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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 29, 2018 4:00pm-4:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm anita mcveigh. the headlines at lipm. labour's david lammy leads 200 mps, who've signed a letter, calling for government promises to windrush migrants to be written into law. south korea says kimjong—un has promised to close north korea's nuclear test site next month, and has invited the world to watch. in northern ireland, police have taken two wanted men back into custody, after they were found tied up on a bench in a county armagh village. also in the next hour, under attack from rising sea temperatures and pollution, australia is promising to spend £290 million to help restore and protect the great barrier reef. celtic win the scottish premiership, with a thumping 5—0 win over old rivals, rangers. and we look at the highlights of new york's tribeca film festival. that's in ‘talking movies‘, in half an hour. good afternoon, and
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welcome to bbc news. the former immigration minister, brandon lewis, is supporting a claim by the home secretary that she didn't know about home office targets for removing illegal immigrants. amber rudd told a commons committee earlier this week that she wasn't aware of the targets, then on friday said she hadn't seen an email lastjune, which gave details about the policy. she has resisted growing calls for her to resign. our political correspondent peter saull reports. another day, another cabinet minister leaping to the defence
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of the embattled home secretary. amber rudd denies reading a memo about the deportations of illegal immigrants. that memo was addressed to the then immigration minister. it was a memo to me. do you remember reading it? yes, i do actually. brandon lewis went on to say that he and amber rudd discussed an ambition rather than a target to increase the numbers. i was working through on a weekly basis to make sure that we were doing everything that we could, working with the police, working with local government, making sure that we were doing what we could to help vulnerable people, to crack down on criminals and to remove more people who were here illegally. yes, i did talk to the home secretary about that and the overall work that we were doing and the overall ambition to see an increase in numbers. last week, amber rudd told a commons committee that there were no targets at the home office. we do not have targets for removals. brandon lewis says she was being asked about regionalised internal targets that she wasn't aware of. but the chair of that committee, yvette cooper, has tweeted that that is clearly not true. meanwhile, more than 200 mps have signed a letter calling
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for assurances given to the windrush generation to be written into law. we have had a lot of nice words from the dispatch box but it means nothing if there aren't rights enshrined, in legislation and the best way to do that is with a quick statutory instrument in parliament. so people know what compensation they are getting, they know what the burden of proof is and they know that they won't be deported. the empire windrush... the windrush scandal has prompted some awkward questions for the conservative government. but a former liberal democrat minister thinks all the main parties share some responsibility. it goes back to new labour, i think the working assumption that successive governments have made is that the public out there are pretty bigoted, and they have got to be given red meat in the form of these very restrictive measures and it has done a lot of harm. i think the interesting thing about windrush, is that, perhaps for the first time, the public opinion has been ahead of the politicians in seeing that there is a terrible injustice. the home secretary has apologised several times in recent days,
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for the moment she appears safe in herjob. there will be more contrition when she returns to address the commons tomorrow. the north korean leader kimjong—un is reported to be promising to dismantle his country's nuclear test site next month, with international experts invited to ensure "tra nsparency". kimjong—un is said to have made the promise during friday's historic meeting with the south korean president, moonjae—in. from seoul, laura bicker, reports. as they celebrate their past, south koreans are trying to envisage a different future. their once threatening neighbour is now promising peace. but can kim jong—un be trusted? translation: i used to think of north korea negatively. little by little i realise that we are one people and i am touched by it.
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translation: our country is the only divided country in the world and it hurts me. i hope unification really happens. translation: this time, kim jong—un speaks with conviction i think this time it will be different. north korea has pledged to destroy its nuclear sites before. they even blew up a cooling tower in 2008, a gesture of goodwill. but secretly, they continued to build weapons. this time, they want to close this... the test site thought to be north korea's main to be north korea's main nuclearfacility. the last six nuclear tests were carried out here. they are prepared to let experts and the media witness the closure. some fear they are putting on a show. they are masters of propaganda. now is the time to put aside our emotions, collect ourselves and concentrate on the key task,
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which is dismantling north korea's weapons. kim jong—un is also turning back time, literally. in 2015, he changed pyongyang's clocks, and since then they have been half an hour behind seoul. korea will become one time zone again. changing the clocks is a huge symbolic gesture of unity. he has also told the south koreans that his weapons prove no threat to them or the united states. but it kind of misses the point. the us does not want them to have those weapons in the first place. south koreans have to wait and see if the us president can do a deal on denuclearisation. history has told them to be wary of the north, but there is hope here that this could be the start of a new era. police have taken two wanted
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men back into custody, after they were found tied up on a bench in a county armagh village. james white and alexis guesto were wanted for offences including a breach of their licences. images shared on social media appear to show them tied up and covered in paint. our correspondent in belfast, john campbell is following the story. well, the police public protection branch had issued an appeal for information about these two men, they have released their pictures, they had also given details of a car which was seen in the south armagh area. south armagh is a particular closely knit rural community. last night, police were called there to the village of mullaghbawn, and they found these two men tied to a bench, their hands bound with cable ties and paint poured over their heads in what was apparently a vigilante attack. a local councillor says that this incident was unfortunate but understandable, given that tensions have been running high in the area. the police say it is completely unacceptable, the two men had to be treated in hospital and they are now investigating an assault. rohingya refugees in bangladesh have been appealing to visiting un
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ambassadors to help them safely return home. a delegation from the un security council is visiting refugee camps in cox's bazar, home to nearly 700,000 rohingyas, who've fled violence in myanmar. their tour comes amid warnings that the coming monsoon season could worsen conditions in the camps. nick beake reports. a breakfrom the misery of life in the biggest refugee camp in the world. hundreds of rohingya people gathered to greet the un delegation. translation: we are standing here to demand justice as the myanmar military have killed our men and tortured women. this is what she's talking about. the burmese military and buddhist
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mobs torched rohingya villages year and forced muslims to flee for their lives. it is not known how many exactly were murdered before they could escape. now in camps across the border in bangladesh, the survivors have placards but not much else. the security council says it wants to help the authorities here prepare for the imminent monsoon season. and try to find a way for refugees to return safely to myanmar, if, indeed, any want to. tomorrow, the delegation will leave bangladesh and fly to myanmar. the leader has been widely criticised for not doing more to protect the rohingya. the burmese army has always claimed it did not target these people but was rooting out terrorists. but many believe this is the face of a crime against humanity. the former speaker of the house of commons, lord martin
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of springburn, has died. his son confirmed the 72—year—old passed away this morning, after a short illness. he was speaker from 2000 until he was forced to step down following his handling of the mps expenses scandal in 2009, the first speaker to do so in 300 years. the eu's chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier, has said the time has come for the uk to "resolve the contradictions" in its irish border policy. mr barnier was writing in ireland's sunday independent newspaper, ahead of a visit to the country tomorrow. he said there needed to be "substantial progress" on the issue by the next meeting of eu leaders, in june. an 18—year—old man has been arrested after four people were taken to hospital — two with potentially ‘life changing' injuries — following a collision in newport. a police cordon has been set up in the city centre after the incident at about 5.30 this morning. a car was found burned out in a nearby street, a short time afterwards.
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our correspondent nicola smith has the latest from the scene. well, this is a really busy part of newport city centre, and this road behind me is lined with bars and nightclubs, so in the early hours of any saturday or sunday morning commute can imagine that it is lined with people out social eyes in, and that was the scene in the early hours of this morning, where at around 5:30am, emergency services we re around 5:30am, emergency services were called to reports that a car driven through a group of pedestrians. four people were injured, three women and one man, and we understand that two of the women have received potentially life changing injuries. as you can imagine, eyewitnesses say that it was a pretty busy scene here, with plenty of emergency services vehicles trying to help out people involved. now, police have sent specialist crime teams to the scene, crime scene officers have been here this morning, sorting through the debris that has been left behind. but officers are very keen to point
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out that they do not believe that this incident is terror related, and they have arrested an 18—year—old man from newport on suspicion of causing injury by dangerous driving. they say investigations are ongoing. australia is promising to spend £290 million to help restore and protect the great barrier reef. the world's largest reef system has been damaged by warming sea temperatures, which have bleached large swathes of coral in recent years, as well as pollution and run—off of pesticides and fertilisers from farms. phil mercer reports from sydney. the great barrier reef is australia's greatest natural treasure, but this listed wonderland is under siege. the two years running it was hit by major coral bleaching, which scientists blame on higher sea temperatures. these
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starfish predators will be targeted by the new multi—million dollar plan to revive and restore the reef. farmers near the queensland coast will be in courage to change their ways, to reduce the flow of fertilisers and pesticides into the sea. it's part of a pledge that the australian government says is the single largest investment ever in the great barrier reef. will be also providing money for scientific research, particularly to build more resilient coral, st louis heat stress and light stress. and this is $100 million for these activities. we'll be putting money towards better data management so that we understand better what is happening in the reef, so we can deal with the challenges. we'll be spending money, in terms of working with local indigenous communities, the traditional owners who have such a big role to play. ministers say there will be efforts to mitigate there will be efforts to mitigate the effects of climate change, but
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they gave no specific details. critics accuse them of being hopelessly unable to tackle the climate emergency facing this underwater paradise that snakes down north—eastern australia. the government in canberra has previously set an ambitious target to cut the nation's emissions by 2030. this is a country heavily dependent on is cheap supplies of coal for its power. dependent on is cheap supplies of coalfor its power. conservationists argue that until this reliance on fossil fuels is argue that until this reliance on fossilfuels is broken, there can be no real hope of preserving the great barrier reef. phil mercer, bbc news, sydney. the headlines on bbc news: labour's david lammy leads 200 mps who've signed a letter calling for for government promises to windrush migrants to be written into law. south korea says kimjong—un has promised to close north korea's nuclear test site next month — and has invited the world to watch. in northern ireland, police have taken two wanted men back into custody, after they were found
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tied up on a bench in a county armagh village. sport now, and for a full round—up, celtic and all of the rest of the day's sporting news... yes, absolutely, starting with celtic because they are celebrating winning a seventh successive scottish premiership title today, and they did it in style by thrashing their rivals, rangers 5—0. brendan rodgers's side are now looking to make history by winning back—to—back trebles. today's when over rangers means they only need to win the scottish cup final to make history. celtic, champions for the seventh time. city already premier league champions, and they now have in their sights. after leroy sane scored city's first after 13 minutes, it was a declan risse own
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goal that gave city a 2—0 lead, continuing a bad afternoon for david moyes's side, although they did get one back. a cracking goalfrom arron swell, to give them some kind of hope. but city continued scoring, fernandinho adding their fourth of the day, and that was their 102nd league goal of the campaign. west ham are now, though, just three points above the relegation zone. united take on arsenal a little later on. chris como has been released from his contract as the sunderland manager. coleman joined the club last november but was unable to stop them going down to league 1. a second successive relegation. owner ellis short has also confirmed he has agreed a deal to sell the club to an international consortium of football investors, led by the ec chairman stuart donald who will take over sunderland subject to efl approval. manchester city's hopes of reaching the women's champions league final had been dashed after a 1—0 defeat to the
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defending champions, lyon, having kept a clean sheet in the first leg, city new one away goal could see them go through to the final in kl. u nfortu nately was them go through to the final in kl. unfortunately was their former player lucy bronze who got the chance in the first half, a stunning volley from her. despite needing just one goal to go through, city could not find the net and they are out of the competition at the semifinal stage for the second consecutive season. semifinal stage for the second consecutive season. today i thought again defensively we were superb, but we just couldn't manage to create a moment like they did, and fair play to lucy, putting that in the back of the net. she scores a few wonder goals and i was hoping she would get one against us but i am proud of all the girls in the tea m am proud of all the girls in the team because we are a young, inexperienced team but we gave it everything over two legs. you can watch that on the bbc red
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button. lewis hamilton has won the first grand prix of the formula 1 season, it was handed victory with relapsed to go in a chaotic azerbaijan grand prix in which both red bull cars sensationally collided with each other. hamilton had taken over vettel, but thou to read to sue was on course to win suffered a puncture, that opened up the pathway for hamilton to take the chequered flag. we are coming to the end of by flag. we are coming to the end of rugby union's english premiership season with the play—off places still to be decided. london irish‘s relegation to the championship was confirmed yesterday, and taking on second placed saracens, who are leading that game 16—14 at the moment. the dictionary for saracens would guarantee them a home semifinal in the end of season play—offs, and in the afternoon's other game, third placed wasps are beating southampton, 21—17. judd
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trump has been in second—round action against ricky walden. trump was trailing 3—1 at one point but came back to win the final frame of the morning session to level at 4—4. they will resume play at seven o'clock this evening, as will anotherformer o'clock this evening, as will another former finalist, o'clock this evening, as will anotherformerfinalist, ding junhul anotherformerfinalist, ding junhui. he won all frames against anthony mcgill, for a place in the quarterfinals. that one still going on. and we have a look at the live pictures, john higgins has booked his place into the next round this afternoon, by beating jack casale ski 13-1. afternoon, by beating jack casale ski 13—1. the other match of the afternoon, mark williams is leading robert wilkins seven frames to five. all of that is on the bbc sport website. that is all the sport for now, we will have plenty more for you at around 5:30pm. they discussed the importance of the
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iran nuclear deal as the best way of neutralising the threat of the nuclear armed iran, agreeing the priority of the international community remain preventing iran from developing a nuclear weapons. the european leaders talks came as michael pompeo also reiterated america's determination to prevent the iranians ever getting a nuclear weapons. on his first visit to the middle east, mr pompeo said tehran had suffered dunn —— iran had suffered worse behaviour. iran has only behaved worst since the deal was approved. in yemen, iran continues to support the violent to the rebels by providing military equipment, funding and training. this is in violation of the un security council conditions. they continue to fire muscles and to
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saudi arabia on a regular basis, threatening the saudi people. while we will continue to assist saudi arabia with its defence needs and support its right to defend its own borders, a political solution is the only way to advance long—term stability in yemen, and end the suffering. earlier i stability in yemen, and end the suffering. earlierl spoke stability in yemen, and end the suffering. earlier i spoke to our middle east analyst, alanjohnson. in terms of the diversions of view in iran, we saw that play out when president macron was in washington just a few days ago. it is the view of president trump that the iran nuclear deal is in his view the worse the us ever struck. the iranians get away with far too much. the line for mr macron and mrs may and mrs merkel of germany is that we need to keep the deal as is, but you need to keep the deal as is, but you need to keep the deal as is, but you need to take into account the
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american concerns, they need to broaden the deal, enhance it if you like, renegotiate with the iranians, add in measures to rein in iranian influence across the middle east, rein in their ballistic missile programme, and so rein in their ballistic missile programme, and so on. rein in their ballistic missile programme, and so on. so we keep seeing this thai virgins between the americans and europeans. the americans and europeans. the americans feeling the deal is way short of what we want, european saint let's keep it that enhances colour broaden it, if you like. michael pompeo was also talking about gulf unity, what is that about? yes, it might sound a bit bland and diplomatic, but delivered by the new us secretary of state, and delivered in riyadh, in particular, it carries some weight. this was a reference to a very long running now and damaging dispute between the gulf state of qatar and
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its neighbours, saudi arabia and other neighbours, accusing the qataris le sommer being too close to iran, or supporting jihad groups across the middle east, and they are very traumatically isolated, qatar. now the americans have wearied of this, they don't like to see that sort of division in the ranks of their allies in the middle east. they are allies of course of saudi arabia, they have a major military base in qatar, and they want to see it coming together, that rift being healed. if that was to happen, there would have to be a degree of compromise, climbing down, loss of face, perhaps, on the part of the saudis, a concession that they couldn'tjust saudis, a concession that they couldn't just overwhelmed their neighbours diplomatically. no sign whatsoever of the moment that the saudis are prepared to go in that direction, but they may come under more pressure now that mr pompeo has a this out. mr pompeo has arrived in israel, what is on the agenda for the talks there? benjamin netanyahu,
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the talks there? benjamin netanyahu, the israeli prime minister, has long railed against the iran nuclear deal. just two weeks away from president trump walking away from that deal, and the iranians will see the hawkish new secretary of state, mr pompeo, as being basically kind of figure they were about to see driving forward a tougher line. we will have the weather forecast and just a couple of minutes, but first... gaming is big business — it's creating a new wave of celebrities and it's even been tipped as a new olympic sport. now, a 13—year—old from kent has become one of the world's youngest professional gamers. kyle jackson has become so good at the game fortnite that he could start earning serious money. joe lynam went to meet him. for many of us, fortnight is the length of time you spend on your holidays every summer but for millions of young people it is the hottest video game on the planet right now, and for this 13—year—old, it is potentially a lucrative former career. kyle jackson is so good at
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fortnite, he has been signed to play with a team of professional gamers. so how did he start?|j with a team of professional gamers. so how did he start? i played video games all my life basically. i started playing competitively when i was around nine or ten. i got into, like, halo, call of due to, things like, halo, call of due to, things like that, and i realised that i could probably go to a pro—level if i keep playing at the level i am at that age. gaming is no joke. it's a big business. thousands of people pay to watch experts play around the world. there are even celebrities. it is becoming a multibillion—dollar industry. just games, production of games, publishing of games and the east sportscene. so it is notjust one thing now, it is a whole industry. in the game you need materials to build. kyle hasn't been paid anything yet and can't of course have a job until he is 16 at least, and to those parents who
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suspect his schoolwork might be suffering, kyle is reassuring. at school i am doing very well in pretty much every subject, so they are not pretty much every subject, so they a re not really pretty much every subject, so they are not really worried about me playing as much as i do. i still have time to study, revise, stuff like that i still have time to do. for now, kyle is doing what millions of boys dream of, playing games and potentially making money for doing so. joe lynam, bbc news. let's have a look at the weather with lucy martin. some very wet and windy weather on the way to start the week the south—east england, east anglia, parts of east anglia seeing over a months worth of rain in 2a hours. today there has been some brightness, sunny spells, the best of those the further north and west you are, this in inverness. cloudy skies the central and eastern england. that wet and windy weather is courtesy of this low—pressure system coming up from the south. it
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will bring with it some heavy rain, and we are looking at strong winds as well. so heavy rain, strong winds, there is potentialfor some disruption to travel, also the possibility of some localised flooding, so stay tuned to your local forecast, particularly through tomorrow morning. through tonight, that rain pressure to twain north and west into south—east england, east anglia, some heavy bursts perhaps falling as low over high ground, and we will see the win strengthening, some coastal gales by the early hours. away from that it will be drier and with clear prescription eyes, a chilly night, temperatures falling below freezing, a touch of frost to start the day tomorrow. scotland, northern ireland, wales and the south of england seeing a chilly but bright start to the day. over in the south and east it will be wet and windy. we are looking at a gusty wind, over 50 mph in a few spots possible, and that heavy rain will work its way north and west as we move through the day, gradually pushing into the east midlands, part of yorkshire and
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lincolnshire as we move through the day. it could fall as sleet or snow over high ground but i don't think it is likely to settle. temperatures really struggling, highs of six celsius in norwich. away from that where it is drier and brighter with some sunny where it is drier and brighter with some sunny spells, highs of around 14 some sunny spells, highs of around 1a celsius. as we move through monday night into tuesday, that area of low— pressure monday night into tuesday, that area of low—pressure clears off, a brief ridge of high pressure, many of our seeing some dry and wet weather but not long before that next area of rain moves into the west. so we start of tuesday with some light rain and drizzle over in the east which will clear away quite quickly, brightening upwards and spun sunny spells but the next weather front with some wet and windy weather for northern ireland and western parts of scotla nd northern ireland and western parts of scotland as we move through the day. temperatures in the south—east matchup on what we are looking at the monday, a maximum of 1a celsius. that's your forecast. this is bbc news, our latest headlines: more than 200 mps have signed a letter coordinated by labour
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backbencher david lammy, sent to the prime minister, calling for government promises to windrush migrants to be written into law. south korea says kimjong—un has promised to close north korea's nuclear test site next month and has invited the world to watch. in northern ireland, police have taken two wanted men back into custody after they were found tied up on a bench in a county armagh village. rohingya refugees in bangladesh have been appealing to visiting un ambassadors to help them safely return home. a delegation from the un security council is visiting refugee camps in cox's bazar.
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