Skip to main content

tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  May 3, 2018 9:00am-11:02am BST

9:00 am
welcome to the programme. and human rights challenges. melissa how is medical coordinator for msf. government and military. shortened the lives of up to for human rights watch. 270 people. specialist for unicef in bangladesh. thank you, all of you, for give them your time. scandal who says we talk to a woman caught up in the scandal. your time. the same job as someone who's over happened to some of 25. whether that's fair. the women and girls? girls? missing from a supermarket in germany on her second birthday. today police begin a five—week excavation of a nearby river bank. hello, violence, either in welcome myanmar or bangladesh. to
9:01 am
the bangladesh. programme. we're live until 11 this morning. medicine and other methods to end pregnancies, using unsafe methods. pregnancies, using unsafe methods. doing what, if you don't mind me asking? in 2013, and wasn't. asking? or someone close to you did. and how the government is dealing with it? to you on the programme this morning. use #victorialive. of stigma because of rape and sexual violence in the community. violence in the community. very difficult for them to access care. difficult for them to access care. of course. you can send us an e—mail and message us on facebook. our top story today... effectively to abort these children conceived scandal is shutting down. through rate. yes, correct. of users' information. correct. about to give birth and you are
9:02 am
trying to help those. ethically and lawfully. trying to help those. into what happened. i'm joined by our reporter lucinda adam. to become mothers to children conceived through rate? conceived through rate? tell us more. if there will be a spike in births as a consequence of rape. as a consequence of rape. they were not viable to continue operating as a business. operating as a business. speculate about the number of expected deliveries at any one time. expected deliveries at any one time. they were involved in the brexit referendum and the trump election. referendum and the trump we do not anticipate exactly that there would necessarily be a spike. there would necessarily be a spike. election. it has caught the public‘s
9:03 am
imagination. imagination. care facilities, the other 77% deliver at home. customers and suppliers and it could not go on operating. deliver not go on operating. at any investigations, if it has closed down? home. down? not, they want to continue with the investigation. investigation. of the stories you have heard, shabnam. shabnam. was grilled in front of a select committee. committee. entity and keep doing what it is doing. doing. because our data has become the world's most valuable commodity now. world's most valuable commodity now. thank you. of the rest of the day's
9:04 am
news. good morning. asked the rakhine meant to they weren't invited for breast cut off his hands and screening. shoot him. because of the his hands and shoot him. mistake. the alarm a lot earlier. a breast cancer support group meeting in surrey many witnesses last night. saw these things —— going. the enormous consequences going. of the government announcement. inside was shot or the homes were set alight. my goodness. there that have been missed. i just think it's really sad and ijust wonder what happened. to try to bring justice for these women? —— something was wrong. that testimony. to 70—year—olds who'd accepted an invitation
9:05 am
to be screened. was, yes, we're waiting for the icc, but what about legal teams... .. the international criminal court? that percentage fell to international criminal 71. court? the lowest in ten years. of an independent review. a smaller place for war criminals, you can freeze assets. you can freeze assets. many women were able to identify... were able to identify... service disrupted and that is very important. because it has different it. they were affected. relatives, they can identify the uniform the soldiers were wearing. uniform the soldiers were for screening in england, will wearing. be contacted by the end of the month. to be completed by
9:06 am
october. andy moore, bbc news. audience about a couple of the stories you heard from them? stories you heard from them? to a porn actress to heard from the other person keep her silent during the on the show. 2016 election campaign. just absolutely horrific. and that his lawyer, michael cohen, paid her $130,000. uniformed members of myanmar's security forces, normally soldiers. security forces, normally soldiers. said the president had personally repaid mr cohen legally. hi, everyone. with the adult film star, stormy daniels. leave the survivors of these rapes with terrible trauma. it is very effective. presidential election. effective. did you know about the $130,000 payment to stormy daniels?
9:07 am
remembering what has happened to you and your community. and your community. it makes returning very hard to your home. returning very hard to your home. they would need to put their questions to mr cohen. president trump's legal team, seemed to contradict his client. that money was not campaign raped, tied to a tree, dragged on the money. sorry. ground —— one 15—year—old. i'm giving you a fact now that you don't know. the ground —— one 15—year—old. it's not campaign money. no campaign finance violation. so, they funnelled it through a law firm? funnelled it through a law firm and the president repaid it. oh, i didn't know... he did. there's no campaign finance law. zero. many days to reach the safety of bangladesh. the interesting thing is... to further questions. go ahead. sorry.
9:08 am
in germany close to where she was last seen. near paderborn, west germany, in 1981. see the kind of statements or action from that group we were hoping for. from that group we were hoping for. he murdered a dog walker. sanctions on individuals most responsible for what happened. responsible for in norfolk what happened. last august. referral to the international criminal court. criminal court. these are really key things that need to happen. into the case is under things that need to way. happen. ignored their warnings. he is going to kill somebody. and he said, "well, it's inevitable. it will happen. happened to this community and it has been going on now for decades... has been going on now
9:09 am
and it did. for decades... he said it himself. nothing has happened. no adequate international action at all. international action at all. and we didn't know what we were talking about... but i wasn't the expert, so what the survivors of rape who may be about do i know? to give birth, carina? about to give birth, carina? it is important we keep services open and that they are accessible. open and opinion since the general election 11 that they months ago. are accessible. results during the day on friday. our political correspondent, jonathan blake, reports. people are going to the polls. of access and available services, this is what we can do. this is what we can do. and district councils. six mayoral elections are also their decisions, that is our main focus. being held.
9:10 am
they have a child or whether they bought a child? including manchester, leeds, and bought a newcastle. child? decision to continue the pregnancy is another decision. is another decision. election last year. until ten o'clock tonight. results won't be known until early on friday evening. jonathan blake, bbc news, westminster. no meaningful benefit, a trial has theirfamily in order found. to keep the child. thank you could be used very better. much. in childhood and often lasts for years. hinkley, sky wheeler and shabnam mahet. thank you so much. coming up.
9:11 am
by the musicians union. are considering giving up. why is it not seen as taboo to "fat—shame" plus of newcomers taking unpaid work in the size people? last year. 30. what she calls "fat phobia". or women to thank find love. she's made a film about it for the bbc‘s obesity season. you. myjourney begins in leeds. if you are getting in touch, you are very welcome. touch, you are very welcome. surrounding fat people. dear fat backlog as a result of people. what are you going to do, fat people? the computer error. error. what are you going to do? are you going to chase me? over 14 million views your family or close friend, get in touch —— your mum. online. sport and they're fat shaming now. you? if you're big, you hear things like this all the time. liverpool into the champions league final.
9:12 am
they certainly are. and even how we see ourselves — especially when it comes to love? i'm going to leeds beckett university to liverpool all the way at the stadio olimpico. meet dr stuart flint. he's an actual expert infat so in the driving seat. shaming. good journey? they actually took the lead in rome. sadio mane capitilising on a mistake to give liverpool a great start. like me are portrayed in the media. bulging is a very unattractive word. 6—2 overall. cannoned offjames milner‘s "fattest children head. in reception. for getting a champions league logo off a face. it's sort of designed to disgust you a bit, i think. wijnaldum's header made it 2—1, 7—3 on aggregate. permitted when it comes to body weight and size? the fans from liverpool kop to breathe a it is a plague or an epidemic. sigh of relief. breathe a sigh us fat people are of relief. lazy, stupid, and friendless. —— got to breathes a sigh of relief. edin dzeko making it 7—4 overall. and normally before radja nainggolan added two late strikes. roma winning 11—2 on the night. headless. and, if we do have a head, we're stuffing
9:13 am
crucially, liverpool winning 7—6 overall. it with food. travelling liverpool fans. from this fat phobia. they now gone to the final against real madrid at the end of may. real madrid at the end of may. can liverpool beat real madrid ? in love and having sex is, quite literally, laughable. in a word, as with the fat yes. liverpool have shown time and again they have goals in them. monica character from friends. you've done it, right? in a champions league campaign. salah, firminhio and mane have 29 goals of course i between them. have. what do you think i am, like, some 30—year—old virgin? oh, my god. you're a 30—year—old virgin. although even i the defending champions. can find 90s comedy amusing. more experienced in that competition than the austin powers character. real madrid. finals four times in the last five years, for the first time. and they are still together. apparently, it's one of the all—time great comedy sketches. i'm a but we will be really bit surprised on fire. by my
9:14 am
own reaction. that's a for tickets at the final on the 26th of may. both clubs have been allocated 16,000 each, 63,000 capacity. so lots going to sponsors, hospitality and officials. bit which liverpool won, by the way. embarrassing. and you feel they have the belief this time too. ijust think, hoping they can upset the party. like... can't wait, victoria. 30am. that is actually like the way that people thank you. see fat people. like, if you just watch some welcome to our programme. tv and film that is all you'd see. that's what you'd associate with it. out on i think it's just something you mammograms. don't think about a lot. myself like that anymore. of things like this. could have shortened the lives of up to 270 women. to 270 women. it saw half a million people miss out on mammograms.
9:15 am
from the age of 50—70. when it comes to romance. so, i do a shout out to my social media followers. for their last a bit of a test. battlefield. of those, around 150,000 have since died of guys are a variety of causes. rude. i've pretty much been single all my life. some of us even believe that we are a danger in the bedroom. going to crush of those who have died. them. to the government injanuary. we still want the same as every other girl. we want to feel sexy in the bedroom. and that we are all destined to be unloved. even primary school kiss chase, i won't with an advanced and aggressive breast kiss a fat girl. cancer two years later. they think i'm going to eat them. who says she doesn't think government plans body positive movement. are realistic. you can still be sexy at all sizes. and yet, how
9:16 am
deep does my self—love really run? co—chair of the all—party group on breast cancer. don't feel ashamed or scared to put pictures like breast cancer. patricia, thank you that out there. forjoining us. forjoining us. you had your last mammogram when you are 67. mammogram when you are 67. that was in 2010. w‘re almost all women. in 2010. we're almost all women. does that mean that men have it easy? in 2013 but it obviously didn't happen. happen. you did notice, you knew that was unusual. that was unusual. for entry is that but i thought the programme was running late. you're fat. running late. because i should have i'm in birmingham. had a mammogram in look, it's a pie. 2009. had a mammogram in 2009. i'd missed out on the programme at that point. that point. by how much weight you lose from week to week. 6.
9:17 am
later i found a breast lump myself, one of three breast lumps. 4, on mate, i'm afraid. one of three breast lumps. and you were diagnosed with breast cancer. were diagnosed with breast many of these guys cancer. what impact did that have on you? have shed the time i dozens of was absolutely devastated. kilos. devastated. in the league the treatment, you have no choice you just go through the treatment. you just go through the treatment. anymore. but i'm not felt quite numb at the time and i didn't have any feelings about it. didn't have any feelings about here for weight it. loss tips. the treatment ended. a pound has made a difference that was it, to their love lives. there's always a man out there really. really. that likes big women. yeah. thought i was just a one—off person that this had happened to. i think it's harderfor a big man to get someone attracted to them. i think big women can still that this had happened to. look very attractive. realise until yesterday it was a major problem. major problem. when you realised, what did you think? horrendous and big shirts or t—shirts that don't what did you think? disappointed about the whole business. it to you. horrendous, big shirts or t—shirts that don't fit you. you can't really make yourself look nice whereas i think women can. do you think you rely on mammograms and at the time i didn't receive mine. time i didn't receive mine. like now, or
9:18 am
do you think and i was concentrating on them at the time. it's like...? the time. i was disappointed that i didn't receive the energy wise, more letter. didn't receive the letter. so. to like now gesture marked yelena energy wise, more so. who knows if it would have made a difference. if it would have made a difference. to think of ourselves as romantically successful. my last stop is back in london. shamed, or laughed at. and itjust so happens that such a place already exists. it's a plus—sized club night called indulge. and was started by miranda whole journey less hazardous, less traumatic in the end. kane five years ago. traumatic in the end. that journey involved a mastectomy. involved a mastectomy. we never see them again. i'm going to a normal a number of long club. ct scans because i about myself and then had some nodules. fly. —— lung ct scans. what they feel good in.
9:19 am
it's very tough. we can dress how we want, we can do what we want. i had no clue there was anything yes, and i think it's tough when you're older. it's tough when you're older. you're not angry. like this. not angry. lots of women say they are angry but you aren't. about liking a bigger are angry but you aren't. who can i be angry with? girl. the government? the nhs? nhs? relax and make the person that decided to change the programme? change the friends. i like something that i can feel. programme? i like women, when i hug them, i don't hug myself. it's difficult to be angry with a nonspecific body. 300 people attend this to be angry with a nonspecific body. valentine's club night. you first have to love find, to be angry when you can't put the blame with somebody. the blame with somebody. i don't know where the blame lies on this. know where the blame yourself. lies on this. iplayer and youtube. wouldn't have necessarily been as harsh. harsh. sport at 10am and before that the weather. was so advanced at that point and in my lymph nodes. my lymph nodes. when she disappeared — more than 36 years ago.
9:20 am
if it could have been picked up that early. the military police are starting excavation work early. at a site nearby. years, you think it could have been picked up earlier. picked up earlier. bring in fiona from breast cancer now. now. we need a lot more nurses to cope with this backlog. operation which will last for several weeks. operation which will last for severalweeks. yes, we do. five weeks, in fact. in the screening workforce over the start excavations later this afternoon. next few years. next few years. afternoon. radiologist justice to stain the current programme. somewhere under the mud on the river bank they will find clues. bank they will find current programme. clues. baffled them and haunted the town of paderborn for decades. paderborn for decades. catch up and offer it to the women who needs that final screening. who needs that on a supermarket shopping trip with her mother on her second birthday. her mother on her second birthday. final screening. there was a huge search, police, soldiers, volunteers. soldiers, volunteers. greater clarity but she was never found. but she was neverfound.
9:21 am
neverfound. katrice lee has never been found. on the been found. plans for this. this. have admitted they made mistakes during their initial enquiry. 309,000 women are going to be invited for screening. during their initial enquiry. they say it was flawed. invited for screening. say it was flawed. how many top of that to cope with the back row? we aren't them to this spot and the decision to excavate here. sure. to excavate here. overtly said they are looking for a body. under 72 and will be automatically offered a catch up screening. body. offered a catch up screening. has been brought up unaware of her background. background. they can have one but they don't necessarily it automatically. necessarily it automatically. an extremely difficult five weeks for herfamily. an extremely difficult five weeks for her family. for her family. what they can find and deliver the current routine screening hopefully finally uncover the truth. service. finally uncover the truth. screening service. now speak to katrice lee's father, richard. he's in paderborn. amount back in within six months is going to be a huge challenge. going to be a huge challenge. can they do it? they do it? thank you so much for talking to us. i wonder what your concerned about whether or not it is realistic. realistic. thoughts are.
9:22 am
there are additional resources to deal with the challenge. deal with the challenge. exactly that will work we are yet to find out. do you mean money? that's not been made clear yet. —— dogged determination of my family. not been made clear family. yet. to fruition at my family was correct from the start. is money, to hire those people is also a from the start. huge challenge. also a huge challenge. family was correct, tell us what you mean. mean. needs to be done alongside still delivering the screening programme. delivering the screening programme. katrice had been taken as a sara get child —— surrogate child. child —— surrogate child. different family and speaking a different language. in may but then what have to wait six months for that screen. six months for that screen. different language. decision to say that katrice had fallen into water and drowned. fallen into water and drowned. really important screening appointment. appointment. ten days of the initial investigation was lost.
9:23 am
investigation was lost. experience the first 24 hours of down and feeling anxious can actually get what the golden hours. they need. golden actually get what they need. hours. certain that your little girl of how many hundreds of thousands of women might have been affected. was abducted. women might have been abducted. affected. out from our audience how many people might have been affected. people might have been affected. excavation, and obviously it's going to cast shadows. to cast shadows. deal with facts and at the moment they haven't proved anything to me. they haven't proved anything to mammogram as patricia should have been but didn't get that letter. been but didn't get that letter. me. please let me know. the search it casts a shadow over our beliefs. our beliefs. the all—party parliamentary is cancer group. the end of the five cancer group. do you think the government's plans are realistic? government's plans weeks they find nothing. nothing. are realistic? of women who need to be contacted and offered screening. and offered screening. eliminates another theory and guess what theory punches you in the face? what theory punches you in the face?
9:24 am
that we were right, katrice is out there living a lie. there living a lie. thank you for talking to us. talking to us. thank you for giving they are affected by this and offer them screening. my daughter them screening. are there enough time. staff to cope? my daughter time. to us from paderborn where police begin investigating. staff to cope? cancer services in general are under a lot of strain. a lot of strain. of sunshine across central and eastern areas. just a matter of money, it's actually a matter of staff. actually a matter of staff. eastern areas. next six months, they wouldn't be trained. ireland and scotland, currently reign trained. here. —— a bit more cloud. is because we have got a warm not working who can come out of the woodwork and help us. front coming our way. coming our way. woodwork and help us. drifting from west to east. to east. look at isobars, not much of a breeze. of a breeze. impact on the normal screening system. ireland, a little bit more of a breeze, nothing too substantial. breeze, nothing too substantial.
9:25 am
it's going to be really challenging. challenging. heaviest rain currently in northern ireland. how shocked were you when you realised what had happened? spots of rain across scotland. when you realised what had happened? i was very shocked at but a lot of clear skies. the scale. something that has been going on for nine years without anybody noticing. nine years without anybody noticing. murky conditions eventually across south—west england. south—west england. upgrade that brought it to the attention of the authorities. attention of the more cloud, authorities. also sunny spells in between. between. when normally we would have had an extra 45,000 a year? extra 45,000 a year? it was only found by chance and has happened for so long. happened for so long. rain and drizzle, murky conditions in western areas, a keen breeze. in western areas, a keen breeze. patricia and people who have lost someone. as a result, not going to be cold. a result, not going to be someone. cold. not as cold as the nightjust gone. as cold as the nightjust gone.
9:26 am
avoided and that makes it harder to deal with. avoided and that makes it harder to dealwith. avoided and that makes it harder to deal with. let me read some messages. messages. light rain across northern and western scotland, northern ireland. western scotland, northern ireland. 53 years ago and i didn't receive my invites screening either. invites screening either. keep going back to my gp to ask for one. one. possibility somewhere like aberdeen could hit 20. for me to get my screening appointment. could hit 20. appointment. i wonder how many other women have been left waiting". women have been left waiting". warmer for all of us than at the moment. variations up and down the line. perhaps people should be line. more responsible for their health". responsible for their health". how are you? generally? across north—west scotland and into northern ireland. by saturday, treatment now for the the temperatures... after—effects of the cancer temperatures... for some, even warmer on sunday and monday. treatment. of the cancer treatment.
9:27 am
good news, thank you. treatment for that at the moment —— i'm having lung disease treatment. i'm having lung disease treatment. the lives of up to 270 uncertainty is a big problem when you have breast cancer. women. you have breast cancer. you don't need a programme failing you. need a programme failing you. when you're in that situation. you're in that situation. that catch up final it take so long for this error screen. to be picked up? nearly nine years is astonishing. it is. it is wholly we will get reaction from labour's shadow health secretary. unacceptable. unacceptable. the same job as someone who's over 25. whether that's fair. is affected by the different minimum wage to ensure that it never happens levels. again. again. also coming up... life here are facing uncertainty.
9:28 am
they are facing possible deportation. good morning. place to make sure it with a summary of today's news. never happens again. again. a breast cancer diagnosis is good morning. devastating enough. devastating enough. because of this error is more devastating. devastating. of up to 270 women. we've had from women affected and through our support is one of anger. through our support is one of anger. they weren't invited for breast screening. surprise that the scale of this and how long it has been going on. being screened should have raised the alarm how long it has been going on. far earlier. you sincejeremy hunt years after she should have had a routine announced this? this? mammogram. i didn't receive the letter. who knows if it would have made a difference. they are affected and what they can do. do. of them were quite deep. the health
9:29 am
on that last mammogram, which would secretary mentioned have... made the whole journey yesterday. less hazardous, less traumatic. yesterday. it seems parochial but he brought it up. brought it up. how would you put a price on that? price on that? it never entered my head to think about compensation. head to scandal is shutting down. think about compensation. of users' information. ones would feel differently than i do. maybe they would want compensation. maybe they should have compensation. but how do you compensate? compensate? ethically and lawfully. or sister, how do you compensate for that? you the uk data watchdog says it will continue its investigation. can't. $130,000 given to the actress stormy anything to anyone who wanted compensation, that's up to them. compensation, that's up to daniels. them. they probably have a right to it, yes. thank you. in the weeks leading up to the 2016 presidential election. that they had an affair.
9:30 am
please keep your messages coming in. you can e—mail, text and tweaked us. bank in germany close to where she was last seen. in west germany in 1981. the dedicated national helpline. website for more and have welcomed the new information. still to come... search. fat phobia — why is finding love more difficult for plus—size people? elections across england. we hear from one woman who aims to make romance less of a struggle. offer no meaningful and london boroughs. polling stations will close benefit. time for the at 10pm this evening. latest news — here's rebecca. the bbc news headlines this no meaningful benefit, a trial has morning. found. scandal is shutting down. could be used of users' information. better.
9:31 am
in childhood and often lasts for years. ethically and lawfully. after a five—year restoration. the uk data watchdog says it will continue its investigation. collection of 10,000 plants from around the world. they weren't invited for breast to the public on saturday. screening. because of the mistake. being screened should have raised the by the musicians union. alarm far earlier. are considering giving up. of newcomers taking unpaid work in the last year. 30. in west germany in 1981. and have welcomed the thank new search. you.
9:32 am
messages about the computer error on the nhs breast screening programme. the nhs breast elections across england. screening programme. and london boroughs. is further mistakes will be made as staff are pushed to work overtime. staff are pushed to work overtime. this evening. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. were no shows because they were issued so randomly. issued so randomly. now the latest sport. only one place to start... liverpool are through to the champions league final. but won their semifinal 7—6 on aggregate. where they'll be trying to win the european cup for a sixth time. tonight, attention turns to the europa league. looking to seal a place in the final. having drawn the first leg 1—1.
9:33 am
to win silverware in his final match in delayed going to the gp because charge. of it. the tour de yorkshire is under way. thank you for getting the women were first to set off from beverley this morning. in touch. do get in it's a four—day race ending on sunday touch. in leeds. and just a bit of snooker to finish. you will be charged at your standard network rate. now the sport. so, it wasn't quite john higgins will face kyren wilson in the semifinals. as comfortable as liverpool encounter at the crucible. fans might have hoped. mark williams will meet barry hawkins in the other semifinal. that's all the sport for in the champions league now. final. they lost 4—2 on the night, but crucially won through 7—6 overall. our sports correspondent, david ornstein, reports. to live long in the memory. months ago were raped and are now about to give birth. some of the mums—to—be are under the age needed to stand firm. of 18. which is why they into an early fled. lead. in neighbouring bangladesh. unfortunate own goal. though liverpool soon regained their advantage. aimed at exterminating in rome and back home. the rohingya people.
9:34 am
twist to a pulsating tie. birth after the sexual attacks last was almost complete. august. but ultimately, liverpool did stand firm. roma, disconsolate. jurgen klopp, his players, and theirfans in dreamland. because it is crazy. don't report such incidents due to stigma and shame. i'm really happy for the club and really to independent documentary maker shafir rahman. happy for the fans. a fantastic ride so far. and now we will go to is very distressing. kiev. with the mighty real madrid in kiev on 26th may. footballing glory yet again within their grasp. david ornstein, bbc news, at the olympic stadium.
9:35 am
as australia's new cricket coach. of the ball—tampering scandal. reputation on and off the field. important is we keep looking to earn respect. respect. more than all of the gold in the world. world. to get respect on and off the cricket field. cricket field. we need to look to encourage great cricketers and great people. cricketers and great people. years starting from day one, really important foundation for us. the tour de yorkshire has begun. the women were first to set off from beverley. the men will get going this afternoon. it's a four—day race, ending on sunday in leeds. that's all the sport for now.
9:36 am
thank you very much. because they're a few years older. that's what's currently happening to some young people in the uk. 83 an hour. 38. 90. 20, if you're under 18. the issue is being debated in the house of commons later today. well, joining us now is alyssa faulkner. she's 19 and works at a fast—food restaurant. she is paid £2 less than some her colleagues who do the same job. the london living wage, even if they are under 25. 20. of living in the capital.
9:37 am
you are not required by law to pay it, you choose to. it, you choose to. first, alyssa, good morning. good morning. thank you for coming on the programme. on the programme. 19, studying, tell us about your part—time job. 19, studying, tell us about your part-time job. us about your part-time job. people, new people, often earning £2 more than me. what job do you do? i work in a delivery shop, install. work in a delivery shop, install. you are training new recruits who are older and they get paid more? are older and they get paid more? do the job, it even though i am earning three times less. earning three times less. what do you think of that?
9:38 am
you think of that? not a job you need to be trained to do, and i am earning less. do, and i am earning less. because they are older or more experience of life? experience of life? too, maybe not as much as them, but in different areas. in different areas. i have done volunteering work outside of work. volunteering work outside of work. they may have less than me. in rowena, your part—time workers, you pay them £10. you pay them £10. 20 an hour, by law, you are required to pay them £7. you are required to pay them £7. 83, why do you pay them more? lifeblood and are what make your business xl. business xl. to pay to people different rates is anathema to me. different rates is anathema to me.
9:39 am
and you are rewarding them and they are rewarding you. it is a two—way process. process. make to your business in terms of the way the staff perform? the way the staff perform? it's about going beyond the call of duty. duty. really want to train and develop them and that's what's important. them and that's what's important. the best shops in london and i couldn't do that without them. couldn't do that without them. that's every member of the team irrespective of age. irrespective of age. the most expensive overheads for lots of small businesses. absolutely. escalating rates, having to do everything in this day and age. everything in this day and age.
9:40 am
the people are still the heart of your business. your business. cost that needs investment, that's your people. your people. investing in people is what's really important to me. important to me. make if you were paid the £3 your older colleagues are per hour? older colleagues are per hour? have bills and rent to pay, same as an over 25—year—old. an over 25—year—old. it would help with that. with that. there was more respect between colleagues. colleagues. was getting paid a decent wage to do it. ok. thank you. thank you for coming on the programme. programme.
9:41 am
mammogram when they should have been. been. everyone who missed out is going to be offered screening. going to be offered screening. extra staff will be needed to cope with the backlog. with the backlog. said that it may have shortened the lives of up to 270 women. lives of up to 270 women. health said public health england is leading on this matter. screening is an noticed a problem with the age groups. with the age groups. check to see if there were any other
9:42 am
problems. problems. we've done a detailed data crawl right back to 2009. crawl right back to 2009. in the 70—71 age group haven't been invited to their final screening. invited to their final screening. that's obviously what we are trying to put right now. to more women who have been affected. let's talk to labour's health spokesman, jon ashworth. he's in leicester. for screening up to 3500 women in the next six months are realistic? the next six months are realistic? screening they should have been invited to. invited to. radiographers, radiologists to interpret the screenings. interpret the
9:43 am
screenings. got enough cancer nurses for example. example. macmillan were pointing this out if you days ago. this out if you days ago. to the brink with 100,000 vacancies across the whole service. across the whole service. government put in the resources, build up the capacity. build up the capacity. visas like she has been doing the doctors and surgeons. doctors and surgeons. screening rates they've been going down year by year. down year by year. we've got the lowest rates for a decade. lowest rates for a decade. why are the screening rates going down? down? did any minister ask why our screening rates going down? screening rates going down? year—on—year we've seen the screening rates going down. screening rates going down. the lowest level it's been for a decade.
9:44 am
decade. somebody must have been asking questions. asking questions. earlier if someone had been asking questions? questions? independent enquiry to look into this. this. and nobody in the system has questioned why. questioned why. raising questions as to why the rates were going down. rates were going down. magnitude can go on for so long and nobody can question why. nobody can question why. we don't know if nobody asked a question. know if nobody asked a question. the independent review exactly who asked what. yes, that's a fair point. that's why we need the reviews. reviews.
9:45 am
swiftly, breast cancer now have told us... us... we are talking about hundreds of extra mammographers. of extra mammographers. yes, i can believe that. believe that. it's also the radiologists as well. radiologists as well. crisis through radiologists to interpret the tests. interpret the tests. when we know it's on its knees because of years of underfunding. because of years of underfunding. theresa may has been blocking international nhs staff. international nhs staff. into the nhs to get these tests done in a timely way. in a timely way.
9:46 am
tests to the back of the queue as well. well. scheduled to have their tests as well coming down the line as well. well coming down the line as well. this mistake began in 2009 under the last labour government. last labour government. there anyone you think should be considering their position today? considering their position today? people are saying this is to do with an it system. an it system. something to do with an algorithm. an algorithm. wasn't it picked up throughout the previous decade i'm not quite sure. previous decade i'm not quite sure. i suppose we'll have to wait for the independent review. independent review. 2010, early 2011 the current government rolled it out nationwide. government rolled it out nationwide.
9:47 am
there any evaluation done of those pilots? was there any assessment done? done? was that an opportunity to have checked out the it? have checked out the it? if it was an opportunity, why was it missed? an opportunity, why was it missed? that's why this independent enquiry was so crucial. was so crucial. there are two fundamental issues that face us. fundamental issues that face us. ringing, whether any questions raised? ringing, whether any questions raised ? ringing, whether any questions raised? raised? staffing they need to be able to do that. thank you jon ashworth. still to come. patients to fund charity work for iraq's persecuted yazidi people.
9:48 am
to stay in britain indefinitely. in their home country and have since resettled here. back to afghanistan. in afghanistan as a captain. he's also the great—grandson of sir winston churchill. former head of the british army. and lewis kett, an immigration lawyerfrom duncan lewis solicitors. this therefore we are threatened with being sent home. what do you say? say?
9:49 am
on the campaign in afghanistan, it's nothing. nothing. forgotten about and they should be allowed to remain indefinitely. allowed to remain indefinitely. why should they be? should they be? untenable without the afghan interpreters. interpreters. able to communicate with the locals in what was a counterinsurgency. in what was a counterinsurgency. population is critical for that to be a success. should the fees be waived? certainly. their own country, then they should have the right to remain. have the right to remain. waving this £1000 per person, it's just money that's not raised. just money that's not raised.
9:50 am
defence is completely in agreement with this campaign. with this campaign. home office some time ago and the home office has sat on it. home office has sat on it. trying to make it difficult for people to stay in the country. people to stay in the country. home secretary agrees that these fees are waived. fees are waived. you mean it is similar to the windrush citizens? similar to the windrush citizens? ” think it's very similar. think it's very similar. and now we are seeing it in the case of these former interpreters. of these former interpreters.
9:51 am
interpreters through whom we can communicate. communicate. and it is vital that we treat them properly. properly. quickly and sort it out in the next few days. few days. as an immigration lawyer, let me read a bit of this letter. let me read a bit of this letter. our wives and children have been told they can'tjoin us. told they can'tjoin us. exact time that we came but this was often impossible. often impossible. culture required our wives to look after elderly pa rents". culture required our wives to look after elderly parents". after elderly parents". also calling for their wives and children. what do you think about?
9:52 am
which the government have pursued this. this. firstly they get the right to have family reunions. family reunions. come after the asylum seeker who has been given refugee status. been given refugee status. to apply for settlement after five years, you don't have to pay a fee. years, you don't have to pay a fee. that's the crucial thing. visas, both have escaped risk and persecution.
9:53 am
persecution. people don't have to pay and the others do is very unfair. others do is very unfair. delivered a petition to the government back in 2014 about this. government back in 2014 about this. 98,000 people had signed it. —— are incredibly dangerous place that was. that was. what do you think about the fact this is still an issue? the fact this is still an issue? it's amazing it hasn't been resolved. four years later it's ongoing. ongoing. into our country and now we are quibbling over a very small fee. quibbling over a very small fee. ultimate sacrifice and now we are quibbling over this. quibbling over this. we've got a statement from the mod. statement from the mod.
9:54 am
expect them to return to afghanistan. afghanistan. permanently and are entitled to work and access mainstream benefits. and access mainstream benefits. " it doesn't mention waving the fee. and access mainstream benefits. doesn't mention waving the feem doesn't. doesn't. the uk, the german government allowed him to remain there. allowed him to remain there. and new zealand and we should do something similar. thank you very much. let me bring you this breaking news.
9:55 am
newspapers over having their phones hacked. hacked. from mirror group newspapers over phone hacking. time for the latest news — here's rebecca. the bbc news headlines this morning. of up to 270 women. for breast screening. being screened should have raised the alarm far earlier. scandal is shutting down. of users' information.
9:56 am
acted ethically. the uk data watchdog says it will continue its investigation. affair, his legal aide, rudy giuliani, has said. ahead of the 2016 election. mr trump has denied ms daniels‘ claims of an affair in 2006. mr giuliani said no campaign finance was used, a key issue in the matter. elections across england.
9:57 am
and london boroughs. polling stations will close at ten o'clock this evening. by the musicians union. are considering giving up. of newcomers taking unpaid work in the last year. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. messages about the breast screening nhs it computer error. nhs it computer error. recurring problem when i see newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. diagnosed breast cancer patients.
9:58 am
request a mammogram after their due dates had come and gone. dates had come and gone. picked up earlier and hence have better outcomes from treatment. better outcomes from treatment. the department to make sure i get an appointment. appointment. when i last had a mammogram, i will check with my gp‘s surgery. sport now with ben. the nerves of last night. lost 4—2 to roma in italy. crucially, they won their semifinal 7—6 on aggregate. they'll face holders real madrid at the end of the month. tonight, attention turns to the europa league. looking to seal a place in the final. having drawn the first leg 1—1.
9:59 am
he probably will not need the coat! silverware in his final match in charge. coach of australia. of the ball—tampering scandal. his firstjob — a tour of england next month. and the tour de yorkshire has begun. and will finish stage one in doncaster. the men get going after lunchtime. it's a four—day race, ending on sunday in leeds. that's all the sport for now. thank you very much. anne norona is an nhs nurse. two years ago, she met a group of yazidis at a greek refugee camp. persecution at the hands of so—called islamic state. to help the yazidi people.
10:00 am
let's talk to anne now. meeting the people at the refugee camp. it had quite an impact. be persecuted wherever they go just because of their religion. because of their religion. so much help, they need international protection. international protection. expect them to go back to their home towns, they need to be rebuilt. towns, they need to be rebuilt. there is nothing left, not one house exists. how are they going to do that? that? to live in other countries, where
10:01 am
do they go? they go? operations, if they need them, they cannot afford anything. cannot afford anything. what do you do to help? a lot. because i am medical, it is a little bit easier. medical, it is a little bit easier. emergency support, and we support the most vulnerable. the most vulnerable.
10:02 am
little bit of money, food, we buy sewing machines, goats. that sort of thing. is it funded by botox patients? patients? i have my own disposable income will stop no, of course not. income will stop no, of course not. i do not learn very much. i give to people, because it is the way i am. way i am. point, the point is big ngos should be doing it. be doing it. someone that has just returned from isis? isis? it is not as if there are thousands of them. only 3000 have escaped. escaped. someone like me to give them a bit of food? someone like me to give them a bit of food ? someone like me to give them a bit of food?
10:03 am
that should not be necessary. necessary. what is your criticism of the non—governmental organisations? the non—governmental organisations? has been a huge figurehead meeting every... who was that? isis, captivity, and she is the head of yazda. of yazda. brought to account with amal clooney. clooney.
10:04 am
yazidis were not mentioned —— the kuwait conference. kuwait conference. yazidi girls on board —— the convoys being allowed to leave. being allowed to leave. the society will die out. will die out. there are maybe in the 800,000 left in the world. 800,000 left in the world. really special, these people are amazing. amazing. based on love and peace, they have never caused anyone any harm. never caused anyone any harm. personally, they are the most amazing gentle people.
10:05 am
they need help. thank you for coming on the programme. programme. about the breast cancer screening story. of not being invited for screening is even more widespread. having not had a screening. thank you both for talking to us. let me ask you first of all, lee, about what happened to your mum. about what happened to your mum. my mum died on the 14th of april, 2012. mum died on the 14th of april, 2012. she found a lump on her breast in 2010. 2010.
10:06 am
they told her it was stage three at that stage. that stage. been called for a mammogram and perhaps wasn't? i do believe so. be told if i had a complaint, i needed to write. needed to write. how did you respond to that? to that? yesterday, we do not really know what to do. really? yeah. ok. so what is the helpline for? what is the helpline for? i honestly do not know. do not know. go away and come back to me and let me know what you need to do? me know what you need to do? back with an e—mail address, complaints department at the nhs. complaints department at the nhs. said all i want to know is whether my mum was one of the people. my mum was one of the people. his shoulders saying, we were only set up yesterday, i don't know. ok.
10:07 am
scheduled appointment between the ages of 68 and 70? ages of 68 and 70? jackie, hello, good morning. what is your own situation? situation? come under the category of this problem —— i rang the help line. problem —— i rang the help line. when was your last mammogram? over three years ago. i cannot be sure. why am i not going to be included in this? he said, no.
10:08 am
i said, why not? he kept repeating himself. eventually, he said, mrs hughes, let me explain this to you simply. me explain this to you simply. me for a screening and he said, no, not under this system you are not. right. local breast screening service and they will send you a letter. they will send you a letter. upset do you feel about this, jackie? i do feel upset. i do not think i have got it, but for me, it is not the point. for me, it is not the point. she has not been called for over six years. thisjust reminded her yesterday.
10:09 am
than is being published, to be honest. thank you. what are you going to do next? going to do next? having not had a mammogram around the time she should. the time she should. what are you going to do next? going to do next? to be honest, i'm not sure what to do. not sure what to do. i need to talk to my family and see how they feel. to my family and see how they feel. i feel the whole process was really badly organised... badly organised... was yes, she's probably one of those women, and that was it. women, and that was it. the phone went dead. what is that? what can you do? i mean, my mum's dead. here but i need to talk to my family. of course. it wasn't picked up earlier, clearly.
10:10 am
is outrageous and disgusting. disgusting. someone needs to resign, to be honest. to be honest. someone needs to take responsibility very high up. responsibility very high up. doesn't matter that 270 women died, it doesn't matter. who cares? that's the feeling you got? the feeling you got? that's how we are left feeling. are left feeling. thank you so much for coming on the programme. for coming on the programme. respond to some of the criticisms you've just heard. respond to some of the criticisms you'vejust heard. respond to some of the criticisms you've just heard. you've just heard. your gp in the first instance but actually to ring the helpline. actually to ring the helpline. going to give you the number again... again... choices website for more information. now been completed.
10:11 am
restoration project of the grade i listed building. species, the fight against plastic and his legacy. for them to go. except they can be kept here, and are. what do you think about the state of nature here in the uk? again, kew has played a part in research into this. well... of our wild natural areas. that's one thing.
10:12 am
roads, railways, schools, just our buildings. and your own programme blue planet ii is often used in this context. at deposit return schemes, bans on plastic straws and so one. do you think it's going far enough? overwhelmed with plastic. in a completely functionless way. it baffles me. in another envelope.
10:13 am
why? i can't understand. but it's quite functionless. and what it might do. stepping in the right direction. deal with plastic waste. ever concerned you? oh yes, of course it concerns. and... things aren't as... i saw this creature here, and aren't we lucky to see it?
10:14 am
in a zoo, that's fakery. and there was fresh snow, that seems to me perfectly acceptable. its natural history. in conversation with the queen. canopy tree project. what would you like your own legacy to be? oh, i don't think i deserve... of other people too, cameramen,
10:15 am
recordists, and so on. we've all worked together and produced a great corpus of stuff. generations will treasure. thundering through these newly planted palm trees. david attenborough chuckling at the end. bath additive treatments to children with eczema. found no evidence of clinical benefit from the treatment.
10:16 am
who was the principal investigator on the study. executive of eczema outreach support. a consultant dermatologist. thank you for talking to us. mean for parents whose children have eczema? eczema? children across 96 practices in england and wales. england and wales. care which is moisturisers applied to the skin and topical treatments. to the skin and topical treatments. the bath every time the child had a bath. and? eventually, we didn't find any difference. find any difference. the nhs for this additional
10:17 am
treatment. treatment. there is real uncertainty over whether it has any benefit. over whether it has any benefit. moisturisers and the skin and using topical steroids if needed. topical steroids if needed. howdy respond to that? respond to that? treatment and we welcome any new evidence —based data. evidence —based data. it's very important to carry on doing that. important to carry on doing that. eczema is and one size doesn't fit all. all. treatment working better for one child or one person and another. child or one person and another. are showing pictures of your daughter who has eczema. daughter who has eczema.
10:18 am
choice as well as receiving reliable and evidence —based information. and evidence —based information. the bath additives other thing they prefer. prefer. and so complex that it's great to have options available. have options available. your daughter's day—to—day life, how does the eczema affect her? does the eczema affect her? the impact of eczema is misunderstood. impact of eczema is misunderstood. when my daughter was first diagnosed she was only two months old. she was only two months old. is no cure, so you just have to manage it. manage it. what that actually means is hours of daily treatment. is hours of daily treatment. creams and bandages. and bandages.
10:19 am
scratching, finding blood on the sheets. it's very difficult to cope with... .. it's very difficult to cope with... with... inaudible i think we might be losing the line. be losing the line. thomas' hospital in london, how do you react to the research? you react to the research? didn't find significant benefit of imodium is. imodium is. stopped regularly prescribing these bath emollients years ago. bath emollients years ago. have the well conducted intervention study to show evidence. study to show evidence. what effect will it have on the nhs? will it have on the nhs? millions and millions of pounds prescribing them. it does.
10:20 am
eczema is a large strain on families and patients. and patients. i'm hoping these funds can be invested in further research. can be invested in further research. or is what you've done with 480 people pretty definitive? people pretty definitive? area there is always further definition that can be added. definition that can be added. this was a study focusing on children. was a study focusing on children. many children will grow out of eczema. eczema. go on to have lifelong dry itchy skin. skin. additives in older children and adults. adults. that's one area that deserves exploration.
10:21 am
deserves exploration. used and the study didn't include that group of bath additives. that group of bath additives. are the two areas that could do with more research. thank you very much. from you about the breast cancer screening programme. screening programme. one viewer says "i've been on the helpline. "i've been on the helpline. october regarding an appointment for a mammogram. a mammogram. between i'm supposed to go to the gp. that's it! cancer, it's always in your mind it could return. could return. stress levels up in many women for months to come. months to come.
10:22 am
the errors, it's the people who programme and operate them. programme and operate them. ensure systems do the job that is required? ensure systems do the job that is required ? required ? 2002 i requested a the following year i was given automatically. year i was given automatically. discovered a large lump in my breast. breast. thanks to the surgeon i'm still alive today". still alive today". thank you to getting in touch. bbc newsroom live is coming up next. have a good day. with the results of the local election. see you next week. good morning. cloud over and rain moving into northern ireland. northern ireland.
10:23 am
towards scotland and the far north—west of england. north—west of england. become lighter and more patchy later on. on. but generally there will be more cloud around. cloud around. 11—13 in the north, potentially up to 17—18 in the south—east. to 17—18 in the south—east. than it has been in the last few days. days. where it's that north—western area mostly cloudy with some light rain. mostly cloudy with some light rain. breaking through the cloud but it will feel warmer for many of us. will feel warmer for many of us. and perhaps 20 in the north—east of scotland. scotland. to mid 20s for the bank holiday weekend. weekend. mostly fine and dry with some sunshine.
10:24 am
00am. which meant they weren't invited for breast screening. i didn't receive the letter. knows if it would have made a difference? difference? than two years and i had three breast tumours. about an alleged affair. the president didn't know about this... this...
10:25 am
i believe... the specifics of it, as far as i know.
10:26 am
10:27 am
10:28 am
10:29 am
10:30 am
10:31 am
10:32 am
10:33 am
10:34 am
10:35 am
10:36 am
10:37 am
10:38 am
10:39 am
10:40 am
10:41 am
10:42 am
10:43 am
10:44 am
10:45 am
10:46 am
10:47 am
10:48 am
10:49 am
10:50 am
10:51 am
10:52 am
10:53 am
10:54 am
10:55 am
10:56 am
10:57 am
10:58 am
10:59 am
11:00 am
11:01 am

19 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on