ministers are clear the uk should leave the customs union when we leave the european union because it would allow the uk to strike trade deals with other countries around the world and also if we were to stay in the uk would be shackled,
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having to follow the rules without any say in how the rules are made, but those who want us to stay in, including labour, say there's an overwhelming case because it would cost the economy billions to and also it would help continued peace in northern ireland. now, downing street are dismissing and playing down the significance of the events today as a routine back bench business debate but it will give a sense of the strength of feeling around this issue and how much the government is facing pressure on future more significant votes in the coming week. jonathan, interesting to see what the tories will be saying about it, we will hear from keir starmer, the shadow brexit secratary, in about an hour to see how he views this vote. the french president, emmanuel macron, has ended his state visit to the united states by admitting that he may not have persuaded donald trump to stick with the iran nuclear deal. at the end of a three—day state visit, he continued his criticism of president trump's policies but insisted their personal relationship was excellent. the us president has been threatening to pull out of the agreement, which aims to curb
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iran's nuclear activities, saying it is too lenient. the number of new cars built in the uk fell sharply last month. demand for new cars has been falling for the past year. manufacturers blame economic uncertainty, as well as confusion over the government's clean air plans, which they believe lies behind a steep drop in sales of diesel vehicles. offering mental health counselling to primary school pupils could provide long—term benefits to the economy, according to a new report. the charity pro bono economics says that every one pound spent could return more than six pounds to society by improving job prospects and cutting crime. our health correspondent, catherine burns, has more. if you don't have a place to be, then you willjust feel like, so negative. the children's mental health charity place to be provides emotional support to pupils at schools across the uk.
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it helps with everything from arguments in the playground to group sessions like this or individual work. it asked economists to put a financial value on its work with primary pupils. the report predicts that every child that has individual counselling through the charity could benefit by £5,700. that's mostly because one day they're expected to go on and get jobs and earn higher wages. they're also less likely to cost society in the future by needing different kinds of help. the service cost more than £4 million across the country in one year. this school paid about £20,000. if it didn't transform children's lives, we wouldn't continue with it because it's got to be cost—effective. how do you weigh up a child's emotional feelings with cost? the government agrees that it's important to spot mental health problems early on, and has pledged £300 million extra help for primary and secondary schools.
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kathryn burns, bbc news. we have all heard of a pampered pooch but what about this for a bit of extravagance? dog loving lottery winners from west yorkshire have spent £5,000 on a two metre high replica of windsor castle for a dog thatis replica of windsor castle for a dog that is ten years old. archie is going to get to watch the royal wedding from there next month. no, no! yes! do you know what, mike, you will be jealous because this dog is treated very well, the castle has a red carpet, of course, a throne and a hot tub. it is a dog's life! it's magnificent, no point in half measures, when you do something like that, throw in the whole thing, hot tub and everything! he looked very proud, he has to throw in his royal
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wave, or proud, he has to throw in his royal wave , or paw proud, he has to throw in his royal wave, or paw wave. welcome back! you have missed things like that! commonwealth games were incredible? they were, hope they were appreciated here as well. the foot ball appreciated here as well. the football was incredible last night, i don't want to gloss over the commonwealth games! you had so many stars on the beach, it was brilliant. i have probably brought a bit of sand back! liverpool had a great start to their champions league semifinals and... defending champions real madrid have taken a big step towards a potential champions league final against liverpool. the spanish giants beat bayern munich 2—1 at the allianz arena. they were 1—0 down, but goals either side of half—time, including this winner from marco asensio, mean they go back to madrid with a one goal advantage and two precious away goals. alex oxlade—chamberlain says he is devastated to miss the world cup. he picked up a knee ligament injury during liverpool's 5—2 champions league win over roma on tuesday night. it's arsenal's turn tonight.
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they welcome atletico madrid to the emirates for the first leg of their europa league semi—final. manager arsene wenger says they need a complete performance to beat a side who've won the comeptition twice in the last eight years. and neil robertson has become the latest former winner to be knocked out of snooker‘s world championships in the first round. he lost 10—5 to qualifier robert milkins. he's the fourth former winner to fall at the first hurdle at the crucible. looking wide open in the snooker. see you later on! thanks very much! carol is out and about for us this morning, in the gardens at arundel castle. the view, you are among all those tulips and the gorgeous yellow coat and then the sun glistening on the building behind you, we could watch that all morning. good morning!
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good morning, everyone. it is the most stunning location. i've had a good look around the gardens this morning with martin, the head gardener, and i have been blown away. look at these tulips, a real carpet, magnificent red. we have got every colour you can think of under the sun and we will show them to you this morning. we're here because it's the tulip festival. if you're coming down it's probably wise to get down as fast as you can because the tulips won't last that much longer, of course they've been affected by the weather, we had a lot of rain, cold for a time, then high temperatures last week but at the moment they are still standing and the other thing that was amazing is if you look at the different heights, notjust is if you look at the different heights, not just tulips is if you look at the different heights, notjust tulips you cut and put ina heights, notjust tulips you cut and put in a vase in your house, there are some humdingers that are really talk, and we'll show you through the morning. a beautiful sunrise this morning. a beautiful sunrise this morning —— tall. but a chilly start.
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the forecast for today, like yesterday, is one of sunshine and showers. the heavy showers today are going to be across scotland and northern ireland, possibly too the far north of england, and some hail and thunder embedded in them. but elsewhere, although there will be some showers around, what you'll find is they won't be as frequent as yesterday, neither are they going to be as heavy. a chilly start, not quite as cold as yesterday, but if you're hanging around outside you will need to wrap up warm the. the showers will get going, not the west, quite a lot in scotland and northern ireland currently and they will develop further in the east and still a keen west to south—westerly wind accentuating the cold feel. temperatures today possibly up to i7. temperatures today possibly up to 17. through this evening and overnight once again we will lose some of those showers, a cold night in scotland and northern ireland, and by then we'll be starting to see some rain coming in across the south—west, that's going to happen
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later on today. it's going to be moving slowly towards the north and the east. for tomorrow we have that scenario once again, we have the rain coming in from the south—west, pushing steadily northwards across england and also wales. to the north of that, we're still in that regime of that, we're still in that regime of sunshine and showers, some of those heavy and thundery with some hail in them and tomorrow will feel cooler than it's going to be today. on saturday we do have a weak weather front in the south—eastern quarter of the uk, so that means some cloud around, patchy rain and drizzle and move across northern england, west wales, northern ireland and scotland, back into sunshine and showers once again and still some heavy with hail. sundays seeing something different in the south—eastern quarter —— sunday is. another area of low pressure, rain moving in, some of that could be heavy, and the wind will strengthen and eventually some could be looking at dales but once again, move away from this south—eastern quarter and
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we're into drier and brighter conditions but still with sunshine and showers and by then the wind direction will have changed to more ofa direction will have changed to more of a northerly —— gales. the weather all over the place, topsy—turvy, almost a bit of everything in it but i must say it is spectacular here this morning. lovely, carol, are you allowed to move, you can't move or you will crush a flower! be careful! somebody very rudely said to me, last night, a producer, isaid i would be tiptoeing through the tulips, and mark furner l, he said, tiptoe, you will be stomping all over them, i have seen you in strictly! cheeky! carol, you missed the casts in the studio! that is one brave producer! —— casts. she would have knocked him out. she was craned down into that spot.
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the papers. the daily mail. a big story about what feels like, especially how the daily mail have called it, plastic at supermarkets. they campaigned hard on this. to be fair, the tide has turned. we're all thinking differently about plastic, what we're using and recycling. there is a lot more consciousness on behalf of normal consumers as to what they're using. the sun. this picture, seal pups, the galapagos islands. charles darwin did a lot of
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work there. they are playing with plastic that washed up on a remote island. they tried to get it off them. a big push when it comes to companies. we were just discussing this, naga and i, during the weather. it is important to say lots of companies are doing things differently. some more, some less. it is significant, going from 46% to 70% recycled. another story. who does this? an entire day a week on line on average! if you are 16— 24, you spend 34 hours a week on the web. i don't know if that is also watching things and listening to podcasts. shopping, playing games... i love watching funny videos. cat
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videos. where we going with this? sport presenters falling into pools. stuff like that. i'm glad, naga. and perhaps... here we go. congratulations. oh, lost my step! we can see it in slow motion. you can see how difficult it is to see the bottom of the pool, another level. sorry, i the bottom of the pool, another level. sorry, lam the bottom of the pool, another level. sorry, iamjust the bottom of the pool, another level. sorry, i am just glad to have you back. the front page of the telegraph. anti—semitism within the labour party. these are some of the comments of len mccluskey. we will talk about that later in the
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programme. the guardian. guardian. talking about plastic. and inventor has been sentence for the murder of kim wall. her body was found after reporting on a boat, the person on it, the inventor, was arrested. amber rudd is accused of protecting the prime minister and the home office's windrush scandal issue. moeen ali had a great summer for the english team. apparently he should should have been dropped earlier to recover his form which he is doing in the premier league. good to see him starring again with bat and ball. jose mourinho says it is time to bury the hatchet, a lot of respect for his old rival. that is when it is time to bury the hatchet.
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that is with arsene wenger, sorry. he is saying a lot of respect. thank you. next month, teenagers across england and wales will be sitting their maths gcse. they'll be joined by a few familiar breakfast faces. yes, jayne, tim, and i will be walking into the exam hall four weeks today. and we're not the only mature students, thousands of people aged over 25 will be sitting exams this summer. tim's been to find out more. iam biting i am biting my fingernails. like many families, the summers have gsce exams looming, but it's the mother that's revising. a month to go. how is it going? it is going 0k. i want go. how is it going? it is going 0k. iwant time go. how is it going? it is going 0k. i want time to practise. why did you decide to do this? when i was at
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school, maths was my weakest subject, so i wanted to go back and relearn it. you wanted to help your children. if i want to ask for help, she knows it. it is weird. i used to help her, now it's the opposite. she knows it. it is weird. i used to help her, now it's the oppositelj think she will pass with flying colours. i have enjoyed going to the class and learning for two hours, doing something for me. this is a paperl doing something for me. this is a paper i did. doing something for me. this is a paperi did. this doing something for me. this is a paper i did. this maths teacher has been guiding naga, jane, and me, as we get ready for ours. for people in their40s, we get ready for ours. for people in their 40s, perhaps older, what is your take on the age factor? their 40s, perhaps older, what is your take on the age factor7m brings challenges and benefits. the challenge is you did it a long time ago. you are trying to stretch the memory a couple of decades. the positive is you are an adult and you
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should be more mature and sensible. there is no point spending six hours night and doing nothing other times each week. it is constantly revisiting that reinforces concepts. evenif revisiting that reinforces concepts. even if you are not getting the right answer, it is important to work on it. you used a pen for a graph. what have you done herethe dots. it is not dot to dot. a smooth curve for a quadratic?! you let us down. rachel has been taking classes at this college. at school if i did not get it i would just shut up. there is more of a drive this time around. it took me a long time to get the courage to do it because of the fear of not grasping the concept is. what is the next step we might
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take. fractions always come up and they say is that it? there is a lot of stigma around topics from school. and for rachel, it is all about seizing the day. a year ago i lost my best friend and i decided you have to grab every opportunity because you do not know how long you have got. one month to go. never too late to learn. tim muffett, bbc news. masse is the bane of my life at the moment. —— maths homework. we would like to get involved. and
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we would like you to as well. are you allowed to use your car collector? two exams are with, one without. oh, isee. this is the question. i will get to the end of this story at some point. you need to know they both drove at a co nsta nt you need to know they both drove at a constant speed and did not stop. what times did they reach the emerald city. the bonus point, what's the speed of the scarecrow‘s
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car? i have one major question. just the one? what about the tin man? they dumped him. this has been on line. john and leslie got it right. leslie also says they should have carpooled. genius. it is time for the news, weather, and travel wherever you are waking up this morning. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sara orchard. people living in a part of pimlico say noise from the tube is reaching their homes after travelling from deep underground. earlier this year, bbc london tested noise levels on the tube, which led to experts warning passengers to consider wearing hearing protection, because some stretches are so loud. transport for london says it's trying to fix the problem in pimlico, but one resident says it's badly affecting her health. it has made me a nervous wreck. it
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has made me sometimes feel very suicidal. and ijust get so depressed with it. the foreign office says it's urgently looking into reports that a science & computer professor at imperial college is being held in iran. the centre for human rights in the us believes abbas edalat, who has dual british and iranian nationality, was detained by the revolutionary guard in tehran eleven days ago. it's not known what mr edalat is accused of, but he's said to have protested his innocence. it's thought they could be the future of home deliveries. zero—emission electric bikes which can carry several shopping orders at a time. it's hoped eventually they'll take thousands of vans off london's congested roads every day. a supermarket is testing them out at its branch in streatham. and the government is supporting the e—bike company behind the idea. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. most are working well except the
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dlr. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. fellow. good morning. lots of rainbows, thunderstorms, and hail yesterday. not as dramatic today. a typical april day. sun and showers. not as heavy and frequent as yesterday. plenty of showers through the afternoon. a cool but sunny start to the day. lots of sunshine through the morning. showers spreading from the worst. homegrown showers. more light than yesterday.
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it won't feel bad in the sunshine. the brief will be lighter than yesterday. a touch warmer. —— breeze. overnights tonight, clear skies. sunshine. we will start to see cloud from the south—west. wet in western areas. tomorrow morning, 6-8. in western areas. tomorrow morning, 6—8. tomorrow, quite let. outbreaks of rain. should be dry. cooler over the weekend. heavier on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning:
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former cabinet minister james brokenshire was diagnosed with lung cancer injanuary despite not smoking. we talk to him about his call for a national screening programme. they're three times faster than cheetahs and take on prey twice their size, but we hope the peregrine falcon that's joining us in the studio later will be a little more sedate. rudi and his handler will be here ahead of a new documentary tonight. you know what that song is, don't you? yes. go on. it's frozen. let it go. it is! and we chat to x factor star saara alto about how she plans to use her talent for languages to charm the eurovision crowd. she sings it in loads of different languages, and a pretty good voice!
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we will good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. management at alder hey hospital in liverpool say staff have endured a barrage of abuse since the decision to withdraw life support from the seriously ill toddler, alfie evans. supporters of the boy's family have been protesting outside the hospital. last night, appeal court judges rejected a further legal bid to allow alfie's parents to take him abroad for treatment. more than 40 companies have signed a new pledge to significantly reduce plastic pollution. the firms, which are responsible for around 80 percent of the plastics sold in uk supermarkets, are promising to make all their plastic packaging suitable for recycling or composting within seven years. the pact also promises to get rid of unnecessary single—use packaging. bbc news has seen evidence which suggests that immigration enforcement teams were set targets to remove people regarded as having no right to stay in the uk. yesterday, the home secretary, amber rudd, told mps that wasn't how her department operated. a target of 12,000 voluntary departures
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of people with no right to remain was in the most recent inspection report into removals, published in december, 2015. the nhs in england will need another £50 billion a year by 2030 according to a review by two former health ministers. labour's lord darzi and conservative lord prior carried out the review with a panel of experts convened by the institute for public policy research. the report also says further efficiency savings will be needed, to meet the anticipated growth in demand for care. if you want to achieve the changes in the nhs, you need to think long—term. there is no short—term intervention, there is no magic bullet, there is no magic drug that will deal with that. you need to think about a ten year settlement in which you can then think through how do you make your strategic investment to really achieve what i
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call the transformational change that we achieved ten years ago. officials in seoul say kim jong—un will be the first north korean leader to officially set foot on the south's side of the military demarcation line, when he attends a summit tomorrow. he is due to meet the south korean president, moonjae—in, at the first inter—korean summit in over a decade. the government's decision to leave the customs union after brexit will be debated by mps today. the outcome won't be binding, but it will show the strength of opposition that theresa may is likely to face in future votes on her brexit plans. the government suffered defeat on the issue in the house of lords last week. medication prescribed to treat depression and bladder conditions are associated with an increased risk of dementia, a new study has found. the report says up to two million people in england are likely to be taking one of the anti—cholinergics linked to dementia at any one time. but experts have warned the findings of the research, published in the british medicaljournal, should be treated with caution.
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there is so much going on in sport, mike, good morning. good morning. i thought you were so busy with the commonwealth games but now you're back and there's a flurry of football. straight into the champions league semi—finals, halfway through and it looks like liverpool, real madrid in the final, which would be amazing, and a landmark for the man behind you, cristiano ronaldo, the legend, as if his season couldn't get any better. he has won more champions league games than any other player. another little milestone for him! he didn't score last night but his real madrid team got two away goals as they beat german champions bayern munich 2—1. marco asensio capitalised on an error by brazilian defender rafinha to score a breakaway second goal for real as they took the advantage after the first—leg. bayern must now score at least twice at the bernabeu next tuesday to prevent real reaching a fourth final in five years. you really feel for alex
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oxlade—chamberlain. he says he is absolutely devastated to have been ruled out of the world cup through injury. the liverpool midfielder damaged knee ligaments during their champions league win over roma on tuesday night. oxlade—chamberlain posted a message on social media last night saying that liverpool have what it takes to do something special in the champions league. he also backed his international teammates to be successful in russia, and paid tribute to liverpool fan sean cox, who remains in a critical condition in hospital after being attacked before the roma game. two men from rome have been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder. tonight it's arsenal's turn in europe. they host atletico madrid in the firt leg of their europa league semi—final. it's likely to be their only chance of qualifying for the champions league next season, and manager arsene wenger knows they are up against a formidible side in atletico. if you look at the table, they are
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the second best team in spain. so overall, we naturally demand total commitment on our side and great discipline, because they have no real wea k discipline, because they have no real weak point. they are strong defensively, they are strong offensively, so we need a complete performance. neil robertson's the latest former winner to go out of snooker‘s world championship in the first round. the 2010 champion followed shaun murphy, stuart bingham and reigning champion mark selby out of the crucible doors, losing 10—5 to qualifier robert milkins. the world athletics governing body says it's going to bring in new rules which will place a limit on the amount of natural testosterone allowed in female athletes. it will only apply to athletes, taking part in track events from 400m up to a mile. this could effect the double olympic and triple world 800m champion, caster semenya. after her first world title in 2009, she underwent a gender test. a rule was then brought
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in which made women that produced high levels of testosterone take hormones to suppress them. this ruling was later overturned, and semenya has dominated since. the change will come into place in november, and athletes like semenya could lose pace. the wbc world heavyweight champion deontay wilder has offered anthonyjoshua more than £35 million for a unification fight. wilder holds the only belt that joshua needs to be the undisputed heavyweight champion, and he has posted a video saying that he's made an offer tojoshua's promoter. anthony, you know what your man eddie, and barry hearn, tell them to check your e—mail, i've got something specialfor check your e—mail, i've got something special for you. by the way, all the money's in the bag, so i expect you to be a man of your word. and diego maradona is very much still remembered by england fans for his infamous hand of god goal in the 1986 world cup quarter—final. his legend has gone a step further
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on the ceiling of a football club in the argentine capital buenos aires. in a painting modelled after michelangelo's creation of adam, maradona is god extending his hand to adam represented by lionel messi. a bit cheeky! the coach of sportivo pereyra said, "for us, this pitch is our temple, a sacred temple of football, and what better than to have a fresco on the ceiling that is worthy of a temple." while you would like those youngsters to be inspired by diego maradona's genius, you don't want them copying the hand of god. referring to the picture on the ceiling, the fresco on the ceiling. it was an interesting picture! thanks very much, mike, we will see you later on. you will do. the murder of swedish journalist kim wall has horrified denmark and others. inventor peter madsen killed the 30—year—old on board his submarine after she'd accepted an invitation to interview him.
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he had denied murder but yesterday a judge in copenhagen jailed him for life without parole. our correspondent, jenny hill, has more. the story was too good to miss. setting sail to interview an inventor, kim wall had no idea this would be her last assignment. a successful journalist, she was about to move to china. instead, her dismembered body washed up on the danish coast. she'd been tortured, killed, dumped at sea. today, a life sentence for her killer. peter madsen was a bit of a celebrity in denmark. few of his fa ns celebrity in denmark. few of his fans knew he had a taste for sexual violence and what investigators describe as psychopathic tendencies. it's not just describe as psychopathic tendencies. it's notjust the brutality of this case that has left many games feeling profoundly disturbed. peter madsen, with his projects and his
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stance, after all had captured the public imagination here. the man danes thought they knew, the harmless eccentric, the folk hero turned out to be a calculating and violent killer. madson‘s expected to appeal. the authorities threatening to destroy his submarine. once a symbol of ambition and adventure now a terrible reminder of one of this country's most gruesome crimes. jenny hill, bbc news, copenhagen. robert fox filmed a documentary with peter madsen as he built his submarine 10 years ago. hejoins us now from copenhagen. you met him and spend some time with him, what did you make of peter madsen all those years ago?|j him, what did you make of peter madsen all those years ago? i was of course doing this documentary and i followed him for, like, 100 days and
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it was kind of a 1—to—1 experience, soi it was kind of a 1—to—1 experience, so i was very dependent on his collaboration all the time. i had some problems in between getting him to co—operate, if he didn't see i was doing him a favour, a big favour. people have said in terms of his character, even before the trial, that he was a narcissist, that there was an element to his character that was very self—serving. is that something you felt? well, not at the time, because at the time we were all viewing him asa at the time we were all viewing him as a kind of inspiration, a guy that had hardly any education, he didn't have any money. he kind of made his pretty fabulous submarines and we thought that comes out of his curiosity, his willingness to create and so on. but what the case has actually shown me personally is that there might have been other reasons, for example is not a cystic
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behaviour, just creating all these things do get attention and so on —— narcissistic. it's so difficult in a way, i understand your position, but are there things you look back on with conversations you had in the time you spend with him in the light of what we now know? yes, absolutely. —— spent. at the time i thought he was an eccentric, a 1—man band, and he woke up every morning with a plan of 120 points he had to do through the day. he was so focused on his goal all the time and if he couldn't place you in the goal, you know, helping him with his goal, you know, helping him with his goal then you were out. every other day my team was forced out, we had to deal with this. especially one scene in the film where we dived with the submarine for the first time, we were supposed to go under and film with a camera but all of a sudden we were told we couldn't go, soi
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sudden we were told we couldn't go, so i had to give the camera to the female captain at the time and she did a wonderfuljob there. but we couldn't have known that. so it was very frustrating. robert, it's difficult for us to understand the impact this trial and this case has had in copenhagen, where the trial has taken place, but i wondered if you could give us a sense of what kind of reaction there has been? i think that the trial... the big shock to the people maybe came before the trial, because when they found the body, i think people realised that what was once kind of an idle here had fallen all the way to the ground, or lower to the ground, but yesterday when we have the verdict, it was very much will he go free almost, because the defence claimed the amount of
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evidence was not enough to convince a jury. but he got the trial and i think it was a good thing. robert, what emerged during the trial is just how calculated he was, the planning, the thought process, does that correspond to the person you met ten years ago? he managed to make a fully functional submarine. incredible. it was driven by himself. he got people to help him. but he was used to making plans, studying on wikipedia, getting people involved and creating something. i think usability of planning and executing is really on
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a high level. —— his ability. planning and executing is really on a high level. -- his ability. thank you for your time. bosses at alder hey hospital in liverpool say medical staff have endured a "barrage" of abuse since a decision was made to withdraw life support from seriously ill child, alfie eva ns. more than 40 companies have signed up more than 40 companies have signed up to read the uk of throwaway plastic packaging within seven yea rs. plastic packaging within seven years. —— rid. time to look at some beautiful flowers. we have been learning some fa cts flowers. we have been learning some facts about tulips. just stunning. great view after great view.|j
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facts about tulips. just stunning. great view after great view. i am looking at the tulips again. behind me isa looking at the tulips again. behind me is a tulip garden opened by prince charles. 120 varieties of tulips, all the way to two feet tall. a kaleidoscope of colour is which you will see this morning. —— colours. this is home of the dukes of norfolk for many years. the forecast is once again sunshine and showers. the heaviest showers in scotla nd showers. the heaviest showers in scotland and northern ireland. hail
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and thunder. fewer compared to yesterday. looking at the chart. you can see what i am talking about. showers in scotland and northern ireland. going further east. sunshine and fewer showers. cloud is building. sunshine is turning hazy. thick cloud introducing rain into the south—west. temperatures up to 17. average for april. a south—westerly wind making it feel more chilly, especially in the gusty west. rain in the south—west continues to push north—east overnight. isle of wight to north wales. a touch of frost. that is how
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we start the day tomorrow. scotland and northern ireland, the far north of england, a bright start. showers from the word go. a band of rain going north. some of the rain will be heavy. especially in south—west england and wales. saturday, a system in the south—east. cloud and patchy light rain and drizzle. sunshine and showers. veering north and north—east. sunday, another area of low pressure in the south—east. that will introduce heavy rain north—west. that will introduce heavy rain north—west. accompanied by strengthening winds. potentially coastal gales as well. we are keeping a close eye on it. it could be disruptive. lots of trees in
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bloom at the moment with leaves for example. i will take great pleasure in showing you a the gardens here at this castle. they are spectacular, as you rightly said, naga. it looks like yourjob as a lot of fun. big news for the government today on its commitment to artificial intelligence. really interesting and big developments. there will be £300 million becoming available to fund ph.d. s into artificial intelligence. we will have a look at the rise of the machines. artificial intelligence. the rise of the machines. will robots like this
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freakish dog one day take over? the quest began more than 70 years ago with the turing test. could a computer ever fall with the turing test. could a computer everfall a with the turing test. could a computer ever fall a human? the chest grandmaster garry kasparov found the answer to be yes when he lost to deep blue in 1997. two decades later, a! can create things and even play ping pong. now the government wants the uk to be an ai hot spot, putting up £300 million to make it happen. it is notjust a story about tomorrow, though. the chanceis story about tomorrow, though. the chance is you have already benefited from al this morning. we do have tabatha with from al this morning. we do have ta batha with us from al this morning. we do have tabatha with us complete with head. a real person! thank you for coming
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in. it is eight minutes to seven. what might someone had used by this morning? i could not have got here without google maps getting me here on time. before i left, my amazon alexa woke me up and played music. i ask my phone the weather. i can find it out quickly. does it worry you? i do not know if that is the right... here is why. the brands you mentioned by tapping into our data.
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they are listening to everything. they are listening to everything. they get data and look back at fb, they are paying to use this data to profile us to sell to us better. but it is my data. that is why i asked. that is not the helpful feeling. what is it? acceptance? we need to be mindful of what data we are putting out and taking ownership of what that is. when we are interacting with machines, we can see how we benefit rather than others benefiting. the protection act from europe is one thing. i am hoping the government announces more governance put into place. there are big ethical implications. you raised some in terms of safety. but these machines are only as good as the people who trained them to do
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things. what if we considered these things. what if we considered these things unethical, morally irresponsible for example? you could have a huge amount of virtual trolls. it is something we need to be mindful of. these artificial intelligence systems, they learn from the people that teach them. from what we can see today, companies, whether they are apple, prowler, they have frameworks and government frameworks. they are looking at stopping things going wrong and looking at bias. to what extent wrong and looking at bias. to what exte nt d o wrong and looking at bias. to what extent do you think there is a new generation emerging now who are com pletely co mforta ble ? generation emerging now who are completely comfortable? that may tap into something, and i do not know if
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it corresponds, people of a certain age, suspicions, worries, concerns, either people thinking it is just here, do not ask questions. —— are there. i feel like as long as we use artificial intelligence to support us artificial intelligence to support us and give us power, that is not a bad thing. i think younger generations have seen how it can help them. rather than our generation not having seen where it will be supportive. in a way, because of the complication of a manual, for example using central heating, i have hit my head against walls to make it work. did it work with yellow i am constantly doing that. you can say "make it the way i want." we
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that. you can say "make it the way i want. " we can that. you can say "make it the way i want." we can talk about the advantage of it, but £300 million has been made available for phds. is there a feeling the uk is not competing with east asia or silicon valley? do we need to be part of the race? we need to benefit from it, from the point of the economy and from the point of the economy and from the point of the economy and from the point of individuals. the more we can both find new talent, ph.d. work and so on, the better we can make sure the uk is the place to deploy ai. fascinating. thank you. there is a festival about al going on in london over the summer if you wa nt to on in london over the summer if you want to know more about it. the computer is telling me... robot
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voice: it is time for the news, travel, weather, where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sara orchard. people living in a part of pimlico say noise from the tube is reaching their homes, after travelling from deep underground. earlier this year, bbc london tested noise levels on the tube, which led to experts warning passengers to consider wearing hearing protection, because some stretches are so loud. transport for london says it's trying to fix the problem in pimlico, but one resident says its badly affecting her health. it has made me a nervous wreck. it has made me sometimes feel very suicidal. and ijust get so depressed with it. the foreign office says it's urgently looking into reports that a science & computer professor at imperial college is being held in iran. the centre for human rights in the us believes abbas edalat, who has dual british and iranian nationality, was detained by the revolutionary guard in tehran eleven days ago. it's not known what mr edalat is accused of, but he's said to have protested his innocence.
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it's thought they could be the future of home deliveries, zero—emission electric bikes which can carry several shopping orders at a time. it's hoped eventually they'll take thousands of vans off london's congested roads every day. a supermarket is testing them out at its branch in streatham. and the government is supporting the e—bike company behind the idea of it. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes this morning, there's a good service on most lines but we do have minor delays on the dlr. on the roads there's northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach. on the m25, there are anticlockwise delays betweenj26 waltham abbey towards j25 enfield following a collision earlier this morning. in the city, farringdon road remains closed between ray st and charterhouse street. and in hayes, the a312 the parkway remains partly blocked at the bulls bridge roundabout following an accident overnight. let's have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello.
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good morning. lots of rainbows, thunderstorms, and some hail spotted yesterday. today is not quite as dramatic. a typical april day. sun and showers. not as heavy and frequent as yesterday. but still, plenty of showers around through the afternoon. a cool but sunny start to the day. there'll be lots of sunshine through the morning. showers spreading from the worst. a few homegrown showers developing here and there. lighter than yesterday. it won't feel too bad in the sunshine. the breeze will be a touch lighter than yesterday. it's going to feel a touch warmer. temperatures average for the time of year. overnight tonight, clear skies. some late sunshine around. we will start to see cloud from the south—west. turning quite wet in western areas. tomorrow morning, 6—8. now, tomorrow, turning
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really quite wet. some outbreaks of rain around. should be quite dry. cooler over the weekend. more heavy in the forecast for sunday. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. bosses at the hospital treating seriously ill alfie evans defend their staff after what they call a barrage of abuse. last night, judges again rejected a bid by his parents to take him abroad for care. a bid by his parents good morning, it's thursday the 26th of april. also this morning: a pledge to cut plastic pollution. more than 40 major companies sign up to rid the uk of throwaway packaging.
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from coca—cola to asda. i'll be finding out if some of the countries biggest firms can put cutting pollution before profits. —— country's. more questions for the home secretary over the windrush row. an official document shows that targets to remove people from britain were set as little as three years ago. it's advantage real madrid in the champions league semi finals as they come from behind to win their first leg against bayern 2—1 in munich. and carol is at arundel castle this morning. good morning. i'm here because the tulip festival is on at the moment and you can see some magnificent tulips in the roundhouse garden. this lot are called the daily news makes, they consist of gascoigne, shearer, and they‘ re makes, they consist of gascoigne, shearer, and they're doing well because it's a chilly start to the
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day, not just here because it's a chilly start to the day, notjust here but across many parts of the uk, another day of sunshine and showers, the heaviest of which will be across scotland and northern ireland. more in 15 minutes. carol, thank you. good morning. first, our main story. bosses at alder hey hospital in liverpool say staff have endured a barrage of abuse since the decision to withdraw life support from the seriously ill toddler, alfie evans. supporters of the boy's family have been protesting outside the hospital. last night, appeal court judges rejected a further legal bid to allow alfie's parents to take him abroad for treatment. keith doyle reports. here that his condition cannot be reversed. outside alder hey hospital, supporters of the family, calling themselves alfie's army, have been a constant presence. there's also support for the family from around the world, who tweeted, alfie evans must be saved. the hospital says staff have been subjected to unprecedented abuse. in an open letter, they said:
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alfie's father, tom evans, has initiated a private prosecution against three doctors for conspiracy to murder. alfie is said to be struggling, now off life—support for a third day, with his parents by his side. alder hey hospital said its staff felt deeply for alfie, and shared the heartbreak when a child couldn't be cured. keith doyle, bbc news. andy gill is outside alder hey hospital this morning and andy, you've been following this case, and we've heard from the management of the hospital as well as our thoughts are with the parents of alfie, as well, so what next? well, we've been told tom evans, alfie's father, may
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come out sometime, in around an hour, to make a statement. it is understandable if he couldn't make it, he and this partner, alfie's ma'am, are at this bedside so clearly their movements are ruled by what they need to do with him. this is the third day alfie evans has been off life—support and breathing on this own. the appeal courtjudges yesterday said that may have surprised members of the public but didn't surprise the specialists at alder hey, and thejudges didn't surprise the specialists at alder hey, and the judges dismissed what they called the one last chance the family had to change the court's mind and allow alfie to go to italy, thejudges in the mind and allow alfie to go to italy, the judges in the appeal court said there is basically been no change in alfie's condition. what we don't know is weather the family will now try to mount another legal challenge possibly at the supreme court. we understand they can do that but there's been no decision from them or there presented is yet. --
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whether the family. andy gill, thank you cash their representatives yet. —— there presented kids yet. —— their representatives yet. more than 40 companies responsible for around 80% of the plastics sold in uk supermarkets have signed up to a new pledge to reduce pollution. the firms are promising to make all plastic packaging suitable for recycling or composting within seven years. victoria is here to explain how it will work. we recycle 46% of plastics in the uk, these big companies want to get it to 70% by 2025 and to be fair, lots of the supermarkets have done a lots of the supermarkets have done a lot already. for example, if you buy a co—op pizza, it comes on a bit of cardboard, it isn't on wallace diary on and the likes of tesco have removed polystyrene from their fish —— polystyrene. —— on polystyrene. there's more that can be done but there are difficulties for the supermarkets because you need certain types of plastics that can
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go in the freezer, and they're very handy for keeping food fresh for longer. there are some real issues around this. more is being done, the government has said they want to do more, they are trying to sort out things like bottle deposit schemes, so there's a big tide turning when it comes to plastic but it's a tricky one and single—use plastic can only be recycled a few times before you have to throw it away so you can only recycle three or four times and that's it. we will talk to procter & gamble, they make things like fairy liquid and head and shoulders, about what's coming up at around 7:50am. it is pouches instead of bigger bubbles, it didn't take off, so interesting if they do something like that. thanks, victoria. bbc news has seen evidence which suggests that immigration enforcement teams were set targets to remove people regarded as having no right to stay in the uk. yesterday, the home secretary, amber rudd, told mps that wasn't how her department operated. a target of 12,000 voluntary departures
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of people with no right to remain was in the most recent inspection report into removals, published in december 2015. let's get more from jonathan blake. good morning, jonathan. there have been a number of issues that have arisen in and around the windrush issues, and this one specifically is to do with targets, isn't it, and state m e nts to do with targets, isn't it, and statements made by the home secretary which are now being challenged? yes, there are still a lot of questions for the government about how people who came from the caribbean in the 19705 perfectly legally were challenged about their immigration status and asked to prove it, and in some cases threatened with detention and deportation and denied services as a result. the home secretary, amber rudd, was facing questions from mp5 on this at westminster yesterday and 5he on this at westminster yesterday and she said there was no evidence of the number of people deported so far, and the number of people detained, 5he far, and the number of people detained, she couldn't say. then there was the issue of targets, as you say, and whether the home office
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used those as a way of monitoring the number of illegal immigrants deported, and she was asked about that by the chair of the home affa i rs that by the chair of the home affairs select committee, is yvette cooper. do you agree the net migration target has distorted the decision—making and lead us to a lot of these problems? no, i don't, i don't think that's got anything to don't think that's got anything to do with it, what we've got is a situation where a group of people who should have been properly documented who are entitled to be here legally have not have the evidence they should be, that's what i'm committed to putting right, i don't think it's got anything to do with it. home office inspection documents showed in 2015 there were 12,000 volu nta ry showed in 2015 there were 12,000 voluntary departures, that was the target said, amber rudd was a bit unsure on the issue and in 2016 it's urged the government was warned by caribbean ministers about this problem. the signs were there, the government either didn't notice or heed the warnings properly, and now it's dealing with the consequences.
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we will leave it there. thank you very much. the government's decision to leave the customs union after brexit will be debated by mp5 today. the outcome won't be binding, but it will show the strength of opposition that theresa may is likely to face in future votes on her brexit plans. the government suffered defeat on the issue in the house of lords last week. the nhs in england will need another £50 billion a year by 2030, according to a review by two former health ministers. labour's lord darzi and conservative lord prior carried out the review with a panel of experts convened by the institute for public policy research. the report also says further efficiency savings will be needed, to meet the anticipated growth in demand for care. officials in seoul say kim jong—un will be the first north korean leader to officially set foot on the south's side of the military demarcation line when he attends a summit tomorrow. he is due to meet the south korean president, moonjae—in, at the first inter—korean summit in over a decade. offering mental health counselling to primary school pupils
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could provide long—term benefits to the economy, according to a new report. the charity pro bono economics says that every one pound spent could return more than six pounds to society by improving job prospects and cutting crime. our health correspondent, catherine burns, has more. if you don't have a place to be, then you willjust feel like, so negative. the children's mental health charity place to be provides emotional support to pupils at schools across the uk. it helps with everything from arguments in the playground to group sessions like this or individual work. it asked economists to put a financial value on its work with primary pupils. the report predicts that every child that has individual counselling through the charity could benefit by £5,700. that's mostly because one day they're expected to go on and get jobs and earn higher wages. they're also less likely to cost society in the future by needing different kinds of help. the service cost more than £4
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million across the country in one year. this school paid about £20,000. if it didn't transform children's lives, we wouldn't continue with it because it's got to be cost—effective. how do you weigh up a child's emotional feelings with cost? the government agrees that it's important to spot mental health problems early on, and has pledged £300 million extra help for primary and secondary schools. catherine burns, bbc news. theresa may will get an indication of the strength of opposition to her brexit plans today in what's expected to be a heated debate in the commons. a key aspect of her policy is that the uk will leave the customs union. that's the agreement which allows goods to move freely within the eu, without the need for further taxes. labour's calling for a new deal, which would effectively do the work of the current customs union. let's talk to its shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer. thank you very much for talking to
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us on thank you very much for talking to us on breakfast. not at all, good morning. could you explain what you see should be the way that unions should work? whether we stay in a customs union or not is obviously a crucially important question. the great advantage of being in a customs union is particularly for manufacturing, businesses that make things, they can get their goods across borders and trade successfully in the future. that's a big advantage. the other big advantage is there is a solemn commitment to no hard border in northern ireland, and nobody thinks that's possible unless you're in a customs union with the eu so what we're proposing in the labour party isa we're proposing in the labour party is a customs union, a new customs union, should be negotiated with the eu that effectively does the work of the current customs union because that's what we think is right for
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the country. interestingly, businesses are pretty supportive of that position, the cbi businesses are pretty supportive of that position, the cb! and institute of government think the same, and as we saw with some of the votes last week, many tory peers and quite a lot of conservative mps think the same too. businesses and the cbi will support this because they want as little friction as possible when it comes to trade and manufacturing, but the whole point of leaving the customs union or not being tied to the customs union and brexit is it gives the uk eight chance to renegotiate trade deals around the world. if you're tied to the customs union, that's not going to be allowed —— eight chance. union, that's not going to be allowed -- eight chance. if you're ina allowed -- eight chance. if you're in a customs union it means you have got a good trade deal with the 27 eu countries, the eu itself has done an agreement with 67 additional countries, there is a benefit of that when staying in the customs union. but if you're in the customs union. but if you're in the customs union you can still strike deals
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with the eu going forward so it doesn't mean there can never be new trade agreements, itjust means you're doing it with the eu rather than on your own. what is really significant here... what's different about that to the customs union we have at the moment? we want a customs union that does the work of the current customs union because it's so important for manufacturers, so important for peace in northern ireland and insuring there is no ha rd ireland and insuring there is no hard border and what we've done is look at what's in the economic interests of the uk's. the government obviously has done some analysis of the impact of leaving a customs union, and it's worked out that the cost of leaving outweighs any benefit it might otherwise get. there's a really important economic argument as well. how is that taking back control of our negotiations of border agreement squirrel trade agreement we wa nt we want a say on that now and in the future. june 2016, the say on the
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ballot paper, should we be a member of the eu? now we are grasping with how do we leave and what does the future relationship look like? and what does the future relationship look like in terms of listening to the voice of manufacturing. we have manyjobs the voice of manufacturing. we have many jobs and businesses. economically it is more sensible to have a customs union with the eu going forward to bite you have to talk to michel barnier, the chief negotiator. he says you cannot have your cake and eat it. you cannot leave the eu but have all the benefits of being inside it. the customs union will not work. what do you say? we have discussed the idea of the customs union with the eu and those in brussels. i discussed it with the 27 countries. they are more positive with that being able to be
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discussed. you have heard a rejection of the idea that could be a customs union with the uk going forward. this is a credible position put on the table. business is taking it seriously. conservative peers and mps are taking it seriously. the government is running away from the discussion and avoiding votes on the issue. they can run and run, but in the end there has to be a decision. there will be a binding vote on it. as soon as the government has the discussion in the house of commons and resolves it, the better. just to talk about the labour party and one of the issues. we talked about it yesterday morning. the row at about anti—semitism in relation to the party. the daily telegraph this morning, the front page. len
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mccluskey. jeremy corbyn, his closest ally. he has said he will rip upa closest ally. he has said he will rip up a row to destabilise the labour party. —— whip up. rip up a row to destabilise the labour party. —— whip uplj rip up a row to destabilise the labour party. -- whip up. i disagree with len mccluskey. he is wrong about that. jeremy corbyn said there is an issue with anti—semitism that has to be rooted out, which means a more effective disciplinary system. we have to deal with the culture in the party. part of that is some people denying there is even a problem. we have to deal with it. it is not an acceptable way to deal with the problem in the labour party at the moment. do you have faith jeremy corbyn will deal with it quickly as has been demanded? what
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he has done is ask the new general secretary to make this a number one priority. she has done that, setting up priority. she has done that, setting up action. she has written two constituencies of the labour party saying those who deny this problem are part of the problem. —— written to. that is part of the response to the scourge of anti—semitism. to. that is part of the response to the scourge of anti-semitism. the shadow brexit secretary. thank you for talking to us this morning. thank you. and now to a beautiful view. carol is out and about for us this morning, exploring the gardens at arundel castle. we cannot see her in this shot. she's lurking in the garden somewhere. lurking! delighting in the gardens! lurking indeed! good morning. what a place to lurk! the
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round house, that's this one. you can see these tulips. this is the tulip festival. if you are coming down to view it, they won't last much longer, another week perhaps. they are being affected by the weather. cold rain and very high temperatures last week. normally they last longer, the beginning of may. chilli —— they last longer, the beginning of may. chilli -- chilly they last longer, the beginning of may. chilli —— chilly across the board. may. chilli —— chilly across the boa rd. less may. chilli —— chilly across the board. less frequent showers outside of the north. looking at the charts.
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more showers developing across the north of the country. further south, some showers. viewer and further between. through the afternoon, they will build. then it will thicken. later, rain. temperatures, 17 in london. generally 11—14. exaggerated by the cold wind from the west, south—west. quite gusty in the west. rain advancing north—east across england and wales. at the end of the night, roughly down to the isle of wight and south—west. a touch of frosty northern ireland in scotland. carrying on with showers. tomorrow,
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picking up the rain, continuing across england and wales. northern scotland, the rest of scotland, northern ireland, we will still have sunshine and showers. temperatures tomorrow, especially in the rain, lower. 12 as a top in london. by the time we get to saturday, the south—eastern quarter of the uk, looking at a fair bit of cloud, patchy rain. the rest of us, sunshine and showers. it goes north—east. sunday, a new area of low pressure in the south—east introducing rain and winds. we could see coastal gales accompanying this. that is something to bear in mind. with the wind, trees in bloom. could be disruptive. away from the south—east, sunshine and showers. it is gorgeous here. we saw some hail
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here but the tulips are still in good shape. and you know all the names of them! i had some help. i talked to be head gardener. —— to there. see you later, carol. next month, teenagers across england and wales will be sitting their maths gcse. they'll be joined by a few familiar breakfast faces. yes, jayne, tim, and i will be walking into the exam hall four weeks today. i'm coming out in a bit of a cold sweat. a bit worried. and we're not the only mature students, thousands of people aged over 25 will be sitting exams this summer. tim's been to find out more. like many families, the summers from solihull have gsce exams looming, but it's mum, rachel, who's busy revising. so, rachel, a month to go, how's it all going?
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umm, it's going ok. i wish i had more time to revise and practise. so why did you decide to do your maths gsce? when i was at school, maths was my weakest subject, and so i decided to go back and relearn everything myself. and one of the reaseons as well is because you wanted to be able to help your kids out. yes. if i want to ask her for help, she knows it. it's kind of weird, 'cause i used to help her, but now she's helping me back. i think she's going to pass with flying colours. the pressure's on. i will miss it. i have enjoyed going to the class and learning for two hours, just solid doing something for me. here's one of my papers i've done. got my red pen ready. maths teacher, bobby seagull, has been guiding naga, jane, and me, as we get ready for our gsce. for people who are doing their gsces in their 405, maybe even older, what is your take on the age factor?
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i think it brings challenges and benefits as well. the challenges are that you did mathematics quite a long time ago. you are trying to stretch the memory quite a couple of decades back. the positive is you are an adult and you should be more mature and sensible in your approach. there is no point spending six hours one night and then doing nothing other times each week. especially with mathematics. it is the constantly revisiting that reinforces concepts. even if you are not getting the right answer, it is important to work on it and you'll pick up some points. now we come to your graph. this is appalling, tim, you used a pen for a graph. i'm sorry. and what have you done here! you joined the dots. a smooth curve for a quadratic?! i feel like i've let you down. you've let the team down. but we'll get there. rachel has been taking classes at solihull college and university centre.
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at school if i did not get it i would just shut down. there is more of a drive this time around. it took me a long time to get the courage to do it because of the fear of not grasping the concepts as well as you hope to. what's the next step, steve, that we might take? fractions always comes up and they say is that it when you start teaching it to them? there is a lot of stigma around particular topics from school. and for rachel, it's all about seizing the day. a year ago, i lost my best friend who i'd had since childhood and i decided you have to grab every opportunity because you do not know how long you have got. i'd like to say i've got it and i've done it. one month to go. never too late to learn. tim muffett, bbc news. that lady inspired me who said you had to grab it. i have a lot of
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respect for people, like you, going back into it. as always, we'd like you to get involved. our maths challenge tutor, bobby seagull has set us another puzzle. it is on the facebook page. go through it and see if you can get it. the scarecrow in the question couldn't do it because it doesn't have a brain. you can email us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk or share your thoughts with other viewers on our facebook page. coming up later in the programme. the speed of the world's fastest animal, the peregrine falcon, is put to the test by scientists. one of the stars of a new documentary, rudi,
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willjoin us in the studio, along with his handler. time now to get the news, travel, and weather, where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sara orchard. people living in a part of pimlico say noise from the tube is reaching their homes, after travelling from deep underground. earlier this year, bbc london tested noise levels on the tube, which led to experts warning passengers to consider wearing hearing protection, because some stretches are so loud. transport for london says it's trying to fix the problem in pimlico, but one resident says its badly affecting her health. it has made me a nervous wreck. it has made me sometimes feel very suicidal. and ijust get so depressed with it. a 17—year—old boy has been arrested in newham after police caught him carrying this a combined hammer and knife. he was detained after being stopped and searched yesterday evening. he's still in custody this morning being questioned by detectives from the met‘s new violent crime taskforce. it's thought they could be the future of home deliveries, zero—emission electric bikes, which can carry several shopping orders at a time. it's hoped eventually they'll take thousands of vans off london's congested roads every day.
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a supermarket is testing them out at its branch in streatham. and the government is supporting the e—bike company behind the idea. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes this morning, there's a good service all lines. on the roads there's northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach. on the m25, there are anticlockwise delays betweenj26 waltham abbey towards j25 enfield following a collision earlier this morning. in catford, there's a broken down truck on the a205 sth circular near catford station causing west—bound delays. and in hayes, the a312 the parkway remains partly blocked at the bulls bridge roundabout following an accident overnight. time for the weather forecast now. hello. good morning. lots of rainbows, thunderstorms, and some hail spotted yesterday. but today is not quite as dramatic.
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a typical april day. lots of sunny spells and showers. not quite as heavy or frequent as yesterday. but still, plenty of showers around through the afternoon. now, it's a cool but sunny start to the day. there'll be lots of sunshine through the morning. we'll start to see these showers spreading from the west. a few homegrown showers developing here and there. lighter than yesterday. fewer and further between. it won't feel too bad in the sunshine. the breeze will be a touch lighter than yesterday. it's going to feel a touch warmer. temperatures around normal for this time of year. 17 in central london. overnight tonight, clear skies. there will be some late sunshine around. we will start to see cloud from the south—west. turning quite wet in western areas. tomorrow morning, 6—8. now, tomorrow, turning really quite wet. some outbreaks of rain around. should be quite dry. cooler over the weekend. more heavy in the forecast for sunday. i'm back with the latest
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from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: bosses at alder hey hospital in liverpool say staff have endured a barrage of abuse since the decision to withdraw life support from the seriously ill toddler, alfie evans. supporters of the boy's family have been protesting outside the hospital. last night, appeal court judges rejected a further legal bid to allow alfie's parents to take him abroad for treatment. more than 40 companies have signed a new pledge to significantly reduce plastic pollution. the firms, which are responsible for around 80% of the plastics sold in uk supermarkets, are promising to make all their plastic packaging suitable for recycling or composting
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within seven years. the pact also promises to get rid of unnecessary single—use packaging. bbc news has seen evidence which suggests that immigration enforcement teams were set targets to remove people regarded as having no right to stay in the uk. yesterday, the home secretary, amber rudd, told mps that wasn't how her department operated. a target of 12,000 voluntary departures of people with no right to remain was in the most recent inspection report into removals, published in december, 2015. the nhs in england will need another £50 billion a year by 2030, according to a review by two former health ministers. labour's lord darzi and conservative lord prior carried out the review with a panel of experts convened by the institute for public policy research. the report also says further efficiency savings will be needed, to meet the anticipated growth in demand for care. a department of health spokesman said the government will be working with the nhs to put together a long—term funding plan. officials in seoul say kim jong—un will be the first
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north korean leader to officially set foot on the south's side of the military demarcation line, when he attends a summit tomorrow. he is due to meet the south korean president, moonjae—in, at the first inter—korean summit in over a decade. the government's decision to leave the customs union after brexit will be debated by mps today. the outcome won't be binding, but it will show the strength of opposition that theresa may is likely to face in future votes on her brexit plans. the government suffered defeat on the issue in the house of lords last week. medication prescribed to treat depression and bladder those are the main stories this morning. we need to share this picture with you. this is about looking ahead to the royal wedding. this is the dog loving lottery winners from west yorkshire spending £5,000 on a two metre high replica,
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yes, you've got it, windsor castle, built specially for their ten—year—old puppy, archie, looking out over his domain there. a p pa re ntly out over his domain there. apparently he will be watching the royal wedding from their next month and if you're wondering what you can see there, not only is there a castle, he can go around the grounds and you will find red carpet on the approach but also a hot club. that's the one random element in the package, the castle, yes, red yes, hot tub? is there a hot tub at windsor castle? good point, i don't know. but there is a red carpet and a castle. he was a very proud pooch, archie, lucky dog. from one top dog to another, cristiano ronaldo. i bet he has got a top dog! as if cristiano ronaldo, couldn't get any better, he's now won more champions league matches than any other player. he didn't score last night
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but his real madrid team got two away goals as they beat german champions bayern munich 2—1. marco asensio capitalised on an error by brazilian defender rafinha to score a breakaway second goal for real as they took the advantage after the first—leg. bayern must now score at least twice at the bernabeu next tuesday to prevent real reaching a fourth final in five years. alex oxlade—chamberlain says he is absolutely devastated to have been ruled out of the world cup through injury. the liverpool midfielder damaged knee ligaments during their champions league win over roma on tuesday night. oxlade—chamberlain posted a message on social media last night saying that liverpool have what it takes to do something special in the champions league. he also backed his international teammates to be successful in russia, and paid tribute to liverpool fan sean cox, as we were reporting in the news on breakfast, he was attacked before the roma game. he remains in a critical condition in hospital. tonight it's arsenal's turn in europe. they host atletico madrid in the first
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leg of their europa league semi—final. it's likely to be their only chance of qualifying for the champions league next season and manager arsene wenger knows they are up against a formidible side in atletico. if you look at the table, they are the second best team in spain. so overall, we naturally demand total commitment on our side and great discipline, because they have no real weak point. they are strong defensively, they are strong offensively, so we need a complete performance. neil robertson's the latest former winner to go out of snooker‘s world championship in the first round. the 2010 champion followed shaun murphy, stuart bingham and reigning champion mark selby out of the crucible doors, losing 10—5 to qualifier robert milkins. the world athletics governing body says it's going to bring in new rules which will place a limit on the amount of natural testosterone allowed in female athletes.
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it will only apply to athletes, taking part in track events from 400m up to a mile. this could effect the double olympic and triple world 800m champion, caster semenya. after her first world title in 2009, she underwent a gender test. a rule was then brought in which made women that produced high levels of testosterone take hormones to suppress them. this ruling was later overturned, and semenya has dominated since. the change will come into place in november and athletes like semenya could lose pace. the wbc world heavyweight champion deontay wilder has offered anthonyjoshua more than £35 million for a unification fight. wilder holds the only belt thatjoshua needs to be the undisputed heavyweight champion and wilder has posted a video, saying that he's made an offer tojoshua's promoter. anthony, tell your man eddie, and barry hearn, tell them
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to check your e—mail, i've got something special for you. by the way, all the money's in the bag, so i expect you to be a man of your word. one little story you may like, although you may not if you don't like diego maradona's hand of god, remembered for that incident in the 1986 world cup quarter—final. his legend has gone a step further on the ceiling of a football club in the argentine capital, buenos aires. in a painting modelled on michelangelo's creation of adam, maradona is god extending his hand to adam, represented by lionel messi. the coach of sportivo pereyra said, "for us, this pitch is our temple, a sacred temple of football, and what better than to have a fresco on the ceiling that is worthy of a temple. the kids inspired by his great skills but not putting up their hand to punch the ball in the net. a
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grand picture. beautiful bit of art! thanks, mike, see you later! we will have the weather in about six or seven minutes. across the uk, the most common cause of cancer death is from lung cancer, with survival rates failing to show any signs of improvement. so is a national screening programme the answer? let's take a look at some of the numbers. there are more than 46,000 new lung cancer cases in the uk every year, that's almost 130 cases a day. it's the third most common type of cancer, and for every 100 people who are diagnosed, just five survive for more than 10 years. but despite these numbers, the uk doesn't screen for lung cancer in the way it does for other cancers, such as bowel or breast cancer, although nhs england is running some pilot studies in london and the north—west. one person who thinks a screening programme would save lives is the conservative mp james brokenshire. he took time off work after he was diagnosed injanuary, and will lead a debate in the commons about the issue today. he joins us now from westminster.
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very pleased to say he joins us now from westminster. mr broken shire, thank you for your time this morning. take us through your own personal story, this dates back to september of last year, you were on holiday, tell us what happened? late summeri holiday, tell us what happened? late summer i remember holiday, tell us what happened? late summer i remember being out... i was out in northern ireland with family enjoying some time with the kids, had some lunch, realised i needed to clear my throat and the next thing i saw when i looked down was to see a blog of blood in my tissue. realising this wasn't right, i was referred onwards by my gp after an inconclusive x—ray, i had a consultant, different steps, and ultimately told i had a tumour in my right lung, a small tumour, but early stage, therefore i was able to have surgery, as i did a few months
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ago. you've highlighted these statistics, the fact that actually the death rates for lung cancer have been stubbornly poor, and that's because in most cases that wasn't the situation. my situation common. most cases are picked up very late when the disease has already progressed to other organs and it's why we need a screening programme, need to be aware of some of the signs of lung cancer so that people can get the help that they need and i think screening people where we can pick things up earlier allows a much better chance to see that people could live longer lives and curative surgery may be available to them, and that's why i'm leading this debate tonight. it's an important issue, isn't it? from your personal story, presumably this had been quite a big learning curve for you, and with you and yourfamily... for anyone who has had cancer or a
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family member who's had cancer, those moments in time, the first trip to the gp, the first time you tell yourfamily, trip to the gp, the first time you tell your family, the realisation trip to the gp, the first time you tell yourfamily, the realisation of the situation you're in, take us through what that's been like for you. it's been hard, it's been really difficult. i remember the early days, that sinking feeling in the pit of your stomach thinking, what is this, what does this mean? also recognising huge pressures on yourfamily. my also recognising huge pressures on your family. my wife, also recognising huge pressures on yourfamily. my wife, cathy, and the kids have been extraordinary where at times you go to dark moments and you think about what the future holds. as you're maintaining a positive sense around this... it's that uncertainty and once i know what my diagnosis was, when i knew i was moving into surgery, you can think, right, we will get through this and be positive about this and
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i feel i've been this and be positive about this and ifeel i've been really lucky, had an ageing nhs care from some extraordinary people —— amazing nhs care. but having been through all of this i feel an obligation to bring back some change, some difference. it's notable we have screening programmes, as you rightly said, in things like breast but yet more women will die from lung cancer than they will from breast cancer. i think it's some of these hard, stark fa cts think it's some of these hard, stark facts that make me believe strongly that a screening programme is appropriate. yes, there are some really good steps that are starting to be taken, pilots ongoing and work clinicians are leading but i think we should be bolder, we should take a step forward and moved to a screening programme to ensure more people in a situation like me are picking up the disease earlier so you can take action and ensure it can be to with, and that we break some of the stigma linked with lung cancer where people may feel guilt because they have smoked in not
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seeking help, or, in cases like my own, where i didn't smoke and people think, i haven't smoked, how can i get lung cancer? 15% of the cases are in non—smokers so we need to challenge the perceptions and the stigma. i wonder, mr challenge the perceptions and the stigma. iwonder, mr brokenshire, given your a member of the cabinet and you have a prominent role, other people will have made a similar argument as you before possibly from outside the commons, i know you said you feel like you're very much on a mission now, do you feel like you're coming up against some of the things that others would have pointed at you previously as a member of the cabinet and you previously as a member of the cabinetand said, you previously as a member of the cabinet and said, what about the money issues, what about when the health secretary turns around and says i'm not sure if this adds up financially, not sure if we can do the sums. we're with you and motioned me and we support you but here's the reality. you're probably going to come across that wall. actually i think there's a real opportunity at the moment. science
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is changing and how we deliver healthcare is is changing and how we deliver healthca re is changing. is changing and how we deliver healthcare is changing. as a government we have invested billions in the health service, but we need to look at the long—term here and we need to look at the new approaches like screening, that are actually about saving people's lives, increasing their time healthily and therefore the benefits to the health service of doing that and that's why i think we need this long—term plan of looking at where the pressures are, where the needs are, and where new medicine is coming in. i had a pa rt new medicine is coming in. i had a part of my tumour sent to some amazing dna molecular analysis where we are better able to learn and develop new precision medicines to help patients do even better. yes, things are changing fast, but on something like this where 36,000 people are dying from lung cancer every year, people are dying from lung cancer every yea r, two people are dying from lung cancer every year, two thirds of those because it is late stage, i think we need to move forward with the screening programme. there's an increasing move towards this now and i want to encourage and promote that
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and see change happens. i'm mindful that dame tessa jowell made a huge impact when she spoke about her personal situation, i dare say today being there with your colleagues, some of whom you've had the several is our dinners with over the years, that's going to be quite emotional? —— vociferous. it was such amazing work she has donein it was such amazing work she has done in relation to brain cancer. what touched me was colleagues from right across the house, you know, a tough place, uncompromising, but the support i felt, the words of concern, the help some people that i expected to help me, and some i did not, people are coming together to make a difference. one in two of us get it in our lives. it is about trends in families, brothers and sisters. —— friends and families.
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that is what i want to do by talking about my personal situation, the challenges of surgery and diagnosis, the impact on you and your family, and we can shift the dial on success rates and really help beat cancer together. thank you for your time and we wish you well. that debate will happen later on in the commons. there is an update. you know about alfie evans. he's been at the centre ofa alfie evans. he's been at the centre of a life support battle. his father is talking this morning. the family will meet with doctors later today to discuss the next step when it comes to alfie's care. we will keep
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you updated after eight o'clock. now it is time for the weather. carol is out and about for us this morning exploring the gardens at arundel castle. good morning. we have been moving around the gardens of the castle this morning. they are spectacular. look behind like tiers q cake. duke the i duke éééfifinke §we . sunshine for
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a and g in them. the showers will be hail in them. the showers will be fewer and further between in england and wales. showers are developing widely across the north of the country. not so in the south. low pressure in south—west england. cloud in the isles of scilly, cornwall, and other places. rain coming in. 11—15 generally. tempered by the westerly wind. 17 in london. overnight, the rain in south—west england will advance steadily north—east. a touch of rust in
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scotla nd north—east. a touch of rust in scotland and northern ireland. —— frost. starting tomorrow off with the rain. continuing north—east. at this stage, not getting into the very far north of england. some heavy showers. a keen wind. feeling cold, especially in the wind. some will be heavy in the south—west of england and wales. frost for you. area another % rain and bringing rain and strengthening winds gales. winds and potentially coastal gales. we will keep an eye on it because it
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could be disruptive. the weather is not disruptive today. we are here for the tulip festival taking place. if this is tempting you to have a look, come quickly. the weather has affected the tulips. rain and high temperatures have reduced their length. the forecast is sunshine and showers, that is why you are wearing a mack. we've been reporting this morning about the latest effort to reduce our plastic waste. this time from more than 40 uk companies. this is the most common thing found on the beach. plastic tops. people do not put them back on. you need to put the lid on. it's called the uk plastics pact. we're going to talk to two
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of the women behind it, but first, here's a reminder of the scale of the problem. the uk produces on average 2.4 million tonnes of plastic packaging every year. at the moment, we recycle less than half of that. just 46% ends up getting used again. the rest, as we have seen recently, ends up in places like our oceans. 42 of the uk's biggest brands, including lucozade and pizza hut, havejoined together to sign a pledge. we have seen that
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