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tv   Meet the Author  BBC News  April 29, 2018 10:45pm-11:01pm BST

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remember every time theresa may has moved ministers around the hassle was binder calculation who was on the remaining side in the referendum and who was on the brexit side. amber rudd was a powerful remain voice in the department, cabinet and her departure will upset the balance and put a seniorfigure on her departure will upset the balance and put a senior figure on the backbenches who was on that side of the argument. the second very important factor here is while amber rudd was in place at the home office she was answering for the mistakes that were made over the windrush generation and this recent confusion of immigration. but who was in charge at the home office before amber rudd took up her position there? the prime minister herself, of course, theresa may. labour has suggested in recent days that amber rudd was somehow protecting her as a human shield, which was denied by the government but now amber rudd has gone from thatjob it may well be that the opposition parties try to point the criticism over this whole issue more pointedly at the
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prime minister herself. that is laura kuenssberg, our political editor. i'm joined again byjohn rentoul of the independent, chief political commentator and ruth lea, who is an economist and former civil servant, so insight on what goes on into those great departments of state. to pick up on what laura said about the prime minister's raul, on friday, full confidence, tonight accepting the resignation of the home secretary —— the prime minister's role. does this make her look more fragile, vulnerable or error—prone? look more fragile, vulnerable or error-prone? i think it does and it isa error-prone? i think it does and it is a problem, especially as it is ha rd to is a problem, especially as it is hard to understand what it was that meant amber rudd had to go, apart from saying the wrong thing. i mean, she obviously shouldn't have said that there are no targets in the home office. should fail to correct that —— she failed to correct that over several days of intense pressure but it is still not obvious
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why they should be resigning matter. she should have just said no why they should be resigning matter. she should havejust said no i will not accept your resignation? we do not accept your resignation? we do not know what has gone on behind the scenes. there may be something else, there may be some other documents that have come to light that make amber rudd's position untenable, but isimply do amber rudd's position untenable, but i simply do not see why personally. i agree with ruth, i think if she has been got out by civil service lea ks than i has been got out by civil service leaks than i think that is a terrible precedent to establish. ruth, what is your view on where the prime minister stands this evening at the end of these several days of toing and froing and pushing and pulling? she must have been aware that amber rudd was under terrific pressure and the indecision and the toing and froing on policy did not make the government look good, it certainly didn't make the home office look good and by extension it didn't make the government look good. i'm sure she will regret losing amber rudd, and in a way, the sooner
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losing amber rudd, and in a way, the sooner she can put in a new home secretary the better. we have mentioned james brokenshire. if for some reason she put james brokenshire into place she could slot him in without any other disruptions to the ministerial team, either at cabinet level or minister of state—level, which strikes me as probably a better option than having to reshuffle everybody all over again. he has experience as well. what do you think because you mentioned, as sebastian did, michael gove or sajid javid? what you think ofjames gove or sajid javid? what you think of james brokenshire's name gove or sajid javid? what you think ofjames brokenshire's name in the frame? he has experience as an immigration minister. he was in the department. yes commanders ruth said he could be slotted in because he came straight out of the cabinet to deal with his cancer. if that is now on the mend he could come straight backin on the mend he could come straight back in and that would be a straight swap. you could see how that would be attractive. i suppose stepping
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back from this particular row and looking at where the cavernous stands at the moment, it is under enormous sustained pressure as a team. they are because they face the most difficult phase of the brexit negotiations because they have actually got to negotiate a treaty thatis actually got to negotiate a treaty that is going to set out the basics of our relationship with the eu and they haven't reached a common position yet. so the tensions are going to be quite heavy over the next few months. we have talked about the pressures and tensions between civil servants, possibly, and a minister who has now resigned as secretary of state in the home office. but then we have also heard over the weekend of the tensions between the brexit secretary and civil servants on brexit issues. sir david davis and olly robbins. olly robbins was wedded to the idea of a customs partnership which is not quite a customs union but not a technical solution either, which the
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eu, never mind anybody else, have said is completely unworkable, but there we go. how much of this is true and how much is dreamt up by the papers, who knows? there were rumours today that david davis was threatening to resign, i do believe this for a second. i think he's going to push this through. i agree withjohn, there is no doubt the brexit negotiations are at a sensitive stage, not least because of the recitation of the idea of staying in a customs union, which seems to appeal to people, not least of all their lordships, which is incredibly regrettable. the important thing is it appeals to the house of commons as well, there is a majority in the house of commons for that. that is theresa may's insuperable obstacle of the next few months. it was discussed last week, the liaison committee debate. the capanagh the liaison committee debate. the ca pa nagh hasn't discussed the liaison committee debate. the capanagh hasn't discussed it, that's the... stepping back from the issue, the... stepping back from the issue, the individual at the heart of the issue —— the cabinet hasn't
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discussed it. as a politician she was one of the bright stars of the conservative party. and one of the leading lights of the remain campaign. and then she was theresa may's substitute in the election campaign. she is a politician who was quite fearless, and has, you know, acquitted herself extremely well in many respects. but obviously, running a huge department, a huge dysfunctional department, a huge dysfunctional department like the home office has proved too much for her. is this too much for ever, is this the end of that political career? as she goes back to the backbenches, or is it a timeout and she would return? who knows? i do think she is talented andl knows? i do think she is talented and i rememberthere knows? i do think she is talented and i remember there was that question time debate prior to the la st question time debate prior to the last general election and at the la st last general election and at the last minute jeremy corbyn turned up. but theresa may said she wasn't turning up, so who turned up? amber rudd. i thought she acquitted herself extremely well that night
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because she was in an extremely difficult position, there were four or five left—wing parties versus her and ukip, and she acquitted herself very well and i was impressed by that. she is a talented politician. i'm not to say whether she will come back or not,... but it is no bar to coming back? looking at decades of government ministers, the kind of episode we have seen over the last few days is not the end of somebody‘s career necessarily. few days is not the end of somebody's career necessarily. no, and especially as it's still not clear what she has done wrong and whether what she has done wrong was a terrible offence or not will stop david blunkett came back. another troubled home secretary. peter mandelson was there twice, three times, sorry, iforgot. one thing we have not discussed in all of this yet is whether the home office is fit for purpose and manageable at
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the scale it is by one individual taking responsibility. john reid thought not, think john taking responsibility. john reid thought not, thinkjohn reid said the department was not fit for purpose but quite honestly it is a huge department and has huge responsibilities, as i think people have been saying tonight, there are security issues as well. the home secretary should be able to cope with it provided it is a functioning department. as john already implied, the implication is it is part dysfunctional which i think is extremely worrying. what is the permanent secretary doing, i don't know? i thought john reid who split the home office into the home office and separate justice the home office into the home office and separatejustice department, had laid the basis for sorting it out but that was more than ten years ago and it is still dysfunctional. the difficult bits were left with the home office. yeah. what's the answer? get a decent civil service,
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i suggest. that is a big challenge. i thought you would say get a decent home secretary but it has come round to the home, civil service. home secretary but it has come round to the home, civil servicelj home secretary but it has come round to the home, civil service. i wonder what the permanent secretaries doing, i don't know, i will probably get nasty letters in the morning for saying things like that but it seems somehow the civil service machine is not working as it should do and we have talked about the leaks already which is egregious, but i think the machine itself isn't functioning properly. for anybody knew in the job, theresa may, she is the one with the experience to handle this,... perhaps she should be sent back to sort it out, she's the only one who managed that department for that period of time. damian green... the speculation about names cannot draw us away from the underlying point the government has lost a home secretary, as we have been saying all evening, one of the great offices of state, amber rudd has
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gone, the prime minister accepted her resignation, probably just gone, the prime minister accepted her resignation, probablyjust over an hour ago. we will have more on that in the course of the next hour. thank you, john thank you, ruth, we will come back for more later but for now we can look at the weather with chris. we are going to focus on the weather in eastern england because tomorrow is going to be a miserable day. how miserable? wet weather comes in, gale force winds around eastern coasts and it will feel cold for the time of year. normally across south—east england will expect temperatures of around 15 degrees this time of year but tomorrow they will be large stretches of the day where temperatures struggle around three or 4 degrees, adding into that they will be strong winds making it feel even colder sow winter coats at the ready. this weekend the pressure has been rising across scotland and as this area of low pressure moves
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northwards through france it is that that pinches together the isobars and rings the strong winds and wet weather working across east anglia and south—east england. further north and west, clearing skies overnight allows things to get chilly once again, while patches of frost, not just in chilly once again, while patches of frost, notjust in the countryside, might get down to zero around edinburgh too. on monday we have windy conditions with gales around eastern coastal areas and heavy rain working in as well. this time yesterday i was suggesting the rain could be further east than we were predicting yesterday and it is, it is 100 miles further east and that trend could continue, so the likely areas to see the heavy rain will be across east anglia and south—east england, where some areas pick up 25-30 england, where some areas pick up 25—30 millimetres of rain but with up 25—30 millimetres of rain but with up to 80 in places and bearing in mind we have had a month's worth of rain so far it is going to work out to bea rain so far it is going to work out to be a very wet month and those temperatures struggle to rise too. north—west of the uk, sunny spells,
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temperatures in double figures. on tuesday the low pressure is still with us but the rain band will be weakening, the last of the ring clearing up through the morning. the pressure then rises and we should see sunshine in scotland, england and wales but then the atlantic weather front moves on to northern ireland and western scotland to bring afternoon rain. that band of rain will push eastwards through tuesday evening and overnight and on wednesday it will slowly clear away from eastern england, sunshine will follow and some showers, we do not need to worry about snow in the showers but there will be heavy and thundery ones coming through and temperatures continue to rise a bit but still par for the time of year, highs between 11 and 1a. this is bbc news. the headlines at 11. amber rudd resigns as home secretary in the wake of the windsrush migration scandal. ms rudd has been under pressure to quit after facing criticism over the existence of home office removals targets and her knowledge of them.
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north korea's leader promises to close its main nuclear test site and invites the world to watch — according to south korea. police in south wales arrest an 18—year—old man after a car collided with a group of people outside a popular clubbing area in newport. australia promises to spend £290 million on restoring and preserving the great barrier reef.
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