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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  April 26, 2018 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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hello, i'm kasia madera. this is outside source. the us comedian bill cosby has been found guilty of sexual assault for drugging and molesting a woman more than ten years ago. he faces 30 years in prison. and now we really know to date who was behind the act, who the real bill cosby was. a countdown to an historic meeting. we're just hours away from a summit between the two koreas, the first time a north korean leader has crossed the border since the korean war. donald trump's first presidential visit to britain is announced. he'll arrive on friday the 13th ofjuly. and track and field says some women with naturally high testosterone levels will have to lower that or race against men. us comedian bill cosby has been found guilty of three
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counts of sexual assault. the 80—year—old actor now faces a sentence of up to 30 years in prison. he has been on trialfor drugging and assaulting ex—basketball player andrea constand in 200a. she testified on wednesday and has been in court for the verdict. today from court, npr reporter bobby allyn said... he described it andrea constand at stony he described it andrea constand at sto ny fa ced he described it andrea constand at stony faced and other accusers crying in court. bill cosby faced the same charges last year. that time, the trial ended with a hung jury. this time, it took less than two days to find him guilty. following this trial, here's the prosector. what was revealed in this
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investigation was a man who spent decades praying with him who he drugged and sexually assaulted, and a man who had invaded this moment here today for far too long. he used his celebrity, he used his wealth, used his network of supporters to help him conceal his crimes. and now we really know today who was behind the act, who the real bill cosby was. for a look at how this trial was different from the last time he was in court, here's wendy murphy, a former prosecutor and now professor of sexual violence law at new england law. i think what changed the result this time around was very much the fact that five other women were able to ta ke that five other women were able to take a stand and say he did the same thing to me. and the same thing it means drugging me and then it sexually violating me after i became incapacitated. the prior trial, only
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one other woman was allowed to testify, and i think it made it a lot harder for the defence to claim that this was an unusual event or that this was an unusual event or that this was not the thing he typically did. when you say woman after woman coming forward and saying this man has a habit of drugging women in and sexually violating them, it's a lot easier for the jury decide why would he not have done in this case, it is he does. nada tawfik is at the court at norristown in pennsylvania. a very different result from last year. just explain the difference, please. last year, the jury deliberated for over 50 hours but they were unable to reach a decision. they were extremely deadlock. this time around, there we re deadlock. this time around, there were certainly different circumstances. many are putting that
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to the #metoo movement. thejudge believed it was important to have five additional women testify, to show a pattern of the coffee pot for behaviour as a sexual predator who drugged and molested women. he also allowed other bits of evidence but also the prosecution did a really greatjob of also the prosecution did a really great job of having also the prosecution did a really greatjob of having experts come in and explain to the jury how some of the inconsistencies in the victim's state m e nts the inconsistencies in the victim's statements does not mean necessarily that they are lying, that it is a normal part of what victims go through, the trauma and trying to recollect all of the details and still be kind of attached to their accuser. and so certainly we saw this time that being a big difference. also when i spoke with a lot of lawyers who deal with these sexual assault cases, they sentjust the idea of the public is so much more aware that sexual assault is so rife in society, that that alone
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played a big part in this trial. and so we saw played a big part in this trial. and so we saw the played a big part in this trial. and so we saw the women come up played a big part in this trial. and so we saw the women come up with this verdict was read, others who have accused the cosby in a vineyard for every day of the trial, they we re for every day of the trial, they were rejoicing in tears, so happy to see this because as they said, outside the court they felt that violate this meant that women were worthy of being believed. that woman could be delayed as much as a very powerful man. i have heard that again and again from women outside of court here today. after the verdict, we saw the attorney, kevin still, the emotional himself. we did not actually here for andrea co nsta nd not actually here for andrea constand but everyone said just how brave she was. yeah, absolutely. one thing that struck me about what the district attorney said was he said he hopes one day they will not have to have experts to explain to the jury to have experts to explain to the jury what is sexual assault and had
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asa jury what is sexual assault and had as a manifest itself. he hopes the problem will become more educated about this because of all the women coming out and sharing their stories. andrea constand and i had the other by who spoke really dealt with with a lot of attacks from the defence. bill cosby‘s lawyers tried to very aggressively defend him in so to very aggressively defend him in so they attacked the woman's credibility, calling andrea constand a pathological liar, a con artist who was just after his money. the other women, one was called a model who was a has—been and wanted publicity, and the other two promiscuous. as always, thank you very much. she has also written analysis on my website so check that out. let us stay in the us. us president donald trump is to visit the uk on friday, 13thjuly. this visit has been a long time coming. a previous visit was cancelled after claims he would face mass protests. theresa may was the first foreign leader to visit the president
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at the white house last january. at the time, she invited him for a state visit. this visit will not be on that scale. it is instead being described as a working visit, as ben wright in westminster explains. significantly downgraded, slimmed down from the state visit that theresa may did extend it to donald trump write a beginning of his presidency in an act of goodwill, hoping to cement that relationship right at the star. then of course we had months of president trump clattering from one controversy to the next. i think a political feeling here in westminster turning against him quite strongly on a number of occasions. that statement as it became impossible to pull off. it was quite clear that mps did not wa nt it was quite clear that mps did not want him to address both houses of parliament. in february, president trump was we thought to come to open
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the new american embassy in london. that visit was pulled for various reasons. i think there'll be relief all around reasons. i think there'll be relief allaround in reasons. i think there'll be relief all around in whitehall and washington that they finally have a day ina washington that they finally have a day in a diary when president trump will come to london and hold bilateral talks with theresa may, but no carriages, did not expect banquets at buckingham palace. it will not have the trappings of the state visit because it will not be won. number ten says it is still their intention to have that visit for the american president at some point but that could still be a very long way away. anchor: a long way indeed. let's turn it then to the accident. theresa may casting doubt 0h accident. theresa may casting doubt on up staying in the customs union after the uk leaves. there has been some debate about this. amber rudd was asked about the future
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relationship of trade with the eu after brexit and whether or not we would still be in the customs union with the eu. the one the eu currently has, in other words, having an external tariff, the uk not being able to forge his own trade relationships outside that block. the government profit position is whatever happens, the you that the uk will leap leave the customs union, it will not happen but it is one of the most controversial things in politics right now. it is where brexit is splitting. amber was asked what she felt about this and she said these are still going on in cabinet. she did notjust are still going on in cabinet. she did not just repeat are still going on in cabinet. she did notjust repeat a policy which was to leave the customs union. that cause all sorts of confusion. then about three or four hours but, amber rudd twitted by a clarification that policy was to leave the customs union but she did not want to get into private cabinet discussions about what the government would be seeking instead. bent right in
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westminster. in a few hours' time, history will be made on the korean peninsula. kim jong—un is set to become the first north korean leader to cross into south korean territory since the end of the korean war in 1953. he'll be meeting south korean president moonjae—in, who is about to leave seoul. kim jong—un will leave pyongyang in the north, headed for the demilitarised zone at the border, and they will meet in the peace house in panmunjum on the south korean side of the border. for more on that historic summit, here's our correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes. this will start off at 930 local time here in selwyn what will be a symbolic moment as kim jong—un arrives with his motorcade from pyongyang on the north side, the piece to go see asian village in a demilitarized zone. then he won't
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get out of his car and walk across the dividing line where he will be welcomed by resident moonjae—in on the south side. no north korean leader has ever done that before. so it will be hugely symbolic moment. this able to walk together to a welcoming ceremony. they will plant a symbolic pinetree with earth so that has come from the north and the south and will pour water that has come from the rivers that run through pyongyang and seoul. so tremendous symbolism in all of that. they will get go into a meeting which will then go on all day up. at the end of wishing that we will all be waiting to see what the summit declaration will contain. the devil is going to be in the detail, and particularly whether kim jong—un is prepared to make some sort of commitment, some sort of written commitment, some sort of written commitment towards denuclearization, getting rid of his nickel weapons. president moonjae—in is doing much of the running in this process. he has created this process, starting with the winter olympics, sending a delegation to pyongyang which
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brought back that message, which was taken to president trump in washington, saying the kimjong—un will prepare to meet with him. so it is very much tamina is being driven from here in seoul. but as i say, this is the step to the bigger prize for kimjong—un, this is the step to the bigger prize for kim jong—un, which this is the step to the bigger prize for kimjong—un, which is the face—to—face summit with president trump. and i do not think the americans are going to agree to that summit without some sort of perhaps ofa summit without some sort of perhaps of a commitment to long—term declarer knew it —— denuclearization, something like that, some sort of commitment to be prepared to give up the club is at some stage in the future. that meeting coming up soon. so far, donald trump on the international stage but at home, his personal lawyer has been in court. what michael cohen had to say. the stand—off between alfie eva ns's family
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and alder hey children's hospital could be at an end. after weeks of legal wrangling and angry exchanges. this is a highly significant development in this story. for the past few weeks, tom evans has given some emotional and often anguished statements to journalists about the way he saw alder hey were treating alfie, his son. tonight, he said his little family and the hospital had become the centre of attention around the world, and that's meant they've not been able to live in their lives the way they would like. he's expressed appreciation for the support people have given him, but now he says he wants everyone to take a step back, go back to their everyday lives so that he and the hospital can work together on what's best for alfie. we also wish to thank alder hey staff at all levels for their level of dignity and professionalism during what must‘ve been an incredibly difficult time for them, too. together, we recognise the strains that recent events have put upon us all. this is outside source live
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from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is: the us comedian bill cosby has been found guilty of sexual assault for drugging and molesting a woman more than ten years ago. he faces 30 years in prison. some other stories we are monitoring here. bbc hindi report on a crash in uttar pradesh that has killed at least 13 children. their school bus collided with a train. the vehicle had been travelling across an unmanned railway crossing, when the accident happened. the scottish conservative leader ruth davidson has announced she's pregnant. she's expecting her first child with with her partnerjen wilson. she'll take some time off work and her deputy will cover her role. that story's on the bbc world service. on the bbc news app, you can read about footballer lionel messi trade—marking his name. the barcelona and argentina striker
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fought a seven—year fight to be able to use his name on sports goods and clothing. it had been challenged by a spanish cycling brand massi. russia has repeated its claim that the chemical attack in the syrian city of douma was staged. at a press briefing in the hague, russia and syria presented alleged witnesses from syria who they say were used in staged videos of the attack. syria said its enemies were using the allegations of a chemical attack as an "evil plan" against it. translation: all the accusations amounted against the syrian government as well as the syrian armed forces. are based purely on
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falls, fabricated allegations. made up falls, fabricated allegations. made up by falls, fabricated allegations. made up by the instruments, proxies of the western countries, that would like to sour the reputation of the syrian armed forces. britain's ambassador to the opcw dismissed it as "a propaganda campaign of misinformation". anna holligan was at the press conference. we know the opcw has been to the scene of the alleged chemical weapons attack in douma. they have collected samples from there but there were only able to access the site after it was under russian military police control. we know that the un team that was sent in first on the reconnaissance mission that were fired at, and what we have
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been witnessing here in the hague todayis been witnessing here in the hague today is the latest round and this information war. and the anti—ease being up allthe information war. and the anti—ease being up all the time. anna at the hagy there. earlier, i spoke to our world affairs correspondent about the information war over what is alleged to have happened. it isa it is a really vicious propaganda warand is it is a really vicious propaganda war and is not going away. it is as loving against the backdrop of the deteriorating —— de tier editorship of the west in general and russia and syria. you recall the un sir terry general saying the cold war is back with a vengeance but without any safeguards that could manage the risk of escalation. he said that before the missile strike that was taken in response to whatever it was that happened on april the 7th, and we have two completely different coventry narratives, one from russia and syria and one from the west about what may or may not have happened that day. let's turn back to washington. we has spoken about donald trump on
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the international stage. let's talk about him domestically. donald trump has admitted his lawyer michael cohen did represent him in efforts to silence the porn actress stormy daniels. she claims to have had an affair with mr trump in 2006, and has brought a civil case to try and end a deal she signed with mr cohen that bans her discussing it. here's the president in a phone interview with fox & friends. asa as a percentage of my overall legal work, a tiny fraction. michael represents me oh work, a tiny fraction. michael represents me on some things, like this crazy crazy stormy daniels deal and from what i see, he did nothing wrong. there were no campaign funds coming out. then why is he pleading the fifth? president trump dialling
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into fox and friends. michael cohen is trying to delay ms daniels‘ lawsuit by 90 days. he'll attempt to do so while staying silent. in a statement, he says... now, that separate fbi investigation returned to court today. here's mr cohen arriving for the hearing in manhattan. a judge decided that an independent official called a "special master" will be the first to examine mr cohen's documents seized by fbi agents earlier this month. here's stormy daniel's lawyer speaking after that hearing. i think the president should appear on fox & friends every morning. i thought it was exceptional for our case and disastrous for him. i think there is no question it implicates him andl
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there is no question it implicates him and i do not believe there is any wager to reconcile what the president said on fox & friends with this statement from air force one and the prior statements of michael cohen. those are all reconcilable and that is a significant problem for michael cohen and the president. the fbi investigation on michael cohen is based on information the agency was given by robert mueller. he's the special counsel investigating alleged collusion between the trump campaign and russia. us lawmakers today advanced a bill preventing donald trump from firing mr mueller. here's the president again, attacking his own justice department, the fbi and the russia probe. and you look at the corruption at the top of the fbi, it is a disgrace. and ourjustice department, which i try and stay away from, but at some point i want. ourjustice department should be looking at that kind of stuff, not the nonsense of collusion with russia. there is no collusion with me and russia and everyone knows it.
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so the president certainly got on a roll there and left us a lot to unpack. the person to do it is anthony zurcher, who's in washington. my my goodness, where do we start? this was one of those telephone calls to one of his favourite programmes and there was an awful lot of information. let's start with michael cohen. right, you saw donald trump essentially confirm that michael cohen was representing him when he was dealing with stormy daniels, at least in that line that you played. but throughout most of the rest of the interview when he was talking about michael cohen, he was talking about michael cohen, he was trying to distance himself from him, saying he did not have any sort of involvement in his business dealings, that is legal work for donald trump was very small. because the fact of the matter is michael cohen is under federal investigation for his business dealings, but also for his business dealings, but also for possible illegality in his business dealings, that is legal
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work for donald trump was very small. because the fact of the matter is michael cohen is under federal investigation for his business dealings, but also for possible illegality and the payment he made it to stormy daniels, that may have violated campaign finance laws. so i imagine donald trump oss lawyers and michael cohen's lawyers we re lawyers and michael cohen's lawyers were pounding their heads into the desk of the last thing they want is donald trump saying anything about this case that would either conflict with what he is the before or reveal new information that could undermine michael cohen's case. it is obvious to president was contorted his interview. he even tweeted he would be interviewed at 8am in the morning, adding injointly! what he did he say about the programme? he was again talked about and played a little clip about how it was a witch hunt, it was basically something set up hunt, it was basically something set up by hunt, it was basically something set up by democrats in order to find a justification for their loss in the 20 16th justification for their loss in the 2016th election. he said he won that there is where, he even boasted of the fact that he won the electoral college and he upset all the predictions made that he was going to lose. but he said he had been taking a hands—off approach to the robert mueller probe and the
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oversight of it from that this is pa rt oversight of it from that this is part of that might change. he feels like he has been treated very u nfa i rly like he has been treated very unfairly and that he might decide to get more involved in this, which raised a lot of eyebrows i think. anthony, do not go away. i want to speak to you about this man. this is ronnyjackson, speak to you about this man. this is ronny jackson, the white speak to you about this man. this is ronnyjackson, the white house doctor. he served three american presidents. he was the pick to take over as secretary of veteran affairs but he is now withdrawn his bid after allegations of professional conduct including excessive drinking and dispensing medication wrongly. he says they were false. he would have done a greatjob. these are false accusations. they are trying to destroy a man. by the way, i did say welcome to watching welcome to the swappable welcome to the world of politics, but forjohn to start bringing up stuff like any man and a
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kind of things he was saying, and then say these are just a vista have been made. there is no proof of this and he has a great record, this beautiful record, unblemished. so again there, anthony, the president speaking on the interview. you have written about this extensively, your title of your article was hiring from the hip. what is this say about him and choosing ronnyjackson in the first place? ronny jackson was a lwa ys the first place? ronny jackson was always an unconventional pick to head up the veterans affairs department. the position in the white house having a small medical tea m white house having a small medical team is very different from running what is the second largest bureaucracy in the federal government, the department of vetera ns government, the department of veterans affairs. he did not have a lot of support and a lot of republicans in congress were on their heels when the announcement was made, and then support evaporated once these allegations of professional misconduct came as well. i did write about that and donald trump does have a history of making unconventional pics like
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that. when he was a businessman, he saw a security guard at it in this tournament, lichen, hired him and that man ended up becoming the person who runs the chief operating officer of troubled properties. because people in positions where they may not obviously be qualified but he sees something as a gabriel raschin but he sees something as a gabriel rasch in and he runs with it. he is than that as president, as well, the problem with that is when you are in politics and for the people in the spotlight like that, they do not have to prove themselves. if you do not do background checks in stuff comes up not do background checks in stuff comes up pretty quickly and we have seen dozens of his pace for several positions, several other herjury positions, several other herjury positions, two secretaries of the army, they have had to withdraw after revelations of intimate with her name came out. anthony, thank you so much. anthony sank in his article, hiring from the hip, check that out it is very good. stay with us that out it is very good. stay with us here for the next edition of outside source. hello there. this evening, star in
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israel where an inch of rain has resulted in flash flooding during the course of wednesday, now fortu nately, the course of wednesday, now fortunately, the likelihood is woodward observer still around will see further issues with flash flooding from these heavy showers and thunderstorms. the gusty winds we re and thunderstorms. the gusty winds were also leaving dust around and it will stay around northern areas for the next couple of days. we've also had an issue with flash flooding from intense showers across cape town. those are ripe for wednesday into thursday with more rain to come friday. this rate is a jewel areas concerning for the likes of somalia and kenya when there is a real flood risk at the moment. the middle east can see tel and beirut, chances are there will be some showers in the coming few days. gusty winds lifting that does. we also will see a lot more rain for nairobi, so for the likes of kenya and rwanda, somalia, tanzania, a heightened risk of flooding the next few days. but he
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is concerned as we head into india as he can see here. heavy showers in the sri lanka, that is pre—monsoon heat building. we also see what. heavy showers in the sri lanka, that is pre—monsoon heat building. we also seek with a rise in temperatures in tokyo and beijing and its couple of days and the many he was pushing that up into mongolia. that has been a rather cooler affair in new york with the fog around. this was taken on wednesday, although they would low— pressure wednesday, although they would low—pressure hat that has moved into the canadian maritimes, another area of low pressure with severe storms moving into the northeastern us and some rain by that stage bringing to an end to the heat that we have had across coastal parts of california. but he will still be with us in several areas but for the likes of vancouver and seattle, it is turning cooler and more unsettled as we head into the weekend as you can see. temperatures are getting away. further east, is sick with another ran away and start to seep the heat building while the beginning of next week but that will bring storms. we have some peace to this in europe
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and the likelihood is that will spread its way to eastern areas. however in the west, we have a real drop in temperature to come this weekend and all thought it would areas of loopers are coming in off the atlantic. so the heat for the evil trigger some intense storms. there are warnings about that. it is low— pressure there are warnings about that. it is low—pressure struggle for gail force winds and driving the way into northwestern europe in the course of product and action taking a look further ahead, we have got low— pressure further ahead, we have got low—pressure coming in off the atla ntic low—pressure coming in off the atlantic and diving southwards across iberia. so still cold enough that to turn the snow on the top of the mountains and temperatures will fall quite low behind that with that chilling wind up from a grid after being in the 20s to back down to the mid—teens. wikis and heat in the warmth further east in athens. could we get here as well but more details to follow about the weekend. in about half an hour. this is outside source and these are the main stories right here in the bbc news room. the us comedian bill cosby bbc news room. the us comedian bill cos by has bbc news room. the us comedian bill cosby has been found that the of
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sexual assault. drugging and molesting a woman more than ten yea rs molesting a woman more than ten years ago. he faces 30 years in prison. now we really know today who was behind that act. with derailed bill cosby was. —— would the real bill cosby was. —— would the real bill cosby was. count down to a historic meeting, hours away from a summit between the two koreas. the first time in north korean leader has crossed the border since the korean war. donald trump's first presidential visit to britain is enough. you will arrive on friday the 13th ofjuly. enough. you will arrive on friday the 13th of july. every enough. you will arrive on friday the 13th ofjuly. every day outside source features bbc journalists working in over 30 languages. your questions are always welcome. donald trump has had success on one
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of his most important nominations for cabinet. that of secretary of state. the senate today confirmed it is the former seattleite —— the cia director will take over from rex tillerson. from washington, it has not been easy, has eight? no. there was quite a lot of opposition to mike pompeo from democrats in particular because they are worried about him, a trompe l‘oeil list, a former policy hobbies. set up is reputation while he was attacked up in congress. very critical of the iran deal, taking strong positions on some of the other issues and they we re on some of the other issues and they were afraid this would carry over in his his secretary of state profile and that he will be more inclined to go for military action rather than diplomacy. and that he would enable mr trump's worst instincts when he came to an aggressive response. he went out of his way to try to counter the narrative during his confirmation hearing. he said no, he was very much for what he called
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relentless diplomacy. north korea and iran, the two main issues that are coming up next month, he says he preferred a dramatic solution. up until the end. though democrats opposed him. they did manage to bring over six or seven of them to vote for him in the senate and so he has been confirmed, and straight out of the decade the plane to go to brussels for a nato foreign ministers meeting. what can we expect from him? he's talking about diplomacy. i think in terms of what he is going to be involved with with foreign—policy, north korea and iran will be on his agenda immediately because those things are coming up. i think it will continue to take lead on setting arrangements for the summit between kim jong—un and president trump. the arty have secret meeting earlier this month. he already goes with the fate of the iran nuclear deal. he doesn't like the deal at all and has been one of the deal at all and has been one of the strongest critics but he told senators he will be prepared to fix
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it rather than scrapping. i suspect he will be involved with the europeans were trying to negotiate something that mr trump could live with and then if he decides to abandon it anyway he will be very much involved and try to figure out what that means because there is no set formula on what it means for the us to pull out of an agreement that he signed. and also on his table, a big thing is to restore the state department after disastrous management of his predecessor rex tillerson. he has said that he wants to return or restore the slander to the state department. he is already looking at filling vacancies, many there. i think we will probably see a town hall meeting with state department employees in the coming days where he is going to speak to them and give him this vision and listen to their questions and try to convince them that he is on both sides. as always thank you very much. let's bring you up—to—date with some outside source business news. revenue at amazon has surged 43% to a whopping $51 billion. that is over the past three months. the firm has just released is over the past three months. the
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firm hasjust released its is over the past three months. the firm has just released its latest numbers. joe miller in new york has them for us. talk us through them. you may remember amazon has been in the headlines for all of the wrong reasons recently, as donald trump has gone afterjeff basils, the ceo of amazon saying that the book smaller retailers in the us out of business and take advantage of the us postal service and throughout all of that time amazon has remained quiet. this is possibly the best way he could respond, pump up profits, profits of 1.6 billion for the last three months, revenues of $51 billion, about the size of the entire economies of many small countries around the world. the good news for amazon's investors is that it is growing in all areas, sales are up, prime membership is up and crucially amazon web services which are the lesser—known part of the company would provide cloud services for businesses around the world, thatis for businesses around the world, that is up more than a0%, accounting for 10% of revenues and as a result the share prices of more than 7% in after—hours trading. amazon
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investors are very pleased indeed. yes indeed. let's go from new york to london. in fact to wembley stadium. as we know, it is known as the home of english football. shaheen khan has made a offer to the football association to buy the stadium. shaheen khan, many people among them. he is the owner of fulham football club, also the owner of the jacksonville jaguars, the nfl tea m of the jacksonville jaguars, the nfl team over in the us. according to the fulham manager, he has been interested in buying wembley stadium for quite some time, apparently speaking about it 18 months ago. if this deal does go ahead there are going to be summer vacations here. a lot of people are questioning whether this would mean that the jacksonville jaguars would them make their home base here at wembley. what that would mean for the england football team. what they can be kicked out of fear, for they then have to travel around the uk, good news for some and bad news for others. we have had a state
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government statement from him who said "we will take excellent care of when we stadium in every respect and at all times be good citizens and neighbors in london and beyond —— wimbley stadium". a spokesman from the fa also came forward saying that they have been given this offer. bbc sources as well finding out that the fa are planning to put any money from the sale back into grassroots football. as you can imagine a bit of skepticism around that. people questioning the fa already have a lot of money anyway and saying they haven't seen the money going to grassroots football yet. and of course the big question is if the sale does go forward, what is the stadium going to be called? studio: a stadium going to be called? srumo: a big stadium going to be called? studio: a big question indeed. we have talked a lot about president trump's frustration with the us trade deficit with china. he has proposed tariffs on 150 billion dollars worth of chinese goods. but a report from the beijing auto show, it is not just a report from the beijing auto show, it is notjust american and chinese firms which could be caught up in this trade spat.
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reporter: it is neither american or chinese, but bmw is worried about the prospect of a trade war across the prospect of a trade war across the pacific. in beijing this would get the annual show, it is launching a new electric suv. but it is the bmws that our ship in from abroad that are the worry. bmw's problem to be that it is kind of stuck in the middle. on the one hand it has a big manufacturing base here in china. but it also makes cars in the united states, tens of thousands of them that are exported here to china. and they could be hit with a big tariff hack. as a trumpet springing $150 billion worth of new tariffs. china plans to retaliate by targeting made in america cards. some of them bmws. so the firm has multibillion—dollar investments at stake. we are clearly invested as free trade because free trade creates wealth on both sides and that is what we stand for. trade barriers is definitely something
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which is impacting most economies, the export and the local economy. but we are clearly in favor of free trade and that has been our business model in the past and for the future. at the same time the big also firms are mulling over china's which to open up its markets. the government is ditching the 50% cap on foreign ownership. but is it too late? no. does the business is a lwa ys late? no. does the business is always going on. we always further developed. there is always the decision. and we're going to be doing planning for the next 5—10 yea rs. doing planning for the next 5—10 years. ending the capis of the president trump has called for. so will america's number two car—maker ta ke will america's number two car—maker take it vantage of the? no plans to do that. that is very early days. we only saw the announcement so you cannot say never say never about something like that. in fact ford is going the other way. it welcomes the opening up plan from president xi xinping but he wants is business or to become or chinese. and being an iconic american brand could prove a
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problem if the trade work it's going. the chinese government encourages consumers to stay away from anything from over there. robin brand, bbc news, beijing. studio:. forget you can get much more detail on our top stories on our website. including the latest on the news that the us comedian bill cosby the news that the us comedian bill cos by has the news that the us comedian bill cosby has been found guilty of three cou nts cosby has been found guilty of three counts of sexual assault. he faces up counts of sexual assault. he faces up to 30 years in prison. the world athletic body, the iaaf has announced new rules on middle—distance female after lisa witnessed nowell naturally high testosterone levels. the new rules mean women who have this condition need to either lower their blood testosterone level or choose to compete against men. here is the reaction of the iaaf president, sebastian coe, who explained that we have to choose pacification for our competition at men's events and women's event. this means we need to
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be clear about the competition criteria for these two categories. south african athlete is expected to be among those affected. we don't have a definite on the day that these new rules were announced. she tweeted the following" i'm 97% sure you don't mind me. i'm100% sure i don't care. also make of that what you well. here's the story. reporter matt what the iaaf have done is reagent used a lot that they first brought in in 2011. it was after cassel so burst onto the scene in 2009, she was 18 and became a world champion but there were room is about whether she had had to undergo about whether she had had to undergo a gender verification tests and her levels of testosterone. so the rule in 2011 words per day limit on the amount of naturally produced testosterone and female athletes across the board. i was challenged in 2015 by an indian sprinter. it was successful and the court for the sport said to the iaaf goalie we are suspending a ruling combat with scientific evidence which shows is
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that they do get an unfair advantage. the evidence was produced last year. and now the iaaf has said we are only going to focus on women, female athletes who compete in the middle distance events. so 400 meters, 1500 meters, 800 meters which is of course where she has won all of her global championships. from now on, orfrom novemberi should say, athletes who are considered to be in this bracket will be tested if the levels are too high they will be offered the chance that will be offered medication to bring those levels down. if they are choosing not to they will say they wa nt to choosing not to they will say they want to compete in international competitions or change events and maybe go to 5000 or 10,000 meters. or possibly compete against men. do we know how many women will be affected by this? difficult to tell. i have heard figures of 12, a few we re i have heard figures of 12, a few were mentioned by people who are putting them in purely speculative. we don't know because when athletes are asked to take this it is confidential. their names are not without their in the public. it has never been confirmed that she was
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forced to take this medication back in 2011. the authorities won't tell us. the only way we will find out is if athletes go public. we have also heard from the anc today from south africa who are very cross about this. they say the iaaf are unfairly targeting athletes from areas in south africa, asia and eastern europe. we don't know the identity of these athletes because of the reasons i have just of these athletes because of the reasons i havejust a claim. studio: think you to out there. we we re studio: think you to out there. we were speaking about brexit a little bit earlier in the programme. one place that we will be watching very closely over the course of britain's exit from the eu is gibraltar. this isa exit from the eu is gibraltar. this is a british territory on the southern tip of spain. it is only seven km square. it is heavily reliant on the flow of people and goods from spain. everyday 13,000 people crossed into gibraltar for work. it is known as the rock
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because its shape, it looms over the mediterranean. gibraltar has been bridges for more than 300 years, really caused by spain under the treaty back and 1730. —— 1713. ever since pain has been trying to regain sovereignty and brexit has given them some cause for concern. heavenly reports. reporter: there have been seven sets of negotiations between the british and spanish over gibraltar, over the past few months. the eu has given spaina past few months. the eu has given spain a voice in a debate of the future of gibraltar which ultimately can see the type of brexit gibraltar has. 32,000 people here, 13,000 coming through. if you look around this place you get a sense of the main street outside the government office, the pubs here, of real britishness. bodies on the beat with the old hats. the red royal mail post boxes as well. what's at spain says it is not pressing for reclaiming sovereignty. going back
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300 years. they are doing that for the channel of the un. they are saying that chiefly they want to jointly managed gibraltar airport and they want to have some of the terminal on the gibraltar side because they believe that that part is not, was not ceded to them 300 yea rs is not, was not ceded to them 300 years ago. studio: gave him a reporting. let's have a look at these eu guidelines. they say that there is no agreement between the eu and the uk applying to gibraltar without a separate agreement between spain and the uk. that has led to concern on the british side that this could amount toa british side that this could amount to a spanish veto over brexit. bbc reality chair have been looking more closely on how things like the future of the airport may play out as negotiations continue. spain says it doesn't intend to mix up the sovereignty dispute with the brexit process. but it does have some demands. most of all, it wants joint management with the uk of gibraltar
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airport, which as you can see it's right next to the spanish border. the airport has always been a focus of dispute, because spain says that unlike the rock land here was not transferred to bridges sovereignty backin transferred to bridges sovereignty back in 1713. joint management could also help in georgia brought to remains part of eu aviation agreements. —— could help ensure gibraltar. when does that bode to join sovereignty? the detention and one which used to really matter. spain also has other concerns, gibraltar‘s tax regime for a couple. corporation tax in spain is 25%. the gibraltar isjust10%. spain corporation tax in spain is 25%. the gibraltar is just 10%. spain says that it's not fair, it wants change. but again when does that become an issue of sovereignty? british as danish officials have been holding bilateral talks on gibraltar. —— british and danish officials. mps are watching very closely because without some kind of deal on gibraltar in the withdrawal agreement over brexit, this bridges overseas territory and not be
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included in the transition period after brexit. interrupting itself and in london, that wouldn't be acceptable. so the search for a solution on. thank you forjoining that. let's turn to facebook. its chief technology officer has been grilled by british mps, admitting that the company failed to read the terms and conditions of the app that improperly shared the data of millions of users for the lyrical consultancy firm cambridge analytica. in evidence, to british mps, facebook‘s chief technical officer said that the company was rolling on the technology to identify political ads on its news feed. let's have a listen. we think one of the best tools to work on this problem is to give everyone radical transparency on what is happening here. so one of the concerns that has been raised is whether food advertisers targeting
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just a segment of the audience and thatis just a segment of the audience and that is why literally injures you will be able to see for any advertiser the entire spectrum of ads they arriving at this time and who they are targeting. we are going further for political ads because we understand how important it is. we are releasing extensive information about those little glad, putting who they were trying to reach and how much they spent, how many times they we re much they spent, how many times they were viewed. very detailed information. mps accused the form of bullying the guardian newspaper when he fought the best informed the company of a data breach. here's what he said in reply to that. will you apologize for this bullying behavior? i am sorry that journalists feel that we are trying to prevent them from getting the truth out. that is not the intent. soiam truth out. that is not the intent. so i am sorry. the country on swaziland has been renamed. the change came last week on the 50th anniversary of the nation's autonomy. if you don't know it, it
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isa autonomy. if you don't know it, it is a small landlocked country that lies between south africa and mozambique. but with the citizens of what is one of the poorest countries in africa be any better off politically or economically with a new name? and travel to the capital to find out more. africa's last absolute martin id marks 50 years of independence. but only the elite are the ones celebrating. the tiny kingdom with a population of over1 million has not seen a civil war in over five decades. but it is certainly not peaceful. pro—democracy activists accuse the country of living a lavish lifestyle and showing very little concern for the poor. an allegation he denies. this is a show of force and a
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display of extravagant for a king who is often accused of being out of touch with his people. cell phone footage of where protests against worsening living conditions. the country's system of government has banned opposition political parties, but allows for a parliament to exist. a major concern for activists who faces sedition and terrorism charges for defining the kane. as puzzling remains a democratic it is becoming progressively and that about the policies that are supposed to emanate from parliament and from politicians are not coming. all this ina politicians are not coming. all this in a country where the king's word is the law. the wealth gap is significant and economic aspects remain sluggish. statistically if you're a small country and the
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shadow of a larger economy near you, you have to be seen to do better and more. we see countries attracting more. we see countries attracting more fight, attracting more investment. we are not seeing that in swaziland at the moment. it really just in swaziland at the moment. it reallyjust brought the backdrop of the horizon. two thirds of people with below the poverty line. but in rural areas, it is even worse. four times four were then those in the country's times four were then those in the cou ntry‘s few times four were then those in the country's few urban areas. translation: we have nothing here. the pension money is not enough for me to pay school fees for my children and look after the rest of my family. i would like the king and his government to do more for us. as they struggle to improve lives intensifies, it is hoped much more will be done to break the chain of intergenerational poverty. bbc news, back of it. now to a study
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that finds there may be as many as twice the number of guerrillas in west africa than previously thought, thatis west africa than previously thought, that is over 300,000. but 80% of them live outside protected areas. western lowland gorillas live in remote forests in cameroon, central african republic, equatorial guinea, congo and grandma gabor and looking at the report, it is found that despite the good news the guerrillas are still in danger of extension and is all due to guns, germs and trees. that means d4 station. a little earlier i spoke to her to find out more. these are the three big threats to the guerrillas. guns really m ea ns threats to the guerrillas. guns really means hunting, means poaching. germs is the ebola virus, which lingers in the forest and
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affects guerrillas from time to time, and when it does affect them they have big die off so they could lose whole populations. entries are the essential habitat in which they live. they need these very dense, remote intact forest in order to survive. tell us a little bit more. the scientists found these populations that they weren't expecting. that right. it is the biggest survey of its kind. they serve a thousands of kilometers, they look for gorilla nests and they did a lot of number crunching and kmart with these estimates which are possibly twice what we thought were there. a glimmer of hope for guerrillas. there is more out there. but the population still have been falling over the time they were surveyed. they are still critically endangered. they are very, very vulnerable to a number of threats. there's always a but. explain to us this decline. the big thing is that 80% of them are living outside
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national parks and unprotected areas. the key thing is to keep up anti—poaching efforts which really means having guards to deter poachers, is completely illegal to poachers, is completely illegal to poach guerrillas and also chimpanzees which are also studied in the survey. but it does happen. thenin in the survey. but it does happen. then in the long term, the big thing is protecting the forest. so you have got to have these remote forests. of course logging is going on. you can have gorillas and chimps living alongside if they are protected rapidly. that means leaving a lot of the trees, so any sort of culture where you are replacing the forest with palm oil or rubber means that you cannot have these charismatic animals as well. the problem here is that because these populations are found in these unprotected areas, then the scientists and experts will have to really look at those areas, too. the
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beauty of this sort of work is they actually now no more about where guerrillas are out there and how you can protect them because they looked at all sorts of threats and how close they were to roads and human habitation. really big study looking at all these different risk factors. so they have the evidence there to make the decisions on where to spend conservation resources. if you have got limited money to protect these animals, the best way to do it and to keep them. helen's article "guns, germs, trees" is on our website. of course you can get in touch. thank you for watching. bye—bye. hello there. a week ago we were basking in temperatures of 29 point for celsius. the warmest april day in 70 years. two and april it is
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looking rather chilly for the time of year. we have got some rain around, too. during friday the rain comes from this area of low pressure, approaching. west. that will be spreading out and patchy outbreak of rain across much of england and wales, moving its way from west to east. the heaviest of the rain for south wales from the southwest of england, cool and breezy here. for the far north of england, scotland and northern ireland a day of sunny spells and a few scattered showers. it will feel quite cool, temperatures of eight or 9 degrees. one or two areas getting up 9 degrees. one or two areas getting up to 12 or13 9 degrees. one or two areas getting up to 12 or 13 celsius. how is the weekend checking out? it is the mix of the showers —— sunshine and showers. for saturday, still quite cloudy across england and wales, particularly towards the east, and re m na nts of particularly towards the east, and remnants of a little patchy rain here. sunshine and a few scattered showers for the north and west. but in temperatures are going to struggle at around about 9—13d. through the weekend if we look at
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the jet stream we have got this big trough in the jet stream which is sitting across portugal and spain. that will push slightly louder and into the southeast but also bring a developing area of low pressure. heading for the latter half of the weekend, particularly later on sunday, an area of developing low pressure m oves sunday, an area of developing low pressure moves in from spain. across france towards the southeast of the uk. although for much of sunday we should have a largely try and somewhat cloudy day, whether in the day there will be a bricks of rain heading and initially to the southeast of england and east anglia. it will move its way further north. elsewhere not a bad day. a few sunny spells particularly towards the northwest, still. quite cool towards the northwest, still. quite cool. for the time of year. let's ta ke cool. for the time of year. let's take a look at the area of low pressure. sunday night into monday moves in across southeast england and east anglia absorbs the northeast of england. monday is a rather disappointing day for many eastern parts of england, notjust heavy rainfall that could cause flooding problems but also really strong and gusty, chilly winds, too.
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disappointing here away from southern and eastern parts, a little bit brighter. temperatures just around 9—12d. ahead into the early pa rt around 9—12d. ahead into the early part of may, we have still got an area of low pressure in the east but it does look like it eases away. a ridge of high pressure in charge for tuesday. quite a bit of dry, said weather on tuesday. the next front is waiting in the wings. and much improved today for central and southeastern parts of england on tuesday. temperatures returning to something a little more time of year. through the middle of next week, there will be a little rain moving from northwest tour the southeast. followed by sunshine and showers. and those temperatures will be on the rise, gradually. let's look at a couple of different weather forecasting and computer models. this is the european model, it shows a big area of high pressure. sitting right across the uk to end next week. quite a lot of dry and pretty warm weather, too. an optimistic computer model, this one.
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another computer model, the american gfs model. social high pressure but this time it is sitting across central parts of europe with laura pressure among them moving in from the atlantic towards the northwest of the uk. more isobars on the map, a windierand a of the uk. more isobars on the map, a windier and a more unsettled spell is likely, particularly towards the northwest. i will update you once again tomorrow. one of america's biggest tv stars, bill cosby, is found guilty of sexual assault. he was convicted on three counts, each could mean ten years in prison. bill cosby, three words for you. guilty, guilty, guilty! once affectionately known as america's dad, he was famed for his own hit show in the 1980's in which his victim appeared. some 60 woman have accused bill cosby of similar sexual offences going back decades. his lawyer says he'll appeal. also tonight.... the home secretary is to scrap immigration removal targets, the targets she claimed yesterday didn't exist.
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knife and gun attacks on the rise with violent crime in england and wales up by 21%.
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