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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  April 26, 2018 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 2.00pm. a new target, which the home secretary does know about. pressure mounts on amber rudd over the windrush scandal. i have never agreed that there should be specific removal targets and i would never support a policy that puts targets the head of people. that gives you no confidence, because they start saying, there aren't targets, then they say that they are fully charge of the situation, then go on to say that they don't know what is going on. violent crime rose by more than 20% in england and wales last year. after 20 years of decline, burglaries and car crime are on the increase. more than a0 companies have signed up to a pact to cut plastic pollution over the next seven years. a new pitch for wembley. it's thought fulham owner shahid khan is offering £800 million for the stadium. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. with the aid is to hugh. yes, good
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afternoon, simon. we will have much more on that with a wembley. where will that money go? it could be that grassroots and participation football are the real beneficiaries of any deal shouldn't go ahead. much more a little bit later. thank you very much. and louise. it is lovely in salcombe. yes, my glass is half full. make the most of it. lots of sunshine across england and wales, showers for further north and west, i will tell you exactly where coming up. louise, thank you very much. also coming up, another forecast of water, lots of it, coming up through the ground after a water main burst in tipton. hello everyone. this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. they're the words every politician
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and football manager dread, that statement that comes from the boss saying that you have their ‘full confidence'. today that was the phrase used by the prime minister theresa may when asked about the position of her home secretary amber rudd. she's facing further calls to resign after it emerged that the home office did set targets in 2015 for the removal of illegal immigrants. yesterday, ms rudd told mps that targets didn't currently exist, during questioning about the problems facing members of the windrush generation. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake has the latest. another day at the office for a home secretary under pressure. did your department set regional targets for the removal of migrants? that and other questions left unanswered after amber rudd faced mps yesterday. diane abbott. this morning, labour asked for clarification. the home secretary said that she had not set specific targets for the number of illegal immigrants to be removed. but... the immigration arm of the home office has been using local targets
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for internal performance management... cries of outrage these were not published targets against which performance was assessed, but if they were used inappropriately, then i am clear that this will have to change. not good enough for the opposition, who were keen to keep up the pressure on the home secretary to quit. isn't it time that the home secretary considered her honour and resigned? hear, hear. home secretary. i would like to make the very clear distinction between legal and illegal migrants. and when the right honourable lady talks about the windrush cohort, we have already established that the windrush cohort is here legally, and this government is determined to put that right. more criticism came from labour. we now understand that people have been removed because of targets, and she said she didn't know. i say with all conscience, is she really the right person to lead this office of state? but support and sympathy
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from amber rudd's own side. would my right honourable friend be assured that she has the total support of this side of the house. hear, hear! the total support of this side of the house in trying to resolve a very difficult, very difficult legacy issue. for a government department to have targets is not unusual, as the home secretary pointed out, labour had many of its own on immigration. but amber rudd's initial uncertainty about whether the targets were still in place, and how they were implemented, has led to more questions about whether the government's crack down on illegal immigration led to those with every right to be in the uk being wrongly targeted. one example of removal targets being used is a home office inspection report from 2015. it specified a total of 5000 voluntary removals, divided into 19 immigration enforcement regions.
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-- 12,000 —— 12,000 voluntary ——12,000 voluntary removals. talk of targets is perhaps a distraction for the home secretary. she is trying to focus on how the government is aiming to put right its mishandling of caribbean migrants. amber rudd has admitted she should have appreciated the scale of the problem sooner. warnings were missed and the government is not yet back on course. jonathan blake, bbc news, westminster. jonathan blake is in westminster now for us. this pressure doesn't seem to be going away in any shape or form. this pressure doesn't seem to be going away in any shape orform. it is quite a serious allegation that any minister that you are not on top of your brief? yes and that was the impression many people came away with before the select committee yesterday. there were several times when she did not have the information that the mps were asking for, and as we heard, she seemed uncomfortable and unsure about that issue of the targets, specifically.
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but, the clarification came today which he said that as you had in the report, there, that there were local targets but in place to monitor performance, but they were not intended to be public, or to be used asa intended to be public, or to be used as a measure against the department's success in any way. never the less, the confirmation from the home secretary today that there were targets, when yesterday shipping to say that their word is embarrassing for her. and that is why we have been more pressure coming from labour, the snp and elsewhere with the home secretary to resign. no sign that year is going to do that, and downing street have expressed their support, the prime minister's support and full confidence amber rudd in her role.” mention that in the intro, only half tonne in cheek, but when you hear that phrase, full confidence, you can that phrase, full confidence, you ca n start that phrase, full confidence, you can start counting the days in many cases. lets not forget that theresa may was home secretary before amber rudd, and we have seen as the
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revelations have come to light over the handling of the windrush generation, that theresa may was in charge of the home office for some of the time in question. that might bea of the time in question. that might be a reason why she might want to keep her in thejob. it is often be a reason why she might want to keep her in the job. it is often the case, that the prime minister or her spokesperson is asked whether she has full confidence in one of her cabinet ministers, i can tell you going to the briefing that we get from downing street, it is quite often asked, and i think in this case, for the time being at least, amber rudd does appear to be safe in herjob, finau. we say for now because over the last few days and weeks we have seen new details coming to light about the government's mishandling of caribbean migrants and new questions for themselves. jonathan blake there in westminster. thank you very much. the number of violent crimes recorded by police in england and wales went up by 21% last year compared to the year before. the figures, published by the office
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for national statistics, show a significant increase in knife and gun crimes, and burglaries. the figures don't include this year's knife attacks in london. leila nathoo reports. it is 24 it is 2a hours after the latest stabbing in their area. the fact that it stabbing in their area. the fact thatitis stabbing in their area. the fact that it is being reported now is meaning that we have the discussions. even if one person gets stabbed, that is one person too much. they are here to talk about causes, solutions, their experiences. growing up, violence has always been close. experiences. growing up, violence has always been closeli experiences. growing up, violence has always been close. i got chased out of my park by a knife, and, it's so common out of my park by a knife, and, it's so common and it is so normalised nowadays. you'd get told when you we re nowadays. you'd get told when you were younger, this person got stabbed and he is dead. this person when it came to daniel ward and postcode was. it was in that you lived through. it was in that union
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meet you had to survive. when you got drunk, you ran. the latest figures say that the problem is not going away. police also recorded a sharp rise in vehicles that and burglaries, too. like this one captured recently on cctv in stourbridge. there are two set of crime figures out today. a survey of people's experiences, and police say it shows abe broadly sta ble police say it shows abe broadly stable picture. but, there is also a surge in violence. largely here in london and in cities across the country. already this year, the situation is worsening in the capital. with a spate of killings. there is still a problem. capital. with a spate of killings. there is stilla problem. i capital. with a spate of killings. there is still a problem. ithink one of the biggest problems is the
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numberof one of the biggest problems is the number of people, particularly young people, who either feel the need or the desire to carry a knife with them. because in many of the offences we have seen, where you get somebody injured, both the victim and the offender and others there are carrying weapons. the government recently launched a new strategy to tackle serious violence. they want to focus on prevention as well as policing and tightening legislation around weapons. but rasheed, who works with young people, thinks it is a conflict picture. we can't have a discussion which is just about one point of intervention. it is notjust about stop and search. it is about families, it is about education, it is about austerity, it is about a long—term strategy and looking at, how do we live in a climate that is able to facilitate essentially a mass murder of thousands of young people on our streets? everyone is looking for answers. how to solve a problem with such devastating consequences? leila nathoo, bbc news. more than a0 companies have signed up to a major initiative to cut
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plastic pollution in britain. the pact is spearheaded by the waste reduction charity wrap, and includes a promise to make all plastic packaging suitable for recycling or composting by 2025. victoria fritz reports. images like this have started to turn the tide, but although public awareness of the dangers to oceans and rivers is at an all—time high, there is still a long way to go in the war on plastic. the uk produces on average 2.4 million tonnes of plastic packaging every year. at the moment, britain recycles less than half of that. just 46% ends up getting used again. 42 of the uk's biggest brands are responsible for about 80% of all plastic packaging. today they signed a pact. they are promising that by 2025, all the plastic they use will either be recyclable, reusable or compostable.
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the uk plastic pact is being billed as the most ambitious plan from businesses yet. what really is unique about this initiative is it's about the whole of the value chain coming together, united behind a common set of really ambitious targets. convenience, but not at any cost. from fresh fruit to household hygiene, the consumer goods industry is responding to a shift in public attitudes. so, things like this in terms of some of our shampoos. we are actually making sure that we are using recycled plastics in the bottles, and for this particular product as well, later on this year we will be introducing beach—collected plastic into it as well. but this will take time, and crucially for manufacturers, money. will it all be worth it? the investment could be wasted if products are not sorted at source. although recycling units are broadening the range of goods that can be accepted, there is still confusion about what can go in which bin. we would like to see
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the labelling different, so it's easierfor the people in their houses to decide whether something is recyclable or not. it's too complicated. there is too much written on the packaging. 0ne green dot to say this is recyclable or not, put it in the recycling bin. complicating things further, different councils have different rules around waste. we know in the communities we serve best, an inner city council is not the same as a rural council, and actually to try and implement the same policies in two very, very different places just wouldn't work, so actually councils do the best that they can in the communities that they know best, which is why you end up with slightly different schemes. rubbish as far away as france and spain washes up here in west wales. although businesses may pledge to clean up their act, shifting the world away from a throwaway culture may be the harder promise to keep. victoria fritz, bbc news. joining me now isjulian kirby, plastics campaigner
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for friends of the earth. it goes without saying that this is something that you welcome? we welcome the sentiment of this. something that you welcome? we welcome the sentiment of thism something that you welcome? we welcome the sentiment of this. it is a commitment. it is a voluntary agreement. with government and business coming together and saying, let's see if we can achieve this by this point. that is credit to the great british public carillion pushing the agenda. there were very concerned after blue planet and even before blue planet, but we are seeing the sort of agreement is coming over the year, and packaging has still been increasing ever the yea rs. has still been increasing ever the years. that is why we are saying that we need government action. what is the alternative of the packaging, thatis is the alternative of the packaging, that is what is at the heart of this. the consumers seem to be on the side of the planet on this. are we talking about package free as in supermarkets? is that the way forward ? supermarkets? is that the way forward? the way forward is to
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prevent the use of plastic in the first place as far as possible. in the short—term, we need to be making sure that we only recyclable content of plastics put on the market. it is good that this group says that it will be achieved by 2025. that is an kingi too late. it is also saying that by 2025, it must be at least 30% recyclable content, there are companies already using that. there are some saying that they will be com pletely are some saying that they will be completely losing are some saying that they will be com pletely losing recycla ble content. com pletely losing recycla ble co nte nt. to com pletely losing recycla ble content. to say that by 2025 less than a third of the packaging you will use will come from recyclable plastic is acting quite weak. what can be done in the meantime on an everyday basis to try and... we can't prevent the problem, the problem was already there, but at least you mitigate it, beachcombing? is that the answer? picking up plastic pollution, which is what it is, rather than later, from beaches
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is, rather than later, from beaches isa is, rather than later, from beaches is a good way of trying to reduce the extent of the problem in the sea, because the sea throws the stuff u p sea, because the sea throws the stuff up onto the beach, and it is an opportunity vast to remove it, but really have to look at getting plastic out of the system is as far as possible. we cycling cannot be the answer in the long run, and we have got to phase out all of the most is aspect if we want it and plastics pollution. imagine blue planet too. what will we do about that? the problem is already there. i think the banks that are a mile under the sea we are going to have to cross our fingers and hope for 110w to cross our fingers and hope for now that they are not doing that bad damage. that is all we can do? so much plastic pollution is that getting into the sea, added is not just from packaging and single use plastic, a lot of it is, from cosmetics, car tyres, plastic, a lot of it is, from cosmetics, cartyres, our plastic, a lot of it is, from cosmetics, car tyres, our trip plastic, a lot of it is, from cosmetics, cartyres, ourtrip that is coming from tyres? out of that
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were? we are all familiar with our tyre being a bit worn. why is it one? it is because the plastic, which mother of the tyre been worn off? where has it gone? into the drains, ended up in the sea. a tape of marine plastic pollution it is estimated to come from our work clothes. that plastic fleece jacket that we wear, that is shedding microfibres. they go into the sewage system, and water companies are horrified at the fact that they know that they are spreading the static on deals, because they spread sewage sludge on fields. it is getting back into the food chain. this is a very broad issue, and we need garments look at it holistically. as friends of the earth, is there one particular way that horrifies human host? what is of growing horror is the idea that used to think was recycling of plastic is exactly down cycling of plastics. what that means
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is that where a plastic bottle is recycled back into a plastic bath bottle and that is a good thing, even better is if it is reused as a bottle, and that it was an plastic in the first place. down cycling is when the quality of the cycling tonne plastic is that it is not good enough to be a plastic bottle. it is made into a fleece jacket or a cycle path road coming. what is a growing horror about that is that those fleece jackets are shedding tiny microparticles of plastics into the environment. those tiny ones are potentially the most dangerous, is that they absorb toxins in the surrounding water. they can be up to a million times more toxic than the surrounding sea water. they get hoovered up by the plastic particles, they get eaten by small fish, and get eaten by largerfish,
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they got the food chain. one final question, nobody thinks this is a good thing, but is the answer in the long run something in science? how you break that down into something thatis you break that down into something that is not harmful? there needs to be in that is not harmful? there needs to beina that is not harmful? there needs to be in a vision for sure to look at some of the to tricky areas, such as tyres. really interesting, we heard last week that this enzyme can break down complex plastics into their simpler molecular forms. but, down complex plastics into their simpler molecularforms. but, that is only going to help with plastic that we have already recovered. it cannot help with plastics that are blowing through the field or in the sea. at the moment, the best recycling, across europe is over one third of... the rest of it is being burnt. it is going to landfill orators escaping into the environment. that enzyme cannot help
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with that two thirds of plastics. julian kirby, plastics campaigner. thank you very much. you're watching afternoon live. these are our headlines: the home secretary amber rudd is under renewed pressure after admitting that offers that have removal targets for immigration. violent crime has increased by 21% last year, finland and wales. more than a0 companies have signed up to a pact to cut plastic pollution. and in sport, the fa have received an offer to buy wembley. it is thought to be web £800 million, and it has come from shahid khan, the owner of full and the jacksonville jaguars. steven gerard is on a shortlist to become the new manager of rangers. he has been coaching at anfield since tiring two years ago. and deontay wilder makes an offer of $50 million to fight anthonyjoshua. the camps will meet to discuss a
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potential deal, tomorrow. iwill have more of those stories, just after 2:30pm. gibraltar‘s chief minister fabian picardo has told the bbc that he's open to the idea of spain sharing the use of gibraltar airport. that would be as part of brexit talks aimed at settling spain's contention over british sovereignty of the territory. but we also understand that ongoing talks between british and spanish negotiators on the territory, are currently deadlocked. gavin leejoins us now from gibraltar. it is interesting, because for the past few months, the british and spanish negotiators have been speaking seven times to work at a solution for the future of gibraltar. there's quite a lot at sta ke. gibraltar. there's quite a lot at stake. it affects how the gibraltar could leave the european union? does it leave before the transition period which the uk is potentially aiming to get? will it leave by
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march 2019? why doesn't have a voice? it is interesting, it goes back centuries, to spend contesting his two and a half square miles, and think it will and miss it, this could be any part of the british shires. very interesting, this is a home of the government and the chief minister, fabian picardo, not too dissimilar from minister, fabian picardo, not too dissimilarfrom what minister, fabian picardo, not too dissimilar from what downing street might look like. i spent the last few days here tried to get to the heart of the issues, get under the rock and see what is at stake. a picture perfect postcard on... the 32,000 gibraltar residents here on its two and a half square miles of land on the verge of leaving the
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european union, despite 96% of the people having against brexit.|j european union, despite 96% of the people having against brexit. i have littered the two years. i am worried about people disclosing. that could lead to us having to go back to the uk. i've accurately worried that it could get that level? possibly, yes. sometimes it goes through one in and out the other. even with the brexit talks, does it not clear things up? get things to a head. no. the eu has allowed spain a voice in these brexit talks, and british and spanish negotiators are now meeting weekly to discuss a solution. the spanish side say that they are not seeking to reclaim the rock is part of these talks, but they do have specific demands. in madrid, earlier
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this month, spain's foreign minister spelt out to me exactly what is at sta ke. spelt out to me exactly what is at stake. what we want is to get rid of some of the returns that have made oui’ some of the returns that have made our relations at the last few years, such as lack of transparency in the tax system is rotten, and questions, having to do with controls at the border. it could be as big an issue. gibraltar‘s chief minister is also involved in the talks. what seydou sy has? without the negotiating, it would not be possible for the gibraltar agreements to be done to the satisfaction of the people of two bottle. there is a legend of gibraltar that while the monkeys that are on top of the rock remain, it will stay british? many aspects of life could change depending on
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the outcome of brexit talks. their future for now lies in the hands of the negotiators. the one thing that i found fascinating from being here, being back and forth at 62 in the previous spanish government said, that if there was brexit, then soon there would be a spanish flag flying on the 0x. the current government is far more dramatic. they are talking about a smooth border. let's bring out someone that we know. christine, from gibraltar broadcasting corporation. as someone that you have lived here and worked here for a long time, do you feel more optimistic than a few years ago? you feel resigned to feel more optimistic than a few years ago? you feel resigned your fate? because we follow brexit so closely, it is a roller—coaster. the british government forgets gibraltar. it is such a roller—coaster. you think your discount well, and suddenly get something else thrown at you. the
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opposition is not going to agree? what is labour going to say? though, resigned and anyway a bit sad, that we are here. spain talk about gibraltar airport wanted to jointly manage it, but on the gibraltar side, some on the spanish side of the border say that maybe, if this sovereignty... may be any few years' time, —— maybe if it is management, could bejoint time, —— maybe if it is management, could be joint sovereignty in a few yea rs' could be joint sovereignty in a few years' time. that is not for the spanish gunmen say, but many people on the other side of the border say. do you recognise that or not?|j think we wanted to be a win—win for spain and for the gibraltar. the devil is in need you tell. whether it isjoint control, devil is in need you tell. whether it is joint control, joint management. if it isjoint it is joint control, joint management. if it is joint use, it is joint control, joint management. if it isjoint use, then gibraltar is always ready to extend a hand of friendship. it is a question of trust, as well. there is
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a long history. briefly, do you realistically think that this place could change? that the border could change in the event of the tour is going wrong? yes. yes, i think the frontier is the crux of the latter. it is where spain could turn the screws, and a lot of it depends on the frontier, and it also depends on the frontier, and it also depends on the uk granting us access, financial access to the uk. that is in their gift, and that is on the net they could do. thank you so much for talking to me. i will leave you to your lemonade. there are a few years fitting around here. slightly red faces, as well. very british sense of the summer. talks on both sides are of the summer. talks on both sides a re pretty of the summer. talks on both sides are pretty difficult and more difficult than they were, but they are talking about achieving summing by the european union summit in 0ctober. just a quick bit of breaking news. a
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naked couple have been chased through salisbury after being caught having sex in a field. the man in his 20s and woman in her a0s have been invited to a interviewed by the police for outraging public decency. time for a look at the weather. louise has a look at that. i hope i do not have to follow that story all afternoon. i am doing a summary of aprilfor afternoon. i am doing a summary of april for you. afternoon. i am doing a summary of aprilfor you. i think most afternoon. i am doing a summary of april for you. i think most people are april for you. i think most people a re really april for you. i think most people are really glad to see the back of this month. this is easter. you will see the next one, stop laughing at speed. this is the second week of april. it was cold and foggy and miserable. third week of april we would all like to remember, wouldn't we? almost, not quite record—breaking, but just shy
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we? almost, not quite record—breaking, butjust shy of record—breaking, butjust shy of record—breaking, 29 degrees, very nice indeed. we will close at the month of april, what you reckon? miserable. sunnis that and showers at the moment, but this weekend will be really disappointing. nine to 12 degrees,. i really hope that summer is just around the corner, we really need it. that was april, ladies entered common. the rest of the map is not great, at all. we will see it being pretty cold and miserable. we have had some sunshine around, today. the showers are widely up and threw scotland, northern ireland, northern england. for england and wales, it is not a bad afternoon, really isn't. 16 degrees be high. that is the last time that we are going to see that temperature for the rest of this month. it will feel cold and disappointing. through this evening and overnight tonight, we will see an area of low—pressure
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which will move up from the south—west. it will bring some persistent rain, but at the same time, further north, the showers will turn away, and we was the tem ptress will turn away, and we was the temptress falling close to freezing. they chilly start in the north—east of scotland, but at least you have got the sunshine. if we look at the regional detail, you can see these bands of surrey rain moving up into the midlands and into the north of the midlands and into the north of the england to the middle of the day. that will be the story through friday. if you are caught underneath that cloud of rain, it will feel pretty disappointing, indeed. further north, part across the extreme north of england, scotland and northern ireland, sunnis doesn't cousin scattered showers, and ties of nine to 13 degrees. what is in store for the weekend? well, it's at least quite a story. we will lose that training is at his early on saturday morning. and then, the wins main light. a cool source at any time of year. that is going to make
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it feel a little bit disappointing for the start of the weekend. we will have sunnis spelt and scattered showers, mostly through scotland and northern ireland —— sunny spells. 0n sunday, the winds will soon ran to more of a north—easterly direction. that will drive more cloud. so, for east yorkshire coast down into east anglia, it will be caught and grey. the best of the brightness further north and west. it really does look as though our weekend summary will continue to be a weekend of april showers. the breeze will have quite a feature, it will feel quite cool, and towards the end of the early hours of monday, we will seek significant heavy rain across the south—east. this is bbc news — our latest headlines.
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amber rudd faces calls to quit as home secretary after it emerges she knew officials were set targets for the removal of illegal migrants. i have never agreed there should be specific removal targets. it gives you no confidence, because they start of there are no targets and then they go on to say they are fully in charge of the situation and then they go on to say they didn't know what was going on. the number of knife crimes recorded by police in england and wales increased by more than a fifth last year, compared with 2016. the office for national statistics says there has also been a rise in burglary and car crime. more than a0 companies sign up to a voluntary pact to cut plastic
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pollution over the next seven years. does brexit put the rock in a hard place? gibraltar‘s chief minister tells the bbc that he's open to the idea of spain sharing the use of gibraltar airport. a new owner for the home of football? american businessman shahid khan, who owns fulham football club, has put in a bid for wembley stadium — thought to be around £800 million. sport now on afternoon live with hugh ferris...and wembley is up for sale. the proposal will be tempting for the fa, who have spent £757 million building the new wembley after originally buying the old wembley, knocking it down and bringing this lark other splendid 90,000 seater stadium to the home of the national game. there are still paying it off. debts are due to be cleared in 202a,
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17 years after it was open. you tempting offer, £500 million for the stadium, 300 million for the club wembley business. the cash being offered by shahid khan, they could invest it back into the game. someone grassroots participation football. shahid khan is the owner of fulham. more significantly in this matter, he is the jacksonville jaguars, who have a deal to play in london at wembley. this is seen as a measure to help secure that in the short to medium term, but also potentially pave the way for that franchised to move to london in the long term, he moved that the n f l have welcomed this afternoon. that would be fantastic, fascinating. and steven gerrard is being linked with managing rangers, how likely is it that could happen? rangers still have not named a
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permanent replacement there, the temporary replacement is unlikely to get thejob. it temporary replacement is unlikely to get the job. it could well be steven gerrard, he hasjoined the get the job. it could well be steven gerrard, he has joined the youth setup that has club. by all accounts, he's doing a very good job. he had the chance to take over mk dons, lower down the league structure in england the couple of yea rs structure in england the couple of years ago, but he turned it down. so it could be considered a gamble for both the club and steven gerrard, given how unproven hears in the management structure. rangers second in the scottish premiership, looking for a new manager, it could be stephenjenner. for a new manager, it could be stephen jenner. arsene wenger has lots of players who would end of the last time playing tonight. it is his final match in charge of arsenal. it
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would be easy. the opponents have a very good recent cricket in europe. it is very perfect goodbye? i don't know. i just want to do as well as it is very perfect goodbye? i don't know. ijust want to do as well as i can, because i think the quality, i've seen the guys this season, the challenge. mentally, and i see them a lwa ys challenge. mentally, and i see them always respond in a positive way. anthonyjoshua's promoter always respond in a positive way. anthony joshua's promoter has always respond in a positive way. anthonyjoshua's promoter has asked wilder to show him the money after he claimed he had $50 million in the bag for the reunification fight. it's the only one of the main belts that he doesn't have and scores a meeting tomorrow for both camps to see a video can made. the fights potentially could be later on this year. tell them to check the e-mail.
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i've got something special for you. either way, all the money is in the bag, sol either way, all the money is in the bag, so i expect you to be a man your word. the venues and fixtures for next year's cricket world cup have been decided today. england will begin against south africa at the oval on me the 30th. semifinals at old trafford at edgbaston. but london stadium will not post any games. it was deemed too much of a risk and potentially too expensive. you can see all the fixtures for the 11 grounds hosting matches at the bbc sport website. also available on the website, live coverage of the snooker championship that continues today. these are live pictures coming from the bbc a village. murk allen meets joe coming from the bbc a village. murk allen meetsjoe perry in the second—round match by the frames to one. keep up with that on the bbc sport website. 0n the other table,
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they are 7—5 currently to ryan day. that's the first round match. after that thread was spotted, that's all you sport for now. thank you very much. 0ffering mental health counselling to primary school pupils could help reduce school truancy and crime, according to a new report. the charity pro bono economics says early help, such as one—to—one support, can help boost the life chances of children and bring economic benefits too. catherine burns reports. if you're feeling sad and worried, you could talk to place to be. and they might — and you might feel happy. a glowing recommendation from eight—year—old charlie. the children's mental health charity, place to be, provides emotional support at schools across the uk. it asked researchers from the group pro bono economics to put a financial value on its work with primary pupils. the report predicts that every child who has individual counselling through the charity could benefit by £5,700. that is mostly because they are one day expected to go on and getjobs and earn higher wages.
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they are also less likely to cost society in the future by needing different kinds of help. it shows in monetary terms what we know as clinicians. if we get in there early, when there are first signs of difficulty, of upset, or behaviour, or of distress, then that won't translate into mental health problems later in life. these year four and five pupils are not thinking about the money though. if i'd had home troubles or school troubles, i could go to place2be and talk to elizabeth and she would lift a weight off my shoulders. you can share your emotions and your feelings and you won't get in trouble for spelling anything. when i didn't have as much friends as other people, i went to place2be and she told me to be more confident. it can get you something very important in life and it's called a friend. the service cost more than £a million across the country in one year.
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this school paid about £20,000. if it didn't transform children's lives, we wouldn't continue with it, because it's got to be cost—effective. i would want the government to recognise that schools need to be places of safety, and that schools need support. the government says it has allocated an extra £300 million to mental health in schools. but let's leave the final word on this to charlie. place2be has helped me with my singing and my attitude, and now i'm going to sing a bit of a song. # happiness will find me # leave the past behind me # today my life begins... catherine burns, bbc news. facebook has admitted that it didn't read the terms and conditions of the app that improperly shared details about millions of its users with cambridge analytica, a british data firm. in evidence to the media & culture select committee, the company's chief technical 0fficer also said facebook didn't know that a senior employee it hired was also a director of the firm
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behind the app. earlier our media editor, amol rajan, explained what's been happening at the committee today. this comes down to an app, and facebook admitted they did not read the terms and conditions of it and that they generally don't read the terms and conditions of such apps. it was tested at some points, especially when julian knight it was tested at some points, especially whenjulian knight mp took them on. i put it to you today that facebook is the morality free zone, destructive to a fundamental right of privacy. you are the problem, your company is the
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problem. what do you say to that?|j respectfully problem. what do you say to that?” respectfully disagree with that assessment. the british interrogators were much more impressive than the americans. but so impressive than the americans. but so far it doesn't seem to be hurting the company too much. the latest figures overnight suggest that the profits are up to 5 billion, which is more than most companies can manage. the effect of this data scandal is not hurting the bottom line as yet. the football association has confirmed it's received an offer, thought to be worth £800m, to sell wembley stadium. our sports news correspondent, richard conway is here. yes, shahid khan, who owns fulham
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football clu b yes, shahid khan, who owns fulham football club and the jacksonville jaguars, has made the offer. the results mean talk about a permanent nfl team based in london and this is a sign from shahid khan that he wa nts to a sign from shahid khan that he wants to make that a reality. £500 million cash plus £300 million for the club wembley hospitality business, which would stay within the fa's control. but because it is a national stadium, is it not protected from the sort of thing? the old wembley had a history that it was redeveloped and owned by the fa, but there's nothing to sing they can't sell it on and still play there. shahid khan said today that there. shahid khan said today that the england national teams will still be based at wembley, they will continue to play there. would team of in there as well? i'm told there is no answer to that yet, i think they would stay at craven cottage for the foreseeable future. i think he sees this as a base for the
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jacksonville jaguars, the game ‘s sell—out every time they play. he also sees this as a chance to protect his position within the london market. he wants to move jacksonville jaguars to london on a permanent basis. when the nfl laser wembley, it is quite something, they poured a lot of money into it. yes, they get fans from all over europe coming to see these games. the ambition has always been for a permanent team to be here. it does look as if this was a big step towards that if the sale goes through. from the fa's point of view, they see an opportunity to get out of the stadium operating business. they haven't finished paying for it yet. yes, they still have a substantial amount of pay off. they can gain £500 million in cash to push back into grassroots participation in football, a chance to reinvest in those a0 pictures around the country, create regional hubs, they see that as a big
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opportunity to use that money, take it out of the stadium and put it into work it sees its realjob, as developing football across the country. the home secretary, amber rudd, has been at a pre—arranged lunch with lobbyjournalists today. vicki young was among them. she is having a rough time. yes, she reflected on that. she said the one thing she didn't want to do was come and have lunch with a bunch of journalists and make a speech to them. these are light—hearted affairs, they make jokes and the guest affairs, they make jokes and the gu est ta kes affairs, they make jokes and the guest takes a lot of questions. she said at the beginning she wasn't feeling particularly light—hearted, because of what is going on. but also the issues she has to deal with, terrorism, policing and this row about immigration. 0n
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with, terrorism, policing and this row about immigration. on that, she said she felt very seriously responsible for addressing the windrush scandal. what she was making clear is that she wants to make changes, she once made changes to the culture and the home office. she has brought in contact centres to deal with this particular issue, but she was saying she was wanting to stay in order to sort it out and she said she was the person to sort that out. she paid tribute to people like the labour mp david lammy for raising the issue of the windrush generation. she said she had personally had listen to lots of stories of people affected and she says that one she remembers most is the pain of a man who was not able to go back to the caribbean to see his daughter get married. she says she has listened to the calls some have made, the telephone hotline, she has listened into some of those and met those affected. she admitted the ones she was meeting were the ones who were getting their papers,
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so beware happy about this. she says she wants the home office to deal with the individual and is a really more sensible about the way they approach these things. as you can imagine, when it came to the questions, she was asked weather she had considered resigning at the last couple of weeks weather she had offered her resignation to the prime minister. she said, it has been a difficult few weeks, but i am committed to the home office. someone asked if that was yes or no a nswer someone asked if that was yes or no answer and she said, it is my answer. speculation she might be seen as a future leader of the party and speculation that her another cabinet members are fund—raising in case there was some kind of vacancy. she said she was not raising money and was focused on what she's doing now. she said, i am just trying to think of staying in the game. she refused to criticise theresa may and her legacy at the home office. thank you very much. the home secretary amber rudd is
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under pressure after admitting her office did have immigration removal targets. violent crimes recorded by police in england and wales have risen by 20%. more than a0 companies have signed up to a pact to cut plastic pollution over the next seven yea rs. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. tsb boss paul pester has told the bbc the bank is "on our knees" after six days of computer chaos. they have now called in experts from ibm to help fix the banking system breakdown. problems began at the weekend when tsb attempted to move customer accounts to a new computer systems. barclays bank has reported a loss for the first three months of the year — they paid £1.abn to settle a lawsuit in the us over the sale of mortgage—backed securities. and also put aside an additional £a00m to cover an increase
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in payment protection insurance mis—selling claims. it means they reported a pre—tax loss of £236m, down from the £1.7 billion it made in the same period last year. it's a new chapter for waterstones as the book chain has been bought by activist investment firm elliott advisors for an undisclosed amount. but one of the main characters james daunt will stay in place as the chain's chief executive. the name elliot may sound familiar — they bought a 6% stake in whitbread recently saying they wanted the company to split its coffee chain costa, from its premier inn hotel business. this week whitbread announced plans to do just that. so facebook is getting a thumbs up from wall street? yes, a 63%jump in profits for the first three months of the year, despite the negative headlines. they
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are surging ahead when it comes to making money. they made almost $5 billion, added more users, the money is coming from online ads. pretty much the same story with twitter yesterday, that buzz online advertising increase. that's where they're getting their money from. it wasn't long ago we were saying how these companies making their money? that's right. joining me now is kim gittleson, our new york business correspondent. how has the share price reacted? it has risen by 8%, which shows investors over the happy with the sheer report. 0ne investors over the happy with the sheer report. one of the reasons is the mobile advertising revenue, because 91% of the advertising that comes on the phone which is seen to
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be keenly. they were worried that the cambridge analytica story would have an impact on the bottom line, but that scandal didn't break until mid—march in these earnings are just the first three months of this year, so it's a little too soon to tell that had any impact on the company's bottom line. mark zuckerberg says the company is facing "important challenges" going forward — did he say what they are they have said they will be investing more in moderating
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contents, there will be mid—term elections here and in the uk. they will be doing more to vet ads on the website. there will be more to show that these are political ads you are seeing when you see them on facebook. the uk is making less cars? figures from the society of motor manufacturers and traders the number of cars made in the uk during march fell by 13.3% from a year earlier lack of demand for uk produced cars both here and abroad — poor weather had affected production. uncertainty over the uk's exit from the european union — and confusion over diesel. but it said that double—digit falls in output is a "considerable concern". so earlier we spoke to tamzen isacsson from the society of motor manufacturers and traders.
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we have seen a lot of confusion around diesel. there have been months of negative message about diesel and unhelpful government policies. that means consumers are confused. they should not be. the latest low emission diesels are far cleaner than ever before and what they are doing is to holding onto their older, more polluting cars, and we're seeing a lack of fleet renewal. that is disappointed for the industry. a quick look at the markets. but changed interest rates and no reaction on the markets. berkeley ‘s share price down, they had disappointing results, but investors have described the masters appointing rather than a disaster. this weekthe bbca‘jaakmg-
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connect in an increasingly polarised world — crossing divides. 0ur chief international correspondent, lyse doucet, has travelled to regent park in toronto —— a neighbourhood in toronto — a neighbourhood with a long history of absorbing new immigrants to canada. imagining a different future, one of many art spaces designed
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to bring people together. leo, a retired businessman, recently moved in. ten years ago, i would never have imagined living here, this was a dangerous area, but now, i look around, it is so changed. it is really going to keep me busy for the next ten, 20 years. old buildings torn down, new ones going up. it may sound like gentrification but here, nobody is being pushed out by people who can pay more to live here. the work of rebuilding this community is not over, but already, people from more than 100 countries have come here to ask, what makes this work? does it have something to do with the character of this community? is this a model which could go elsewhere? the model built on a partnership, the toronto housing association, and a private developer. so it is possible to do good and make money? absolutely, we enjoy doing that every day. he takes me on a tour. so here, you have people from different backgrounds living here, different incomes... altogether, in the same street. yes, all together, in the same street. this is market housing, social housing is down the street. that is a success then,
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a great success. a shout out to canada's leader. this yoga class, a snapshot of a diverse society, half the people who live in toronto were born in another country. success is not just about living side by side. the design might enable citizens of regent park, the people who live there, but it is up to the region to part the people who live there, but it is up to the regent park individuals to take that, the power of the design, and make it vibrant. this lady raised three children in regent part when it was a different place, now she tries to connect people across the financial divide. hey, i am your neighbour, when did you move in, what do you do. what do you do to the community, how do you give back to the community, it is living here, it is delicious!
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the generation growing up here confronts the same challenges as kids anywhere. but when there is a greater sense you are on the same side, there may be a greater shot at success. before the weather forecast — i'm going to bring you some pictures of water — lots of it — coming from the ground. this is the situation on a residential road in tipton — which has turned into a river — after a water main burst this morning. several cars have been submerged as gallons of water has gushed out. south staffs water have said that they're working to get the problem fixed — and have apologised to customers in the area who may be experiencing low pressure. time for a look at the weather...
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here's louise. there have been some showers, one or two isolated in north—eastern england. as we go through the evening, the showers will continue to ease. we need to draw your attention to cloud and rain pushing in from the south—west. this will be quite a nuisance through friday. that will prevent temperatures from falling further than 80 trees. into the far north—east, it could be a chilly start to your morning. the best of the sunshine likely to be through scotland, the far north of england and northern ireland. the cloud and rain will spell up into
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the midlands by the afternoon. the cloud and rain will be heavy and persistent for a time, disappointing at eight or 9 degrees. what ever you are doing, wrap up warm. hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 3.00pm. a new target which the home secretary does know about... pressure mounts on amber rudd over the windrush scandal. i have never agreed that there should be specific removal targets and i would never support a policy that puts targets ahead of people. that gives you no confidence, because they start saying, there aren't targets, then they say that they are fully in charge of the situation, then go on to say that they don't know what is going on. violent crime rose by more than 20% in england and wales last year after 20 years of decline. burglaries and car crime are on the increase. more than a0 companies have signed up to a pact to cut plastic pollution over the next seven years. i'ts thought fulham owner shahid khan a new pitch for wembley. i'ts thought fulham owner shahid khan is offering £800m for the stadium. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport:
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£500 million of that potential offer is in cash, and it could be part of the much bigger deal. the fa may well reinvest that half £1 million in the games. it is a once in a windfall opportunity for the grassroots. we will talk more about ita grassroots. we will talk more about it a little bit later on. thanks hugh, and we'll bejoining you for a full update just after half—past. louise lear has all the weather. thanks, simon. it is another afternoon of april showers, and some of them are still heavy and sundry. more details coming up. thanks, louise. also coming up, another forecast of water, lots of it, coming up through the ground, after a water main burst in tipton. hello everyone, this is afternoon live,
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i'm simon mccoy. they're the words every politician and football manager dread, that statement that comes from the boss saying that you have their "full confidence." today that was the phrase used by the prime minister theresa may when asked about the position of her home secretary amber rudd. she's facing further calls to resign after it emerged that the home office did set targets, in 2015, for the removal of illegal immigrants. yesterday, ms rudd told mps that targets didn't currently exist during questioning about the problems facing members of the windrush generation. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake has the latest. another day at the office for a home secretary under pressure. did your department set regional targets for the removal of migrants? that and other questions left unanswered after amber rudd faced mps yesterday. diane abbott. this morning, labour asked for clarification. the home secretary said that she had not set specific targets
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for the number of illegal immigrants to be removed. but... the immigration arm of the home office has been using local targets for internal performance management... cries of outrage these were not published targets against which performance was assessed, but if they were used inappropriately, then i am clear that this will have to change. not good enough for the opposition, who were keen to keep up the pressure on the home secretary to quit. isn't it time that the home secretary considered her honour and resigned? hear, hear. home secretary. i would like to make the very clear distinction between legal and illegal migrants. and when the right honourable lady talks about the windrush cohort, we have already established that the windrush cohort is here legally, and this government is determined to put that right. more criticism came from labour.
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we now understand that people have been removed because of targets, and she said she didn't know. i say with all conscience, is she really the right person to lead this office of state? but support and sympathy from amber rudd's own side. would my right honourable friend be assured that she has the total support of this side of the house. hear, hear! the total support of this side of the house in trying to resolve a very difficult, very difficult legacy issue. for a government department to have targets is not unusual, as the home secretary pointed out, labour had many of its own on immigration. but amber rudd's initial uncertainty about whether the targets were still in place, and how they were implemented, has led to more questions about whether the government's crack down on illegal immigration led to those with every right to be in the uk being wrongly targeted. one example of removal targets being used is a home office inspection report from 2015. it specified a total of 12,000
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voluntary removals, divided into 19 immigration enforcement regions. talk of targets is perhaps a distraction for the home secretary. she is trying to focus on how the government is aiming to put right its mishandling of caribbean migrants. amber rudd has admitted she should have appreciated the scale of the problem sooner. warnings were missed and the government is not yet back on course. jonathan blake, bbc news, westminster. of all of the day is to have a pure range lunch with journalists, this was probably not it. at that lunch was probably not it. at that lunch was vicki young. what is all the right saying? hamer she says that she was to sort the problem sad. she
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was after she would considered resigning over the past few weeks. she did not really answer that question, and just said that she is committed to staying at the home 0ffice committed to staying at the home office and putting all of this right. interestingly, on that hole inissue right. interestingly, on that hole in issue of targets, you mention that yesterday, she didn't seem to recognise that there was a regional target in place. this is for illegal people being deported. this is not for those from the windrush generation. today, she said, "i have not set targets going forward, and i didn't think it is right to have theirfor removal.". i think didn't think it is right to have their for removal.". i think we didn't think it is right to have theirfor removal.". i think we can ta ke theirfor removal.". i think we can take from that that if there are targets, they will not be there much longer. she also about that how she felt serious the responsible, and that was committed to changing the windrush fiasco. we talked again about how we home office to to the way it deals with the sorts of issues. on the other issues, this
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customs union, have you got some news on that? on birth -- amber rudd was one of the leading politicians on the side of remain. she is clearly coming from a certain direction. right on this moment, they are discussing about staying in they are discussing about staying in the customs union or not. she was asked about this, and she said, i don't want to in gauge with that. she said, i will —— "we will so have a few discussions to be had in a easy way amongst my cabinet collea g u es easy way amongst my cabinet colleagues to arrive at a final position". she did not repeat the government is lying, she suggested it was still open. i am just saying that keir starmer, the opposition brexit ‘s spokesman, he said that if what you just said is right, the prime in this should rethink her approach i listened to the voices in parliament, and the business
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community, that they have got it wrong on a customs union. that is the inevitable response to what you have been hearing? that is right. the house of lords has already defeated the government honest. there will be a vote on this. there is other legislation, as well. are several conservatives who are likely to be willing to defy their own government on this issue. they feel very jolly that a deal particular with the northern ireland, southern island board issue, that being in the customs union would help. the flip side the argument from brexiteers is, hang on a minute, thatis brexiteers is, hang on a minute, that is to staying in the eu. there will be no independent trade policy. it cannot happen. theresa may under an awful lot of pressure, but the fa ct an awful lot of pressure, but the fact that her home secretary has been unable to repeat the government, what we thought was the settled position that we are leaving the customs union is quite a moment, and it does suggest that this is still being discussed at the top of government, and has not yet been resolved. vicky, thank you very
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much. we can speak now to lucy moreton who is general secretary of the isu union which represents immigration staff. good afternoon. i was rather hoping that you would get called back into that you would get called back into that meeting yesterday, because you had onlyjust that meeting yesterday, because you had only just left that meeting yesterday, because you had onlyjust left when amber rudd was asked about your interpretation of the facts and the fact that there are these targets. what would you have said if you had listened to what she had just said? it was very surprising that there was anything in any way controversial about any civil service department having target. this is how the civil service as a whole demonstrates business. howard gets funding and how budget allocation is done. there is no suggestion that these targets we re is no suggestion that these targets were in any way misused to target those of the windrush generation, or any other migrant, legal or otherwise. they are simply a performance measure for how many people leave the uk, how many people
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are moved from the uk, in response to activities that particular year. head of immigration for the home 0ffice head of immigration for the home office said moments after you have left the chamber, there no published removal targets and nothing is broken down by region. as we now know, that was a missed statement at best. there are targets, have been for some time and they are set regionally. i wouldn't hold amber rudd to account for not knowing precisely what they were. shouldn't she know they exist?” precisely what they were. shouldn't she know they exist? i am curious as to maybe she thought i was referring to maybe she thought i was referring to something different. i do not know what was inside her head. i can't expend why she didn't at that time know that internal targets are commonplace across the entire several servers, let alone in immigration. so whether they do or don't exist, scrap them anyway? that is one way to deal with it? certainly so. out of this work for
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you, because presumably, budget and everything worked the basics of figures that you do not have. an i presume that figures will still be collected. there are still has to be a measure to justify to the attacks payer. —— to the taxpayer. whether you then turn the data gathered all the number to happen passively into some sort of performance measure, i don't know. but these targets were never used to go out and individually intercept individuals. they were never used in that way. they were never used in that way. they were never used in that way. they were not used to target people. what about your members. are they feeling tender about all of those? because amber rudd sort of says, not a problem, and it is the interpretation perhaps of the level of your members that there are problems? that is particularly distressing. to our members. we have
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sought assurances from amber rudd, that went you made those days meant in the house she didn't actually mean the front line immigration officials responsible for making those decisions. i am ready sad that those decisions. i am ready sad that those assurances have not come forward. it is not reasonable to name front line staff for the policies that they are civil serva nts policies that they are civil servants are compelled to an act. i have been hearing stories of groups of immigration officers who have been handed intelligence packs for individuals caught up in this, who are individuals caught up in this, who a re lawfully individuals caught up in this, who are lawfully here as part of the windrush cohort, and they have refused to grant arrestees individuals. they have acted with integrity, and it is unfair to blame them for this. so, there are folders that there are british in citizens, that there are british in citizens, that people are ready to go out and arrest. in the past, yes. but not any more. you know how many? i did.
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it is one thing talking about the enactment of a policy, like this. the question seemed to be, where did this policy start? where do you think it began? it began with the urge of the then government to try and bring down migration. there was and bring down migration. there was a lot of pressure from the public... the coalition government? yes, the coalition government. 2012—2013. the start of what was then called the hostile environment. you might remember the go home fans which were there very briefly and then removed. the use of logo immigration enforcement vehicles. the attempt to make this very visible, that the government is taking every effort to deal with the issue of illegal migration. every individual policy decision that was taken was reasonable in itself and against that background. the problem was the
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failure to appreciate the the impact that this would have notjust on the windrush cohort, but also on british citizens born here who have never left, who just don't have passports. the ownership of that policies with the then home secretary who was?” believe it was theresa may.” the then home secretary who was?” believe it was theresa may. i am wondering where you think the line is drawn, where responsibility lies? this is a scandal where you have got british citizens here legally facing deportation. like any civil servant, it is not really my face to appoint blame at any particular member of parliament. i think that i've no guess she asian —— i think that investigation has got to take place. they have got to put this right. what proportion will it take? that'll be the cabinet is at decide.
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for you, any opposition, you do want to get the bottom of this? what is important to me at my members is the clear alliteration that they were not responsible for this. they were some of the individuals amongst a large number of external bodies who wa nt large number of external bodies who want the government that this was a possible ramification, and it is not reasonable for amber rudd to stand up reasonable for amber rudd to stand up in the house and suggest that this is their responsibility, that they have in some way lost touch with the individual, all been overzealous, or use targets inappropriately. those are very unfair accusations. there are people saying that there was a time and people would resign over these issues. we don't mean to be in those times? it would appear not. do you wish that we were in those times? that is not for me to have an opinion. thank you so much. you're watching afternoon live,
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these are our headlines: the home secretary amber rudd is under renewed pressure after admitting her office did have immigration removal targets. violent crimes recorded by police in england and wales increased by 21 percent last year — compared with 2016. more than a0 companies have signed up to a pact to cut plastic pollution over the next seven years. and in sport, the fa have received an offer to buy wembley, it is thought to be worth £800 million and coming from shahid khan, the owner of fun coming from shahid khan, the owner offun and coming from shahid khan, the owner of fun and the jacksonville jaguars nfl tame. the london stadium will not host games at next year's world cup. it is not one of the 11 venues. england will begin the tournament in south africa on may the 30th at the 0val. even gerard is on the shortlist to become the manager of rangers. the liverpool captain has
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been coaching at the anfield academy since retiring two years ago. i will have more on this story that grief —— on those stories after 3:30pm. the number of violent crimes recorded by police in england and wales went up by 21 per cent last year compared to the year before. the figures, published by the office for national statistics, show a significant increase in knife and gun crimes, and burglaries. the figures don't include this year's knife attacks in london. leila nathoo reports. it is 2a hours after the latest stabbing in their area, and these young people in south—east london have come together to debate one of the most pressing issues in their community. the fact that we are having these discussions, and we can get together to try and find solutions. even if one person gets that, that is too much. they are here to talk about causes, solutions, their experiences, growing up violence has always been
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close. i remember being in my local park, and getting chased at my park bya park, and getting chased at my park by a knife. it is so common, and it is so normalised, nowadays. you get stalled when you were younger, this person got stabbed, he is dead. when it came to gang wars and postcode wars. it is lived through. it was something that you knew you had to survive. when you've got told run, you ran. the latest figures say that the problem is not going away. 0verall, violent crimes recorded by police in injured in wales increased by 21% last year. knife crime was out 22%, and gun crime was up 11%. police also recorded a sharp rise in vehicle theft and burglary is, too. like this one captured recently on cctv. there are two sets of crime figures out today, a survey of people's experiences. but, police
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data reveals what is happening at this serious end of the scale, where there is a surge in violence, largely here in london and in cities across the country. already, this year, the situation is worsening in the capital with a spate of killings. there is still a problem, at one of the biggest challenges is the number of particularly young people who either feel the need to or the desire to carry a knife with them. many of the offences that the sea, where you get somebody injured, both the victim and the offender and others that are carrying a knife. the government want to focus on prevention as well as policing and tidying up legislation around weapons. but this lady who works with young people thinks it is a convex discussion. it is notjust about stop and search, it is about families, austerity, education, long—term strategy and looking at
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how do we look in a —— live in a climate that is able to facilitate essentially a mass murder of thousands of young people on our streets. everybody's looking for a nswe rs. streets. everybody's looking for answers. how to solve a problem with such devastating consequences. robert cuffe, bbc news, head of statistics is here with all the numbers. 21 per cent in violent crime, that's a big increase — what's behind it? it is an increase in recorded crime. it is an increase in recorded crime. it is an increase in recorded crime. it is better recording, but there has been an increase in the serious crimes. they were drifting down at the first part of the decade, but you see that around 2015, since then, there has been a sharp year on year increase. it is now running at about a5,000 reported crimes per year. we know that it is notjust
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better reporting. because we are seeing more people admitted to accident and emergency with injuries. it is worth saying that a5,000 crimes only accounts for a very small proportion of the violent crime is that the police report in a year. the broad picture of a violent crime is actually quite different.” will come on to london injust a moment. but what's the broader picture of violent crime? you need to go to a different source for that data. the survey of violent crime capture is all of the stuff that does not get reported to police. you can see that the long—term trends are down, down and down. that the crease has maybe slowed. it has flattened out a little bit since 201a, but this broader category of violent crime accou nts broader category of violent crime accounts for most of the violent crime that we see, and that trend is going down. it is backed up... we
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see the same picture in scotland. long—term downward trend. we have two different things going on. we are becoming a less violent society, but there is this increase in high harm the serious violence? any thing else that scored two i? rise in the archive? yes, so we are seeing an increase in car crimes, clefts of ca rs increase in car crimes, clefts of cars and an increase in burglary and of robbery. both recording crime and the survey are saying the same thing. so, pretty convinced that this is real. maybe that is more worrying, because it affects more people? the high harm violent crime is pretty rare. but we are talking about a lot of other people getting
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affected by these other types of crimes. the knife and the crime is more concentrated around london and the much policy areas. be met police haveissued the much policy areas. be met police have issued some figures. for knife crime in the capital, it is looking like the national trend. 0ther crime in the capital, it is looking like the national trend. other by about 21% both in london, and in the country more broadly. i think the numbers that have been capturing a lot of attention in london have been the murders. there was a spate of murders in january and the murders. there was a spate of murders injanuary and february. member all the comparisons to new york and those sorts of things. i would be a little wary of interpreting those two harshly. in london, we have been seeing maybe ten murders enough. —— a month. london, we have been seeing maybe ten murders enough. -- a month. also terrorist attacks. we have seen some horrific attacks. the terrorist attacks accounted for eight of the
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murders that we saw last year. even if you exclude those, if you go from ten at 213%, then that looks 0k10% rise, so you got to be colourful by looking at the data. 0ffering mental health counselling to primary school pupils could help reduce school truancy and crime, according to a new report. the charity pro bono economics says early help, such as one—to—one support, can help boost the life chances of children and bring economic benefits too. catherine burns reports. if you don't have a place to be, then you'll just feel, like, so negative. the children's mental health charity place to be provides emotional support to pupils at schools across the uk. it helps with everything from arguments in the playground to complex issues, either through group sessions
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like this or individual work. it asked economists to put a financial value on its work with primary pupils. the report predicts that every child who has individual counselling through the charity could benefit by £5,700. that's mostly because they're one day expected to go on and getjobs and earn higher wages. they're also less likely to cost society in the future by needing different kinds of help. it shows in monetary terms what we know as clinicians. if we get in there early, when their first signs of difficulty, upset of behaviour, then that will translate into mental health problems later on in life. these children are not thinking about the money, though.” these children are not thinking about the money, though. i could go to place to be and speak to elizabeth and she would lift the weight off my shoulders. you can share your omissions and feelings. you won't get in trouble for spelling anything. she told me to be more confident. it can get you
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something very important in life, i did is called a friend. —— and it is called a friend. the service cost more than £a million across the country in one year. this school paid about £20,000. if it didn't transform children's lives, we wouldn't continue with it, because it's got to be cost—effective. i would want the government to recognise that schools need to be places of safety, and that schools need support. the government says that it has allocated millions more pounds to mental health. but let's leave the final words to this to charlie. it has helped me with my attitude. now i will sing a bit of the song. # today, my life begins. #. .we # today, my life begins. #. . we have just been talking to vicki
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young about amber rudd. amber rudd has just treated on her account, saying thank you for the lunch. i should have been clearer. 0f saying thank you for the lunch. i should have been clearer. of course when ——" i should have been clearer, of course when we leave the european union, we will be leaving the customs union". there is amber rudd reacting to that. and another one which is also windrush related. the labourmp which is also windrush related. the labour mp has which is also windrush related. the labourmp has said which is also windrush related. the labour mp has said that the home secretary has informed me that the... the status was raised in the house of commons because he was facing cancer treatment, he was one of the windrush migrants and was told that he was not, on a fight to be covered by nhs payments for that.
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we have just heard that he will be granted indefinite leave to remain. he is due to start his radiotherapy treatment at the royal marsden cancer hospital. the nhs in england will need another £50 billion a year by 2030, according to two former health ministers. the former labour minister lord darzi and a conservative lord prior, carried out a review with a panel of experts convened by the centre—left think tank the ippr. 0ur health editor hugh pym is with me. how significant is this, because we keep hearing possible figures coming out of everywhere, but this seems to bea out of everywhere, but this seems to be a little more serious.” out of everywhere, but this seems to be a little more serious. i think thatis be a little more serious. i think that is absolutely right. it is significant because theresa may has announced that you want to see a long—term funding plan for the nhs in the english. and here you have two very authoritative figures
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coming up with some numbers, more less you want a long—term plan, here's what it will cost. lord darzi is widely respected across westminster. they are saying that it will be 50 billion pounds more neededin will be 50 billion pounds more needed in real terms by 2030. on top of the current one spent on health in england. that is equivalent to, say, six or seven pence on income tax or national insurance. this could come from higher borrowing, or it could come from the proceeds of economic growth. lord darzi, who i spoke to, made it clear that basically politicians, westminster and the public are going to have to face up to the idea that it will cost more in taxes. this is what he had to say.
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i definitely think that something needs to be done about the funding envelope that the nhs should be receiving. i think that that should be in much more long—term funding settlement. and i stress the importance of long—term, because if you want to achieve the changes in the nhs, you need to think long term. just to be clear, that figure, the extra 50 billion, does that make the nhs and then we no longer have to worry about? well, probably in 2030, when we are both sitting here, talking about the subject... there will be a health miracle, there, let me tell you. we will be trying to predict what is it of the next ten or 15 years. the greater problem is that demand is rising faster. so, they're brief, is, let's see what is
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needed. they have modelled it. it is largely down to the demographics. there will be a increase in the numbers of over 65 in the next few yea rs. numbers of over 65 in the next few years. people with long—term conditions. more medicines and treatments coming online which people will want to get access to. so, these extra 50 billion assess on want to pay for it, then it is sustainable. - have been mmfifi a ring fence :; peeple ' " insurance, where people say that whatever that figure is, it is going to the nhs, and of course to social care, with that figure, might that make that argument more easy to sell? there is a lot of debate going on. the allotment have got to deliver. they have said they wanted create a long—term plan, and ideas
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are being kicked around. jeremy hunt are being kicked around. jeremy hunt are saying that national insurers could be part of that. whether you read brand at as a nhs tax. the authors of this report do say that 10 billion more is the divorce of sugar aren't above the figures that we have already been talking about. so, you could for example raise national interest the over 65s who are working. jeremy hunt you m he. the
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scotland. far? a scotland. need far? a scotland. i need % your of scotland. we need to draw your attention to cloud and rain pushing in from the south—west, which will bea in from the south—west, which will be a nuisance on friday. that'll prevent temperatures falling further than 80 trees, but a chilly start to friday morning. the best of the sunshine in scotland, the far enateeé' fl..- s and i eflalz'lj and northern 95131; and northern ireland. if at best. e whatever you're doing, up warm.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines. i have never agreed that there should be specific removal targets and i would never support a policy that puts targets ahead of people. it gives you no confidence whatsoever, because they start off saying there are not targets and then they go on to say that they are fully in charge of the situation, then go on to say they didn't even know what was going on. new figures from the office of national statistics show
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a rise in knife crime, burglary and car crime compared with 2016. however a separate survey on the public‘s experience of crime said most types of crime stayed at similar levels to 2016. a pledge to cut plastic pollution — more than a0 companies sign up to a pact to reduce plastic packaging over the next seven years. £50 billion a year — that's how much more money the nhs in england will need by 2030 according to a review by two former health ministers. a new owner for the home of football? american businessman shahid khan, who owns fulham football club, has put in a bid for wembley stadium — thought to be around £800 million. sport now on afternoon live with hugh and who is this man with the moustache who wants to buy wembley? shahid khan, the owner of fulham and
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more significantly, the jacksonville jaguars. he is worth about £5 billion by people's reckoning. it's an extraordinary story about how he made his money after arriving from pakistan made his money after arriving from pa kista n pretty made his money after arriving from pakistan pretty much penniless. he has made his money in the motor industry and is essentially hoping to secure the jaguars future in london, both with their annual appearance in london but also potentially long—term, in bringing a franchise, his franchise, to london, perhaps notably, the nfl have welcomed the offer made by shahid khan today. the man himself has also released a statement. here is what he had to say. that is crucial, £500 million of the
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offer would potentially be in cash, which the f a good the reinvesting grassroots football. it's been described as a once in a generation opportunity for the fa to bring money that is being tied up in the stadium and put it back into the game. looking north of the border but staying with football. and steven gerrard could be making his first step in management at rangers. yes, it would be quite the start to his managerial career. rangers have still not named a permanent replacement of the former manager. graeme murty has been in temporary charge but is unlikely to get the job full—time. it could be steven gerrard. he is on the shortlist for thejob. he retired from playing and joined the youth setup. he did have a chance ‘s takeover mk dons but
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decided to turn down the offer. but rangers could come calling. arson figure will have several players available for the first leg of the europa league semifinal against madrid tonight. they mist the first round with minor injuries. it is his final european home match in charge. it would be easy. athletic or madrid second in spain and good record recently in europe as well. is it a perfect goodbye ? recently in europe as well. is it a perfect goodbye? i don't know. i just want to do as well as i can, because i think we have the quality, these guys, i have seen them this season with challenge, mentally. and i have seen them was responded a positive way. it has been confirmed slatternly driven the fish will not be coming out of international retirement of play for sweden at the world cup this year. he said he
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would attend the world cup but not in what capacity. but apparently he has not changed is made about joining the national team in russia. the american holds only one of the four main belts and seejoshua doesn't invent division. that is a meeting tomorrow for both camps to see if a deal can be paid to potentially fight later this year. tell them to check their e—mail. i got something special for them. by the way, all the money is in the bag. sol the way, all the money is in the bag. so i expect she will be a man of your word. there are news and pictures for next year's cricket world cup have been decided and denounced and england will begin against south africa at the oval on me the 30th. lords will hold the
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phonein me the 30th. lords will hold the phone in semis will be at old trafford at edgbaston. london's stadium will not have any games. it was being considered with the drop—in pitch, but was considered too much of a risk and potentially too expensive. all details can be found on the bbc sport website. you can also follow on the website live coverage of the world snooker championship. it continues today. these are the latest pictures on bbc two. murk allen currently reading joe perry. the other match in the first round, anthony against ryan. it is 8—7 to the welsh man, with ten required to make the next round. at soldier sport runout. more than a0 companies have signed up to an initiative to cut plastic pollution in britain. the pact is spearheaded by the waste reduction charity, wrap,
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and includes a promise to make all plastic packaging suitable for recycling or composting by 2025. victoria fritz reports. images like this have started to turn the tide, but although public awareness of the dangers to oceans and rivers is at an all—time high, there is still a long way to go in the war on plastic. the uk produces on average 2.a million tonnes of plastic packaging every year. at the moment, britain recycles less than half of that. just a6% ends up getting used again. a2 of the uk's biggest brands are responsible for about 80% of all plastic packaging. today they signed a pact. they are promising that by 2025, all the plastic they use will either be recyclable, reusable or compostable. the uk plastic pact is being billed as the most ambitious plan
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from businesses yet. what really is unique about this initiative is it's about the whole of the value chain coming together, united behind a common set of really ambitious targets. convenience, but not at any cost. from fresh food to household hygiene, the consumer goods industry is responding to a shift in public attitudes. so, things like this in terms of some of our shampoos. we are actually making sure that we are using recycled plastics in the bottles, and for this particular product as well, later on this year we will be introducing beach—collected plastic into it as well. but this will take time, and crucially for manufacturers, money. will it all be worth it? the investment could be wasted if products are not sorted at source. although recycling units are broadening the range of goods that can be accepted, there is still confusion about what can go in which bin. we would like to see the labelling different,
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so it's easier for the people in their houses to decide whether something is recyclable or not. it's too complicated. there is too much written on the packaging. one green dot to say this is recyclable or not, put it in the recycling bin. complicating things further, different councils have different rules around waste. we know in the communities we serve best, an inner city council is not the same as a rural council, and actually to try and implement the same policies in two very, very different places just wouldn't work, so actually councils do the best that they can in the communities that they know best, which is why you end up with slightly different schemes. rubbish as far away as france and spain washes up here in west wales. although businesses may pledge to clean up their act, shifting the world away from a throwaway culture may be the harder promise to keep. victoria fritz, bbc news. the football association has
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confirmed it's received an offer, thought to be worth £800m, to sell wembley stadium. it's understood fulham owner shahid khan is the prospective buyer. sources told the bbc the sale would allow the organisation to make a major investment in grassroots football. kieran maguire is a football finance expert from the university of liverpool. why would the fa want to sell wembley? is it something they need to do? no, they don't need to sell. the fa have about £1a2 million debt to banks and they all a lot of money on leases as well, but they managed to finance those debts reasonably well over recent yea rs. those debts reasonably well over recent years. in addition, they have been putting around £125 million a year into grassroots football from the existing income streams. this will raise eyebrows among those who
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think this is iconic, the home of england football. under the fa's stewardship, people were comfortable with that. yes, they have been. i think the fa perhaps looking at this asa think the fa perhaps looking at this as a one off potential windfall, and if they did receive a substantial sum of money, it is fairly clear, you go around the country, that there are problems in relation to there are problems in relation to the funding of local football. there are problems in relation to the funding of localfootball. in terms of facilities, because many local authorities have had their funding cut and one of the areas they pass their cups onto is local sports. it would give the fa the opportunity to invest in training facilities, in 3g opportunity to invest in training facilities, in 36 pictures and also in coaching, which is very much neededin in coaching, which is very much needed in the country at present. what would shahid khan get out of this deal? he'd be able to move his nfl franchise to london, so that would guarantee, that would be nine fixtures a year. then what is good to happen from there, i'm presuming
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that england would still probably played the majority of their matches at wembley, the fa cup final, the semifinals. the one big? 0ver what will happen to fulham football club, because he also owns it. if they move to wembley as part of this deal, then craven cottage, which presently is in a very desirable place in london, would potentially be upfora place in london, would potentially be up for a redevelopment there and it could be very lucrative from that point of view. there is no evidence at this stage that that is what he wa nts. at this stage that that is what he wants. but he could. potentially. we'd have to see the planning permission in terms of craven cottage. he has said historically that he has been committed to its redevelopment. and i think you would have to ask yourself the question, if fulham move to wembley, do they have a fan base which is capable of filling a 70,000 or 80,000 seater stadium? from a london club point of
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view, all of the other major london clu bs, view, all of the other major london clubs, with the exception of crystal palace, have moved too much bigger grounds and fulham could be left behind. finally, what about international games, cup finals and semifinals, would be beyond any doubt under new ownership?” semifinals, would be beyond any doubt under new ownership? i think it's unlikely they would be transferred, because they are very lucrative. if you look to see what the football association has done but the fa cup final, tickets for the semifinal, which were £65, they become £115 for the final. i think the fa would be reluctant to give it up the fa would be reluctant to give it up and from shahid khan's point of view, he'd be able to charge the fa a large rentalfee for these major matches, so i expect us to continue. perhaps the england games could move around the country a bit more, though. thank you very much for joining us. take a look at these pictures of water — lots of it — coming from the ground.
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this is the situation on a residential road in tipton in the west midlands — which has turned into a river — after a water main burst this morning. 0ur correspondent, sima kotecha is in tipton for us. it is quite something, isn't it? it really is. it started around ten a:m.. there were roadworks taking place just here a:m.. there were roadworks taking placejust here behind me and it's believed a digger burst the water pipe. somebody from the water maintenance company has just told us that around for swimming piles, for 0lympic size of wrinkles, that's how much water was released from a pipe. we know around for homes were evacuated, 30—65 firefighters were at the scene, helping people, some stranded in these cars, some of them submerged. the water was even higher and in some places, it was around nine feet high. businesses and homes
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have been affected. as you can imagine, people who live close by, these terraced houses, lots of people in their front garden is worried that the water might actually seeping through their doorways, into their living rooms. the warning from the water board was she might have low water pressure for a while, but i'd have thought that was the last of their worries at this stage. yes, you can imagine the people living by, there is incredibly worried. what is taking place at the moment is there is a high volume pump, the droning noise behind me is the pump pumping out the water at a very fast speed. but what was going into the neighbouring canal, so they are trying to do that as quickly as possible, so that people here don't have any problems with their water and that any businesses affected can continue as normal. at the moment, we don't know how long that process will take. thank you. in a moment, the business news. first a look at the headlines
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on afternoon live. the home secretary amber rudd is under renewed pressure after admitting her office did have immigration removal targets. violent crimes recorded by police in england and wales increased by 21 percent last year — compared with 2016. more than a0 companies have signed up to a pact to cut plastic pollution over the next seven years. discount retailer poundworld may close about 100 of its 355 stores, putting up to 1,500 jobs at risk. the company is also considering an insolvency process cold a company voluntary arrangement or cva. like many retailers poundworld has been hit by falling consumer confidence, rising overheads and the weaker pound. reports have also said that department store chain fenwicks, which has nine branches, may restructure itself, although details have yet to emerge. barclays bank has reported a loss for the first three months of the year — they paid £1.abn to settle a lawsuit
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in the us over the sale of mortgage—backed securities. and also put aside an additional £a00m to cover an increase in payment protection insurance mis—selling claims. it means they reported a pre—tax loss of £236m, down from the £1.7 billion it made in the same period last year. it's a new chapter for waterstones as the book chain has been bought by activist investment firm elliott advisors for an undisclosed amount. but one of the main characters james daunt will stay in place as the chain's chief executive. the name elliot may sound familiar — they bought a 6% stake in whitbread recently saying they wanted the company to split its coffee chain costa, from its premier inn hotel business — this week whitbread announced plans to do just that. its coffee chain costa, from its premier inn hotel business. this week whitbread announced plans to do just that. deutsche bank will make "significant" job cuts as it scales back its corporate and investment banking operations. germany's biggest lender said the cuts will mainly fall in us and asia. the bank reported a sharp drop in first—quarter corporate and investment bank revenues. tsb, the bank that likes to say.
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help! service status - we're limiting access to internet banking. we've restricted the number of customers who can log in at once to ensure a good service once you're in. so please bear with us and keep trying. and that is what the bank is doing — they keep trying to fix it — for anyone who isn't familiar with this story — tsb were taken over by spanish banking giant sabadell in 2015 — and at the weekend they finally
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tried to transfer all their 1.9m customers to sabadells banking platforms and it has not gone well... let's hear what the boss paul pester said to bbc five live earlier today... you said it was up and running, with no caveats. your owners said they successfully completed the technology migration. the opposite happened. can you explain why that happened, why will you telling customers that was fine? all i can do is tell customers what my it provider tells me. they tell me it's working, but then what was clear was it wasn't the case. we putting things right for our customers. when the team of global experts arrived this morning, they will start getting to the bottom of exactly why we are having issues providing the service to our customers. that only 50% of customers can get into the website. when tsb is through this issue. we are no knees, we we will get up. we are on our knees? that's
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quite an admission from the boss. six days on a no sign of much progress. that's exactly right, that's what he said. he said, we will come back fighting. will he? he may not? when they come back fighting, will be have any customers left to fight for question might joining us now is sophie devonshire, chief executive of branding. consultancy the caffeine partnership how strong was tsb's brand before this and is it resilient enough to survive? it is for days like these that you need a strong brand. the zillion ones are need a strong brand. the zillion ones are the ones that will survive. tsb is stuck in a very difficult place, because it's any category where there is a huge amount of
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corporate cynicism anyhow about financial institutions, and also, in a world where customers are expecting so much more and expecting it fast and quick and efficiently, in terms of their technical support and the way in which the bank interacts with them. so is going to be extremely challenging for the brand. you've also written a book cold leading at speed.” brand. you've also written a book cold leading at speed. i would you assess the situation? in this fast—moving, accelerating business world, it's so important for the face of the organisation, the corporate leaders, to be seen to be responsive and also responsible as well. so i think he has done a great job and lots of ways in terms of being very human. just listening to him talk about it on the radio, he is not coming up with corporate speak, he's not picking up excuses. businesses do screw up and mess up and have issues, and leaders do as
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well, but the real test will be can he rectify this the people as quickly as possible? will this destroy the trust that customers have in him? will this be a ratner movement or will he, like samsun, be able to see it through because the brand itself is strong and he himself as leader is strong and has made things happen fast. that is no doubt at all that there is up against it in terms of the expectation, and moving at speed to fix this hobby his maximum priority. thank you for your time. a quick look at the markets. tamper the weather. , time for the
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weather. most of the showers today, in comparison to yesterday, are further north. as you can see, rattling in on quite a significant wind across scotland, northern ireland and into north—west england. there are some across england and wales but not as many. overnight, most showers will die away to the far north of scotla nd die away to the far north of scotland and will start to see this area of low pressure coming in from the south—west. further north, leader skies mean a chilly start scotland. no single figures, perhaps close to freezing in some places. this north and south divide is how
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we will keep the day going. bands of showery rain continuing to drift up from the south—west. we could see an inch of rain fall before that clears. in miserable feel for many underneath that cloud and rain. far north of england, cumbria and the la ke north of england, cumbria and the lake district, over it in northumberland, scotland and northern ireland, they will see sunny spells and scattered showers. but the temperatures are only eight or9 but the temperatures are only eight or 9 degrees under the rain and cloud. really disappointing for the end of april. that will take its time to clear, leaving justly rain. then saturday, a relatively quiet story. the noticeable difference is that although the winds will be like, they come from a northerly direction. the cooler source. scattered showers cropping up across the country. highs of 9—12d, pretty disappointing indeed. the subtle
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difference on sunday as the winds will start to swing of the north sea, meaning the east coast of england down to north kent will be cloudy, grey and cool. sheltered western areas will see the best of it in practice, but temperatures subdued. we should be seeing 16 or 17 degrees as afternoon highs towards the end of april. your summery, generally more significant means threatening in the south—east late on sunday night. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at four... a new target, which the home secretary does know about — pressure mounts on amber rudd over the windrush scandal. i have never agreed that there should be specific removal targets, and i would never support a policy that puts targets ahead of people. it gives you no confidence whatsoever, because they start off saying there aren't targets, then they go on to say they're fully in charge of the situation, then go on to say they didn't even know what was going on. violent crime rose by more than 20%
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in england and wales last year — after 20 years of decline, burglaries and car crime are on the increase. more than a0 companies have signed up to a pact to cut plastic pollution over the next seven years. a new pitch for wembley — it's thought fulham owner shahid khan is offering £800 million for the stadium. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. yes, a big decision for the fa, £500 million offer which they could invest into grassroots. we will also tell you about shahid khan, the man who wants to buy wembley, later. and louise has the weather. this is what most of us want this afternoon but this is what some of does have got. and we keep the april showers for the remainder of april.
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thanks, louise. also coming up — another forecast of water — lots of it, coming up through the ground after a water main burst in tipton. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. they're the words every politician and football manager dread — that statement that comes from the boss saying that you have their ‘full confidence'. today that was the phrase used by the prime minister theresa may when asked about the position of her home secretary, amber rudd. she's facing further calls to resign after it emerged that the home office did set targets — in 2015 — for the removal of illegal immigrants. yesterday, ms rudd told mps that targets didn't currently exist, during questioning about the problems facing members of the windrush generation. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake has the latest.
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another day at the office for a home secretary under pressure. did your department set regional targets for the removal of migrants? that and other questions left unanswered after amber rudd faced mps yesterday. this morning, labour asked for clarification. the home secretary said that she had not set specific targets for the number of illegal immigrants to be removed. but... the immigration arm of the home office has been using local targets for internal performance management... cries of outrage. these were not published targets against which performance was assessed, but if they were used inappropriately, then i am clear that this will have to change. not good enough for the opposition, who were keen to keep up the pressure on the home secretary to quit. isn't it time that the home secretary considered her honour and resigned? hear, hear. home secretary. i would like to make the very clear
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distinction between legal and illegal migrants. and when the right honourable lady talks about the windrush cohort, we have already established that the windrush cohort is here legally, and this government is determined to put that right. more criticism came from labour. we now understand that people have been removed because of targets, and she said she didn't know. i say with all conscience, is she really the right person to lead this office of state? but support and sympathy from amber rudd's own side. would my right honourable friend be assured that she has the total support of this side of the house. hear, hear! the total support of this side of the house in trying to resolve a very difficult, very difficult legacy issue. for a government department to have targets is not unusual, as the home secretary pointed out, labour had many of its own on immigration.
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but amber rudd's initial uncertainty about whether the targets were still in place, and how they were implemented, has led to more questions about whether the government's crack down on illegal immigration led to those with every right to be in the uk being wrongly targeted. one example of removal targets being used is a home office inspection report from 2015. it specified a total of 12,000 voluntary removals, divided into 19 immigration enforcement regions. the home office is scrapping internal targets and the downing street says it has full confidence in the home secretary but amber rudd admits she's faced a difficult few weeks and she and the government are trying to get back on course. let's cross to westminster and talk to vicki young.
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how was she? she didn't really show how much pressure she was under today. she gave a speech, there were a couple of jokes today. she gave a speech, there were a couple ofjokes but she said actually she wasn't feeling particularly light—hearted because of the things that have been going on in her department, she means as well things like terrorism. she did talk about the windrush scandal, as she put it, and she was asked whether she had considered resigning or offering her resignation to the prime minister. she didn't directly a nswer prime minister. she didn't directly answer that, but she said she was committed to putting this issue right and spoke generally too about the culture of the home office saying it had to change, she wanted to bring those changes in, and also talked about those targets which yesterday she didn't know existed, these regional targets for deportations. this is about the deportations. this is about the deportation of illegal immigrants, she said she has never cleared
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those, she doesn't think going forward that she will do that, and she doesn't think it is right to have any targets for removals. it does sound like those, if they ever existed or not, have gone.l does sound like those, if they ever existed or not, have gone. a bit of confusion about what was said about the customs union, which is a hot topic at the moment. that's right, and she will give this speech and half an hour or more of questions, so she fielded dozens of questions and was asked about whether she thought it was more or less likely now that the uk would leave customs union. the government's position is that we are leaving the single market and customs union but amber rudd was very much on the remain side of the argument when it came to the referendum so everyone was listening carefully to what she had to say about this. she said, we still have a few discussions to be had in an easy way among some of my cabinet colleagues in order to arrive at a final position. she was
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clearly trying to laugh this off, not wanting to engage with what is going on behind closed doors when it comes to the future trading relationship of the uk and the eu. this has been read by lots of people as her opening the door to the possibility that we could stay in the customs union so after doing and growing, amber rudd has tweeted to clarify the situation, thanking the press gallery for her enjoyable lunch. this of course is incredibly important, it has become a focal point of debate and argument here in parliament. just now in the house of commons they were debating the issue of the customs union, the house of lords has already defeated the government on this issue. theresa may is under pressure when it comes to coming up with an alternative, particularly the issue of not coming back with any kind of hard order
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between northern ireland and the republic of ireland. was it a convivial lunch or was a tense? actually i would say she was incredibly relaxed given the circumstances and she realised she wasn't going to have to field these questions. lots of people around me we re questions. lots of people around me were having a very good time, simon. i'm just reading something, we are hearing the prime minister's spokesman said amber rudd was clear we are leaving the customs union and was not told to send her to eat of clarification. that tells me people area bitjumpy clarification. that tells me people are a bitjumpy about this, aren't they? yes, because today wouldn't have been binding vote anyway so this is a backbench debate if you like but the government knows that coming up there could be two or three votes, very meaningful votes about the customs union and they are not entirely sure they have the
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numbers. there are many conservatives who are willing possibly to defy the government's position on this. they see it as a crucial issue and similarly on the brexit side of the argument there are many who are furious at the idea we may stay in the customs union because they feel we wouldn't be able to sign our own trade deals or have an independent policy and for them they feel it smacks of staying in the eu so it's an incredibly lives, sensitive issue. thank you. the number of violent crimes recorded by police in england and wales went up by 21% last year compared to the year before. the figures, published by the office for national statistics, show a significant increase in knife and gun crimes, and burglaries. the figures don't include this year's knife attacks in london. leila nathoo reports. it is 2a hours after the latest stabbing in their area, and these young people in south—east london have come together to debate one of the most pressing issues in their community. the fact it is being reported more
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means we can discuss it. we can have these kind of discussions. and we can actually get together and try to find a solution to it. because honestly, even if one person gets stabbed in london, that is one person too much. they are here to talk about causes, solutions, their experiences. growing up, violence has always been close. i remember playing in my local park and i got chased out of my park by a knife. it is so common. it'sjust so normalised nowadays. you get told when you are younger, this person got stabbed, he's dead. this person when it came to gang wars and postcode wars. it was something you lived through. it was something you knew you had to survive. and when you were told to run, you would run. the latest figures show the problem is not going away. overall, violent crimes recorded by police in england and wales increased by 21% last year compared with 2016. knife crime was up 22% and gun crime was up 11%. police also recorded a sharp rise in vehicle thefts and burglaries, too.
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like this one captured recently on cctv in stourbridge. there are two sets of crime figures out today. a survey of people's experiences that also captures offences not reported to police, shows a broadly stable picture. but police data reveals what is happening at the serious end of the scale, where there is a surge in violence — largely here in london and in cities across the country. already this year the situation is worsening in the capital with a spate of killings. there is still a problem and i think one of the biggest challenges is the number of people, particularly young people, who feel the need or the desire to carry a knife with them. because in many of the offences we have seen, where you get somebody injured, both the victim and the offender and others there are carrying weapons. the government recently launched a new strategy to tackle serious violence. they want to focus on prevention as well as policing and tightening legislation around weapons. but rasheeda, who works with young people, thinks
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it is a complex picture. we can't have a discussion which is just about one point of intervention. it is notjust about stop and search. it is about families, it is about education, it is about austerity, it is about a long—term strategy and looking at, how do we live in a climate that is able to facilitate essentially a mass murder of thousands of young people on our streets? everyone is looking for answers. how to solve a problem with such devastating consequences? leila nathoo, bbc news. more than a0 companies have signed up to an initiative to cut plastic pollution in britain. the pact is spearheaded by the waste reduction charity, wrap, and includes a promise to make all plastic packaging suitable for recycling or composting by 2025. victoria fritz reports. images like this have started to turn the tide, but although public awareness of the dangers to oceans and rivers is at an all—time high, there is still a long way to go
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in the war on plastic. the uk produces on average 2.a million tonnes of plastic packaging every year. at the moment, britain recycles less than half of that. just a6% ends up getting used again. a2 of the uk's biggest brands are responsible for about 80% of all plastic packaging. today they signed a pact. they are promising that by 2025, all the plastic they use will either be recyclable, reusable or compostable. the uk plastic pact is being billed as the most ambitious plan from businesses yet. what really is unique about this initiative is it's about the whole of the value chain coming together, united behind a common set of really ambitious targets. convenience, but not at any cost. from fresh food to household hygiene, the consumer goods industry
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is responding to a shift in public attitudes. so, things like this, in terms of some of our shampoos. we are actually making sure that we are using recycled plastics in the bottles, and for this particular product as well, later on this year we will be introducing beach—collected plastic into it as well. but this will take time, and crucially for manufacturers, money. will it all be worth it? the investment could be wasted if products are not sorted at source. although recycling units are broadening the range of goods that can be accepted, there is still confusion about what can go in which bin. we would like to see the labelling different, so it's easier for the people in their houses to decide whether something is recyclable or not. it's too complicated. there is too much written on the packaging. one green dot to say this is recyclable or not, put it in the recycling bin. complicating things further, different councils have different rules around waste. we know in the communities we serve best, an inner city council is not
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the same as a rural council, and actually to try and implement the same policies in two very, very different places just wouldn't work, so actually councils do the best that they can in the communities that they know best, which is why you end up with slightly different schemes. rubbish as far away as france and spain washes up here in west wales. although businesses may pledge to clean up their act, shifting the world away from a throwaway culture may be the harder promise to keep. victoria fritz, bbc news. to all of those thinking, did he say the word composting? i know it is the word composting? i know it is the right word, don't wait, i know, it is one of those things, you are going to have to live with me getting that word wrong.
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you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines... the home secretary amber rudd is under renewed pressure after admitting her office did have immigration removal targets. violent crimes recorded by police in england and wales increased by 21% last year — compared with 2016. more than a0 companies have signed up to a pact to cut plastic pollution over the next seven years. and the fa have received a bid to buy wembley from shahid khan, the owner of jacksonville jaguars. and the london stadium will not host games at next year does cricket world cup, it was thought west ham's home would have a drop in pitch but it's not one of the 11 venues. i
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will have more on those stories after a:30pm. gibraltar‘s chief minister, fabian picardo, has told the bbc that he's open to the idea of spain sharing the territory's airport. the proposal could form part of brexit talks with spain aimed at resolving issues over gibraltar that result from the uk's decision to leave the eu. the bbc understands that talks between british and spanish negotiators on the territory are deadlocked. with 11 months to go until brexit, we're looking at the future of gibraltar in a special day of coverage. gavin lee reports. gibraltar. a picture postcard of britishness on the southern tip of spain. gib, as the locals call it, has been uk territory for three centuries, a state of affairs contested by spain for almost as long. the 32,000 gibraltarians here on its two—and—a—half square miles of land are on the verge of leaving the eu, despite 96% of the people having voted against brexit. i've lived here for two—and—a—half years now, but my biggest worry
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is that the border will close, which would result in the gaming companies leaving, because my husband works fora gaming company that's based in gibraltar. which could lead to us obviously having to relocate back to the uk. you're really worried about that, that it could get to that level? possibly, yes. we've had this all our lives, it's nothing new. they want gibraltar, the airport and everything. sometimes they listen through one ear and it comes out the other one. we're tired of this. brexit talks, doesn't it clear things up? no. get things to a head? we don't know where we stand with brexit. not even uk knows. the eu has allowed spain a voice in these brexit talks over gibraltar, and british and spanish negotiators are now meeting weekly to discuss a solution, and the spanish side say they're not seeking to reclaim the rock as part of these talks, but they do have specific demands. in madrid, earlier this month, spain's foreign minister spelt out to me exactly what is at stake. what we want is to fold some
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of the irritants that have plagued our relation in the last few years, such as lack of transparency in the tax systems in gibraltar, questions having to do with the controls at the border. gibraltar can be as big an issue if it comes to a deal breaker. gibraltar‘s chief minister is also involved in the talks. how much of a say does he have in the matter? without gibraltar representation in the room it would not be possible for gibraltar agreements to be done to the satisfaction of the people of gibraltar. there's a legend in gibraltar that while the macaque monkeys that dot the top of the rock remain, gibraltar will stay british. and while there's no serious territorial claim right now, many aspects of life could change here, depending on the outcome of brexit talk. theirfuture, for now, lies in the hands of the negotiators. gavin lee, bbc news gibraltar.
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one woman has been rescued from a house and cars have been left submerged after a water pipe burst in the black country. this residential road in tipton rapidly resembled a river after power engineers damaged the pipe while installing new electricity cable this morning. 0ur correspondent, sima kotecha is in tipton for us. whoops! as you can see behind me, this water is around three feet high at the moment, at its maximum it was nine feet high. this morning a water pipe burst, it's believed the digger behind me was responsible for bursting that water pipe. i'm joined by steve vincent from the west midlands fire service. you are going to give more information about what's happened, can you explain exactly why you think this happened
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this morning? there was an incident this morning? there was an incident this morning? there was an incident this morning in terms of that broke a20 this morning in terms of that broke a 20 inch main which allowed a considerable amount of water over the next few hours to escape and affect the properties as you can see. affect the properties as you can see. to try to give you an idea, we talk about olympic sized swimming pools, about six olympic size swimming pools of water has been released into the area affecting local residents and also some of the local residents and also some of the local economy in terms of their work. what danger is that posing? is anybody‘s life at risk today? work. what danger is that posing? is anybody's life at risk today? water and electricity don't mix and obviously the water is rising, some people had to go upstairs into their properties. nobody is in immediate danger now, the water is receding, and we are working with the other agencies now to get the water out of the vicinity so cars can get home and the economy and the residents can get back to normality as soon as
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possible. we can hear the very loud droning noise behind us, can you explain how the pump is working and what it is doing? we are working with the canal trust at the moment because this water in terms of the sewerage in the area is full. we need to take this excess water to another place because you cannot just pump it anywhere. we are working to pump this water into the canal so we can take it away safely and get these residents back to normality and get the economy in this area back to normality and people able to get home. so no more water is leaking at the moment, what are your next steps in terms of training this water out? we are working with the local authority who are working with the residents to try to get the affected properties back so they can live there. that will mean the electrics need to be checked and dried out. with local businesses, we are making sure they can get theircars
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businesses, we are making sure they can get their cars out and get lorries back into their properties so they can keep going. we will be working over the next few hours to help people being able to get to their homes and back to their properties but we will be here supporting the local authority and other agencies to make sure it happens as quickly as possible. thank you, that is steve vincent from the west midlands fire service. we are hearing reports a man has broken his wrist azzarello —— as a result of what's happened today and people living nearby are worried this water could seep into their living rooms. there is confidence in the fire service here that they will do all they can to make sure that doesn't happen. thank you. the nhs in england will need another 50 billion pounds a year by 2030, according to a review by two former health ministers. labour's lord darzi and the conservative lord prior carried out the review with a panel of experts convened by the institute for public policy research.
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the report also says further efficiency savings will be needed to meet the anticipated growth in demand for care. the football association has confirmed it's received an offer, thought to be worth £800 million, to sell wembley. it's understood fulham owner shahid khan is the prospective buyer. sources tell the bbc if the sale does go through it would allow the organisation to make a major investment in grassroots, participation football. wiltshire police have been forced to act, after alfresco activities got out of hand in a salisbury park. officers were called amid reports of a man and woman having sex in a field. after a chase along a riverbank, the naked pair were eventually found, hanging out at a property nearby. they've been invited for a police interview, to bare all about what they were up to. i'm looking at louise, i'm not sure
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she's going to get through the weather. i'm just checking it is not the 1st of april, are you making that up? not the kind of weather for any alfresco entertaining. i'm doing any alfresco entertaining. i'm doing a lot back at what happened in the month of april because it has been a month of april because it has been a month of april because it has been a month of extremes. this is easter, when we had up to 15 centimetres of snow in the first week of april. in the second week it was grey and foggy. the second week it was grey and foggy, pretty miserable. it was horrible. but this is my favourite week of weather, 29 degrees, and let's hope that is not some because we we re let's hope that is not some because we were working that day so i didn't get out to experience it. it was hot and glorious but we have sunny spells and scattered showers for today. you are so naughty! i'm going
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today. you are so naughty! i'm going to carry on. it is a party piece simon and! to carry on. it is a party piece simon and i like to do. lots of scattered showers across the country for the close of april and that will be the story for the remainder of this month. we are doing classic april showers and here they are. plenty of sharp showers, heavy and thundery, across scotland, northern ireland and into england. we have seen a few further south but this is where the best of the sunshine has been today and we have seen temperatures peaking at 16 degrees. that will be the last time we see 16 degrees for a few days because those temperatures will be subdued. into the south—west we will see more rain, moving steadily northwards overnight. it will bring plenty of cloud and rain across the south—west and into the midlands. further north we keep the clear skies. temperatures in low single figures. that's where the best of the sunshine will be, not bad at all, but further south significant rain will be the story through the day. it won't be that heavy but it will
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bea it won't be that heavy but it will be a nuisance throughout the morning, showery rain moving up through the south—west, wales and into the north of england. maybe cumbria, further north into scotland you will see the best of the sunny spells but there are still likely to be showers. the temperatures will be disappointing, only around 9—13d, weighed down on where they should be for the time of year. the weather front hangs around first thing on saturday morning, cloudy and damp, rather drizzly, then we see this northern flow. it will be a light wind upa northern flow. it will be a light wind up a cool source so if you are in any shade it will feel disappointing. cloudy on saturday, further north we see a scattering of showers with sunny spells as well and a similar feel. showers with sunny spells as well and a similarfeel. 0n the north sea facing coast it will feel disappointing. then little change as we move into sunday, i wish i could offer you something more optimistic but the north—easterly breeze will continue to drive in cloud. this is the story that gets us into trouble
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with the landlady is on the east coast because it is miserable down towards east anglia and kent with highs of 9 degrees, but predominantly dry until the end of the day and then we are likely to see some rain. and shine and showers, a cool breeze with the potential for more heavy rain into the south—east by the end of the weekend. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. amber rudd faces calls to quit as home secretary after it emerges she knew officials were set targets for the removal of illegal migrants. she's told reporters she's focusing on "staying in the game". i have never agreed that there should be specific removal targets, and i would never support a policy that puts targets ahead of people. it gives you no confidence whatsoever, because they start off saying there aren't targets, then they go on to say they're fully in charge of the situation, then go on to say they didn't even know what was going on. new figures from the office of national statistics show a rise in knife crime,
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burglary and car crime compared with last year. however a separate survey on the public‘s experience of crime said most types of crime stayed at similar levels to 2016. a pledge to cut plastic pollution — more than 30 companies sign up to a pact to reduce plastic packaging over the next seven years. £50 billion pounds a year — that's how much more money the nhs in england will need by 2030, according to a review by two former health ministers. a new owner for the home of football? american businessman shahid khan, who owns fulham football club has put in a bid for wembley stadium — thought to be around £800 million. sport now on afternoon live and let's talk about wembley first... shahid khan, he is a self made billionaire, simon, he is the owner of fulham but more importantly the
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jacksonville jaguarsnfl franchise is worth about £5 billion. it is an interesting story about how he made his monetary policy in car bumpers after arrived in the us from pakistan. he has $500 in his pocket and very little else. he is hoping to to secure the jaguar‘s future in london because they have been playing there as part of their regular season but they would like to potentially long—term become a franchise in london, which is i suppose what shahid khan is laying the ground for. the nfl have welcomed the offer but shahid khan has released a statement, saying we would strive to be the best possible stuart ward for a venue that is iconic, he goes on to say that wembley could return to private ownership and that would allow the football association to focus on its co re football association to focus on its core mission of developing players and this could be something that proves to be a carrot for the fa.
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£500 million of an 800 million offer, would be cash. the fa could re— i nvest offer, would be cash. the fa could re—invest that in grass roots football. it is a significant sum of money. problems this week concern at liverpool for the safety of fans in roma next week. that is right. they are worried, frustrated at the protest. we understand they have made several attempts to get information about security arrangements from the italian authorities for that match. despite meetings and correspondence that has been described as exhaustive they are concerned, all this in the context of what happened outside anfield before the first leg. andy swiss has been following the story. what more can you tell us, this has developed again. liverpool say they have taken the puppional mr your of
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requesting an extraordinary meeting in rome, they say they want reassu ra nces over in rome, they say they want reassurances over a number of thing, will there be a safe and secure shuttle service, what time do the turnstiles open. what areas should fa ns turnstiles open. what areas should fans avoid. what roots, they don't feel they have that had the answers they want so far, there have been a number of others developments regarding what happened on tuesday night. two italian men appeared in court in today. they both face charges relating to the violence before the match on tuesday, they both have been remanded in custody and will next appear at liverpool crown court on may 2ath. in court today we had an update on the condition of shaun cox who was seriously injured. we were told he was ina seriously injured. we were told he was in a critical but stable condition. he is in an induced coma. we heard a statement from his family. they describe him as a truly decent man who adores liverpool.
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they hope he makes a full recovery. arsene wenger will will have have mesut 0zil, jack wilshere and petr cech for the match with atletico madrid. it is arsene wenger‘s final european home match in charge of the club. it won't be easy, atletico are second inla won't be easy, atletico are second in la liga and they have a good record in europe too. it is a very perfect goodbye, i don't know, first of all. i want to do as well as i can, this time is —— team is quality. i have seen them this season with that challenge, mentally. they respond in a positive way. steve gerrard is on a the shortlist to become the new manager for rangers, gerrard who was capped
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114 for rangers, gerrard who was capped 11a times for england and a member of the liverpool side who won the champions league in 2005 is working asa champions league in 2005 is working as a coach in temperature liverpool candidate. it has been convirt firmed that hedge vic will not come out of retirement to play for sweden. he said he would at ten the world cup but wouldn't say in what can pa pty, world cup but wouldn't say in what can papty, the swede dish fa said he had not changed his mind about joining the national team in russia. joshua's promoter has asked ww champion show us the money after wilder claimed he had 50 million in the bag, for a unification fight. the american holds the only one of four main belts thatjoshua doesn't in the heavyweight division. there isa in the heavyweight division. there is a meeting for both camps to see ifa is a meeting for both camps to see if a deal can be made late this year. that is all your sport for now. with
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will will be with you in the next hour. now on afternoon live — let's go nationwide — and see what's happening around the country — in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. nick 0wen is in birmingham and can tell us more about a staffordshire man who has received an award for his dedication in tending to the grave for the last 25 years of a world war 11 airman he never knew. and justin leigh is in plymouth and can tell us more about a local raf veteran who has been honoured with a medal by the dutch government for a special world war two mission he was involved with 73 years ago this week. but first to nick... nick, this is a simply enchanting story? yes it is captivating, it started to unravel when members of the raf association noticed a certain wartime grave in cannock cemetery was beautifully tended and manicured
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with flowers and perfectly moan grass, week in, week out, but who by? the grave was that of warrant officer by? the grave was that of warrant 0fficerjohn benjamin burrows, a australian airman who died in the war. wayne heart shorn is a green—keeper on a local golf course, he used to visit the cemetery, he noticed the burial place had a distinctive whitehead stone had sunk into the soil. he took it on himself to do something about it. he has been doing it for more than a quarter a century. there is a poignant quote from him, he said i was 26, when i started doing this 25 yea rs was 26, when i started doing this 25 years ago. i am 52, warrant officer burrows will forever be 21. that is remarkable. what do we know about warrant officers burrows. he was married to a cannock girl, he was a navigator in a bomb earthquake, and
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the plane was hit during an operation over germany to drop propaganda leaf lets in 19a3. the plane limped back across france and the english channel, they hoped to make it back to their base in the west cou ntry make it back to their base in the west country but it crashed near way hill railway station in wiltshire. his original home was victoria in australia. his parents had these words placed on the headstone. still live, still our, father and mother. john and his wife marjorie had only be married about eight month, she remarried and went to live in the united states and she died as recently as 2007. meanwhile, wayne continues to tend this grave? yes, he goes once a fortnight. fortnight. has erected a border, he says i like to make sure something is flowering for he has received a certificate of appreciation from the raf. he has
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been interviewed by a radio station in australia ant this. he wishes a relative would get in touch. all this for a complete stranger. relative would get in touch. all this for a complete strangenm relative would get in touch. all this for a complete stranger. it is great and i tell you what it won't be the only time we talk about that. nick, thank you, a wonderful story from nick. and justin... this is ivor foster and this is ivorfoster and nick was talking about the bravery of airmen in the second world war. ivor was pa rt in the second world war. ivor was part of a lancaster bomber crew an went on many bombing raids over germany but as the war drew to a close the nazis began starving the people of holland creating a terrible humanitarian disaster, something like 20,000 people died as a result, so ivor and his come raids we re a result, so ivor and his come raids were tasked with a different mission, rather than dropping bombs they were asked to fly low and drop
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food. that is what happen ivor and his crew mates did. it had a great effect on them. something ivor has never forgotten. most effect on them. something ivor has neverforgotten. most had, until now. more than 70 years later, suddenly through the post ivor received a medal from the dutch authorities, for his role in that mission. what has his reaction been to that? he was astounded but greatly humbled. this brought back a flood of memories about the event, and ivor received the medal because a friend of his spoke to the dutch embassy and told them about his role in the mission, so, they duly found out more about ivor and sent him the medal and this is what he told us when he received it. i feelvery proud that i'm the last one of some of the crew alive, and i take great
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pride wearing that, in honour of my six comrades that are gone. and and this has had a profound effect on ivor. he goes on the describe a moment when they were flying low over holland and the pilot of the plane told i yvonne that they could see the people below really clearly because they were flying so lowlet. at one stage they could see a woman on her hands and knees praying sky wards to the planes and they were coming in and dropping the food. something ivor has never forgotten and dropping the food. something ivor has neverforgotten and his role hasn't been forgotten as he has received the model from the dutch authorities. plenty more on spotlight. nick, a theme tonight, and quite wonderful, both storied. if you would like to see more you
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can if you would like to see more you ca n a ccess if you would like to see more you can access those stories by the bbc iplayer and we go nationwide every week day afternoon at a.30 here on afternoon live. according to a new report. the charity pro bono economics says early help can help boost the life chances of children and bring economic benefits too. catherine burns reports. catherine burns reports. if you're feeling sad and worried, you could talk to place to be. and they might — and you might feel happy. a glowing recommendation from eight—year—old charlie. the children's mental health charity, place to be, provides emotional support at schools across the uk. it asked researchers from the group pro bono economics to put a financial value on its work with primary pupils. the report predicts that every child who has individual
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counselling through the charity could benefit by £5,700. that is mostly because they are one day expected to go on and getjobs and earn higher wages. they are also less likely to cost society in the future by needing different kinds of help. it shows in monetary terms what we know as clinicians. if we get in there early, when there are first signs of difficulty, of upset, or behaviour, or of distress, then that won't translate into mental health problems later in life. the report predicts that every child who has individual counselling through the charity could benefit by £5,700. that is mostly because they are one day expected to go on and getjobs and earn higher wages. they are also less likely to cost society in the future by needing different kinds of help. it shows in monetary terms what we know as clinicians. if we get in there early, when there are first signs of difficulty, of upset, or behaviour, or of distress, then that won't translate into mental health problems later in life. these year four and five pupils are not thinking about the money though.
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if i'd had home troubles or school troubles, i could go to place2be and talk to elizabeth and she would lift a weight off my shoulders. you can share your emotions and your feelings and you won't get in trouble for spelling anything. when i didn't have as much friends as other people, i went to place2be and she told me to be more confident. it can get you something very important in life and it's called a friend. the service cost more than £a million across the country in one year. this school paid about £20,000. if it didn't transform children's lives, we wouldn't continue with it, because it's got to be cost—effective. i would want the government to recognise that schools need to be places of safety, and that schools need support. the government says it has allocated an extra £300 million to mental health in schools. but let's leave the final word on this to charlie. place2be has helped me with my singing and my attitude, and now i'm going to sing a bit of a song. # happiness will find me # leave the past behind me # today my life begins... catherine burns, bbc news. a bit of breaking new, we are hearing donald trump is to visit the united kingdom onjuly hearing donald trump is to visit the united kingdom on july 13th. hearing donald trump is to visit the united kingdom onjuly13th. he will hold bilateral talks with the prime
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minister theresa may, now this is coming from britain's ambassador to the united states, that is all we have at the moment. i don't know if there is any more to it. whether he will meet the queen, we just have he is coming to the uk onjuly13th. plenty more on that to come. the football association has confirmed it's received an offer, thought to be worth £800m, to sell wembley. it's understood fulham owner shahid khan is the prospective buyer. sources tell the bbc if sale does go through it would allow the organisation to make a major investment in grassroots, participation football. live now to our correspondent, frankie mccamley, who is outside wembley stadium. what is the latest on this? well, yes, as you can see we are here outside wembley, the iconic home of english football. this 90,000 seat stadium. largest in the uk, cost more than £700 million to build back in 2007, now today what we know is
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the fa board met to consider this offer, worth round 800 million. the prospective bayer shahid khan, many will know him, he is the owner of fulham football club and jacksonville jaguars. according to the fulham boss this has been on the cards for some time. the interest shahid khan ‘s interest has been on the cards for some time, apparently he told the fulham boss round 18 months ago he was interested in wembley stadium. now if this deal does go ahead it is going to have implication, i could mean that the jacksonville jaguars could be heading over here making this their home ground, if they to that, they are going to be the first nfl team to have a home ground overseas but that throws into question what will the england football team do? will they travel round country again? of course some will be an posed to that. others will welcome that. a lot of people have to travel from
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all over the get here to see their national team play. thank you very much. the ukip leader says rises in council tax could be controlled if net migration into the uk was reduced to 50—thousand. speaking ahead of next month's local elections, gerard batten said immigration takes its toll on the resources of local authorities. just in one place, in the london borough of havering, they have to build 30,000 new homes in the next 20 year, that is because of the rise in population down to migration, but if that plan to build house there's is no plan to build the additional hospitals and schools and roads and public services that these people will need. it is, not only is it unsustainable we can't afford it. the way to keep council tax down is the first thing is to cut out unnecessary expenditure and
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concentrate. the home secretary amber rudd is under renewed pressure after admitting her office did have immigration removal targets violent crimes recorded by police in england and wales increased by 21% last year — compared with 2016. more than a0 companies have signed up to a pact to cut plastic pollution over the next seven years. tsb boss paul pester has told the bbc the bank is "on our knees" after six days of computer chaos. they have now called in experts from ibm to help fix the banking system breakdown. problems began at the weekend when tsb attempted to move customer accounts to a new computer systems. discount retailer poundworld may close about 100 of its 355 stores, putting up to 1,500 jobs at risk. the company is also considering an insolvency process called a company voluntary arrangement or cva. like many retailers poundworld has been hit by falling consumer confidence, rising overheads and the weaker pound.
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reports have also said that department store chain fenwicks, which has nine branches, may restructure itself, although details have yet to emerge. it's a new chapter for waterstones as the book chain has been bought by activist investment firm elliott advisors for an undisclosed amount. but one of the main characters james daunt will stay in place as the chain's chief executive. the name elliot may sound familiar — they bought a 6% stake in whitbread recently, saying they wanted the company to split its coffee chain costa, from its premier inn hotel business. this week whitbread announced plans to do just that. deutsche bank will make "significant" job cuts as it scales back its corporate and investment banking operations. germany's biggest lender said the cuts will mainly fall in us and asia. the bank reported a sharp drop in first—quarter corporate and investment bank revenues. so a disappointment but not a disaster for ba rclays? that's what some investors are saying.
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the bank posted £236 million pre—tax loss for the first quarter, but that included £1.a billion to settle a lawsuit in the us over the sale of mortgage—backed securities, and put aside an additional £a00 million to cover an increase in payment protection insurance mis—selling claims. 0n the flip side royal dutch shell reported its best quarterly profits in over three years — but the share price fell over 2% in morning trade — now down about 0.8%. part of the reason is that investors had high expectations for cash flow forecast — that matters because of dividends — and shell fell short. it feels like there is a lot going on the markets when it comes to big companies at the moment — comcast and 21st century fox in a bidding warfor sky, takeda making five bids for shire, and whitbread — spinning off costa — what's going on? which that that bidding war, i am
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getting confused. theed by wag for for sky. then we have whitbread splitting into costa and holding on the premier inn and to kate —— taking control of shire, why are companies so important? let us ask russ, he is director at aj bell. do you feel there is a lot happening? obviously one of the highest profile deals was melrose acquisition of gkn. so, there is a lot going on, i think there are two reasons for that, firstly, overall economic growth is ok, but not fantastic and chief executives are looking to generate growth by requiring of the company, stripping out costs or expanding their own operationings and secondly interest rates on cash are still low, companies are under pressure to generate a better return for their investor, they are not going to get that by keeping cash in
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the bank. so they will try and spice up the bank. so they will try and spice up their return, so those are two possible friends, one thing i would say you do tend to see the animal spirit activity quite near the top of stock market cycles, four ftse bids, the highest number is six, and that was 2007, just before the great financial crisis started, so let's see. let us talk about barclay, posting a pre—tax loss for the first three months of year. investors some saying it's a disappointment but not a disaster, how would you assess it. mixed number, there was a headline pre—tax loss but all of that came from that us fine you mentioned and yet more claims for payment protection insurance, another a00 million. that isn't going to go away until 2019. if the bank can keep its nose clean, avoid fine, avoid lone losses, it will be an extremely profitable bank, the fact is it
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isn't keeping its nose clean, although we are through the us investigation, the whistle—blower blowing, we still are the serious fraud office investigation, so there is still more potential difficulties there and that is one of the reasons why ba rclays has there and that is one of the reasons why barclays has an activist investor, who clearly thinks he can make proposals to improve the overall profitability, culture and conduct of the bank. now let us talk about shell. no surprise they have rapid strong results with the oil price bobbing rounds $75 a barrel. explain what theissueis rounds $75 a barrel. explain what the issue is with future cash flow and dividends. they have said it was overall very strong and cash flow is key because it pays dividends, shell is the single biggest payer of deaf depends in the ftse100. £12—13 million. so a lot of viewers whether they know it or not will be benefits
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from that cash flow because it will be in their pension funds, so it is very important that shell keeps that dividend going, the cash flow today was ok, once you look a profit, take off tax, capital investment, there was $6 billion left, the quarterly dividend payment is a billion. so although people were disappointed, the buffer is still good, the dividend looks safer than two or three years ago when oil was in the $30 a barrel range. thank you. markets? the american markets a open and trading. the most valuable companies in the world. we go apple. alphabet. also begins with a? amazon? the results are out 9.3 our time. i believed you would know it. and we have put up ftse and the dax,
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we had ecb, european central bank holding interest rate, no real reaction on the european markets. tomorrow, we have gdp, q1, first estimate out so gdp, the total value of everything produced by all the people and companies in this country, many people that think it is the singularly most important figure we get because it tries to incorps raith everything but we get it in three stage, we have the first estimate, tomorrow we will have the first. all that bad weather we're have had, people think that may have had an impact. thank you very much. the american ambassador to the uk has tweeted a video which we will show you later. that is response to the breaking news that trump is coming to the uk, announced in the last few minutes via the ambassador
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to the united states, the uk ambassador, this is kim tar rock who says, —— darrock, driegted he will visit the uk and hold bilateral talks with prime minister may, so thatis talks with prime minister may, so that is the 13thjuly, and i should perhaps point out, that that is a friday. friday. friday 13th july. friday. friday 13thjuly. president friday. friday 13th july. president trump coming to the uk. that is it from your afternoon live time. next the news at five, that is jane hill. first the weather. for some it has been a better day with more sunshine and fewer showers round but there have been shower, this with a snapshot earlier, most heavy and frequent in scotland and northern ireland, but, as you can see one or two isolated. as we go through the evening the showers will continue to ease in the far north of scotla nd continue to ease in the far north of scotland and will keep clear skies here, need to draw your attention to
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cloud and rain pushing in there the south—west. this is going to be a nuisance through friday. that will prevent temperatures from falling further than eight degrees but into the far north east it will be a chilly start, low single figures not out of the question. but the best of the sunshine is likely to be through scotland, the far north of england and northern ireland, elsewhere is cloud and rain will spill up into the north of england by the afternoon. if you are caught under the cloud and rain which will be heavy, it is going to be feel disappointing with eight or nine degree, so whatever you are doing wrap up warm. today at 5: the bbc understands the home office will scrap immigration removal targets. a day after the home secretary amber rudd said the targets did not exist, she's had to admit they do, and she's facing calls to stand down. i have never agreed that there should be specific removal targets and i would never support a policy that puts targets ahead of people. that gives you no confidence whatsoever because they start off saying there aren't targets,
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then they go on to say that they are fully in charge of the situation, then go on to say they didn't even know what was going on. i'll be talking to yvette cooper, the chair of the home affairs select committee. the other main stories on bbc news at 5: the home of english football, wembley stadium, could be sold. the football association receives an offer worth £800 million.
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