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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 4, 2018 6:00am-8:30am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. it is the biggest test of political opinion since last year's general election. the local election results are coming in — we'll have reaction and analysis. the breast cancer 55—23—52; 5525—5542! 7 8,000 calls to a helpline as it emerges concerns were raised more than a year ago. a world first — a national review into why so many people with learning disabilities die early will be published in the next few hours. good morning. first it was the department stores struggling, now it's their in—store concessions. after blaming the beast from the east, will a sunny bank holiday and certain shindig put on by these two bring a bit of retail relief? in sport, no joy for arsenal in the europa league. atletico madrid celebrate
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a place in the final — denying arsene wenger the chance to leave his club with one last trophy. some of us could celebrate because sun is on the way. sarah has more. it isa it is a glorious morning. i'm here in eastbourne, lots of sunshine here but lots of sunshine also for many through the bank holiday weekend. i'll bring you all the details throughout the morning. good morning. first, our main story. labour and the conservatives have lost control of key councils as counting countinues in 150 authorities across england. the tories did well outside of london, holding on to key battle grounds. labour increased its vote in the capital but failed to win in some of their top targets. the liberal democrats made gains but it was a night to forget for ukip. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake has the story of the night. cheering
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0ne cheering one side think they are winning, but so one side think they are winning, but so does the other. a long night in the london borough of wandsworth. 0nce the london borough of wandsworth. once a rock—solid tory council that labour thought it could win. they gained seats, but not enough, the conservatives held on. and through the night, across england, those who set and spend your council tax watched and waited for the voters‘ the verdict will stop cheering there was a celebration in swindon, another council labour wanted to win, but again the conservatives kept control. i'm absolutely delighted that we‘ve fended off a significant challenge from the labour party. they‘ve worked very ha rd labour party. they‘ve worked very hard in six of our seats, they‘ve brought in a lot of people, spent a lot of time and money and effort into trying to take
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fl " labour it in; the loving it in trafford, too. the % loving it in trafford, too. the mug lost control of what conservatives lost control of what was their only council in the north—west of england. was their only council in the north-west of england. trafford wa nted north-west of england. trafford wanted a change, needs a change, and i think that‘s what it‘s going to get. we‘re pleased. i think that‘s what it‘s going to get. we're pleased. it's gone fa nta stically. get. we're pleased. it's gone fantastically. it's a triumph for labour. voters needed id in gosport and a handful of 2-3.“ 9 59.555?! ft! ether n!:—!;‘;s $4.2! . — there xvii , nfc” wt“ 7
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how been, 1: be '” two nhs health trusts raised concerns in march 2017, but were told it was a local — rather than a national — matter. 450,000 women were not invited to breast cancer screenings due to a computer error. an independent review has been announced by the government. public health england has said the response to the crisis cannot be rushed. we have an expert advisory group
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running with expert clinicians who have told i they i very have told us they are very clear that women need to have a helpline in place to have all of these things and for us to have the complete picture before we go out to them so that we don‘t cause them any more anxiety than the current situation. the world‘s first national review into the deaths of people with learning disabilities will be published in a couple of hours. the report by nhs england is expected to show the average—age at which those with learning disabilities die is significantly lower, compared to the general population. and we‘ll hear more about the significance of this who has been following this story very closely with the families affected. volkswagen‘s former chief executive, martin winterkorn, has been charged with conspiracy to defraud the united states and violating the clean air act in connection with the diesel emissions scandal. prosecutors there claim he knew that his company‘s vehicles were cheating in emissions tests. mr winterkorn resigned from vw shortly after the scandal emerged in 2015 twitter has warned its 330 million
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users to change their passwords. the site said a technical glitch had led to some passwords being stored in plain text on an internal computer system. bill cosby and roman polanski have been expelled from the us academy of motion picture arts and sciences. the academy — which runs the oscars — said this was done in accordance with its standards of conduct. tv star cosby was convicted of sexual assault last month. oscar—winning director polanski admitted statutory rape troops fighting the taliban will be able to stay in the uk for free. more than 150 interpreters who were given five—year residency permits said they faced being sent back to afghanistan when they expire, unless they paid £2,400 for indefinite leave to remain.
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hawaii has passed a bill banning the use of most suntan lotions on the island. suncreams contain chemicals which have been found to damage coral reefs. the new law could take affect from 2021 and may force manufacturers to adjust the formula of their products. time now is six 7am. good morning, mike. good morning! you want to end ona mike. good morning! you want to end on a high. who are asked he talked about a fairy tale ending. but the problem is there are big bad ogres that comeback to haunt you. diego costa, brilliant player, but he tormented eyes and beg for years playing for chelsea and now he‘s had
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the final say on his final night in europe. can we save all the little children watching... no, it'sjust a play on words. children watching... no, it'sjust a play on words- children watching... no, it'sjust a play on it 'rds- fissaémfihg children watching... no, it'sjust a play on it wasn't affsgémyth; children watching... no, it'sjust a play on it wasn't egg-egg; tale 14h; for me! it wasn‘t the fairy tale ending for us in anger as his place with —— aussie side were denied a place in the europa league final. it was poor defending that proved costly, as costa, yes diego, their former chelsea tormentor, got ahead of his marker, to smash home the goal that took atletico madrid into the final, and end venger‘s dream of leaving arsenal with a trophy. it‘s more extreme than the tour de france and the italians go mad for it — the first big international cycling race of the season, the giro de italia, gets under way today...this is the one chris froome wants to win now to complete his set and he starts as favourite despite his ongoing doping case. the race actually starts in israel, before finishing at the end of the month in rome. it‘s a marathon too in the snooker world championship, semi
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finals. it‘s the best of 33 frames and barry hawkins and john higgins lead their semis 5—3, over mark williams and kyren wilsen ahead of today‘s sessions. it all got a bit heated when tony bellew and david haye, went head to head, ahead of their heavyweight clash this weekend. the pair meet in a rematch at london‘s 02, 1a months after bellew pulled off a surprise victory over former heavyweight world champion haye that‘s it for now, plenty more in the papers in a moment, including why carrots i‘d always good for kangaroos. let‘s return to our main story — and it‘s been a mixed picture in the local elections. 0ur political teams have been up all night. 0ur political editor laura kuenssberg‘s been up all night watching the results come in, and shejoins us now from westminster. how has it been in terms of interest in terms of surprises? what is the feeling you‘re coming away with this morning? what's really interesting to me this morning is the last time
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we did these big overnight programmes and your stale and drink a lot of tea and eat a lot of twixes, or i do, this time in a morning you are going, while, something really unexpected has happened, a big dramatic result in a way we hadn‘t anticipated. what happens tonight, really, is voters around england in these 150 councils, and we haven‘t got all the results yet, but that won‘t be to the end of the day, have kind of opted for something a bit like the status quo. now, if you are the tories, you‘re really relieved about that because they had been expecting maybe not disaster, but certainly a difficult night, and if you‘re the labour party, you‘re probably a bit disappointed and maybe a bit puzzled because they have been putting a lot of effort, a lot of energy, into these local elections, and they did think they were on the verge of making more progress than they actually have done. what do you think of the issues, then that‘s... perhaps gave us hints or encouraged us
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perhaps gave us hints or encouraged us to think we‘d have a decent result? we‘ve had brexit, problems with bremain, leave. there has been windrush, allegations of anti—semitism. —— columns with bremain. have those problems fed into much of this? your rights to mention all of these issues, because the national backdrop at westminster is always in the ether when people are thinking about politics, isn‘t it? it's are thinking about politics, isn‘t it? it‘s worth saying that i think both of the main parties have had a pretty rough couple of months. it‘s not as if one of them has been up and bea not as if one of them has been up and be a bit down and therefore these results have been influenced ina these results have been influenced in a really straightforward way. remember, too, in the local elections, guess what? people are often voting on really local issues! in some areas that might have been an issue around schooling or in sheffield, for example, that huge issue about what was going on with the council cutting down lots and lots of trees. we‘ve certainly seen
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in some areas it is local factors that have pushed the results. in terms of the overall backdrop, both parties, the main parties, have had a hard time in recent months. i should mention, the lib dems have had a decent night. they took richmond council in south—west london and they‘ve made little pockets of gains in other parts of the country, to. you've followed this all evening. you‘ve followed this all evening. you‘ve followed this every minute of every day. feels like it sometimes! how should we ta ke feels like it sometimes! how should we take this as a reflection of how people feel generally? say if the general election were to be called, we‘re not thinking that‘s the case, but how does it reflect general opinion if local issues are so important? the way i think about local elections is they are like a signpost, the direction in which politics are going. they don‘t tell us politics are going. they don‘t tell us how we‘ll get to the final destination, let alone how long it will take us to get there or what it‘s like when we eventually
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arrived. politicians will look at these results, the fact, the psychology of the parties, how they feel about it. it will make a difference to the day—to—day feel of business in the next few months and probably an influence over the next couple of years of politics panning out. in terms of drawing a straight line from local to general elections, that‘s a pretty dangerous game because, remember, in 2017, the tories almost wiped the board at local elections. what happened four weeks later? theresa may lost that majority that she‘d hoped to turn into something big. indeed. it's never quite safe for them. never make predictions! it‘s a bad plan. laura, more tea and more chocolate for you, is that the plan? i'll probably get on the copy quite soon, t stops working after a while. thank you, laura. 0n the subject of predictions, let‘s look ahead to the weather. we can
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glance outside in one or two places. this is outside our studios right here in salford. it‘s slightly hazy, almost, today. it's promising to be almost, today. it's promising to be a good day. that is naga's analysis of that picture. it looks similar on the other camera. the prospect is that across the weekend, bank holiday for a lot of people in the uk, it is looking lovely. if we go down to bournemouth this morning, it‘s looking... eastbourne, sorry! sarah is in eastbourne. i see blue sky. good morning. i‘m pretty lucky this morning. it‘s a glorious start to the day here. it's a glorious start to the day here. it‘s been a beautiful sunrise here and the town of eastbourne holds the record for the sunniest month ever recorded in the uk. that was way backin recorded in the uk. that was way back in 1911, when we had around 384
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hours of sunshine here in eastbourne. it‘s notjust along the south coast will be seeing some sunshine through the bank holiday weekend. for many, things are looking pretty decent. what about the prospects over the next few days? it‘s looking largely fine and dry for much of the country. there will be some spells and sunshine around for many and you‘ll be pleased to hear that those temperatures are going to be warming up, too. today it is quite a fresh start. clear skies and sunshine from the word go, especially across southern and eastern parts of england and eastern scotland, too. into the afternoon, a bit more cloud that drifts eastwards. clouding over perhaps to the south—east but a bit more sunshine in northern england, wales. temperatures out there but two between 17 to 21 degrees. always a bit cloudy and breezy for the north—west of scotland in particular, where we will have one 01’ particular, where we will have one or two showers around. heading through the evening and overnight, we keep the widely clear and dry conditions for many. variable
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amounts of cloud, still quite cloudy and breezy in the far north—west with one or two showers. by the time we get to saturday morning, the temperatures will not be quite as cold as they have been over recent mornings. many of us still in double figures. saturday morning stars with mist and fog here and there, but that should burn away quickly. a largely sunny and dry day. some areas of cloud and some mist and fog around the irish sea coasts, as well. temperatures up to around 18 to 21 degrees so it will feel pretty pleasa nt to 21 degrees so it will feel pretty pleasant with the light winds. the only exception will be the north—west of scotland. again quite cloudy and breezy with a few spots of light rain. another decent day in store for sunday. any early mist and fog clears away to leave us with a lot of sunshine, particularly across much of england and wales. a bit more low cloud and fog at times around the irish sea coast for the bristol channel towards parts of northern ireland. for most of us, a largely warm and dry day. 23 degrees 01’ so largely warm and dry day. 23 degrees or so possible for sunday and it
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warms up or so possible for sunday and it warms up there for bank holiday monday, too. monday is looking like a dry day. again a lot of sunshine after early morning mist clears. breezy in the north—west but with temperatures up to 25 or 26 degrees, it could well be the warmest early may bank holiday on records. enjoy that. it's it‘s a better record than the rainy records we‘ve had! it‘s a better record than the rainy records we've had! isn't it? we started this week with a month‘s web of rainfall in kent so it‘s looking more optimistic. i like those little huts. i bet they're worth a fortune! they are coveted! i was reading the papers. those huts by the beach... property prices, they are ridiculous, the prices of some of those! i‘m sure there‘s an item on that somewhere in the future. very
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good. good morning, by the way. front page of the times. a couple of stories. the front page, the picture you‘re seeing is about tutus. they are returning to the production of swa n are returning to the production of swan lake. the front page story is john bercow, who is about to carry on as the commons speaker after being accused of bullying by the second former senior westminster official in less than a week. the daily mail story we looked at yesterday. 0ngoing issues, health officials. we are now being told we we re officials. we are now being told we were warned of errors in the breast cancer screening programme more were warned of errors in the breast cancer screening programme more than one year ago. public health england conceded that problems were with the scheme as far back as march 2017 and many people are still asking many questions about just what many people are still asking many questions aboutjust what happened, this ide error, and the images you can see there are some of the victims. those people who should have had screenings who missed out because of what has happened and
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will have more on that throughout the morning, as well. the telegraph also mentioning that on its front page. britain will be unable to leave the customs union before 2023. that‘s the latest that ministers have been told according to the daily telegraph. jeremy corbyn, labour leader in the picture, outside a polling station. we are covering the results of the local elections throughout the morning. the results are not in for the newspapers this morning. i‘ve found something. newspapers this morning. i've found something. on beach huts? u nfortu nately i've found something. on beach huts? unfortunately not, but equally interesting, the inside pages of the financial times, tesla, the electric car company, and the boss, elon musk, he was on one of these city calls that happens all the time were bosses have to talk to analysts and investors explain what is going on. tesla a re investors explain what is going on. tesla are under a lot of pressure lately. he was asked a lot of questions. he said, i‘ve had enough of these bonehead, boring questions. he refused to answer any more from
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the city analysts who may be investing in his company. he decided to go to an online blogger who are interested in tesla and said he would take courses from them. shareholders were unimpressed and the share price fell by 8%. elon musk very much unimpressed. he was sailing yesterday, no interest in your boring questions. if he ever had an interview on here, you might have to... what was he saying? the same difficult questions and people think, is tesla really a sustainable business, can you build as many model threes as you are saying? he‘s struggling. one for the scrapbook, final time we‘ll see this headline. it is literal, he is out of europe. liverpool fans have apparently been asked, £6,000 per night for hotels that are normally £20 per night. this is for theirfinal. flights have shot up in price. 0ne
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this is for theirfinal. flights have shot up in price. one that caught my eye. we'll look into that, as well! this caught my eye will stop in australia, we were told not to approach kangaroos. tourist do to get photographed. in new south wales they have been throwing punches. the kangaroos are attacking visitors a p pa re ntly kangaroos are attacking visitors apparently because they are addicted to... carat! ithought apparently because they are addicted to... carat! i thought they were healthy. is that the kangaroo attack? yes, happening on that chap attack? yes, happening on that chap at the moment. they are trying to milk them for carrots? eating too many carrots and it is making them aggressive and hyper. it looks like that guy is running away and the kangaroo is trying to get to the current. he's punching and scratching him. you are warned not to get too close to wild kangaroos for photographs. looks like the kangaroo is being misrepresented there. he‘s only going for the carrots, he‘s not... there. he‘s only going for the carrots, he's not... we need to be fair. look at the picture and you can determine who is the bad guy and sometimes it‘s not always like that.
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we haven‘t had any comment from the kangaroos this morning. in the next few hours the world‘s first national review into the deaths of people with learning disabilities will be published. it is expected to highlight a significant gap between the life expectancy of those with learning disabilities and those without. jayne mccubbin reports. stephanie died at 25 after spending seven years largely in this one room. that‘s why i‘m here. we have to stop this. richard died at 33, of constipation. it's devastating, really. it shouldn't have happened. and laura died at 21 after going into hospital for a routine eye operation. what they see is the person what‘s sat on that bed with all the disabilities, she can‘t talk, she can‘t walk, she‘s got this, that and the other. what they didn‘t see at the back was that lovely girl what we knew. what was so happy.
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these are just some of the deaths we‘ve reported on the last 12 months but it was the death of this young man back in 2012 which led to a promise of action. connor sparrowhawk‘s death had been passed off as of natural causes but it was neglect. people don‘t really care about people like connor. it‘s just bewildering, really. it led his mum to ask one crucial question, how many more? how many more deaths have there been, how many more of those deaths have had proper scrutiny? jeremy hunt promised to try and answer that question with the world‘s first national review into the deaths of people with learning disabilities. this will be a very important moment to step back and look at the way we look after that particular highly vulnerable group. that review is published later this morning. its findings, we are told, will highlight a problem long known, that people with learning disabilities die too young and too often those deaths are avoidable. and jayne joins us now.
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good morning. you‘ve been following cases like this for months now and looking into this. what should we expect from this report later? this was a huge commitment by the department for health, by nhs england. a promise to look at every single death of an adult with learning disabilities in england. a huge commitment. that would be looked at by reviews teams, leader reviews teams, across the country. a few months ago we had a sense of what was happening on the ground. we we re what was happening on the ground. we were told that one in ten deaths looked at by those teams there were red flag indicators. that meant there were problems, concerns. that might be either abuse or neglect, gaps in care, delays in treatment. we have a sense of what‘s happening but we don‘t really know what will
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happen at 8am. there is a problem in this area, it‘s already well known. report was published called death by indifference. i spoke to the author of that report, beverly dawkins, she said there was institutional discrimination and there is institutional discrimination. today, people are still dying. not enough is being done to change things. she said you can see it in the medics that don‘t give the same treatment to people with learning disabilities as they watched to anyone else. you can see it in the families that have defied the scrutiny when their loved one dies. you can it also in the coroners who she says don‘t seem to get these problems. is this going to bea get these problems. is this going to be a statistical analysis? who are we going to hearfrom? what be a statistical analysis? who are we going to hear from? what will we know? the report has been commissioned by nhs england. it‘s been carried out by academics at bristol university and it is going to look at every single death that has been given to those review teams
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to try to find out, what are people dying? i be dying avoidable deaths? are they dying prematurely? this is a world first, the first time anything like this has been done in the world, a national review of every single adult learning disabled death. we‘d hoped nhs england would be speaking to us today but they are issuing this report without comment and that has surprised and dismayed many people but we‘ll have more information in the next couple of hours. 8am. 8am, yes. thank you. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. it‘s been a successful night for the liberal democrats in london — winning control of richmond council in the local elections. no other councils have changed hands so far, despite labour having set its sights on boroughs including wandsworth and westminster. however the conservatives have seen a drop in the number of councillors overall in the capital.
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here‘s our political correspondent karl mercer. a night that started with smiles and the hope of something special, but one that before long turned into one of anxious looks and worried glances. it wasn‘t the triumphant night labour had hoped for in the tory stronghold of wandsworth. they had hoped for an historic win but it wasn‘t to be. labour did win seats from the conservatives, but not enough. national politics always washes into people‘s minds. 0ur message was relentlessly local. it is about your streets, the potholes. it was a similar story in westminster. the conservatives held on here despite losing seats to labour. perhaps a slap on the wrist, but certainly not a knockout punch. we actually gained a seat from
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labour this evening so i think it‘s a win—win for the people of westminster. and like to have made more gains but it's good to have achieved what we have done. it was always a mountain to climb. the swing required were enormous. we've given it our best shot, a good try and we've made some good progress. in hillingdon, where labour had hoped to gain seats, if not the council, the tories actually won more than last time. every one of our candidates has increased their personal majority and i think that‘s a direct effect ofjeremy corbyn. down in the south—west, there were lib dems tears ofjoy. the glum tory faces in richmond told their own story. and a night when they lost control of the council to their nearest rivals. they were also pushed into third place when the greens picked up four seats here. i‘ve now the new green party member for the longest name in the country.
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this area fought to remain in the referendum and that was key in these local elections. they were a heavy bremain boruc. very european community. —— very heavy remain. that has been reflected in the ballots tonight. success for the lib dems, too, in neighbouring sutton, where they held on to control the council despite losing seats to the conservatives. we‘ve just heard the conservatives have held on to kensington and chelsea. labour target barnet is yet to declare. we‘re also waiting on a result from the mayoral election in tower hamlets. let‘s have a very brief look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there‘s a good service on all lines at the moment. let‘s have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. the weather is looking lovely, not just today but also over the rest of the bank holiday weekend. now, this picture was taken yesterday. today will be a few degrees warmer, again dry with lots of sunshine around, just turning cloudier later
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on this afternoon. this is how we are starting off the morning, it‘s milder than it was this time yesterday. some of our temperatures already into double figures. a bit of cloud out towards the west but lots of sunshine developing through the morning everywhere and then it will turn cloudier into the afternoon. still some good spells of sunshine, some good breaks in the cloud. and a lot of that cloud will melt away again as we head into the evening. top temperatures between 18 and 21 degrees. through this evening and overnight, again some cloud around at times but lots of clear spells and we will start off the morning tomorrow in double figures for most areas. a mild start to the day, some decent spells of sunshine on and off through the day on saturday. temperatures all the way up to 21 or 22 celsius. how high can those temperatures go? well, i think by the time we‘re into sunday, bank holiday monday, we‘ll be up to 25 degrees, but somewhere towards the north—west of the capital could get as high as 26 or 27. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty.
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it‘s friday 4th may. coming up on breakfast today. we‘ll have everything you need to know about the local elections throughout the morning and we‘ll speak to all the main parties. the wintery storms over easter meant shops suffered financially. sean will be here to explain how they‘re going to use the royal wedding to bounce back. and we‘ll have previously unseen footage of orangutans and hear how they‘re being pushed towards the brink of extinction. good morning, here‘s a summary of today‘s main stories from bbc news. labour and the conservatives have lost control of key councils as counting countinues in 150 authorities across england. the tories did well outside of london holding on to key battle grounds. labour increased its vote in the capital but failed to win
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some specifically targeted seats. the liberal democrats made gains, but it was a night to forget for ukip. 0ur political correspondent, jonathan blake, has the story of the night. cheering. one side think they are winning, but so does the other. a long night in the london borough of wandsworth. once a rock—solid tory council that labour thought it could win. they gained seats, but not enough, and the conservatives held on. and through the night, across england, those who set and spend your council tax watched and waited for the voters‘ verdict. cheering. there was celebration in swindon, another council labour wanted to win, but again the conservatives kept control. i‘m absolutely delighted that we‘ve fended off a significant challenge from the labour party. they‘ve worked very hard in six of our seats, they‘ve brought in a lot of people, spent a lot of time and money and effort into trying to take some of those seats, and they‘ve not taken one from us.
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plymouth was labour‘s big win of the night, they took it from the tories at 2:30am. labour were loving it in trafford, too, where the conservatives lost control of what was their only council in the north—west of england. trafford wanted a change, it needs a change, and i think that‘s what it‘s going to get. we‘re pleased. it's gone absolutely fantastically. i think it's a triumph for labour. voters needed id in gosport and a handful of other places running a trial to cut fraud. there are claims some people were turned away but the government down any problems. i think it's my passport i've got, i'd better check. yes, it's my passport, everybody! yellow was the winning colour in richmond—upon—thames, the liberal democrats took that london borough from the tories. 0ne place where views on brexit may have come into play. more than 4000 seats, 150 councils, mayors elected, too. this has been the biggest test of political opinion since
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the general election last year. and it‘s not over yet. the picture so far is patchy and there are more results still to come. in the parliamentary by—election in west tyrone, sinn fein held the seat with a slightly reduced majority. 0rla begley secured a majority over the dup ofjust less than 8,000, taking 47% of the vote. it‘s emerged public health england was warned about the breast cancer screening errors last year. two nhs health trusts raised concerns in march 2017, but were told it was a local rather than a national matter. 450,000 women were not invited to breast cancer screenings due to a computer error. an independent review has been announced by the government. volkswagen‘s former chief executive, martin winterkorn, has been charged with conspiracy to defraud the united states and violating the clean air act in connection with the diesel emissions scandal. prosecutors there claim he knew
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that his company‘s vehicles were cheating in emissions tests. mr winterkorn resigned from vw shortly after the scandal emerged in 2015. twitter has warned its 330 million users to change their passwords. the site said a technical glitch had led to some passwords being stored in plain text on an internal computer system. in a blog post twitter said the error has been fixed and there was no indication that passwords had been stolen or misused by anyone. bill cosby and roman polanski have been expelled from the us academy of motion picture arts and sciences. the academy, which runs the oscars, said this was done in accordance with its standards of conduct. tv star cosby was convicted of sexual assault last month. oscar—winning director polanski admitted statutory rape of a 13—year—old girl in 1977. the time is 6:35am, those are the
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main stories. let‘s get an update on the sport. i feel quite sorry for arsene wenger. it would be very hard if you didn‘t, after all he has achieved in the game, and all he has done for football, you will never have won a european trophy. —— he will never have won one. this was his last chance for a fairy tale ending. football has no room for and six. —— for romantics. ending. football has no room for and six. -- for romantics. it is a hard industry. especially when it is ruined by someone especially when it is ruined by someone who used to haunt you when they were at chelsea. it was ruined by former chelsea striker, diego costa who once again made wenger suffer with the only goal of the night. so 2—1 on aggregate, watched by our sports correspondent joe wilson in madrid. 0n the edge of madrid lies a football stadium where the fans wait for their team to concede a goal. it rarely happens. atletico madrid have players to score too. diego costa left his mark on english
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football with moments like this. arsenal had not been helped by the early departure of laurent koscielny to injury, but at 1—0 down, they now had to score to stay alive. the fact that they didn‘t can be explained by missed opportunities and resolute opponents. diego simeone, atletico madrid‘s manager, banished to the stands, was wild in joy. arsene wenger subdued, in the knowledge that it was over. a goodbye without glory. like the team, very sad and very disappointed. 0verall, even very frustrated as well because when you go out of the competition and the very good performances in 180 minutes we had, it‘s very difficult to take. but as well for the club, now, some time to think about what to do for next season. this is a football stadium built for a club which is one of the very best in europe.
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that is atletico madrid‘s status. it remains arsenal‘s ambition. an arsenal team to inspire, any takers? could not be a bigger contrast in emotions in the managers there. it‘s more extreme than the tour de france and is the first big cycle race of the season. the giro d‘italia starts today, and all attention will be on britain‘s chris froome. team sky have defended froome‘s involvement, despite his ongoing anti—doping case. this is the one he now wants, having won the tour de france and vuelta a espana. only six men in history have won all three of the big tours. the race actually starts in israel before finishing at the end of the month in rome. what a moment for yorkshireman harry tanfield, who has won the first stage of the tour de yorkshire. he won commonwealth silver for england last month, and caused a major upset, as he held off his rivals in a sprint finish for the stage between beverley and donaster. mark cavendish finished further back in the main peleton. today‘s second of four
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stages starts in barnsley. the women‘s event is a two—day race. the netherland‘s kirsten vild, edging this bunch sprint at the line. she was the favourite prior to the stage from beverley to doncaster and had too much power for everyone else. britain‘s alice barnes finished third. barry hawkins and john higgins lead their semi—finals at snooker‘s world championship. hawkins, who was a finalist five years ago, has a 5—3 lead against two—time winner mark williams. they will resume this afternoon. before thatjohn higgins, who‘s going fo a fifth title, will hope to extend his 5—3 lead against kyren wilson. it‘s fair to say boxers david haye and tony bellew really don‘t like each other. the pair go toe to toe tomorrow night in a rematch of their enounter 14 months ago. bellew came out on top as tempers got a little frayed yesterday when the pair went face to face after the press conference, which all sets it up for another feisty encounter on saturday night. britain‘s new number one kyle edmund plays today in the quarterfinals
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of the estoril open in portugal against home favourite joao sousa, but will be full of confidence now that he‘s shot up to 23 in the world rankings, and thanks to his football team. as he starts looking ahead to the french open and wimbledon, i went down for a knock up with him at queens, where he will be competing in the fever tree championships injune. it‘s turning out to be some year for kyle edmund. showing off his fancy football skills at queens with his beloved liverpool team into the champions league final, he goes into the summer grand slams as british number one, overtaking the injured andy murray. it obviously feels good, it‘s one of them when you‘re sort of in the moment, it‘s just a ranking, it doesn‘t change what you do or how you train or how you think or anything. it‘s one of them where you look back on it, you can be proud. kyle showed me the spin that has helped propel his remarkable rise up the rankings and which was too good for top—10 players like grigor
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dimitrov at the australian open, as edmund stunned the tennis world by reaching the semifinals. amazing experience, first of all. good to experience, i guess, the physical demands, the mental demands, staying on it every day throughout the tournament. it was just really, it was a new experience for me but something that was great to learn from. more people recognise you. i do enjoy that side of things, especially when kids come up and ask, it‘s really nice for them because i was once that age and realised to have someone be looked up to and to be able to see them or take a picture, it means a lot. now his aim is to take his current form into the french open and wimbledon and go further than the second round. if i was sliding around a bit on the clay, it‘s very different when the players suddenly have to switch to grass. going from clay to grass, when you‘re so used to sliding, you have to then tell yourself, don‘t slide. so then when you hit on the grass, you almost have to hit and sort of slowdown. to compete with kyle, maybe i needed to develop a superstition or two like so many players have these days.
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i always put my right sock on first, stuff like that. always use the same shower cubicle, at the tournament, it‘s always the same one. edmund is not one who seeks the headlines on court but it is rather different when he‘s watching the football. 0n court, i‘m quite, i would say, quite quiet, keep myself to myself, kind of person. but when i‘m watching football, it‘s the opposite, i‘m quite animated. ifind myself shouting more, getting up from my seat. so, if it came to it, what would he prefer, liverpool champions of europe or winning wimbledon? i‘d probably have to say me winning wimbledon. i guess the best time, british number one, home fans, home tournament, had a year abroad so it‘s nice to be here staying at home, you get your home comforts. there‘s obviously all those good things and family coming to watch. so it‘s a really good time of year and there‘s always a real buzz around it. it's
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it‘s going to be a very different wimbledon experience for him this summer being the british 11. adorably and all of the attention. he seems very sensible. he hesitated when he was asked about liverpool wimbledon. isn't it nice to look at the tennis? it is looking forward to summer. lots of people are enjoying the prospect of sunshine. please send us your pictures. alternatively, you can just look
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alternatively, you canjust look at the weather, you don‘t have to send it or take the weather, you don‘t have to send it ortakea the weather, you don‘t have to send it or take a picture, you could just enjoy the moment. i like seeing the pictures. you have got a choice. temperatures are set to rise in the uk this bank holiday weekend, with the highest predicted in the south. sarah is in eastbourne this morning. it is looking rather glorious there. it is beautiful. there are certainly worse places to be early on friday morning. iam worse places to be early on friday morning. i am in eastbourne this morning. i am in eastbourne this morning on the east sussex coast, it is beautiful start to the day and eastbourne is one of our really british coastal resorts. it is going to bea british coastal resorts. it is going to be a busy weekend heading towards the coast across many parts of the country. we are expecting a fine, sunny and warm by conor daly kent. around the coast, it will be: —— bank holiday weekend. it will be cooler around the coast, but it will be sunny so pack up your suncream. 0ver
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the coast, but it will be sunny so pack up your suncream. over the next few days, a lot of fine and dry weather across the country. quite a bit of sunshine coming through and that will lift the temperatures nicely. we could see temperatures in the mid or high 20s by the time we get to bank on a day monday. today is quite a fresh start to the day, some sunshine around across parts of southern and eastern england, eastern scotland, a bit more cloud across other parts of the country particularly towards the north—west. more breezy with the showers towards the north—west of scotland. temperatures 17—21dc so it will feel the warm letter on particularly towards eastern scotland and england. largely dry this evening and overnight, one or two light showers in the far west of scotland where it will be breezy. light winds elsewhere so one or two misty patch is developing so for most of us it will not be as chilly as it has been most mornings. a bit cooler and
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pressure towards the east first thing. any mysterious clears away early saturday and it is looking like a fine and dry day. breezy and cloudy for north—west part of scotla nd cloudy for north—west part of scotland with one or two showers, elsewhere, looking dry with variable amounts of cloud, the rest of the sunshine in southern and eastern parts of england. temperatures 18—21 agrees on saturday. into saturday evening, it remains fine if you have plans for a barbecue and that sets us plans for a barbecue and that sets us upfor plans for a barbecue and that sets us up for another fine day on sunday. but there is some misty conditions in north scotland, and around the irish sea so it could be gloomy around some coastal part around the irish sea. it should brighten up and bridges will respond, 23 degrees possible in the warmest spots on sunday. bank holiday monday will be the warmest day, some sunshine on offer and a little bit of cloud, cooler around
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coastal parts of north england and scotla nd coastal parts of north england and scotland but for many of us, looking beautiful. temperatures up to possibly 27 celsius, and that would make it the warmest early may bank holiday on record. things are looking fine over the next couple of days, certainly some really decent weather for getting out and days, certainly some really decent weatherfor getting out and enjoying the coast. most of the results for the local elections are in, the last seats will be declared at roughly six o‘clock this evening. political analyst, professorjohn curtice, has been crunching the numbers all night, hejoins us now from our london newsroom. how are you feeling, are you 0k? are you full of caffeine and ready to go? this is par for the course, elections come with an all—night session and at the moment i am still awake! you have been watching as the results have come in all night, have you had a moment to pause and give
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us you had a moment to pause and give usa you had a moment to pause and give us a big picture thoughts, what is your impression right now? the big picture thought is in a sense not all great deal has happened. there are very few changes in seats won and lost by each party, very few changes of council control. but behind that apparent stasis, there isa behind that apparent stasis, there is a big picture story to tell. a few weeks ago we will told that perhaps theresa may would be under pressure under her continual leadership because she would face a disastrous set of local election results, that disaster has not happened. the conservatives have hung on to wandsworth and westminster. they have lost a little bit of ground in london but they have gained a bit of ground in the rest of the uk. all the rest of england. that means that probably conservative and labour can convert
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this local election results in what they would mean into a general election, they are still pretty close to being even stevens. which is roughly where the two parties we re is roughly where the two parties were four years ago when the seats that were contested yesterday were last up for that were contested yesterday were last upforgrabs, that were contested yesterday were last up for grabs, so not much has happened. but because the expectations had been set up that maybe the conservatives would do badly and labour would do well, that means that this morning labour look rather disappointed. they a chilly don‘t have any gains so far but they can lord, they have got a couple disappointing result in derby and nuneaton. but the conservatives can say, opposition should do well in local elections and you have not done that well. reading through what you are saying about the almost status quo situation, then we dropped back as you were explaining to what the expectations were and
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whether the parties can feel satisfied with almost staying where they were? i think the answer is the conservative party will feel relatively satisfied in having done this well in the local elections four years ago and the labour party will not because of those by virgin expectations. that still means that the labour party is in a better position —— by virgin the labour party is in a better position than it was in the general elections. you can see why there is a sense of disappointment, though, for neighbour, particularly in london. labour thought that it would be able to give the conservatives a bloody nose but it could be that at the end of the day the labour party will fail to take a single council in london, so most of the capital will be still run by labour but they
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will be still run by labour but they will not have those totemic councils of wandsworth and westminster. the lib dems and ukip, these fortunes so divergent, now? the ukip vote has collapsed and that is a repetition of what happened in the general election. part of the reason that the conservatives have done better than some people expected, where the ukip vote collapsed, the conservatives have particularly benefited so they did well in those parts of the country that voted leave. for the liberal democrats edited progress, vote up a few points on a few years ago, but nothing like as dramatic or as strong as they were before they were in coalition before the vote fell away in what people thought was a bad deal in the coalition. so a long way to go, but they have a big gain in richmond in the territory of
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their leader vince cable and that means they do have something to cheer about. thank you for your forbearance and making it through the night, and to 6:50am on friday morning! you must get a buzz from all the news coming through. high street retailers have been closing stores, shedding jobs and struggling to make sales. easter was a let down so can the bank holiday and the royal wedding give them a lift? sean is taking a look for us. yes, we heard yesterday that concessions in some of the stores like abundance and house of fraser are having problems. —— dermot —— debenhams and house of fraser. but a possible lifeline for them over the next few weeks. the bad weather really hit retailers hard. according to bdo sales were down nearly 4% in april. they didn‘t fare much better in march.
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but the retailers are banking on a bumper may. not only are there two bank holidays but of course that royal wedding. 0ne market research company says it could generate half a billion pounds of extra sales in the uk, about half of that is coming from commemorative souvenirs. let‘s talk to diane wehrle, insights director at springboard. they keep a close eye on the high street. good morning. if the sun is out this weekend, as has been predicted and it‘s really hot, are people really going to be going, i will take advantage of the weather and go shopping? in part, yes, they do. we track the footfall across the uk and a couple of weekends ago when it was really hot, we saw an 8% increase week on week, and 2% over the year. so people do respond to good weather and want to go out and spent time
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with friends and family in high streets, perhaps, or in retail parks. enjoy it as a leisure experience. we might as well talk about a couple that might be spending some money this weekend themselves but they are hosting a big event in a few weeks, the royal wedding, those commemorative souvenirs and all that, will it really boost retailers or is it a niche retailer that will benefit?m isa niche retailer that will benefit?m is a niche but spending does tend to go is a niche but spending does tend to 9° up is a niche but spending does tend to go up around special events, it creates a feel—good factor and people have parties and barbecues, and that means that people buy food and that means that people buy food and beverages in grocery stores, but also they get a much more positive feel and that permeates through consumers and they want to enjoy things much more. we need that right now because we have not had much positivity over the last few months. when you keep an eye on the number of people who are heading to shops, do you actually see them spending any money at the minute? we have
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heard this week that people are borrowing a lot less on credit cards than they were previously, things are tightening up, the economy is not rowing as strongly as it was, so what are people when they hit the shops? there is a structural change under pinning the way we use our destinations and go shopping, we are not just destinations and go shopping, we are notjust going to buy stuff, we used to do notjust going to buy stuff, we used todoa notjust going to buy stuff, we used to do a lot of that in the 80s and 905. a to do a lot of that in the 805 and 905. a lot of us are renting now and we have small spaces in which we live so we don‘t have much space to put all this stuff and we have quite a lot already. people are going out and they tend to eat andrew and —— eat and and they tend to eat andrew and —— eatand drink and they tend to eat andrew and —— eat and drink and have coffee and we 5ee eat and drink and have coffee and we see that in the plethora of eating places that have opened up. but people are now finding the pinch in that. the experience is now more rounded, it‘5 that. the experience is now more rounded, it‘s not just that. the experience is now more rounded, it‘5 notjust about buying goods, it‘5 rounded, it‘5 notjust about buying goods, it‘s about enjoying time and leisure and eating and drinking and socialising. that is what retail needs to in brace, and is make it an
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experience in shoppers. so if we have lots of stuff at home, will we be buying more tat? it could be more digital, we will be downloading photos and putting them on our pc. we have seen a springboard that positive events can increase footfall by about 5% so it can happen but it does not really last. it dissipate over time. i'm sure we will get you back on to see what happens after the event. a few little stats, when the duke and duchess got married, 350,000 more tourists came in. 2% increase in retail sales, it was a bang, they this —— that was a bank holiday as well. i wonder if more americans will come over? probably. i think i wonder if more americans will come over? probably. ithink they i wonder if more americans will come over? probably. i think they did
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last time, chinese and americans are pretty important for us at the minute. time to get the local election results, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. it‘s been a successful night for the liberal democrats in london, winning control of richmond council in the local elections. no other councils have changed hands so far despite labour having set its sights on boroughs including wandsworth and westminster. however, the conservatives have seen a drop in the number of councillors overall in the capital. here‘s our political correspondent karl mercer. a night that started with smiles and the hope of something special, but one that before long turned into one of anxious looks and worried glances. it wasn‘t the triumphant night labour had hoped for in the tory stronghold of wandsworth. they had hoped for an historic win but it wasn‘t to be. labour did win seats from the conservatives, just not enough. national politics washes into people‘s minds.
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0ur message was relentlessly local. it is about bins, your streets, the potholes. it was a similar story in westminster. the conservatives held on here despite losing seats to labour. not much of a bloody nose. perhaps a slap on the wrist, but certainly not a knockout punch. we actually gained a seat from labour this evening so i think it‘s a win—win for the people of westminster. i'd like to have made more gains but it's good to have it was always a mountain to climb. the swings required were enormous. we've given it our best shot, a really good try and we've made some good progress. in hillingdon, where labour had hoped to gain seats — if not the council — the tories actually won more than last time. down in the south—west, there were lib dems tears...ofjoy. the glum tory faces in richmond told their own story on a night when they lost control of the council to their nearest rivals, but were also pushed into third place when the greens
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picked up four seats here. i am now the new green party councillor for ham, petersham and richmond riverside, the longest name in the country, but in the borough of richmond. this area voted heavily to remain during the brexit referendum. the council‘s new leader says that was key in these local elections. it‘s been huge. we were a heavy remain borough, heavily pro—european community. we don‘t like what theresa may orjeremy corbyn‘s had to offer on brexit. success for the lib dems, too, in neighbouring sutton, where they held on to control of the council despite losing seats to the conservatives. we‘ve heard the conservatives have held on to kensington and chelsea. labour target barnet is yet to declare. we‘re also waiting on a result from the mayoral election in tower hamlets. let‘s have a very brief look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there‘s a good service on all lines at the moment. this is how the blackwall tunnel is looking this morning —
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already very busy on the southbound approach. let‘s have a look at the weather. today will be dry with some sunshine, although cloud will tend to build during the afternoon. there‘ll be light winds but it will be pleasantly warm with a maximum temperature of up to 21 degrees. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. it is the biggest test of political opinion since last year‘s general election. the local election results are coming in — we‘ll have reaction and analysis. good morning, it‘s friday 4th may. also this morning... the breast cancer screening scandal — 8,000 calls to a helpline as it emerges concerns were raised more than a year ago. a world first — a national
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review into why so many people with learning disabilities die early will be published in the next few hours. good morning. are you off on holiday this weekend? last year millions of people travelled without insurance so i‘ll be taking a look at the risks of going without. in sport, no joy for arsenal in the europa league. atletico madrid celebrate a place in the final — denying arsene wenger the chance to leave his club with one last trophy. i think most of us can celebrate a sunny weekend. sarah has more. i‘m in eastbourne, where it is a glorious start of the day. many will be heading to the coast over the next few days because we are expecting some sunny and warm weather for the bank holiday. expecting some sunny and warm weatherfor the bank holiday. all the details in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. labour and the conservatives have lost control of key councils as counting countinues in 150 authorities across england.
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the tories did well outside of london holding on to key battle grounds. labour increased its vote in the capital but failed to win some specifically targeted seats. the liberal democrats made gains, but it was a night to forget for ukip. 0ur political correspondent, jonathan blake, has the story of the night. cheering. one side think they are winning, but so does the other. a long night in the london borough of wandsworth. once a rock—solid tory council that labour thought it could win. they gained seats, but not enough, and the conservatives held on. and through the night, across england, those who set and spend your council tax watched and waited for the voters‘ verdict. cheering. there was celebration in swindon, another council labour wanted to win, but again the conservatives kept control. i‘m absolutely delighted that we‘ve fended off a significant challenge from the labour party. they‘ve worked very hard in six of our seats, they‘ve brought in a lot of people,
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spent a lot of time and money and effort into trying to take some of those seats, and they‘ve not taken one from us. plymouth was labour‘s big win of the night, they took it from the tories at 2:30am. labour were loving it in trafford, too, where the conservatives lost control of what was their only council in the north—west of england. trafford wanted a change, it needs a change, and i think that‘s what it‘s going to get. we‘re pleased. it's gone absolutely fantastically. i think it's a triumph for labour. voters needed id in gosport and a handful of other places running a trial to cut fraud. there are claims some people were turned away but the government played down any problems. i think it's my passport i've got, i'd better check. yes, it's my passport, everybody! yellow was the winning colour in richmond—upon—thames — the liberal democrats took that london borough from the tories. 0ne place where views on brexit may have come into play. more than 4,000 seats, 150 councils,
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mayors elected, too. this has been the biggest test of political opinion since the general election last year. and it‘s not over yet. the picture so far is patchy and there are more results still to come. and a third of the results won‘t be known until counting starts later today. there will be coverage on the bbc throughout the day. 0ur political correspondent eleanor garnierjoins us from westminster. good morning. there‘s always stories to tell the morning after a vote, but i‘m hearing already those words, mixed results, status quo. tell us your analysis of what‘s happened this morning. i think those words are this morning. i think those words a re pretty this morning. i think those words are pretty accurate, charlie. no big shocks, no big size of surprise. we
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haven‘t seen decisive ships to either of the main parties. for labour, there probably will be some disappointment, perhaps some confusion, too. they put a lot of effort, a lot of energy into these local elections and haven‘t seen the significant progress that many in the progress had been anticipating. pa rt the progress had been anticipating. part of that problem might be down to expectation management. 0n the other side, for the conservatives, i expect there is a massive amount of relief this morning. they had been expecting a difficult set of results and in general across the board they have managed to hold up. just think, we are eight years into austerity, eight years into the conservatives being a government either on their own or in coalition, and traditionally governments get a kicking in local elections but that hasn‘t happened. we are not seeing conservatives haemorrhaging support. they have benefited from the colla pse they have benefited from the collapse in the ukip vote. we are two thirds of our way into the results being declared. we won‘t know the absolute final pitch until
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later this afternoon. thank you very much. we will speak to our correspondence through the morning. we will be speaking to all of the political parties. and we‘ll be talking to the conservative party chairman brandon lewis in just under 10 minutes. it‘s emerged public health england was warned about the breast cancer screening errors last year. two nhs health trusts raised concerns in march 2017, but were told it was a local — rather than a national — matter. 450,000 women were not invited to breast cancer screenings due to a computer error. an independent review has been announced by the government. public health england has said the response to the crisis cannot be rushed. we‘ve had an expert advisory group running with expert clinicians who have told us they are very clear that women need to have a helpline in place to have all of these things and for us to have the complete picture before we go out to them so that we don‘t calls... cause them any more anxiety. volkswagen‘s former chief executive, martin winterkorn, has been charged
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with conspiracy to defraud the united states and violating the clean air act in connection with the diesel emissions scandal. prosecutors there claim he knew that his company‘s vehicles were cheating in emissions tests. mr winterkorn resigned from vw shortly after the scandal emerged in 2015 twitter has warned its 330 million users to change their passwords. the site said a technical glitch had led to some passwords being stored in plain text on an internal computer system. sean is here. they said there was a tweet, appropriately, last night, from twitter and its chief executive jack dawson that said these users need to change because of a glitch, to put it mildly, in twitter‘s internal systems. there ended up being a file somewhere in those internal network at twitter that have a huge number of people‘s passwords on in open glory for all to see. it was there. the key bit is, even though that file was there, twitter say it hadn‘t been misused in any way. they
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don‘t expect any breach of it, but for transparency they are telling their users, you could have had your password open on one of these files, so password open on one of these files, so they are recommended to everyone to change them. what is the likelihood that people are actually going to change it? there is a resista nce going to change it? there is a resistance to having too many different passwords. this is a bit of the problem. it feels like, we kept the week, month after month, there is somewhere that has been hacked or have a security breach. it's hacked or have a security breach. it‘s hard to keep track of all your passwords. i changed mine this morning on twitter and it publicly took me a good five minutes to think of something that i knew i would rememberfor the next of something that i knew i would remember for the next time of something that i knew i would rememberfor the next time i use it. if it's rememberfor the next time i use it. if it‘s one of the applications you use regularly, you need to know the password. what is it? i'm sure you could guess. no, you wouldn‘t guess. not mine. funnily enough... thank you. we have been warned. let‘s pick up with the rest of the stories. bill cosby and roman polanski have been expelled from the us academy of motion picture arts and sciences.
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the academy — which runs the oscars — said this was done in accordance with its standards of conduct. tv star cosby was convicted of sexual assault last month. oscar—winning director polanski admitted statutory rape of a 13—year—old girl in 1977. hundreds of afghan interpreters who served with uk troops fighting the taliban will not have to pay for the right to stay in britain. more than 150 interpreters said they faced going back to afghanistan when they expire, unless they paid £2400 for indefinite leave to remain. the home secretary says the fee will be waived because they put their lives at risk for the country. a volcano has erupted in hawaii. mount kilauea erupted on the big island of hawaii. thousands of people have been told to leave their homes after lava ran down into a residential area. kilauea is one of the world‘s most active volcanoes. you can see some of the images
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there. they never fail to impress, volcanoes, do they? hopefully eve ryo ne volcanoes, do they? hopefully everyone is safe there. 7:10am. the conservatives benefited from the collapse in ukip‘s vote in many areas in the local elections. however the party lost control of richmond in london and plymouth. joining us now from westminster is conservative party chairman, brandon lewis. thanks very much forjoining us this morning. what‘s your overall feeling in terms of how the conservatives have fared in this round of local elections? good morning. ithink it‘s been a good night for us. a dreadful night for labour. they were promising to sweep the board in london. they haven‘t gained at the moment a single council in london. 0bviously moment a single council in london. obviously there are still results to come in. what we‘ve seen across the country is people voting on those local issues actually wanting to see good services provided by good
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conservative councils. 0ur conservative councils. 0ur conservative family ran the country have worked hard, real team effort to get that message out there. you‘ve gone straight in with why it was bad for labour. where do you think you could have improved or wish you‘d done better? think you could have improved or wish you'd done better? we never like to see the loss of any councillors. i‘m about eight years into government now, it‘s astonishing. labour had lost some 4000 councillors when they were eight years in. the loss of any council is sad. hard—working people. particularly when he realised we lost control of traffic and plymouth and we want to work to windows bag. it's and we want to work to windows bag. it‘s a good night for us but it‘s just stage one. we have work to do as we go forward to the next general election and as part of that, we will want to win back those councillors across the country. how will you win back the councillors in trafford and plymouth? they were significant losses by the conservative party. trafford has been a marginal council, a small
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majority going into these local elections, but we want to make sure we can show people in trafford the reasons trafford was the lowest council tax in the area, £154 roughly cheaply than surrounding labour councils, is because it was well managed by conservatives. we wa nt to well managed by conservatives. we want to show people they can have a conservative council again in the future and do the work to try to win that fight. similarly in plymouth, where we had some really hard—working where we had some really ha rd—working councillors. where we had some really hard—working councillors. what we have seen around the country and where we‘ve seen labour lose, derby... , interrupt? we are going to be talking to the labour party so we let them talk about how they‘ve done. let‘s talk about plymouth. 0ne of the councils was talking about defence cuts and how that was a real problem in local areas. it is highlighting detachment that some councillors are feeling between government and what‘s happening at local level and as you said people wa nt to local level and as you said people want to vote on local issues that impact them immediately. as i say, we wa nt impact them immediately. as i say, we want to be working to win back the councillors we have lost. councils like plymouth, but also recognising we had really quite impressive gains in dudley, in
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wa lsa ll, impressive gains in dudley, in walsall, taking control of peterborough, basildon, we‘ve done well in southend, and holding councils in london that everyone said we couldn‘t do. that‘s because of the good work conservative councillors do and what i‘ve seen on the ground when i‘ve been travelling around the country over the last few months is people talking about the fa ct months is people talking about the fact that they‘ve seen a really good clear strong leadership from our prime minister and they respect that and want to see that in the local government, as well. there are people in plymouth, councillors, defence cuts. there are also concerns about how the whole windrush debacle has been dealt with by the conservative party. these obviously feed through. what will you do to work must disconnect the future? there's a couple of points there. firstly, we are increasing defence spending. the defence team are working hard to make sure we have got, as we always have, the most fantastic defence systems and armed forces in the world. we‘ll be working closely with the team in plymouth to make sure we do all the work we need to do to give a good conservative council again. across
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the country, i felt people have focused on local issues, making sure the things that matter do us other day. our bins collected, car parking, schools, potholes, they are being dealt with the way good conservative councils do. even with windrush, its not often on the doorsteps but where it has we‘ve had people making the point that, yes, we obviously are very clear that these are british people. we want to do the right thing and make sure we get that sorted out and the focus and determination of the prime minister doing that is something people have recognised. we spoke to laura kuenssberg this morning and one of the points she made, and i think any people are feeling this this morning, is off when you have local elections, you have big election night and expect a real shift. there doesn‘t seem to have been a shift, or a significant gain by any party. isn‘t that disappointing for the party in government? we've made some games across england. significant, significant gains. let'sjust remember we are eight years into government. 0thersimilarstage, labour lost stop 4000 councillors.
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—— lost some 4000 councillors. i am clear about the fact this is stage one of a four—year period of work in terms of our party work towards the next general election. what we have seen next general election. what we have seen overnight is people in all parts of the country, in a range of areas, wanting to opt for good conservative local government and backing the prime minister and what she‘s doing for our country. backing the prime minister and what she's doing for our country. brandon lewis, chair of the conservative party, thank you. we will be talking to the other parties as well, ed davey from the liberal democrats will be talking to us and andrew greene, the shadow community secretary from labour talking to us later. in connection with the results themselves, some of those results yet in. some won‘t be complete until saturday morning. most will be in by the end of today so we‘ll keep you up—to—date as those come in. marking the start of a bank holiday weekend for all of us. it‘s looking good outside. we saw westminster this morning. central london is
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looking glorious. and this we‘ve been sent this picture of this morning‘s sunrise in merthyr tydfil. thank you for that. that was sent to us on thank you for that. that was sent to us on twitter. it‘s been a lovely morning for many. if you want to see what that sunset is looking like a little later, we can go to eastbourne beach. doing the weather from down there. what a beautiful location that is. i‘m seeing a lot of cloud above! good morning. it is a beautiful start to the day here. there‘s a bit of cloud just drifting in from the sea, but there are blue skies to be seen sea, but there are blue skies to be seen overhead, two and that will be the story for many parts of the country. there is a bit of cloud out there, so not wall—to—wall sunshine but things are looking decent. in eastbourne, this town holds the record for the sunniest month recorded anywhere in the uk. that was back in 1911 when there was 384
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hours of beautiful sunshine. through the weekend ahead, a lot of sunshine here in eastbourne, but across many parts of the country, holiday—makers will be flocking towards the coast to search out those rays of sunshine around. how is it shaping up through the bank holiday weekend? high—pressure building, so lots of fine and dry weather on the cards. spells of sunshine for many and those temperatures will be responding. they‘ll be on the way up, so it could be the warmest bank holiday, early may bank holiday monday, on record. today, a fresh start but some sunshine across many southern and eastern parts of england, eastern scotland. a bit more cloud across some other parts of the country, particularly for the north—west of scotland where it is quite breezy with one or two showers. those temperatures will be doing fairly well for most, between 15 to 21 degrees. fine, largely dry weather sticks around through this afternoon and in onto this evening, as well. one or two showers across
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the far north—west of scotland. it should be dry elsewhere. 0vernight, a bit of mist and fog forming in a few spots, particularly around western coasts and also through the midlands, towards lincolnshire. a fairamount of midlands, towards lincolnshire. a fair amount of cloud around. temperatures won‘t be as chilly as in recent morning. for many, it will be staying in double figures overnight tonight. saturday, a largely fine day. probably the best of the sunshine will be the southern and eastern part of the country once again. sunny spells developing more widely by the afternoon. most of us dry but again a chance of one or two spots of light rain for the far north—west of scotland. temperatures between 18 to perhaps 21 degrees once again through the day tomorrow. it is looking fine and ends will be warming up. the warming trend continues into sunday, too. any early morning mist and fog should clear to leave a good deal of sunshine on sunday, particularly across england and wales and a bit more cloud to the north—west of the uk where it will be quite breezy at times. some low cloud and fog around
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the irish sea coast for a time, but temperatures up to around 23 degrees or so temperatures up to around 23 degrees orso in the temperatures up to around 23 degrees or so in the warmest spots. it should feel quite pleasant. that sets us opt for a fine bank holiday monday. it should be the warmest day of the bank holiday weekend. some mist and fog like the first thing but that should clear away and then a lot of sunshine on offer once again. bit breezy and cloudierfor the far north—west and a slightly cooler day for eastern scotland and north east england, as well. chance ofan north east england, as well. chance of an isolated shower in the south—west but i think most of us should stay dry. lots of sunshine, 26 degrees, possibly 27, and we are likely to be seeing the warmest early may bank holiday on record. things are looking fine, many will be heading to the coast, but don‘t forget the sun cream because uv levels are looking quite tight through this weekend. it does look rather lovely down there. in the next hour, the world‘s first national review into the deaths of people with learning disabilities is expected to reveal significant concerns about the number of premature deaths.
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the report by nhs england is expected to show the average age at which those with learning disabilities die is significantly lower, compared to the general population. jayne mccubbin reports. stephanie died at 25 after spending seven years largely in this one room. that‘s why i‘m here. we have to stop this. richard died at 33, of constipation. it's devastating, really. it shouldn't have happened. and laura died at 21 after going into hospital for a routine eye operation. what they see is the person what‘s sat on that bed with all the disabilities, she can‘t talk, she can‘t walk, she‘s got this, that and the other. what they didn‘t see at the back was that lovely girl what we knew. what was so happy. these are just some of the deaths we‘ve reported on the last 12 months but it was the death of this young
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man back in 2012 which led to a promise of action. connor sparrowhawk‘s death had been passed off as of natural causes but it was neglect. people don‘t really care about people like connor. it‘s just bewildering, really. it led his mum to ask one crucial question — how many more? how many more deaths have there been, how many of those deaths have had proper scrutiny? jeremy hunt promised to try and answer that question with the world‘s first national review into the deaths of people with learning disabilities. this will be a very important moment to step back and look at the way we look after that particular highly vulnerable group. that review is published later this morning. its findings, we are told, will highlight a problem long known, that people with learning disabilities die too young and too often those deaths are avoidable. and jayne joins us now. when we first heard those words from
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families there, these stories are so personal. there will be a lot of expectation around a report on this issue. there will be, because the promise made byjeremy hunt was a world first, a huge commitment, this promise was to give fresh scrutiny to every single death of an adult with learning disabilities in england. a huge commitment. a few months ago, we revealed what these review teams on the ground were already starting to see, and that was that there were concerns. at that point, one in ten deaths. at that point, one in ten deaths. at that point, one in ten deaths. at that point if they said it might mean things like abuse, neglect, gaps in care, delays in treatment. these are problems that we have all known about for quite some time. backin known about for quite some time. back in 2007, mencap published a report called death by indifference.
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i spoke to the author of that report yesterday and she said the institutional discrimination that people were facing back then, people are still facing today. she said to me, you can see that. from the moment a family is taken aside by a doctor who hasn‘t done the things they would have done for anyone else in the same situation, perhaps with the belief that that person‘s life is not worth saving in the same way. she said you can see it in the families that have defied the scrutiny, in the coroners thatjust don‘t seem to get these problems. there have been changes. things like health passports, health checks annually, but people like richard in that report had all those things and still died it seems something more ofa still died it seems something more of a cultural shift that is needed. it's of a cultural shift that is needed. it‘s a world first. whenjeremy hunt made the announcement, the world pricked up its ears to get this kind of information. yet we‘ve not had anyone put out from the government or the department of health. know, and that is a huge disappointment.
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so many people. we have absolutely, repeatedly asked. we asked beverly dawkins, who wrote that death by indifference report. what it says is that the nhs isn‘t fully committed to getting on top of this problem otherwise they would be talking about it today. it‘s a huge moment. we are expecting it then around half an hour. when that happens you will tell us much more. thanks. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m victoria hollins. it‘s been a successful night for the liberal democrats in london — winning control of richmond council in the local elections. no other councils have changed hands so far and labour haven‘t managed to win the councils it aimed for — including wandsworth and westminster — although the party
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did increase the number of its councillors across london. here‘s our political correspondent karl mercer. a night that started with smiles and the hope of something special, but one that before long turned into one of anxious looks and worried glances. it wasn‘t the triumphant night labour had hoped for in the tory stronghold of wandsworth. they had hoped for an historic win but it wasn‘t to be. labour did win seats from the conservatives, just not enough. national politics washes into people‘s minds. 0ur message was relentlessly local. it is about bins, your streets, the potholes. it was a similar story in westminster. the conservatives held on here despite losing seats to labour. not much of a bloody nose. perhaps a slap on the wrist, but certainly not a knockout punch. we actually gained a seat from labour this evening so i think it‘s a win—win for the people of westminster. it was always a mountain to climb.
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the swings required were enormous. we've given it our best shot, a really good try and we've made some good progress. disappointment for labour in barnet. they needed one extra seat but failed, with the tories taking hold. very sad. we are shocked. we thought we would be able to win the council for the sake of the people of barnet. down in the south—west, there were lib dems tears...ofjoy. the glum tory faces in richmond told their own story on a night when they lost control of the council to their nearest rivals, but were also pushed into third place when the greens picked up four seats here. i am now the new green party councillor for ham, petersham and richmond riverside, the longest name in the country, but in the borough of richmond. this area voted heavily to remain during the brexit referendum. the council‘s new leader says that was key in these local elections. we‘re a heavily
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pro—european community. we don‘t like what theresa may orjeremy corbyn‘s had to offer on brexit. success for the lib dems, too, in neighbouring sutton, where they held on to control of the council despite losing seats to the conservatives. in the last few hours, the conservatives have held on to kensington and chelsea, which was another key target for labour. there are still results to come in, including the mayoral election in tower hamlets. let‘s have a very brief look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there‘s a good service on all lines at the moment. let‘s have a check on the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. the weather is looking lovely, not just today but also over the rest of the bank holiday weekend. now, this picture was taken yesterday. today will be a few degrees warmer, again dry with lots of sunshine around, just turning cloudier later on this afternoon. this is how we are starting off the morning, it‘s milder than it was this time yesterday. some of our temperatures already into double figures.
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a bit of cloud out towards the west but lots of sunshine developing through the morning everywhere and then it will turn cloudier into the afternoon. still some good spells of sunshine, some good breaks in the cloud. and a lot of that cloud will melt away again as we head into the evening. top temperatures between 18 and 21 degrees. through this evening and overnight, again some cloud around at times but lots of clear spells and we will start off the morning tomorrow in double figures for most areas. a mild start to the day, some decent spells of sunshine on and off through the day on saturday. temperatures all the way up to 21 or 22 celsius. how high can those temperatures go? well, i think by the time we‘re into sunday, bank holiday monday, we‘ll be up to 25 degrees, but somewhere towards the north—west of the capital could get as high as 26 or 27. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. here‘s a summary of this morning‘s
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main stories from bbc news. labour and the conservatives have lost control of key councils as counting countinues in 150 authorities across england. the tories did well outside of london holding on to key battle grounds. labour increased its vote in the capital but failed to win some specifically targeted seats. the liberal democrats made gains, but it was a night to forget for ukip. earlier our political editor laura kuenssberg told me the results hadn‘t been very startling. do you know what‘s really interesting to me this morning, naga, the last time we‘ve done these big overnight programmes, you stay up and you drink a lot of tea and eat a lot of twixes, if you‘re me, anyway, every time i‘ve done that in the last few years, at this point in the morning, you‘re going, wow, something really unexpected has happened, there‘s been a big dramatic result in a way that we hadn‘t anticipated. what‘s happened tonight really is voters around england in these 150 councils, and we haven‘t got all of the results yet, that won‘t be
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until the end of the day, have kind of opted for something a bit more like the status quo. now, if you are the tories, you‘re really relieved about that because they had been expecting maybe not a disaster but certainly a difficult night. and if you‘re in the labour party, you‘re probably a bit disappointed and maybe a bit puzzled because they had been putting a lot of effort and a lot of energy into these local elections and they did think that they were on the verge of making more progress than they actually have done. political coverage will continue throughout the morning as the results come in, the latest results will not be in until saturday. it‘s emerged public health england was warned about the breast cancer screening errors last year. two nhs health trusts raised concerns in march 2017, but were told it was a local rather than a national matter. 450,000 women were not invited to breast cancer screenings due to a computer error.
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an independent review has been announced by the government. volkswagen‘s former chief executive, martin winterkorn, has been charged with conspiracy to defraud the united states and violating the clean air act in connection with the diesel emissions scandal. prosecutors there claim he knew that his company‘s vehicles were cheating in emissions tests. mr winterkorn resigned from vw shortly after the scandal emerged in 2015 bill cosby and roman polanski have been expelled from the us academy of motion picture arts and sciences. the academy, which runs the oscars, said this was done in accordance with its standards of conduct. tv star cosby was convicted of sexual assault last month. oscar—winning director polanski admitted statutory rape of a 13—year—old girl in 1977. twitter has warned its 330 million users to change their passwords. the site said a technical glitch had led to some passwords being stored in plain text on an internal computer system. in a blog post twitter said
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the error has been fixed and there was no indication that passwords had been stolen or misused by anyone. a volcano has erupted on the largest island in hawaii, triggering an evacuation. witnesses said lava from mount kilauea burst across a road like a "curtain on fire". thousands of people have been told to leave their homes after the lava ran down into a residential area. a local state of emergency has been declared. you can see some of the images there of the lava flow as the eruption took place. time now is 7:33am. time to talk to mike. huge characters in sport, we a lwa ys mike. huge characters in sport, we always enjoy them and their su ccesses , always enjoy them and their
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successes, but sometimes when it comes to the end, they are not a lwa ys comes to the end, they are not always dealt the best hand. riddick comes to going out on a high. -- when it comes to going out on a high. neutrals would have been willing arsene wenger to go out on a high and win a european trevi, which he has never done with arsenal. this was his final chance to finish the love story, as he called it, with arsenal well, but it had not happened. no room in sentiment in football. the fairy tale ending wasn‘t to be for arsene wenger at arsenal. it was ruined by former chelsea striker, diego costa who once again played the ogre role. he was a constant menace and put atletico ahead in their europa league semi final, when he lost his marker and smashed the ball high into the net. the spaniards have only conceded four goals at home in the league all season, and arsenal couldn‘t find a way back.
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it's it‘s very difficult to take. as well for the club, now, some time to think about what to do for next season and i think there are some good ingredient in our team and maybe we will bounce back, these players, they have quality and with the right petitions in the summer, the right petitions in the summer, the team will compete next you. —— right additions that he will compete next year. marseille will compete in the final against atletico madrid. it‘s more extreme than the tour de france and is the first big cycle race of the season. the giro d‘italia starts today, and all attention will be on britain‘s chris froome. team sky have defended froome‘s involvement, despite his ongoing anti—doping case. this is the one he now wants, having won the tour de france and vuelta a espana. only six men in history have won all three of the big tours. the race actually starts in israel before finishing at the end of the month in rome. what a moment for yorkshireman harry tanfield, who has won the first stage of the tour de yorkshire.
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he won commonwealth silver for england last month, and caused a major upset, as he held off his rivals in a sprint finish for the stage between beverley and donaster. mark cavendish finished further back in the main peleton. today‘s second of four stages starts in barnsley. the women‘s event is a two—day race. the netherland‘s kirsten vild, edging this bunch sprint at the line. she was the favourite prior to the stage from beverley to doncaster and had too much power for everyone else. britain‘s alice barnes finished third. former england batsman jonathan trott has announced he‘ll retire from cricket at the end of the season. trott was a member of three ashes—winning sides, including the squad that won the ashes in australia for the first time in 25 years, in 2010/11. when you‘ve played as long as i have, it‘s important that you, a, make sure the decision is right for you but also you think of the club as well. and with some young players coming through here, it‘s important the likes of myself and the senior players, we look after those players and also make sure they get the right opportunity. barry hawkins and john higgins lead their semi—finals
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at snooker‘s world championship. hawkins, who was a finalist five years ago, has a 5—3 lead against two—time winner mark williams. they will resume this afternoon. before thatjohn higgins, who‘s going fo a fifth title, will hope to extend his 5—3 lead against kyren wilson. the weather is getting better which makes you think of grass court tennis. britain‘s new number one kyle edmund plays today in the quarterfinals of the estoril open in portugal against home favourite joao sousa, but will be full of confidence now that he‘s shot up to 23 in the world rankings, and thanks to his football team. as he starts looking ahead to the french open and wimbledon, i went down for a knock up with him at queens, where he will be competing in the fever tree championships in june. it‘s turning out to be some year for kyle edmund. showing off his fancy football skills at queens with his beloved liverpool team into the champions league final, he goes into the summer grand slams as british number one,
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overtaking the injured andy murray. it obviously feels good, it‘s one of them when you‘re sort of in the moment, it‘s just a ranking, it doesn‘t change what you do or how you train or how you think or anything. it‘s one of them where you look back on it, you can be proud. kyle showed me the spin that has helped propel his remarkable rise up the rankings and which was too good for top—10 players like grigor dimitrov at the australian open, as edmund stunned the tennis world by reaching the semifinals. amazing experience, first of all. good to experience, i guess, the physical demands, the mental demands, staying on it every day throughout the tournament. it was just really, it was a new experience for me but something that was great to learn from. more people recognise you. i do enjoy that side of things, especially when kids come up and ask, it‘s really nice for them because i was once that age and realised to have someone who you looked up to and to be able to see them or take a picture,
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it means a lot. now his aim is to take his current form into the french open and wimbledon and go further than the second round. if i was sliding around a bit on the clay, it‘s very different when the players suddenly have to switch to grass. going from clay to grass, when you‘re so used to sliding, you have to then tell yourself, don‘t slide. so then when you hit on the grass, you almost have to hit and sort of slowdown. to compete with kyle, maybe i needed to develop a superstition or two like so many players have these days. i always put my right sock on first, stuff like that. always use the same shower cubicle, at the tournament, it‘s always the same one. edmund is not one who seeks the headlines on court but it is rather different when he‘s watching the football. 0n court, i‘m quite, i would say, quite quiet, keep myself to myself, kind of person. but when i‘m watching football, it‘s the opposite, i‘m quite animated. ifind myself shouting more, getting up from my seat. so, if it came to it, what would he prefer, liverpool champions of europe or winning wimbledon? i‘d probably have to say
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me winning wimbledon. i guess the best time, british number one, home fans, home tournament, had a year abroad so it‘s nice to be here staying at home, you get your home comforts. there‘s obviously all those good things and family coming to watch. so it‘s a really good time of year and there‘s always a real buzz around it. juggling a tennis ball on your foot like that is pretty impressive. he could probably have made it as a footballer. very transferable skill. he is number 23 in the world, right now, incredible achievement in itself. he has shot up the rankings, a lot due to the amazing performance and that run to the semifinals of the australian open and with andy murray only just the australian open and with andy murray onlyjust coming back to injury, that helps him to british number one. he will go into the summer tournaments with all the focus on him as british born. on a
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personal note, i have seen you play tennis better than you were...” personal note, i have seen you play tennis better than you were... i was giving him a chance. it was the spin that he was putting on it, it was difficult to get it over the net.|j am useless at tennis, properly useless. like, out of the court, cannot do anything with it. i'll give you again. —— a game. the weather has got us in the mood for tennis and grass courts. you‘ve been sending us your beautiful pictures this morning. margaret snapped this lush scene while out for a walk in pinchinthorpe. while anthea from southbourne—on—sea managed to capture the british seaside at its best. and here‘s ross from hampshire on an early morning, sunrise stroll with his dogs. they looking like, are we going now,
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have you finished taken the picture, can we go? they are almost like a victorian dogs, they are so synchronised! you are an expert on victorian dogs? just checking. sarah is on the beach, the picture where you are is really lovely as well. good morning. a lovely start to the day in eastbourne, the coast of east sussex, blue skies and sunshine and that will be the recipe for the bank holiday weekend. 5 million visitors flock to the town of eastbourne throughout the year for its 19th—century pier, the tennis tournaments and the airshow. not just here, right around the coast of the uk, we are set to see a lot of people flocking towards the coast through the next few days because it‘s not often i get to say bank holiday weekend and warm sunshine in
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the same sentence! that is how it is shaping up. 0ver the same sentence! that is how it is shaping up. over the next few days, a lot of fine and dry weather over the vast part of the country. sunshine coming through and temperatures responding, it could be the warmest ever early bank holiday in may on record. a fresh start here and there tomorrow, sunshine in southern and england part of england and scotland. more cloud generally further west, particularly for the north west of scotland where it is briefly with one or two outbreaks of light and justly rain. —— it is breezy there. temperatures are doing quite well for the time of year, 2221 degrees, warmest towards eastern scotland england. —— 20—21d. paddy with a few showers to the far north—west of scotland, clear out swear that clearer elsewhere. we
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will stick into double figures into saturday morning. we could have some mysterious —— misty conditions around, but that will clear around and it is fine and dry, a bit more cloud around the irish sea coasts. temperatures will be doing pretty well, up to around about 18 to 21 celsius for most places on saturday. the warming trend goes through saturday into sunday, largely sunni on sunday. blue sky blue sky across the way, temperatures likely to reach 23 celsius in the warmest spots. certainly a fine day if you have got outdoor plans on sunday. bank
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holiday monday, it will be a glorious day for most of us. a little bit of cloud here and there, not wall—to—wall sunshine but largely dry and fine, still breezy in the north—west of scotland with one or two showers. the small chart ofan one or two showers. the small chart of an isolated shower in the south—west of england but most should avoid it. temperatures around 25, 26 or possibly 27 degrees in one or two spots. things looking dry and warming up and we are looking forward to potentially the warmest early may bank holiday on record. the thing is about the bank holiday weekend, people choose to go abroad and then the weather is great like this, you think, should have timed it for where the red —— weather is wrong. if you go away, in the uk, is it worth
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travelling joints? probably not. -- travelling joints? probably not. -- travel insurance? well, we should not do this item! you should not go to charlie for financial advice! stop telling people not to get travel insurance! the director is saying, just get on with it. thank you, we will just saying, just get on with it. thank you, we willjust run everything by you, we willjust run everything by you later. the data is out today from the travel trade body, according to them, nearly 10 million of us went on holiday without the right travel insurance or without any at all. and a third of those who did not get any, said it was about the cost. let‘s talk now to megan french from money saving expert. 10 million people not getting the right insurance, cost being given us
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the reason? is that the main reason? i think people get swept up with booking but forget about it to be honest. book your travel insurance as soon as you have honest. book your travel insurance as soon as you have booked your holiday. you need the protection in case you have to cancel for any reason before you go. if you are thinking about getting a holiday this weekend, you should be booking your travel insurance as well? yes, do it as soon as you have booked a holiday before you put the kettle on, get it done before you do it so you get the protection. if you decide today, i‘m going to have a weekend in cornwall, where it‘s nice and sunny, do you need travel insurance? is kind of up to you, it depends what you are doing. is your trip going to boil water sports? with travel insurance, the key is checking what you are covered for. a lot of policies cover uk and abroad stays but sometimes they will only work if you have booked accommodation or if you are a certain amount of miles from home,
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ora certain amount of miles from home, or a certain time. it is about checking exactly what you are covered for to make sure it is right for you. are there more caveats to keep an eye out for if you are travelling domestically? i have caught out by that distance away from home, if you lived in manchester and were going to form the beach for the weekend, it‘s not that far from the beach for the weekend, it‘s not that farfrom home but the beach for the weekend, it‘s not that far from home but it‘s a the beach for the weekend, it‘s not that farfrom home but it‘s a proper holiday. perhaps not more caveats but we think about them less because we are used to them and we know if something went wrong we could go to the nhs. with abroad, eugenie to check exactly what you are for. if someone says, come on check exactly what you are for. if someone says, come on this jet ski, you might not be covered. it is about making sure you read to terms and conditions when new books you have got it in my exacting what will happen if anything goes wrong. how are insurance prices at the moment? insurance premium tax has been coming in over the last few years, that excuse that some people have
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about cost, is it a fair one? you can getan about cost, is it a fair one? you can get an annual policy for europe that will cover a single adults, 18-30, that will cover a single adults, 18—30, for that will cover a single adults, 18-30, for £19. it that will cover a single adults, 18—30, for £19. it does not have took cost a fortune. it‘s about making sure you are going to the right places. if you see it as an add—on for your holiday it could be more expensive so add—on for your holiday it could be more expensive so have a look. look at the best policies for you as well. thank you very much. i hope that was all right with you, charlie. i have taken note and i will pass on the expertise because i am not an expert. we have cleared that up. before the local elections the lib dems had been managing expectations for the results, with leader sir vince cable saying he hoped to pick up "one or two" councils. with two—thirds of the results in, the party‘s picked up one council, richmond in london. joining us now from westmisnter is liberal democrat ed davey. good morning, thank you for your
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time this morning. give us your sense of how it has been for the lib dems. a really good night, we were taking seats of labour in the north, in areas that voted to leave, places like hull, sunderland, sheffield and liverpool. we also made gains in remain areas off the tories, places like richmond, winning with a huge majority, but also winchester and other places. liberal democrats had one of our best nights for years. what do you put that down to? strong local campaigns, people have been campaigning on things like against education cuts, the need for more police on our street and so on but also be found on the doorstep assessed for people to have a voice which was not a right—wing cuts the schools and cut the hospitals
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brexiteer tory voice or a left—wing corbin —— corbin brexiteer voice. when they see what we do and what we stand for and what they say, then they backed off. i think what tonight has done is build a really solid platform with real progress for future results, to solid platform with real progress forfuture results, to make the breakthrough that i think people wa nt to breakthrough that i think people want to see. they wanted to see a third party coming through and offering a different voice, that is what the liberal democrats offer and if we get results like that one again, we will be at the table today. when people. when politicians say, building a platform, it is another way of saying, they have not got much right now. the truth is that the lib dems, by comparison with the position you are in four yea rs with the position you are in four years ago, certainly six years ago,
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certainly the golden times, you must look at them that wake of the lib dems before you went into coalition, your results now are really small relative to that point in the lib dems history. and that‘s the reality check around the successes you are talking about. if you want to talk about history, in 1906, we won government! i am talking about recent history as you well know. the point is, we have had some bad yea rs. point is, we have had some bad years. i‘m not denying that. this is a change of direction. it‘s where the future lies which is important when you look at election results. we have changed the dialogue of the liberal democrats last night and the platform is a genuine run across the country. because we are in tune with a lot of people, people are fed up of this conservative government where they promised brexit and it is more costly and complicated, taking longer than the leave promised. i think people are looking for a party
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that has been principled on the issue of leave and remain, pro—european, who want to say, the people should have the final say, this method has been made, when the deal is eventually done, whenever they get round to finalising it, let they get round to finalising it, let the people have the final say. that is what the liberal democrats have been saying and if you look at the polls and what people tell us in the elections, that is what people want to hear and see. one of the pictures that emerges from lib dem successes that emerges from lib dem successes that you‘re talking about is that they are in pockets. this has been they are in pockets. this has been the case for quite awhile with the lib dems, you have certain places, richmond is of those places where there has been a tradition of quite a lot of lib dem success and popularity. that is part of the problem. you are not reaching places you have not really reached before. and therefore, if you translate this into what might happen, looking ahead to a general election results where the lib dems could make significant impacts, you are still very marginal across the uk in a
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small number of places. very marginal across the uk in a small number of placeslj very marginal across the uk in a small number of places. i would disagree with that. what was interesting about last night was seeing where we were making gains. in sunderland, we had some great by—election victories since the general election and we had more victories last night. it is not a traditional liberal democrat area. in big cities like sheffield and liverpool, we were making progress. i think liverpool, we were making progress. ithinka liverpool, we were making progress. i think a actually, my version of events is that liberal democrats are making progress across the country, i‘m not say we are making breakthroughs yet but we have to travel before we can do that. if we look at our recent history, in the 805 and 905, we built our breakthrough, got into government, ran low lots of councils up and down the country with the initial success we had. when you make that progress at the liberal democrats have done, thatis at the liberal democrats have done, that is how you go forward. when people hear what the liberal
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democrats have to say, that we want to defend spending on schools and the health service, we want more police on the street and we want a more sane police on the street and we want a more sane debate on europe, people will vote for us. they are fed up with the extremes of british politics with corbyn and in may and brexit, we want people to be offered more optimistic alternative and i think vince cable and the double democrats did that last night and will do in the future. -- liberal democrats. thank you very much. looking at the local election results, more results coming in through the morning. we have got a picture of sorts and we will take you through the clutter throughout the programme. you‘re watching breakfast. still to come this morning: the winner of this trophy, the women‘s fa cup, will be decided on saturday afternoon. we‘ll ask former england international player sue smith whether arsenal or chelsea will take it home. we have to be very careful, don‘t
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knock it off! it has been deliberately put that aside, away from us. time now to get the local election news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. labour has missed out on all its key london targets in the local elections, failing to take barnet, wandsworth or kensington and chelsea from the conservatives. however the party did increase the number of its councillors across the capital. and there was good news for the liberal democrats, who won richmond council. here‘s our political correspondent karl mercer. a night that started with smiles and the hope of something special, but one that before long turned into one of anxious looks and worried glances. it wasn‘t the triumphant night labour had hoped for in the tory stronghold of wandsworth. they had hoped for an historic win but it wasn‘t to be. labour did win seats from
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the conservatives, just not enough. 0ur message was relentlessly local. it is about bins, your streets, the potholes. it was a similar story in westminster. the conservatives held on here despite losing seats to labour. it was always a mountain to climb. the swings required were enormous. we've given it our best shot, a really good try. disappointment for labour in barnet. they needed one extra seat to take control but failed, with the tories keeping control. very sad. we are shocked. we thought we would be able to win the council for the sake of the people of barnet. protests over kensington and chelsea‘s handling of grenfell did little to dent the conservative hold there. but remains a big local issue. we need to earn trust and we need to earn it day by day and by our actions not just by our words.
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down in the south—west, there were lib dems tears...ofjoy. the glum tory faces in richmond told their own story on a night when they lost control of the council to their nearest rivals, but were also pushed into third place when the greens picked up four seats here. i am now the new green party councillor for ham, petersham and richmond riverside, the longest ward name in the country, but in the borough of richmond. we're a heavily pro—european community. we don't like what theresa may orjeremy corbyn's had to offer on brexit. success for the lib dems, too, in neighbouring sutton, where they held on to control of the council despite losing seats to the conservatives. there are still results to come in, including the mayoral election in tower hamlets, and those in hackney, lewisham, and newham. let‘s have a very brief look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there‘s a good service
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on all lines at the moment. let‘s have a look at the weather. today will be dry with some sunshine, although cloud will tend to build during the afternoon. there‘ll be light winds but it will be pleasantly warm with a maximum temperature of up to 21 degrees. there‘ll be a full forecast for the bank holiday in our next bulletin. that‘s in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. it is the biggest test of political opinion since last year‘s general election. the local election results are coming in. we‘ll have reaction and analysis. good morning, it‘s friday 4th may. also this morning. the breast cancer screening scandal, 8,000 calls to a helpline as it emerges concerns were raised more than a year ago. a world first, a national review
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into why so many people with learning disabilities die early is about to be published. good morning. have you got a twitter account? if so, you‘re being asked to come up with a new password. i‘ll have more on what‘s gone wrong, in a moment. in sport, no joy for arsenal in the europa league. atletico madrid celebrate a place in the final, denying arsene wenger the chance to leave his club with one last trophy. and sarah can tell us if we are due a sunny bank holiday weekend. this is central london. hazy sunshine. sarah is going to bring us up—to—date on how the weather is affecting you wherever you wherever you are this morning. first, our main story. labour and the conservatives have lost control of key councils as counting countinues in 150 authorities across england. the tories did well outside of london holding on to key battle grounds.
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labour increased its vote in the capital but failed to win some specifically targeted seats. the liberal democrats made gains, but it was a night to forget for ukip. 0ur political correspondent, jonathan blake, has the story of the night. cheering. one side think they are winning, but so does the other. a long night in the london borough of wandsworth. once a rock—solid tory council that labour thought it could win. they gained seats, but not enough, and the conservatives held on. and through the night, across england, those who set and spend your council tax watched and waited for the voters‘ the verdict. cheering. there was celebration in swindon, another council labour wanted to win, but again the conservatives kept control. i‘m absolutely delighted that we‘ve fended off a significant challenge from the labour party. they‘ve worked very hard in six of our seats, they‘ve brought in a lot of people, spent a lot of time and money and effort into trying to take some of those seats,
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and they‘ve not taken one from us. plymouth was labour‘s big win of the night, they took it from the tories at 2:30am. labour were loving it in trafford, too, where the conservatives lost control of what was their only council in the north—west of england. trafford wanted a change, it needs a change, and i think that‘s what it‘s going to get. we‘re pleased. it's gone absolutely fantastically. i think it's a triumph for labour. voters needed id in gosport and a handful of other places running a trial to cut fraud. there are claims some people were turned away but the government down any problems. i think it's my passport i've got, i'd better check. yes, it's my passport, everybody! yellow was the winning colour in richmond—upon—thames, the liberal democrats took that london borough from the tories. 0ne place where views on brexit may have come into play. more than 4000 seats, 150 councils, mayors elected, too. this has been the biggest test of political opinion since the general election last year.
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and it‘s not over yet. the picture so far is patchy and there are more results still to come. and a third of the results won‘t be known until counting starts later today. there will be coverage on the bbc throughout the day. the great thing about local elections are the smaller stories that are often missed in general elections. this picture is from plymouth. this is the scene of a local story which is labour taking back control from plymouth. that was taken from the conservative party. this is the scene here, sorry, we arejust wiping the this is the scene here, sorry, we are just wiping the lens. we are told jeremy corbyn is on his way to join those labour supporters. we‘re expecting jeremy corbyn down there later on this morning. he‘s the
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first party leader we‘ll have seen today we‘ll be speaking in a few minutes‘ time to a representative from the labour party to talk more generally about how the results have gone. some supporters gathering in plymouth. this is the view of westminster. hazy sunshine but many people very keen to see what tells has been going on. 0ur political correspondent eleanor garnierjoins us from westminster. we were just referring to plymouth there. it‘s the smaller stories that tends to give a bit of flavour to how the national parties, how well they are connecting with those on they are connecting with those on the ground. we‘ve gotjeremy corbyn now arriving in plymouth. labour has ended the night with 31 seats of the 57 and plymouth city council. this is one of the stories that reflects
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how well connected the main parties are. that's right. when you dig down into the detail in local elections you get the stories and you get a flavour of what‘s happening across the country. it‘s very difficult to extrapolate that across the country and makea extrapolate that across the country and make a grand pattern or decipher some grand pattern. in local elections people vote on local issues but they also vote on national issues. we can‘t be com pletely national issues. we can‘t be completely accurate about why people are voting. for both of the parties it‘s been a bit of a mixed results. jeremy corbyn is going to be celebrating this result her, because it isa celebrating this result her, because it is a council seat he has taken, that labour have one. they are going to be celebrating that one. there really were no big shocks overnight. no big cars, if you like, of shock and surprise. no decisive shifts towards either party. 0verall labour
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are going to be a bit disappointed and perhaps a bit puzzled. they put and perhaps a bit puzzled. they put a lot of energy and effort into these local elections and they haven‘t seen the significant progress that many of the party had anticipated. it could be that a small part of that problem is down to management expectations. for the conservatives, i think there‘s going to bea conservatives, i think there‘s going to be a massive amount of relief. they‘ve been expecting a difficult set of results and so far generally they have managed to hold up. we are eight years into austerity, eight yea rs into a eight years into austerity, eight years into a conservative party in government either on its own or in coalition, and traditionally governments get a kicking in local elections. we haven‘t seen that happen so we have benefited from the com plete colla pse happen so we have benefited from the complete collapse in the ukip vote. thank you. we were just showing you pictures ofjeremy corbyn, the first
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major party leader to turn up this morning. there he was talking to supporters. this is after labour ended up with 31 seats out of 57 and plymouth council. taking control of it from the conservatives. it‘s emerged public health england was warned about the breast cancer screening errors last year. two nhs health trusts raised concerns in march 2017, but were told it was a local, rather than a national matter. 450,000 women were not invited to breast cancer screenings due to a computer error. an independent review has been announced by the government. public health england has said the response to the crisis cannot be rushed. we‘ve had an expert advisory group running with expert clinicians who have told us they are very clear that women need to have a helpline in place to have all of these things there and for us to have the com plete there and for us to have the complete picture before we go out to them so we don‘t cause them any more anxiety than the current situation.
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volkswagen‘s former chief executive, martin winterkorn, has been charged with conspiracy to defraud the united states and violating the clean air act in connection with the diesel emissions scandal. prosecutors there claim he knew that his company‘s vehicles were cheating in emissions tests. mr winterkorn resigned from vw shortly after the scandal emerged in 2015. twitter has warned its 330 million users to change their passwords. the site said a technical glitch had led to some passwords being stored in plain text on an internal computer system. sean is here. a glitch might be a mild word when you‘re thinking 300 million users. last night twitter tweeted that those users need to think about changing their password. a large number of those passwords from those users had ended up on a file in twitter‘s internal network with no security around it, literally a list of everybody‘s passwords. they‘ve
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said they don‘t think there‘s been any misuse but for transparency they are saying change passwords today. it automatically comes up as soon as you log on. yes, if you go into it this morning you should seek something that says change your password. lots of people mightjust click across and not change it. it‘s quite a big issue for twitter because they know that potentially there was a file with everybody‘s password. they are being very transparent which we are seeing a bit more from tech companies but at the same time there‘s clearly been a breach internally which has meant everyone‘s password has been leaked. given the scale of their operation and all of the issues surrounding security it seems extraordinary. and all of the issues surrounding security it seems extraordinarym is extraordinary but it‘s happening so is extraordinary but it‘s happening so often, should we be less surprise than we used to be by this? from tsb a week ago to twitter today, there‘s a week ago to twitter today, there‘s a lot of tech problems out there
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when it comes to security. bill cosby and roman polanski have been expelled from the us academy of motion picture arts and sciences. the academy — which runs the oscars — said this was done in accordance with its standards of conduct. tv star cosby was convicted of sexual assault last month. oscar—winning director polanski admitted statutory rape of a 13—year—old girl in 1977. in the last few minutes an nhs england report into the deaths of people with learning disabilities has been published and it has highlighted significant concerns. 0ur reporterjayne mccubbin has been following this review and joins us now. what are the key findings? it's it‘s a world first in terms of what it‘s looking into. it‘s a world first in terms of what it's looking into. that's right. let me give you some of the key findings in now. one in eight deaths looked at so far involved problems, either abuse, neglect, delays in treatment, gaps in care or what they call
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organisational dysfunction. that means agencies not properly communicating with each other to look after a person. it has found the mortality rate compare to the general population is much wider than was previously thought. women with learning disabilities die on average 29 years younger than the rest of the population, meant 23 yea rs sooner. rest of the population, meant 23 years sooner. it has found 45% of deaths were under the age of 50. that compares to the general population of just that compares to the general population ofjust 5%. one example given in this report was of a man who couldn‘t speak. it took months for medics to identify his problem and months for him to receive treatment during that time he wasn‘t given proper pain relief. the bold promise going into this was that every death would be investigated. you‘ve spoken at length to many of the families. is that what has
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happened? no. what we've seen is the number of completed reviews, there has only been 8% of review is completed because of two reasons. the big number of deaths being passed on to the review teams and the shortage of review staff. ijust wa nt to the shortage of review staff. ijust want to tell you that the writer of the winterbourne review said "the prime minister has said her mission is to tackle the burning injustice. there can be no community more abused or neglected than people with learning disabilities and their families. how many more deaths before we tackle this injustice?" the department of health has told us "from june every department will have to publish data on avoidable deaths". clearly, they say, there‘s more work to do. a volcano has erupted on the largest island in hawaii, triggering an evacuation. witnesses said lava
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burst across a road. thousands of people have been told to leave their homes after the red hot molten ran down into a residential area. a local state of emergency has been declared. let‘s go back to the local election results. labour and the conservatives have both lost control of key councils in local elections across england. labour failed to take several targets from the tories, including wandsworth in london however the party won back plymouth, and became the largest party in trafford. joining us now is shadow communities and local government secretary andrew gwynne. good morning. wejust saw good morning. we just saw your party leaderjeremy corbyn in plymouth celebrating with. .. leaderjeremy corbyn in plymouth celebrating with... have we still got some of those pictures? give us
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a sense of how you see the party doing across the board. it was a good win in plymouth and i‘d like to thank our activists there for what turned out to be a very good result. across the country, i think what we‘ve seen yesterday is a mixed picture. it‘s very much a consolidation of where the labour party has been since thejune general election. also a consolidation of where we were last time we fought many of these seats four years ago in 2014, which you‘ll remember we have a very good set of election results four years ago. what that meant is that going into yesterday‘s election, we were defending particularly in some of those london boroughs and metropolitan boroughs in the big cities outside london, over 80% of the council seats. in terms of big numbers of games we were never going to see that for that reason, and also many of the councils outside of
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london only elect by thirds so the scope for big numbers of sea changes we re very scope for big numbers of sea changes were very limited. what a mixed picture. when you saw those images from plymouth, you see the activists who have got a result in no doubt it is a good result for labour but one thing people are drawing attention to is that you put a lot of time and effort and a lot of people on the ground ina effort and a lot of people on the ground in a lot of places and the reason you did that, presumably quite a bit of expense or personal sacrifice for people who believed in your cause and you trumpeted that very loud, that they are out there and knocking on doors and asking questions and going to people who had not previously voted labour before. it is all to no avail. you have been treading water in these elections, no more than that. you sages to no avail but last night there were lots of new labour councillors elected and there were
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labour councillors that lost their seats as well. on the actual number of councillors, you are down, aren‘t you? the total number of labour councillors? the total number that i last saw we are broadly where we were. the question is, you are treading water, and that is the case. but those are headline figures and within that there will be losses and within that there will be losses and gains. we had spectacular results in trafford where we launched the local election campaign, that little bit of blue in the north—west of england in that metropolitan belt between merseyside in greater manchester, we have taken that into overall control with the labour party as the largest party in the first time in 15 years. again, thatis the first time in 15 years. again, that is a tribute to the resources, time and effort put in i party workers in that particular borough but it is a mixed picture around the country and the tories have benefited from the collapse of the
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ukip about, which four years ago, you could pull riding high in the polls. can we talk specifically about barnett? labour have lost seats there and those people, mrs barryjohn rawlings, seats there and those people, mrs barry john rawlings, the seats there and those people, mrs barryjohn rawlings, the group labour leader there, —— this is. it was said the defeat that has had the anti—semitism issue is playing the biggest part in labour‘s defeat. this is one of your own officials saying that on the doorstep and in the result, the anti—semitism issue had a tangible result. i understand that and in those areas... understanding is different, but do you accept it? we know that we have to do you accept it? we know that we have todoa you accept it? we know that we have to do a lot more in the labour party to do a lot more in the labour party to tackle those complaints of
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anti—semitism where they have been brought. are you saying you think you lost this because of the anti—semitism issue —— how it has been handled by the labour party? there is a question of trust with the jewish community, and there is a question of trust with thejewish community, and the only way to rebuild that trust, and it will be a slow process, is that we tackle the complaints of anti—semitism head on and rooted out of the labour party where it exists. it's of the labour party where it exists. it‘s a small number of cases in a big party like ours, but one complaint of anti—semitism is one too many and we don‘tjust call it out, we root it out. we have a lot more to do. i want thejewish community in this country to feel that they are able in future elections to support a progressive, left of centre row gram, to support a labour government because many in the jewish community want to a labour government because many in thejewish community want to see a progressive left of centre government and the country and we
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have got to tackle their concerns head—on. have got to tackle their concerns head-on. just on the wider issues, a lot of people have tried to present jeremy corbyn as a leader in waiting, prime minister in waiting. i know there are lots of issues about whether you can take anything from local elections and put it forward , from local elections and put it forward, but do you think is standing has changed at all as a result of what has happened? what has happened in these local elections, and we‘ve seen it as a trend since the general election is that politics is very polarised. all the opinion polls sincejune last year showed the tories and labour neck and neck. the blue and red column does not shift much in the margin of error and that is what we have seen out of the election results last night. we have a lot of work to do to get that labour government and i‘m determined that going forward we rebuild trust in the communities and we consolidate our position, as we have done in those communities that we still need
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to win. thank you forjoining us this morning. temperatures are set to rise in the uk this bank holiday weekend, with the highest predicted in the south. sarah is in eastbourne this morning. can you believe it? i know, it‘s not that often i get to say the terms warm sunshine and bank holiday monday in the same sentence but believe me things are looking fine and dry and things will warm up for many of us over the next couple of days. i am on eastbourne beach and it is a beautiful start to the day and behind me you can see the 19th—century iconic peer. four years ago onjuly 19th—century iconic peer. four years ago on july 2014 19th—century iconic peer. four years ago onjuly 2014 there was a huge fire on the pier but it was quickly restored to its former glory and it‘s one of the attractions that bring 5 million visitors to eastbourne every year. right around the coast of the uk will be a busy weekend with people flocking to the beach as we will see sea breeze is developing so it won‘t be quite as
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hot the beach as inland, but it means we are expecting lots of blue sky and lots of sunshine if you are heading to the seaside. add is a look through the bank holiday weekend? with high pressure building m, weekend? with high pressure building in, largelyfine, weekend? with high pressure building in, largely fine, not wall—to—wall sunshine but sunny spells to be enjoyed and the temperatures will be responding nicely. things will warm up responding nicely. things will warm up over the next couple of days. todayit up over the next couple of days. today it has been a fresh start, especially where we had clear skies across eastern scotland, southern and eastern england as well. more cloud in the western half of the country. a bit more breezy in the far west of scotland but dry elsewhere. temperatures will be between 17 and 21 celsius this afternoon. we keep the dry unsettled weather into the evening and overnight as well. there could be the odd mist and fog patch as well asa the odd mist and fog patch as well as a bit of low cloud through the midlands and also towards the north—west of the uk where it will be cloudy and breezy with one or two
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spots of rain. most places start saturday morning on that clear and dry note. not quite as chilly as it has been in recent mornings so many in double figures first thing. early mist should clear away on saturday, it is part of eastern england and scotla nd it is part of eastern england and scotland that will see the best son, slightly cloudier further west. low cloud and mist around the irish coast through time but temperatures probably a degree or so than today. 18 up to 21 or maybe 22 in one or two spots. if you are planning a barbecue, buying evening and that will continue into sunday. sunday morning starts fine and dry and temperatures will be on the rise in the sunshine. always a bit of cloud around the west coasts and breezy and cloudy with a light showers but dry for much of the country and those temperatures by sunday will be between 18 and 23 celsius and it
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will start to feel really quite warm. that trend continues into bank holiday monday. for many of us, it looks like a fine bank holiday monday with lots of sunshine, cooler for coastal north—east england and scotla nd for coastal north—east england and scotland but temperatures might get up scotland but temperatures might get up to 26 celsius making it the warmest early may bank holiday on record. a lovely thing to hear. a warm bank holiday monday. and good weather for sport. it is a builder silverware that arsenal could win this season. arsenal‘s men might be out of the europa league but the arsenal women will play chelsea for this live on the bbc tomorrow evening in front of a record 40,000 fans at wembley. sue smith, the former england international who played in four fa
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cup final international who played in four fa cupfinal is, international who played in four fa cup final is, because you never got to lift it. as a player i was superstitious about not holding a cup and it didn‘t work for me because i lost all four of the finals. but what an occasion it is. it's finals. but what an occasion it is. it‘s changed over the years but when you were playing, what was it like? it's you were playing, what was it like? it‘s the pinnacle of every football career to play in an fa cup final at wembley in front of a record crowd. every young boy and girl growing up wa nts to every young boy and girl growing up wants to do that and the fact that these girls can do that now, and because it is a chelsea and arsenal derby it makes it more interesting. attendances are increasing all the time. 33,000 watched it two years ago, and more than 40,000 tickets have been sold for saturday. ago, and more than 40,000 tickets have been sold for saturdaym ago, and more than 40,000 tickets have been sold for saturday. itjust shows the growth of the game. people wa nt to shows the growth of the game. people want to come and watch women‘s football and the fact it‘s live on the bbc, even if they cannot get to the bbc, even if they cannot get to the game. it is cheap, and that
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helps. £15 per ticket for adults and free for kids so you can take the family. you can properly a member @ andi family. you can properly a member @ and i remember the first fa cup final was —— you can probably remember it. you would remember a time when people wouldn‘t have known it is on, but it is live on national television now. it‘s a fantastic thing. my first fa cup final was for leeds and we played at the nottingham forest ground and i think they are 15,000 people and it was massive for the women‘s game, but they are getting 40,000 people and people in my local area are going, it shows the interest in the game. it's it shows the interest in the game. it‘s to such an extent do you think the players are used to these occasions, playing internationals, they are used to these big crowds?|j they are used to these big crowds?” spoke to some of the girls and they say they‘ve never played in front of 40,000 so it‘s a new experience for some of them. it is sometimes how
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you cope with the occasion. you look at chelsea and arsenal and chelsea would be favourites going into that in 2016 they were favourites and arsenal managed to lift the trophy. it's arsenal managed to lift the trophy. it‘s to get the tactics right on the day and who can cope with the atmosphere because it will be a great atmosphere and it‘s a big occasion for any player, especially the youngsters. you mentioned the family atmosphere. is it different in terms of watching men‘s football forfamilies in terms of watching men‘s football for families and people in terms of watching men‘s football forfamilies and people in in terms of watching men‘s football for families and people in the stadium? i think so and i think a lot of people have started going to the women‘s game because of that because they feel they can take the family along and it is cheap and they have a fan zone before so you can have fun before they have a football freestyler they‘re doing the skills. it‘s just a fun day out. a reminder, mike? tomorrow evening, 5pm. 5:30pm is kicked. in the
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sunshine at wembley. i will hand of the trophy back. let‘s put it back on the stand. pretty heavy. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. and all the latest local election hello. the bank holiday weekend is nearly here and foremost it‘s looking dry and warm. a few exceptions. from dishonour —— patchy light rain and drizzle at times. a fairamount of light rain and drizzle at times. a fair amount of cloud through this morning from northern ireland, western coasts of england and wales. that cloud will tend to thin and break. most of us will see some sunshine which will help temperatures between 16 and 19 for many. cooler in the far north and west of scotland. parts of
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aberdeenshire and south—west england could see highs of 20. parts of patchy drizzle food northwest scotla nd patchy drizzle food northwest scotland through the evening and overnight. elsewhere a mixture of cloud and dry spells. temperatures falling to 5—6 but closer to double figures where we keep the cloud. for the bank holiday weekend, looking mainly dry with some good spells of sunshine. temperatures slowly rising. a bit of mist to clear the titley for irish sea coasts. elsewhere a dry day with good spells of sunshine. temperatures continuing to climb 18—21 again in parts of eastern and south—east england. this area of high pressure stays close by throughout the bank holiday weekend. he is still on sunday, more cloud with outbreaks of light rain at times. a more easterly breeze so the eastern coast on sunday will be
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cooler. 0therwise eastern coast on sunday will be cooler. otherwise a good deal of sunshine, 23—24 the top temperature on sunday. by the bank holiday monday parts of south—east england could see a high of 27. this is business live from bbc news with alice baxter and maryam moshiri. the former boss of volkswagen, martin winterkorn, faces criminal charges following his alleged involvement in the diesel emissions scandal. live from london, that‘s our top story on friday 4th may. martin winterkorn has been accused of conspiracy and fraud, but will the former boss of volkswagen avoid prison as he‘s pursued by us authorities? also in the programme, soybeans and olive branches.
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the us treasury secretary steve mnuchin is holding talks in china, but can the world‘s two biggest economies avoid
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