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tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  April 30, 2018 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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you're watching beyond 100 days. the hawks are circling on the iran nuclear deal. and now the israeli prime minister is giving those who oppose it a reason to withdraw. benjamin netenyahu says his government has new and conclusive proof the iranian government has been secretly developing a nuclear weapons programme. incriminating presentations, incriminating blueprints, incriminating photos, incriminating videos. and more. britain appoints its first muslim home secretary. sajid javid says hisjob is to make sure the uk's immigration system is fair and decent. also on the programme... the fate of a caravan of migrants seeking asylum in the us remains in limbo, as dozens are stopped by authorities at the mexico border. good evening. here we are... the comedian who skewered sarah sanders at the white house correspondents‘ dinner, causing outrage and praise. get in touch with us using the hashtag... #beyond100days.
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hello and welcome — i'm christian fraser in london, jane o'brien is in washington. the past hour, israel has set out what it says is new and conclusive proof that iran has a nuclear weapons programme. prime minister benjamin netenyahu said 55,000 pages of material, stolen from tehran by israel intelligence agents, showed iran had been deceiving the world since signing the nuclear deal in 2015. the new secretary of state, mike pompeo, who is in the middle east on his first trip abroad, has been briefed on the intelligence. donald trump must decide before a may 12th deadline whether or not to stick with the deal. iran's supreme leader, ayatollah khamenei, has accused the us and israel of trying to stoke a crisis in the middle east. mr netanyahu has now claimed that iran lied about not pursuing nuclear weapons.
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here's a little of what he had to say a short time ago. well, tonight, i'm here to tell you one thing. iran lied. big—time. after signing the nuclear deal in 2015, iran intensified its efforts to hide its secret nuclear files. in 2017, iran moved its nuclear weapons files to a highly secret location in tehran. joining us now is pj crowley, a former state department administrator. thank you very much indeed forjoining me. there is clearly no ambiguity about what mister neta nyahu believes clearly no ambiguity about what mister netanyahu believes iran is up to. but do you believe he has made a convincing case for donald trump to leave the rangel? i think he is leaving no stone unturned, pending
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the decision next week. john bolton suggested the on the sunday shows that no decision has been made. so you have benjamin netanyahu, not surprisingly, saying it is a bad deal. he failed in that regard to help block the original deal. he now has a second shot at it and he hopes his friend donald trump will follow through. it's such a contrast to president emmanuel macron from france, who was herejust last president emmanuel macron from france, who was here just last week. he seemed pretty convinced he had convinced donald trump to stay in the deal, a third way. that's what we don't know. 0bviously, president macron and chancellor merkel both showed that they have responded to the process that donald trump laid out. the question is, will donald trump take yes for an answer? the substance will say that there is something to continue to bear suit. politics would say, since he said we re politics would say, since he said were still ever, that the politics would say he will withdraw from the deal. we will find out next week.
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people are saying that this big reveal that mister neta nyahu people are saying that this big reveal that mister netanyahu has put out there have been published and reports dating back year. the issue it seems to me is that back in 2015 when negotiating the deal, for it to go forward, iran had to disclose the information it had. we'll have to see whether these files that mister netanyahu see whether these files that mister neta nyahu is published see whether these files that mister netanyahu is published today, whether or not that was put forward to the international community. clearly israel is trying to say, no, they didn't. i don't think there is a secret here that iran knows how to build a nuclear weapon. the present time, they have stayed short of point. and that's what this is all about. keeping iran from crossing the nuclear threshold, in contrast to north korea. i don't think there is much different here. it reinforces that neta nyahu is much different here. it reinforces that netanyahu has never beenin reinforces that netanyahu has never
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been in favour of the iran nuclear deal and is trying to lobby the trump administration to follow through its threats. if it is as comprehensive as mister martin who says, —— as mister netanyahu says, presumably there are other securitas rides in the country that would enable them to restart this nuclear programme if mist trump portability of it. that's a conundrum. mr trump reinforce the other day, i'm going to make sure iran never gets a nuclear weapons. by every indication, including from mike pompeo, there was acknowledgement that up to this point, iran is following through from the agreement and its requirements. president trump has actually been out talking about this deal, saying he has not made a decision yet. but if he does pelleted this point, at a critical juncture with north korea on the table, what would that say to kim jong un? i mean, there is such a
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profound lack of mistrust between the united states and north korea already. just as there was between the native states and iran. —— between the us and iran. i am not sure that that will make a meaningful difference, but the task, obviously, is so much harder with respect to north korea because it has a significantly mature nuclear programme, certainly in contrast to iran and libya.john programme, certainly in contrast to iran and libya. john bolton brought up iran and libya. john bolton brought up media as being a model, but i think the price is going to be much higher when you try to figure out what combination of inducements you can put together that will impel kim jong unto give up this capability. thank you very much indeed for joining me. you're quite welcome. the president has been giving a
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press co nfe re nce the president has been giving a press conference in the white house rose garden and talking about iran. let's listen to what he had to say. prime minister netanyahu just gave a very... i don't not everybody has seen very... i don't not everybody has seen this, but i saw little bit of it. that is just not unacceptable situation. —— just not an acceptable situation. —— just not an acceptable situation. they have been setting of missiles which they say is for television purposes. i don't think so. television purposes. i don't think so. we'll see what happens. i would tell you what i'm doing. a lot of people think they know. before the 12, we will make a decision. that was president trump in the rose garden. merry... you go, christian! staying with the immigration fame... staying with the immigration theme, scores of latin american migrants travelling to seek asylum in the united states have been stopped at the border. the group set off from southern mexico just over a month ago. president trump has said they are a threat to us safety.
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if they make it across the border, they're likely to face many months in detention while their cases are considered by the courts. james cook is on the mexican side of the border and sent us this report. they came to the border on the beach to drown out the words of donald trump. supporters of the migrant caravan insisting on compassion, not hostility, at the sea—washed gates of the world's most powerful nation. well, these people have gathered both on the american side of the border and here, on the mexican side. and they've come to stand, they say, in solidarity with the migrants who have been making their way up through mexico for the past month, and who, very soon, face the decision as to whether to claim asylum in the united states. theirjourney through mexico has been arduous, and such a long journey, more than a month on the rails and on the roads.
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they say they're escaping persecution in central america. this mother says she fled guatemala with her two—year—old son because she feared the boy's father was going to kill him. translation: it was hard. we suffered on the way. we came across good people, and bad people. thank god we're here. many people supported us, have helped us. but it hurts to leave my country. translation: we had to bury some of our relatives before we left. my father was one of them. he was tortured. many people think we left because we are criminals. we're not criminals. we're people living in fear in our countries. all we want is a place
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where our children can run free. are you watching that mess that's going on right now with the caravan coming up? president trump says the caravan is linked to crime and drugs, and must be stopped. and if we don't get border security, we'll have no choice. we'll close down the country. because we need border security. defiant, desperate, they pushed on anyway. but at the border they were told there was no room to process their claims. and so, this day on the road ended like so many others, with nothing more than american dreams. james cook, bbc news, on the us—mexico border. well, this is what president trump has just said in the last few minutes on immigration. 0ur immigration laws in this country
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are total disaster. they are laughed at all over the world. they are laughed at for their stupidity. and we have to have strong immigration laws. so i think if i apologise, it would not make 10 cents worth of difference to them. there is nothing to apologise for. we have to have strong immigration laws to protect your country. let's discuss this with ron christie, who served in the george w bush administration. he is in san francisco. ron, this caravan was supposed to galvanise the left. it seems to have galvanised the conservative element of the country more. as it backfired? i don't think it has. this is about the solvency of the us. it is important for us to have laws for those who come here to respect them. this group of largely onjune, respect them. this group of largely on june, they say that they are fleeing their country. in order to
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come here legally and seek asylum, one must be either fleeing from political persecution or from torture. it remains to be seen whether those two elements will have been met and our border officials will look closely at those people seeking asylum. two thirds of americans want comprehensive immigration reform. why is this still such a problem on this side of the atlantic and in britain?” still such a problem on this side of the atlantic and in britain? i think people are really trying to get a sense of what it means to be a national sovereign. what does it mean to be a member of the uk? what does it mean to be an american citizen? and there are some who think the united states should allow all those who seek asylum in our country to be able to come here. 0thers country to be able to come here. others say, wait a second, what is american citizenship stand four if it stands for nothing at all? how much of an issue is this going to be in the midterms? i think a pretty significant one. there are a lot of people on the conservative side
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saying the democrats are in favour of open borders. a lot of democrats, the progressive elements in our country, from a political standpoint, will see the republicans are racist and xenophobic. it will give both sides an opportunity to raise a lot of money. not heard the last of immigration as an issue in the united states for quite sometime. what part of the debate, and it is a debate that is very much in play in the uk, it is how you harden up immigration policy. that's what people want. 0n the doorsteps, they want to get rid of illegal immigrant is but how do that by protecting, at the same time, those who have every right to stay in the united states? good to see you, christian. this is a very difficult issue. you have to look at united states innocents dumb accident and is who have been swept up in this. —— eat united states citizens who have been swept up in this. you have to balance that well also having a
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welcome mat will stop the veracity is our strength in the native states. we recognise as well as in the uk and other starts dummett countries in the world, we need other countries to enrich our culture. it is a question of how you enforce the laws already on the books well tightening up the border process. a debate which is very much active on this side of the atlantic as well. stay with us, because be what your thoughts on something else later in the programme. but there is a very active debate here in the uk about immigration. there is "nothing racist about managed migration", says the new british home secretary. sajid javid is the son of pakistani migrants. but he has also been an active supporter of the government's hardline approach to illegal immigration. and it's that so—called "hostile environment", which the prime minister encouraged when she was home secretary, that led to some catastrophic mistakes. british, commonwealth—born citizens legally in the uk have been arrested, deprived ofjobs and services, some even deported. mrjavid is furious about the way
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people have been treated, and before parliament today, he promised to put it right. like the caribbean windrush generation, my parents came to this country from the commonwealth in the 1960s. they too came to help rebuild this country and offer all that they had. so when i heard that people who were long—standing pillars of their community were being impacted for simply not having the right documents to prove their legal status in the uk, i thought that it could be my mum, my brother, my uncle, or even me. that's why i am so personally committed to, and invested in, resolving the difficulties faced by the people of the windrush generation. savvy javad, the new savvyjavad, the new home savvy javad, the new home secretary. -- sajid savvy javad, the new home secretary. —— sajid javid, the new home
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secretary. stephen kinnock, many people would be outraged if the uk had not set targets for removing illegal immigrant. the challenge is doing that effectively without punishing those who have every right to be here.|j think that's absolutely right. i personally don't really understand why amber rudd felt the need to deny the existence of targets. if you have a policy, you have to have a means of measuring whether or not you are succeeding in achieving your objectives. and targets are one way of doing that. ijust think objectives. and targets are one way of doing that. i just think the whole thing has been incredibly badly handled. and what it shows is that we need a clear and proactive strategy for how we deal with immigration that is properly communicated with the british people. treat them like grown—ups, don't try and brush things under the carpet and type things away. let's have a grown—up conversation about how we want to manage immigration. it's at the top of everyone's
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concerns, but something for political correctness and political expediency issues, it gets brushed under the carpet. that's what we have to deal with. how would labour effectively get rid of the people who have no right to be here?|j who have no right to be here?” believe we need a policy which does have targets, which does have a clear definition of what it is to be an illegal immigrant, and which empowers our civil service and the entire public sector to take the action required. if that does mean deportations, that is of course what we need to do. but i think it needs to be transparent and not hidden away from the british people. what about an amnesty, which the foreign secretary has advocated?” about an amnesty, which the foreign secretary has advocated? i don't think that works, because i think that's a again a one size fits all social. what we need to do is say, here are the clear criteria of what makes you a legal immigrant or an
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illegal immigrant. and this is what we will do as a society and government to ensure that those who are not here legally leave the country as rapidly and efficiently as possible. i think that the trade unions and business and government should be getting together every year and looking industry by industry, sector by sector and setting the quarters that we need to make the economy work, so we have the numbers of immigrants we need to keep our economy going forward. but also to ensure that employers are investing in local skills, local apprenticeships, localtraining, investing in local skills, local apprenticeships, local training, so that local people are having all the opportunities they need and deserve. mr kinnock, americans are always astonished that, in britain, government id is not required. is that something that would have helped in this situation? absolutely. in fact, helped in this situation? absolutely. infact, it helped in this situation? absolutely. in fact, it was a labour home secretary, david blunkett, that tried to introduce id cards and
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u nfortu nately, tried to introduce id cards and unfortunately, the decision was taken that they were too expensive. i think that was a false economy. i think we should have invested in id cards and i think it would have given far more trust and transparency in the system, and would have avoided, i think, transparency in the system, and would have avoided, ithink, some transparency in the system, and would have avoided, i think, some of these really problematic issues around the immigrant. we should also, by the way, have had a much better registration system for eu citizens coming into the uk. i've lived and worked in other eu countries where you have to go to the local minister party and register. —— the local municipality. you have to have proof of employment and residence and that is when you get your id card. it works well and builds trust in the system. i believe in immigration. it has brought huge economic and cultural benefits to the country. but something is when you cherish something, you have to be prepared to change it as well. labourmp, labour mp, stephen kinnock. the thing that you take from that interview, for me, is that it wasn't
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so much the targets that did for amber rudd, it was the lie about the targets. not being able to account for who had set up the targets and what we actually meant. when we talk about the hostile environment on both sides of the continent at the moment when it comes to illegal immigration, it is not because governments are insensitive to what the public thinks once, it is precisely because they are sensitive to what the voters want. this is what comes up time and time again on the doorstep in the uk. they want it system when it comes to immigration, a hostile and —— environment for immigrants, even in some cases and those who are here legally. that is a problem for politicians, certainly in the uk, how to implement that within the current system while at the same time, not expelling those who have every right to be in the uk. the stand—up comedienne michelle wolf says she'll not be making any apology for her performance at the white house correspondents' dinner this weekend. mr trump, who did not attend, described the event as "an embarrassment to everyone associated with it." the filthy "comedian"
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totally bombed, he wrote. ms wolf's brief was to "singe, not burn" the notables in the room, which included the white house press secretary, sarah sanders. we are graced with sailor's presents tonight. i have to say that i am a little starstruck. i love you as and lydia in the handmade's tale. i actually really like sarah will stop she is very resource. she burns fa cts she is very resource. she burns facts and uses that ashton drake a perfect smoky eye! —— and uses that ash to create. in the eyes of many in the room, she'd gone too far. not so much lewd as cruel. or was it? the dinner is supposed to be a celebration of the first ammendment, free speech. and plenty of those who have leapt to ms wolf's defence say the president is the last person who should be giving lessons on what
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is and what isn't appropriate. the organisation behind the annual event expressed regret at the divisiveness of the after—dinner act. they said, last night's programme was meant to offer a unifying message about our common commitment to a vigorous and free press while honouring civility, great reporting and scholarship winners, not to divide people. unfortunately, the entertainer‘s monologue was not in the spirit of that mission. despite some harsh criticism, michelle wolf isn't hiding away. journalist mika brzezinski said wolf's jokes about sarah sanders were "deplorable". and wolf responded on twitter, saying, why are you guys making this about sarah's looks? i said she burns facts and uses the ash to create a perfect smoky eye. i complimented her make—up and her ingenuity of materials. political analyst ron christie joins us live now from san francisco. ron, offensive, fair game orjust not very funny? what did you make of it? i didn't think it was very funny
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at all. i thought it was deplorable. you would invite people as you guessed to arrive at this black—tie event and then insult them in that manner? the president of the united states can take it, whether it is george bush or barack 0bama, but to invite white house staff there and treat them that way is truly out of bounds. doesn't this also show how close illegal relationship is between the white house correspondents and the ministration, that they have a, supposedly, to challenge and cover objectively?” think that's right and i think that there should be a bit of apprehension, not hostility, but certainly a distrust of the individuals in government that you're supposed to cover. but this is an evening about students, scholarships, and it is an evening thatis scholarships, and it is an evening that is supposed to bring together the administration and those who cover them. i think this comedian wasn't very funny and decided to make it a personal attack against these women. ijust make it a personal attack against these women. i just find make it a personal attack against these women. ijust find it really unacceptable. i'm going to play at
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the devil's advocate. because the correspondents have all come together to defend the first amendment, free speech. you can't set guidelines to the comedian. he has no attachment to the correspondents. time again, they have gone after the notables are these dinners. george w bush and president 0bama turned up, donald trump didn't. that's what they do. they go after the main people in the room. fair point, my friend. but this is where i differ with you on this. you can call george bush names, you can say dick cheney is darth vader, he enjoyed that as well. but to say that the tree should fall on kellyanne conway, referring to sell —— sarah sanders in the way that she did, it is cruel. you can poke fun at each
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other, as we do on this programme, but in so people based on their looks, demeanour are weight is a little too much beyond the pale for me. ryan christie, thanks very much. christian, i think this also demonstrates that there are a lot more important things that correspondents in washington should talk about. did you go? do we know anyone who wed? —— anybody that went? we do. the boss went. that's my boss, probably your boss as well. there are a lot of bosses in the bbc who did go. i know someone who did go and said it was pretty cringeworthy. this is beyond 100 days from the bbc. coming up for viewers on the bbc news channel and bbc world news — president trump's due to speak at the nra's annual meeting later this week. we'll be speaking to a former congressman. hello again. we've had some enormous
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contrasts in the weather across the uk during the day. across many north—western areas, there's been a lot of dry weather. the scottish highlands were bathed in sunshine earlier on today. and you can see the extent of the sunny skies across the northern and western areas. however, you can't help but notice this area of cloud across eastern parts of england. the area of low pressure close by has just been feeding in this band of rain all day across east anglia and the south—east of england, with strong winds as well. gale force gusts around eastern coasts. that's led to these grey, gloomy skies. rough seas out and about as well. and a combination of strong winds and the rain has kept temperatures very low for the time of year. this area in east sussex only got up to four degrees in the afternoon. normally in this part of the world, we expect to see highs of around 1a or 15 degrees. so it has been a very cold day. that area of low pressure will be moving away to the north sea as we go through this evening and overnight. the weather will become dry but staying quite windy for east anglia and south—east england. lighter winds again across the northern half of the uk will allow temperatures to dip down to freezing orjust below.
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so expect some patches of frost to start the day in northern areas of the uk. tuesday looks like being a better day. a ridge of high pressure coming in for a time. it means a big improvement to the weather across eastern areas of england. to the weather across with to the weather across some sunshine, the winds ai coming with some sunshine, the winds are coming a lot lighter through the day as well. further west, coming a lot lighter through the day as well. furtherwest, developments in the weather as a band of rain pushes in. that rain will be heavy in northern ireland and western scotland. temperatures of 10—15 degrees closer to what we expect at this time of year. through tuesday night, the band of rain continues eastwards a cross night, the band of rain continues eastwards across the country. it will loiter across england. solwhit start on wednesday here before pushing and clearing through. sunshine will follow but we will see some showers coming in across the northwest. some could be heavy, with some thunder mixed in. it will be a cooler day as well, temperatures between 10—12 degrees. towards the end of the week, we start to see an
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area of high pressure formed in the south of the uk. more of an influence from the continent that should help boost temperatures, particularly across southern parts of the uk. as the rain clears from london, we should seek temperature is pushing back into the low 20s as we head into the weekend. that's your weather. this is beyond one hundred days, with me christian fraser in london and jane 0'brien's in washington. our top stories — the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu says his country has new and conclusive proof that iran has a secret nuclear weapons programme. britain appoints its first muslim home secretary — sajid javid is pledging to make the uk's immigration policy ‘fair‘. coming up in the next half hour — another setback for the may government over brexit — if no deal is reached, the uk could be blocked from leaving the eu. the mystery of macron's missing tree — the french president's gift to the trumps is planted, then pulled. we'll be finding out why. let us know your thoughts
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by using the hashtag... 'beyond—0ne—hundred—days' let's go back to the news that the israeli prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, has claimed his country has proof that iran has a secret nuclear weapons programme in spite of the deal struck three years ago. the iranian authorities insist they've stuck to the agreement. but mr netanyahu, says israel had amassed tens of thousands of pages of evidence to the contrary. incriminating presentations, incrementing blueprints, in creating photos, incrementing videos, and more. with me is our diplomatic correspondent jonathan marcus. a certain amount of political theatre about this, wasn't there?” would say more than a certain amount, this was vintage benjamin button matthew, it was theatre at the highest order. how much
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revolution was there he? israel claims to have had access to what they call a sigrid iranians nuclear archive in a nondescriptive warehouse in the suburbs of southern teheran. if that is true, and we don't know whether they had access electronically or physically, whether they had the physical papers come about is obviously a great espionage story in itself. i think a lot of the so—called revelations about iran's nuclear programme are not going to surprise the experts. after all, whilst iran have denied ever having a weapons programme, the reason we have this iran nuclear agreement is precisely because of the international community's fears that iran was on the path towards a bomb and they wanted to constrain and limit its nuclear work and also to inject a much greater degree of observation and verification. as i
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say, it is part of a political process , say, it is part of a political process, all intended to influence president trump who is going to decide on whether he is going to stick with the deal in around me both. the french, the british, the germans have always in on the side of keeping the deal. now mr trump is having a, rather mr netanyahu is having a, rather mr netanyahu is having a, rather mr netanyahu is having a theatrical bash at putting forward his case and in very simple terms, i suppose it is a persuasive one. president trump does decide to go with benjamin netanyahu as to present micron, what impact could this have on negotiations over north korea and asking them to get rid of their nuclear weapons?” korea and asking them to get rid of their nuclear weapons? i think the problem is, you could argue it both ways. some people will say, how can the americans renege on an agreement with one country, iran, and then expect another country, north korea,
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to enter into an agreement with them in good faith? 0ther to enter into an agreement with them in good faith? other people have said the two are very different situations and that in a way, north korea, by being much more aggressive, by developing its own nuclear programme to the point in which it has weapons that it claims can reach continental united states, has given it a much stronger hand in the negotiations and so the north korean and the iranians situations are not comparable. i think you're quite right, on the face of it, it isa quite right, on the face of it, it is a peculiarjuxtaposition of cases and the fact they should both be coming at the same time is pretty extraordinaire. can i get results very quickly about something donald trump has just said very quickly about something donald trump hasjust said in very quickly about something donald trump has just said in the last few minutes. he is saying he thinks the meeting with kim jong—un will go ahead but instead of meeting in geneva, they're talking about meeting at peace house on the border with north korea. that is interesting and it follows on from the momentum created by the two
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korean leaders, north and south, meeting just a few days ago. it is fascinating. people lived at all the obvious places, geneva, stockholm and so on, then perhaps because of the north korean leader's problems in transportation, they looked at places closer to home, singapore and so on. if it was the korean pensioner, that would be on the borderline and the disengagement line, as it were, that would be a very obvious and convenient way of getting out of this problem of location. on a day of violence in afghanistan, the bbc has announced that one of our own reporters ahmad shah has been killed in an attack in khost province which borders pakistan he was just 29 years old. the bbc has paid tribute to him and his work, and says its supporting his family at this very difficult time. his death comes as nine journalists are among 26 people killed in attacks in kabul. 0verall, monday is believed to be
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the deadliest day for afghanistan's media since the fall of the taliban. this report from richard galpin. this morning in cavill, the aftermath of the attacks in what is supposed to be a secure area known as the green zone. leaving dozens either dead or injured. the second blast killing nine afghan journalists who had gathered here to report on the earlier bombing near the us embassy and afghan intelligence headquarters. the bomber was on foot to reportedly had a camera in his hand, he approached journalists and that is where he detonated his explosive device and that was such a delivered attack against journalists. amongst those killed was a veteran photographer of the french news agency, afp. he had
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covered the turbulent events in his country for 22 years. many of the other journalists who country for 22 years. many of the otherjournalists who lost their lives were much younger. this was the deadliest attack on the afghan media but decades. but also today, ina media but decades. but also today, in a separate incident, the bbc journalist amir shah was shot dead in the east of the country. he had been working for the service from more than a year. he was 29 and engaged to be married. 0n more than a year. he was 29 and engaged to be married. on top of all this, there have been reports today from the southern province of kandahar that a suicide car bomber has killed 11 children at a religious school. the target was a p pa re ntly religious school. the target was apparently meant to have been a convoy of troops. this wave of attacks by militants in recent months comes despite an attempt by the government here to reach out to the government here to reach out to the taliban offering peace talks.
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what has happened today is yet another setback. it makes age more difficult for their government to strengthen the national consensus on peace and reconciliation when you see such a peace and reconciliation when you see such a severe peace and reconciliation when you see such a severe attack, but our effo rts see such a severe attack, but our efforts will continue and also, the peace process is not like this which you can turn on and off, it is a long process. but at the moment, it seems but the taliban and so—called islamic state are determined to suit chaos across the country. not least because elections are due to be held on the issue. the british government has lost another crucial vote in the house of lords on its brexit legislation. the ammendment if adopted by the house of commons would block the government from leaving the eu without a deal. the eu's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier, who was in dublin today said there is still a risk of no deal if the two sides can't find a way to avoid a hard border in ireland.
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mr barnier said he is ready to work with britain on any proposal put forward. but the leader of the dup in northern ireland arlene foster said he was not "an honest broker". his proposal she said for one regulatory system in ireland with a border in the irish sea, will not work. iam not i am not ready to engage in this kind of politics with arlene foster. i have never been aggressive from day one of this negotiation. there is no spread of revenge, no spread of punishment. let me repeat that i regret brexit. for many reasons. i am never aggressive. let's speak to tony connelly, the europe editor for rte in ireland.
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an important summer ‘s coming up in june. is arid and the insurmountable filler that could bring it all down? we keep coming back to this problem, christian, of the irish border. we thought there was a deal in december when there was a joint report between the eu and the uk on how to manage the problem of avoiding a ha rd manage the problem of avoiding a hard border. now that deal is going to have to be converted into the withdrawal treaty which is an international legally binding agreement and it was going to be in the form of a protocol and when the protocol was converted into legal language, the british government rejected it out of hand. brussels and the other member states have invited the uk government to come forward with alternative proposals as to how to avoid a hard border but so far the proposals they have brought forward have either been rejected as unworkable or have been
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rejected as unworkable or have been rejected because they did it back to august and had already been rejected before. i think the sense in brussels is, certainly descends that the uk must come up something credible in the next few weeks ahead of that summit injune. there is a key negotiating round in two weeks' time but of course all of this has to be seen in the context of these very destabilising arguments and disputes within the conservative party and again, the political problems that theresa may has another house of lords defeat today, so all of these things taken around shows that there is a lot of problems ahead for theresa may and the brexit process. one of the problems you talk about within the conservative party is the man doing the negotiating in brussels which is not david davies but the senior civil servant. there's a lot of backstabbing going on in the uk. in the papers on sunday, they said the options he is putting forward on the
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border issue are not the options that david davies once. there are reports and i am hearing those also here in russell ‘s of warfare between the department of exiting the eu and number ten downing st. the sense is that so better is the civil war within the conservative party and within theresa may's party that each week there is a different target. this week the target appears to be 0llie robbins, chief european adviser. he is the chief negotiator in terms of the technical behind—the—scenes negotiations. david davis is the political negotiator, i guess, david davis is the political negotiator, iguess, but david davis is the political negotiator, i guess, but there appears to be a real division between david davis and ollie robbins and yet my understanding is that 0llie robbins has the ear of the prime minister, theresa may, and if you attack 0llie robbins, then by extension, you're criticising theresa may herself and theresa
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may's policy on breakfast. apart from the politics surrounding this issue, what about people on the ground of both sides of the irish border? how is it affecting them, how toxic is it for them?” border? how is it affecting them, how toxic is it for them? i think the main sensation i would say in ireland is uncertainty. we have had this post referendum period dating back to june 2016. this post referendum period dating back tojune 2016. contours have not really changed, we still do not know how they will avoid a hard border. there is very significant trade across—the—board north there is very significant trade across—the—boa rd north and there is very significant trade across—the—board north and south, particularly in the agri— food there. there are complex supply chains and also the island of ireland, the republic of ireland, actually, has huge volumes of trade with the uk as well and all of this points to the fact that ireland, north and south, is the most exposed entity, the most vulnerable entity to brexit and there is still no
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clear pathway, no clear trajectory as to how this will be solved and the withdrawal treaty has to be agreed by october and if they do not get agreement in june agreed by october and if they do not get agreement injune or on a legal text that will copper fasten the idea of no hard border, then a time to october will be short, we will have a summer recess so that is why attention has been placed onjune to get some progress on this issue. voters in england, scotland and wales will go the polls this thursday to elect local representatives, with seats on 150 councils up for grabs. and after two general elections and two referendums injust four years, you'd think most people might be a little fatigued. perhaps on the side of brenda from bristol? who you might recall wasn't best pleased when theresa may called a general election last year. you arejoking? you are joking? not another one! you arejoking? not another one! 0h, i cannot honestly stand this.
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but not everyone thinks like brenda. a new audit by the hansard society, suggests public appetite for elections is now at its highest ever. 62% of people surveyed say they are certain to vote in the event of an immediate general election, 11 points higher than in the first audit in 200a. we're joined now by director of the hansard society ruth fox two referendums, two general elections and they want more politics, what is driving is? is not just certainty to vote, we're also seeing some dramatic increases in terms of knowledge and interest in politics compared to the first audit in 2004. politics compared to the first audit in 200a. also you can look at the certain element of close election results helps drive interest and engagement. given we have had two hung parliament out of the last three general elections. where
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people went to the polls and thought there but would really matter. compared to what we saw in the early yea rs. compared to what we saw in the early years. you see in your report that people are politically unsatisfied. if they are looking for satisfaction, where are they going to find it? where they going to go water the extremes or are we talking about people and grassroot inclusion? they are dissatisfied with our governing so it is a competence of analysis that is required of the whole way in which we do politics. it is clear from the study this year and has been clear in previous years is that people would like to be more engaged themselves and feel their involvement which made a difference and at the moment they don't feel that. you're talking about local elections, they would really like to be involved more locally. yet they do not vote in local elections. this is one of the complexities and that is one of the complexities and that is partly because you don't get as much information, you don't get as
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much information, you don't get as much engagement around the electoral process and itjust doesn't attract the level of attention that national general elections do. president trump is expected to speak at the national rifle association's annual meeting later this week —— despite mounting pressure for tighter gun controls following february's high school shooting in parkland, florida. in his new novel, big guns, former democratic congressman steve israel takes on the gun lobby and tries to explain congressional inaction with firearm legislation. hejoins us now. what do you think is the significance of donald trump meeting with the n r a in the middle of this grass roots movement to try and get gun there is no significance to it. donald trump's base includes so many gun owners and people who are opposed to any sensible regulations orany opposed to any sensible regulations or any sensible, reminders to the gun violence that is rampant in
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america today. why is this still such a contentious issue when you would have thought that so many mass shootings would have shifted the pendulum? the answer is to words, gun intensity. it is not the amount of money begun lobby provides the numbers of congress who will be loyal and pledged their paid to the gun lobby, is the fact that many members of congress understand that they have constituents who will vote to re—elect them are based only on that one issue. they will forgive them on any other issue, they will hold them accountable on this one issue. you were on the democratic congressional committee for a time, we we re congressional committee for a time, we were speaking to rip box here who was telling us about the re—engagement in british politics. paradox in america is that a lot of yourformer paradox in america is that a lot of your former colleagues in the paradox in america is that a lot of yourformer colleagues in the house are leaving and resigning and trying to get away from politics and yet the same is true in america as here
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in the uk, but more people are coming to it at a grassroots level, why is that? this is really a unique period, we have a mid—term election coming up in november and i will tell you, if you are a republican incompetent —— incumbent, this is going to be a strong year for democrats. this will be a wave election in the united states like in 2006 and 2012, this is going to bea in 2006 and 2012, this is going to be a wave election. the energy a lwa ys be a wave election. the energy always goes to the offence. that is why over a0 republicans have decided to leave and that is why you have a record—breaking number of democrats who are running in this mid—term election. senatorjohn mccain has said that there are enough statesman in congress that a committed to meeting the challenge of bringing people together and that voters are
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actually more alike than different. do you agree with that? he is so right. i served do you agree with that? he is so right. iserved in do you agree with that? he is so right. i served in congress for 16 yea rs right. i served in congress for 16 years and i served withjohn mccain. he really is an elder statesman but here is the problem we have, it is called gerrymandering, this archaic issue where congressional districts are drawn, not to uniquely represent are drawn, not to uniquely represent a certain number of people but to protect the incumbent and so, over a00 districts, there are only 60 in the middle, where compromise is valued. all the remaining districts are eitherfar valued. all the remaining districts are either far right, valued. all the remaining districts are eitherfar right, far left valued. all the remaining districts are either far right, far left and that explains the polarity. this is beyond one hundred days. still to come — the sapling and the special relationship — why the french president's present to the white house was there one day, and gone the next? here, the sainsbury‘s chief insists that the firm's planned merger with asda will not lead to closures
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orjob losses but could lead to lower prices. the deal is worth £10 billion but still needs approval from the competition and markets authority. here's simonjack. lower prices for everyday items, but as the promise on offer to customers of what the sainsbury and asda as they lay out their plans for one of they lay out their plans for one of the biggest retail mergers in decades. the prospective boss of the new giant said it has increased buying power would make a better dealfor buying power would make a better deal for customers. ultimately we will pass those benefits back to our customers in the form of lower prices and what we're talking about todayis prices and what we're talking about today is we would expect the price of everyday items to fall by 10%.. combination of a second and third largest supermarkets will create a retailing powerhouse. thirdly the two companies have a total of 2,800 stores in the uk, employing a giant
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workforce of 330,000 people. together they would account for over 31% of the uk grocery market, knocking tesco into second place. sometimes a tag is the best form of defence and many see this bold move asa defence and many see this bold move as a response to threats in the marketplace from the discounters aldi and middle. amazon has set its sights on the uk grocery market. the question is, will this eager is better strategy be enough to convince competition authorities, suppliers and customers.” convince competition authorities, suppliers and customers. i think it's a bit strange because they are com pletely it's a bit strange because they are completely different ends of the market and i wonder which way they will go. not sure how it is going to work, with them being so close to each other. in most towns, they do have both. this deal is far from done, it will attract scrutiny from the competition watchdog but its audacity is proved just how much the beta landscape has changed.
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we want to take you back to that news conference at the white house where president trump is hosting the nigerian president. and there was an awkward moment. mr buhari was asked, as the first sub—saharan african leader to visit mr trump, if they discussed the american president's use of vulgar language earlier in the year when referring to african countries. well, i'm very careful with the phrases, other than myself. well, i'm very careful with the phrases, otherthan myself. i'm well, i'm very careful with the phrases, other than myself. i'm not sure about the validity or whether that allegation was true or not, so the best thing for me is to keep quiet. we did not discuss it and you
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do have some countries that are in very bad shape and very tough places to live in, but we didn't discuss it because the president knows me and he knows where i'm coming from and i appreciate that. a symbolic gift from the president of france, to the president of the united states has disappeared. just last week, emanuel macron gave donald trump an oak tree from france. he said that 100 years ago, american soldiers fought in france, and that the tree would serve as a "reminder of the ties that bind" their two countries. when the tree was planted, it caused quite a stir on social media. mathieu von rohr wrote on twitter "the new sopranos season is the best" and hunter luries tweet, "which pink floyd album is this?" received over 100,000 likes. then this mysterious picture emerged over the weekend. the sapling has been pulled out. and now only a patch of slightly
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yellow grass is left behind. so what happened ? well, mr macron's office confirmed on monday, that the tree had to be placed in quarantine, but it's expected to be re—planted later this year. i'm quite relieved by the real story because i sort of had visions of donald trump going out into the garden laid at night after the speech he gave at congress and removing it. iam speech he gave at congress and removing it. i am worried about the tree, if it is in quarantine, how will it survive? that comes out looking a bit limp and that is between supposed to be the bond between supposed to be the bond between the us and france! wasn't there an allegation that donald trump is going to dig up michelle 0bama's vegetable garden as well! you call it rocket of course in
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britain, don't you? we will see what happens to the tree. we'll be back at the same time tomorrow, thank you for watching. we have had some enormous contrasts in the uk today. in northern areas, a lot of dry weather. the scottish highlands were bathed in scotland earlier on today. you can see the extent of the sunny skies however you cannot help but notice this area of cloud across eastern parts of england. low pressure close by has been feeding in this band of rain all day across east anglia and the south—east of england with strong winds as well, hail force gusts around the eastern coast and that has led to these grey skies. the combination of strong winds and the rain has kept temperatures varied over the time of year. it has been a very cold day. tonight
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area of low pressure will move away into the north sea we go through the evening. the weather will become dry but staying quite windy. lighter winds across the northern half of the uk will allow temperatures to dip down to freezing orjust below so expect some patches of frost to start the day in northern areas of the uk. to state looks like being a better day. high pressure coming in for a time which means a big improvement to the weather across eastern areas of england with some sunshine and the winds turning lighter through the day. further west, further developments in the weather. rain pushes into northern ireland and that rain will be heavy and in western scotland with temperatures up to 15 degrees, closer to what we would expect that this time of year. through tuesday night, we will see the band of rain continuing eastwards across the country. it will buy the across england so a bad start to the day
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here on wednesday before pushing and clearing three. sunshine will follow but we will see some showers coming in across the north—west. some of those could be heavy with some thunder mixed in and it will be a cooler day with temperatures between ten and 12 degrees. towards the end of the week, we will see an area of high pressure for me to the south of the uk which will have more of an influence coming in from the continent which should help boost the temperatures are beautifully across southern part of the uk. as the rain clears away from london, we could see temperatures pushing back into their late 20s as we head into the weekend. this is bbc news. i'm carole walker. the headlines at eight... a new home secretary and a personal promise from sajid javid as he pledges to address the windrush scandal, taking overfrom amber rudd, who stood down yesterday. the windrush generation, who have been in this country for decades and yet have struggled to navigate through the immigration
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system, this never should have been the case and i will do whatever it takes to put it right. with amber rudd's departure, labouraim theirfire at the prime minister. amber rudd has been the human shield of theresa may. and she is now gone. theresa may now has questions to answer. the government's brexit plans have suffered another overwhelming defeat in the house of lords. israel's prime minister claims he has conclusive proof that iran has a secret nuclear weapons programme.
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