Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 7, 2018 10:00pm-11:00pm BST

10:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines. the foreign secretary is in washington in an attempt to stop president donald trump abandoning the iran nuclear deal. working with our european friends. we can be tougher on iran but not throw away the heart of the deal which is about stopping them getting a nuclear weapon. president trump says he'll make an announcement about the iran nuclear deal at seven o'clock tomorrow evening. the uk has its hottest early may bank holiday on record — hitting a high of 28.7 degrees celsius. just make the most of it because this incredible weather is unheard of this early in may. it was the beast from the east a few weeks ago but now we are in shorts and t—shirts, so, great. police appeal for witnesses after a number of shooting incidents over the bank holiday weekend — in london and manchester. vladimir putin is sworn—in
10:01 pm
for a fourth term as president — promising to improve the lives of the russian people. i'm carole walker, and in the next half hour, the impact of tourism on global warming. a new study says it accounts for 8% of global carbon emissions — around three times more than previous estimates. and flowing lava and toxic gas from an erupting volcano in hawaii destroys homes and forces hundreds to flee. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the foreign secretary borisjohnson has appealed to donald trump not to "throw the baby out with the bathwater" by abandoning
10:02 pm
the iran nuclear deal. on a trip to washington, mrjohnson appeared on president trump's favourite morning tv show ‘fox and friends‘ to say the 2015 accord was not perfect, but could be fixed. and tonight we've heard that mr trump, who's called the agreement "insane," will announce his decision on the issue tomorrow. nick bryant reports. on american television this morning a double serving of boris at breakfast, the foreign secretary appearing on donald trump's favourite news show, fox and friends, to address an audience of one. we think that what you can do is be tougher on iran, address the concerns of the president and not throw the baby out with the bath water. just in case the president had switched channels, he popped up on a rival network as well. i understand people have anxieties about this deal, and of course they're right, in the sense that it is very far from perfect, but it is the best
10:03 pm
thing that we have at the moment. donald trump has called the iran deal, negotiated by the obama administration, a disaster. and although the foreign secretary is not scheduled to shake hands with the us president, that hasn't stopped him stroking his ego. if he can fix north korea, and if he can fix the iran nuclear deal, then i don't see why he's any less of a candidate for the nobel peace prize than barack obama who got it before he even did anything. long live the united states, long live france. he's not the first european to compliment, charm and cajole. france's president macron last month pleaded with donald trump not to rip up the deal, and the german chancellor angela merkel made the same case a few days later. so from boris johnson, a final face—to—face plea to senior officials like the new secretary of state mike pompeo.
10:04 pm
but he has taken a tough stance on iran and said the landmark deal is built on lies. the european countries have not yet admitted defeat but the word from paris tonight is france, germany and britain would stick to the iran deal regardless of what donald trump decides. the problem is that the reimposition of us sanctions on tehran could deal it a fatal blow. nick bryant, bbc news, washington. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 11:30 this evening in the papers. our guests joining me tonight are journalist damejoan bakewell and the political correspondent for the times, lucy fisher. it's been a record—breaking early may bank holiday — as temperatures in some parts of the country hit 28.7 degrees celsius — the hottest since the long weekend was introduced a0 years ago. south—east england, the midlands, and east anglia enjoyed the warmest weather. but many had to endure busy roads and overcrowded trains as people flocked to the coast. frankie mccamley has spent
10:05 pm
the day in southend — she sent this report. whether you want to dive right in and really make the most of it, just get your feet wet, or have some good old—fashioned fun, today has certainly been the day for it. i had to tell this one, "put down the marigolds", you know, and the bleach — you're not cleaning today. "come on, let's go". yeah, "i'll see you in an hour, love, later". so she dragged me out of my house. you haven't been able to get a place on the beach? yes, but look at it! after 12 o'clock, no chance. you look around, people can't sit down. this is not usually a sight you would expect to see on the first may bank holiday but with record—breaking
10:06 pm
temperatures including here in southend, it is clear a lot of people have the same idea. but for those who didn't fancy getting sand in their toes, making a splash in the new forest water park was on the agenda, orgrabbing an ice cream in bognor regis. a slightly more relaxing time for those dipping their toes in the lakes in south wales, but in devon, beautiful calm seas did not put off those who wanted to make the most of it. considering it was beast from the east a few weeks ago and we're now out in shorts and t—shirts, great. it's nice and hot and sunny. we're planning to hire kayaks and get out and make the most of it. it's just unheard—of, this incredible weather early on in may. the hottest temperature previously recorded was 23.6 celsius in 1999, but that had already been broken by 11 o'clock this morning, which means today has been
10:07 pm
the warmest day over the early may bank holiday weekend since the holiday was introduced in 1978. it has caused some travel disruption, though, with roads and train lines to the coast heavy and overcrowded. but once in the sunshine and enjoying a british rarity, there's not a frown insight. frankie mccamley reporting on a record—breaking early may bank holiday. police are appealing for witnesses following a series of shooting incidents over the bank holiday weekend. tonight a man is in hospital after being found in a lewisham street in south london suffering from gunshot wounds. in another attack in london yesterday, three teenagers were injured. one, aged 13, is thought to have been an innocent bystander. and on saturday evening 17 year—old rhyhiem ainsworth barton was playing football with his friends when he was shot dead, in the southwark area.
10:08 pm
in manchester the police are investigating after a teenager suffered serious injuries in a shooting. the victim, who's in his late teens, was with his friends when he was shot in his leg on vale street in the clayton area of the city. he was taken to hospital for treatment and a police cordon remains in place — whilst enquiries continue. and in oxford tonight a street in the city centre has been cordoned off by police following an exchange of gunfire between officers and an armed man. shots were believed to have been fired from a residential property in paradise square. members of the public are being warned to avoid the area. vladimir putin has been sworn in as the president of russia for the fourth time. during an ornate ceremony at the kremlin, he laid out his life's aim — to do all he could for russia, both now and in the future. today's inauguration extends his almost two—decade rule by another six years.
10:09 pm
here's our moscow correspondent steve rosenberg. he probably could have walked this with his eyes closed. for the fourth time in his career, vladimir putin climbed the staircase of the grand kremlin palace, to take the oath of office. on the stroke of midday, he entered the hall where russian emperors were crowned. the symbolism and the message couldn't be clearer — putin, the modern czar, loved by his people. he swore on the constitution to serve his citizens, protect russia's sovereignty, and made this pledge to the russian people. translation: our main goal is a new quality of life, security and health. our reference point is russia for the people, a country where everybody has the possibility for self—fulfilment. then, ringing out over moscow, a gun
10:10 pm
salute in the president's honour. vladimir putin is arguably the most powerful russian leader sincejosef stalin, but in this power lies a potential problem for the president and his country. he has built a political system in which all other institutions, from the parliament to the court system, are weak, and all key decisions are taken by him — by putin. that's not only a huge responsibility. it begs the question, what will happen here when vladimir putin exits the political stage? not everyone's been celebrating six more years of vladimir putin. police broke up this anti—putin protest in moscow at the weekend. the kremlin is facing international pressure, too, over the salisbury poisoning, and the war in syria. meanwhile, western sanctions against russia are biting.
10:11 pm
russia feels it's being squeezed by the west, and at this moscow arm wrestling club, they tell me only putin has the political muscle to protect them. we don't have somebody to substitute him. there is no rival, opponent of him. even in a country of 146 million people, there is no substitute for putin? ah, yes. it sounds not very good, but it's true. that is precisely how vladimir putin wants to be seen by his people, as the only choice for russia. steve rosenberg, bbc news, moscow. tourism accounts for around 8% of the world's carbon emissions — that's the conclusion of a sydney university study. the figure is about three times higher than previous estimates. it takes into account leisure activities such as dining out and shopping — as well as flights and accommodation.
10:12 pm
our environment correspondent matt mcgrath reports. from bus tours to souvenir hats, tourism is a key part of the london economy as it is in nearly every large city on earth. the industry is booming, growing by around 4% every year, and employing one in ten of the world's working population. now for the first time a scientific study has taken a detailed look at every aspect of leisure tourism. while aviation is a major part of the carbon output of tourism, this review looked at the whole life—cycle of the food, beverages, hotel accommodation and shopping enjoyed by travellers. all that carbon adds up to around 8% of global emissions, a significant increase on previous estimates. key to the rise are travellers from well—to—do countries like the uk who journey to europe and the us and other affluent destinations. they demand higher carbon transport and better quality accommodation and services on their holidays compared to people from poorer nations.
10:13 pm
according to the report countries like the maldives have the highest emissions per head of population. for exotic destinations like these, paul lim is a —— tourism is a double—edged sword. driving up living standards but contributing to the rise in climate and threatening the very future of these islands. the author says to tackle the issue there needs to be more offsetting schemes like planting trees. world travel industry representatives have welcomed the report. they argue that greater awareness is the key to consumers making lower carbon choices on their holidays. rochelle turner, the director of research at the world travel and tourism council, has been telling me she thinks the problem is more serious than previously thought. it is a different measure than what was done in 2008,
10:14 pm
which was looking at the direct impact. this takes into account direct and indirect impact so this is a broader study and i don't think this is comparing like with like, actually. it is a very good study published in nature magazine, something we have to take seriously, and something we can now align to and really start to recognise how we can change our impact when we have something to measure towards. given that we all like to take a holiday, what would you say are the key measures for tourists as they weigh up how to enjoy a break without adding too much to this problem of global warming? it's about everybody‘s lifestyle today, and we have to have the understanding as to what are the things that cause emissions and what are the things which cause us to emit carbon and other gases in our daily lives. there are things we can do
10:15 pm
about the food that we eat, eating certain meats raises the number of emissions, for example. we can choose closer to home destinations but we can also choose destinations that are already carbon neutral, that they have offset their emissions and they are already working towards reducing them further to become net negative, so i think having that information available for consumers will help them make those choices. but at the moment it is very very difficult because nobody knows how much carbon is in any of the choices that we make. it is a complex issue because perhaps as we were hearing in the report, people might consider that the emissions would be huge to fly to somewhere like the maldives, but there's an entire local economy there which is dependent on tourism. absolutely. we look at the economic impact for 185 countries around the world and we find small island developing
10:16 pm
states have upwards of 96% of their gdp coming from travel and tourism. so to say, no, you mustn't travel to those destination because the carbon emitted is too much, would completely devastate those economies. there's far more which could be done in terms of offsetting and recognising the importance of tourism which provides forjobs and growing prosperity and for opportunities for education and development of the destinations. the headlines on bbc news: the foreign secretary is in washington in an attempt to stop president donald trump abandoning the iran nuclear deal. the uk is enjoying a record—breaking heatwave — it's the hottest early may bank holiday weekend on record. police appeal for witnesses after a number of shooting incidents over the bank holiday weekend — in london and manchester. sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. and we'll get straight
10:17 pm
to the snooker. because mark williams has won the world championship for a third time, with a thrilling 18—16 win overjohn higgins. the welshman led 15—10 from the afternoon's action, but higgins pushed him all the way this evening. clearing up every time williams made a mistake. but the 43—year—old, who's now the oldest champion in a0 years, held his nerve — this was the red that clinched it. he had thought about quitting the game, and didn't even qualify for last year's championship, but now has another world title, 15 years after his last one. it's unbelievable. 12 months ago i wasn't even here. to come out and just to play in the final is an experience in itself because i haven't been here for a long time, and the crowd have been fantastic tonight, all the way through, really. i just come
10:18 pm
tonight, all the way through, really. ijust come believe it. england have made it two wins out of two at the under 17 european championship. the hosts came from behind to beat italy 2—1 in walsall. england's senior head coach gareth southgate was keeping track on the young lions who went behind early on to italian captain alessio riccardi's strike. this under 17 side is a new generation to the one which became world champions last year, but they dominated the second half. nottingham forest forward arvin apieer‘s goal got them level and then five minutes later they won a penalty which manchester city's tommy doyle scored. that was the winner. they face switzerland on thursday in rotherham in their final group game. a draw would be good enough to reach the quarter finals. wolverhampton wanderers have enjoyed a premier league promotion parade, celebrating their championship title. thosands turned out to cheer on the team. an open top bus carried them through wolverhampton before a party in the city's park in front of 30,000 people. next season will be wolves‘ first in the top division since 2012. it is what this city deserves
10:19 pm
and it is what the supporters deserve and it is what we deserve as a team because we have played great football this is. the fans deserve it, they have suffered for a long time. fantastic fans. we have worked hard since the beginning of the season and we deserve this fantastic party. sir alex ferguson remains in intensive care after he underwent emergency surgery on saturday. the former manchester united manager was treated for a brain haemorrage. the club said the procedure went well but no update on his condition since. the 76 year—old continues to recieve get well messages. we've heard from ryan giggs and philjones today. giggs, who starred in all 13 of ferguson's premier league title wins, described his old boss as a fighter. his sentiments were echoed by current united playerjones. he was the one who brought me to the club and gave me the opportunity to play for one of the biggest clubs in the world. he took me under his wing like a father. it's shocking. sad.
10:20 pm
but i know his character, he has that fight in him and hopefully he will recover well. anthonyjoshua and his management team will meet tomorrow to discuss his next steps in the heavyweight division. joshua holds three world titles and is under pressure to take on the american wbc champ deontay wilder in a unification bout. i think if it's a real offer with real contract terms which we have not seen yet, and i believe the americans do want it and they want it in vegas, then we are looking at a fight that anthony joshua would prefer because he wants to create his own legacy and legacy would be undisputed world champion. and, they want to do it — we want to do it. that's the message from the tour de yorkshire organisers, who say they're interested in hosting the start of the vuelta a espana. the yorkshire race originated after the county hosted the grand depart in the 2014 tour de france. it's also going to stage next year's world championships. welcome to yorkshire chief executive sir gary verity,
10:21 pm
says talks with vuelta organisers have been going on "for many months". that's all the sport for now. a reminder you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. all the reaction to mark williams victory at the world snooker championships. studio: many thanks. more than 20 homes have been totally destroyed — and hundreds more are in danger after a volcano erupted in hawaii. 1700 people have been evacuated from the largest island as a result of the activity from the kilauea volcano. some people have been allowed to return temporarily but only to collect their pets. james cook reports. fountains of lava, bursting from one of the world's most active volcanoes. kilauea has been erupting constantly for more than 30 years. but not like this. destruction unfolding in slow motion, gobbling up the ground in a residential area called
10:22 pm
leilani estates. since thursday, lava has been spewing forth from more than half a dozen fissures in the ground. this community was built on a field of fire, and no one knows where the next rupture will emerge. already, two dozen homes have been destroyed, and nearly 2000 people have fled. as you go down the hill you can see the avenue doesn't exist any more. there is a black lava thing. everything is all gone. at one point lava burst more than 200 feet into the air, higher than nelson's column in trafalgar square. at the crater of kilauea, geologists are using time—lapse videos to keep watch. but even the experts say that predicting the behaviour of a magma plumbing system which extends a0 miles beneath the earth is practically impossible. instead, they can do
10:23 pm
little more than watch in awe and issue warnings. there is sulphur dioxide gas in the air. it can be deadly, and the forecast is for more eruptions and earthquakes, perhaps for months to come. james cook, bbc news. with temperatures soaring you may tempted to indulge in an ice cream or two, but if your favourite flavour is vanilla the price you pay for it could be about to rise. bad weather in madagascar, the world's top producer, has affected the harvest and is pushing up prices. our business reporter maryam moshiri has been to see how businesses are coping. cookie dough, chocolate brownie, creme brulee, whatever your favourite flavour, vanilla, the key ingredient for sweet treats is now, after saffron, the second most expensive spice in the world. i have got some flavours for us to try. i've got honeycomb and original
10:24 pm
vanilla and rum and raisin. snugburys ice cream is run by three sisters in cheshire. the family's been churning ice cream for 30 years, but the cost of this key ingredient is starting to bite. yes, it has gone up. we decided to buy it forward and buy a year's worth. we had to make a decision as to whether we were going to absorb the costs, which we did in the end. this summer, we have to crunch the figures and just see how it will work out. the sisters insist they'll stick with the real thing, but other ice cream businesses are taking vanilla off the menu. so why has vanilla become such a valuable commodity? here at these rhs gardens,
10:25 pm
vanilla orchids are grown in this glasshouse, but 75% grows in madagascar. vanilla is currently around $600 per kilo. the main reason for this is that there was a cyclone in madagascar last march which damaged a lot of the plantations and despite hopes that the price would have eased by now it's still on the high side, around those levels, and, in fact, this means it is higher than the price of silver. a highly prized and highly priced ingredient. as a result, only 1% of the flavouring in food comes from actual vanilla plants like these ones. and even though you might find it in sweet scented perfumes or candles, cakes, or even cocktails, do beware, because cheaper alternatives can be extracted from wood and even petrol. it will take untiljune to find out how this year's vanilla harvest fares. the team at snugburys say they aren't passing on the cost to customers yet. they say the taste is worth it, whatever the price.
10:26 pm
maryam moshiri, bbc news. we the weather forecast. the sun has set on the warmest may bank holiday on record. quite understandable, with temperatures reaching nearly 29. it was not the same everywhere, though, this was in north cornwall where temperatures we re north cornwall where temperatures were only a 10—11 at some point. the warm air has been pushed off into northern europe as atlantic winds start to dominate. out there at the moment, a pleasant enough night, dry
10:27 pm
and clear in central and eastern areas and misty in the western coastal hills, and temperatures dropping in some eastern areas down to around 6—7, but plenty of sunshine temperatures shooting up. a misty grey start in the west, turning wet in the afternoon, west of scotla nd turning wet in the afternoon, west of scotland and northern ireland and also north west wales, before the sunshine arrives back late in the day. temperatures, improvement for some, but with the highs of 20—27 in eastern england, that could be enough to set off a few heavy and thundery downpours and they will continue into the first part of the evening. overnight, drive the most into wednesday, but the village of high pressure will be there on thursday —— the ridge of high pressure. the weather will be pushing its way in. the isle of man again, north west wales, slightly
10:28 pm
heavy rain, and more prolonged than what we will see tomorrow. the brightest conditions further east but temperatures dropping. al breaks of rain spreading east through wednesday night, —— outbreaks. thursday is living like a fine day with sunny spells for many, but much cooler for most —— looking with sunny spells for many, but much coolerfor most —— looking like. 13-17, coolerfor most —— looking like. 13—17, very pleasant when you have the sunshine and it should be for this time of year. we would do it again on friday, dry and bright to begin with, cloud increasing, turning wet in the west and temperatures where they should be for the time of year. president trump declares he'll announce tomorrow whether he's abandoning the international nuclear deal on iran. the agreement limits iran's nuclear programme in exchange for the lifting of sanctions — it's been strongly criticised by mr trump. the foreign secretary borisjohnson is in washington, making a last—ditch attempt to persuade the us to stay in. we think that what you can do
10:29 pm
is be tougher on iran, address the concerns of the president, and not throw the baby out with the bath water. we'll be asking what the president is likely to say. also tonight. britain basks in the warmest early may bank holiday since it was introduced a0 years ago. a lavish ceremony as vladimir putin is sworn in for a fourth term as president of russia. and flowing lava and toxic gas from an erupting volcano in hawaii destroys homes and forces hundreds to flee. good evening. president trump said this evening
10:30 pm
that he will announce his decision on whether to pull the us out of the iran nuclear deal tomorrow. the statement, made on twitter, came as the foreign secretary boris johnson, on a visit to washington, urged mr trump not to abandon the agreement — saying it would mean "throwing the baby out with the bath water." the deal, struck in 2015, led to iran limiting its nuclear programme in return for a lifting of economic sanctions — an arrangement which president trump has called "insane. " our north america correspondent nick bryant reports from washington. on american television this morning, a double serving of boris at breakfast, the foreign secretary appearing on donald trump's ‘s favourite news show, fox & friends, to address an audience of one. we think what you can do is be tougher on iran, address the concerns of the president, and not throw the baby out with the bath water. and just in case the president had switched channels,
10:31 pm
he popped up on a rival network to repeat a bad deal is better than no deal. i understand that people have anxiety about this deal and of course they are right in the sense that it is very far from perfect, but it is the best thing that we have at the moment. donald trump has called the iran deal a disaster and says he will announce his decision tomorrow. and although the foreign secretary isn't scheduled to shake hands with the us president before then, that has not stopped him stroking his ego. if he can fix north korea, and if he can fix the iran nuclear deal, then i don't see why he is any less of a candidate for the nobel peace prize than barack obama who got it before he had even done anything. signed by iran and six world powers in 2015, this landmark deal was the signature foreign policy achievement of barack obama's presidency, one that lifted crippling economic sanctions, in return for limitations on the country's nuclear energy programme. but donald trump thinks it is far too lenient on tehran.
10:32 pm
the iran deal was one of the worst and most one—sided transactions the united states has ever entered into. it is insane, it is ridiculous, it should never have been made. is there room for a compromise, a fudge, one in which america would withdraw from the deal without necessarily blowing it up, one which would allow european countries to continue trading with iran while at the same time putting more pressure on tehran over its ballistic missile technology and regional aggression. long live the united states, long live france. boris johnson is not the first european to charm and cajole, the french president emmanuel macron last month pleading with trump to accept that kind of compromise. and the german chancellor angela merkel made the same case a few days later. so from the foreign secretary, a final face—to—face plea with senior administration officials, such as the new secretary
10:33 pm
of state who said the iran deal is built on lies. there's been a lot of diplomatic activity around this issue — is it likely to have had any effect on president trump? i don't think european diplomatic effo rts i don't think european diplomatic efforts have been aimed at reversing the donald trump's thinking about the donald trump's thinking about the iran deal, that would have failed. he hates this deal. i think what european diplomatic efforts have been in that is damage limitation. salvaging something that is meaningful. and there are indications from the white house tonight that that could have achieved a measure of success. an administration official is saying that tomorrow donald trump will announce a partial pull—out of the iranian nuclear deal, although not
10:34 pm
giving an indication of what that would look like. what we know is that britain, france and germany have said it remains committed to that landmark deal. the president of iran has said the same thing, that iran has said the same thing, that iran would stand by the deal even in the absence of the united states. so what we might get is that compromise, the fudge i was talking about. that european countries continue to trade with iran without incurring penalties for the united states. we don't know for sure, we will hopefully find out tomorrow. it's been a record—breaking early may bank holiday — as temperatures in some parts of the country hit 28.7 degrees celsius — the hottest since the long weekend was introduced a0 years ago. south—east england, the midlands, and east anglia enjoyed the warmest weather.
10:35 pm
but some had to endure busy roads and overcrowded trains as people flocked to the coast. from southend—on—sea, frankie mccamley reports. whether you want to dive right in and really make the most of it... just get your feet wet... or have some good old—fashioned fun... today has certainly been the day. i had to tell this one, "put down the marigolds", you know? "and the bleach, you're not cleaning today. come on, let's go". and she was like (makes noise of protest). and i was like, boop—boop—boop. "i'll see you in an hour love, later. " so she dragged me out of my house in other words, otherwise i would have had a day of cleaning. been down here since half ten. and you haven't been able to get a place on the beach? we've got a place here, but look at it. any people that got down here after sort of like, 12 o'clock, no chance. you look up and down here, look, there's people looking around to sit down. orgrabbing an ice
10:36 pm
cream in bognor regis. a slightly more relaxing time for those dipping their toes in the lakes in south wales. but in bigbury in devon, beautiful calm seas didn't put off those who wanted to make the most of it. considering it was beast from the east a few weeks ago, now we're in shorts and t—shirts, so, great! just make the most of it because it'sjust unheard of, isn't it? this incredible weather, this early on in may. but yeah, we've got a picnic. 0h! and were going to get out in the water, hopefully get this one to get his toes in the water. that's the plan. the hottest temperature previously recorded for an overall early may bank holiday was 28.6 celsius in 1995. but this afternoon that record was broken away from the coast, in northolt in west london where temperatures reached 28.7. it has caused some travel disruption
10:37 pm
with roads and train lines to seaside towns heavy and overcrowded. things are expected to cool down from tomorrow but for those who've been able to enjoy this british rarity, there's not been a frown in sight. frankie mccamley, bbc news in southend—on—sea. police say a 13—year—old — who was one of three teenagers shot in a single incident in north—west london yesterday — was an innocent bystander. the gunman's intended target — who's 15 — is in hospital with head injuries, following the shooting in wealdstone. tonight there was a further shooting in south—east london, bringing to six the total of separate shootings in london, over the bank holiday weekend. danny shaw reports. the scene of london's latest gun attack. the latest victim — a 13—year—old boy walking down the road with his parents, hit in the head by a stray pellet from a shot gun. i was walking down the road, just round here, and basically
10:38 pm
there was a whole load of commotion, a boy bent down with his head down, and basically he had a pellet wound. luckily there was a first aider, he was a good samaritan, who came off the bus. the boy was treated in hospital after the attack which happened yesterday lunchtime. he's since been discharged. the intended target is believed to have been a 15—year—old who was hit a number of times in the head and whose injuries are not thought to be life—threatening. a third victim was hit in the arm but has not come forward. clearly an appallingly cowardly act with no regard to the safety of members of the public, who were enjoying a lovely bank holiday weekend. certainly as a father myself i can understand how people are extremely concerned for their safety and that of their children. police say a 39—year—old man has been arrested in connection with the attack and released under investigation. the shootings here in wealdstone were the latest in a series
10:39 pm
of violent incidents this weekend, fuelling more concerns about gangs, guns and knives on our streets. on saturday rhyhiem ainsworth barton was shot and killed in southwark in south london, aged 17. and in greater manchester tonight, police are investigating after a teenager was shot in the leg in clayton. the weekend's violence reflects the rise in gun crime across england and wales. community leaders and politicians are still searching for long—term solutions. danny shaw, bbc news, wealdstone. a 17—year—old boy has appeared in court charged with causing grievous bodily harm after a woman was attacked with an electric drill in strabane in northern ireland. the incident happened in the early hours of saturday. the woman suffered a serious head injury and is in a stable condition in hospital. the court was told the attack was being treated as a homophobic hate crime. vladimir putin has been sworn in as the president of russia
10:40 pm
for the fourth time. during an ornate ceremony at the kremlin, he laid out his life's aim — to do all he could for russia, both now and in the future. today's inauguration extends his almost two—decade rule by another six years. here's our moscow correspondent steve rosenberg. he probably could have walked this with his eyes closed. for the fourth time in his career, vladimir putin climbed the staircase of the grand kremlin palace, to take the oath of office. on the stroke of midday, he entered the hall where russian emperors were crowned. the symbolism and the message couldn't be clearer — putin, the modern czar, loved by his people. he swore on the constitution to serve his citizens, protect russia's sovereignty, and made this pledge to the russian people.
10:41 pm
translation: our main goal is a new quality of life, security and health. our reference point is russia for the people, a country where everybody has the possibility for self—fulfilment. then, ringing out over moscow, a gun salute in the president's honour. vladimir putin is arguably the most powerful russian leader since josef stalin, but in this power lies a potential problem for the president and his country. he has built a political system in which all other institutions, from the parliament to the court system, are weak, and all key decisions are taken by him — by putin. that's not only a huge responsibility, it begs the question, what will happen here when vladimir putin exits the political stage? not everyone's been celebrating six more years of vladimir putin. police broke up this anti—putin protest in moscow at the weekend.
10:42 pm
the kremlin is facing international pressure, too, over the salisbury poisoning, and the war in syria. meanwhile, western sanctions against russia are biting. russia feels it's being squeezed by the west, and at this moscow arm wrestling club, they tell me only putin has the political muscle to protect them. we don't have somebody to substitute him. there is no rival, opponent of him. even in a country of 1a6 million people, there is no substitute for putin? ah, yes. it sounds not very good, but it's true. that is precisely how vladimir putin wants to be seen by his people, as the only choice for russia. steve rosenberg, bbc news, moscow. in lebanon, early reports suggest the militant group hezbollah
10:43 pm
and its allies have won just over half the seats in the country's parliamentary elections. the organisation, which is backed by iran, inflicted heavy losses on the party of lebanon's prime minister. the leader of hezbollah described the gains it's made as a "moral and political victory." more than 30 homes have been destroyed — and hundreds more are under threat, after a volcano erupted in hawaii. 1700 people have been evacuated from the largest island as a result of the activity from the kilauea volcano. james cook reports. fountains of lava, bursting from one of the world's most active volcanoes. kilauea has been erupting constantly for more than 30 years. but not like this. destruction unfolding in slow motion, gobbling up the ground in a residential area called leilani estates. since thursday, lava has been spewing forth from more
10:44 pm
than ten fissures in the ground. this community was built on a field of fire, and no one knows where the next rupture will emerge. hundreds of homes are threatened. hundreds of people have been forced to flee. as you go down the hill you can see that leilani avenue doesn't exist any more. there is a black lava thing. everything is all gone. at one point lava burst more than 200 feet into the air, higher than nelson's column in trafalgar square. at the crater of kilauea, geologists are using time—lapse videos to keep watch. but even the experts say that predicting the behaviour of a magma plumbing system which extends a0 miles beneath the earth is practically impossible. they are particularly concerned about gas stored in this geothermal plant near one of the fissures. and about sulphur
10:45 pm
dioxide in the island air which can prove deadly. this could go on for months but there is nothing anyone can do about it, except to gaze in awe. james cook, bbc news. wales's mark williams has been crowned snooker world champion after a tense final at the crucible in sheffield. the welshman went into this evening's final session 15 frames to ten in the lead. but despite a mini—comeback by scotland's john higgins, williams held on and sealed victory. he takes the title for the third time and picks up prize money of £a25,000. as pressures on the nhs increase, a senior government advisor has warned that the health service could be bankrupted by people's lifestyle choices. nick harding from nhs england says urgent action is needed particularly in poorer communities with higher rates of smoking, poor diets,
10:46 pm
and too little exercise. for the past 18 months, our health correspondent dominic hughes followed efforts to improve health in one such town, fleetwood in lancashire. # que sera sera...#. this is the generation that has seen their town of fleetwood undergo dramatic changes. from a prosperous fishing port to a community plagued by illness and premature death. one step forward. but now the youngest generation is being offered the prospect of a healthierfuture. from getting active... to thinking about what they eat. they're taking control of their destiny. i wouldn't be sat here now, i'd probably be in a coffin, dead. when we first met tom in 2016, he was playing football as part of his recovery from drug addiction. a year and a half later, he is doing well. now coaching others and in some ways, making amends for his behaviour in the past. the only thing i wanted to do was cause chaos and destruction.
10:47 pm
and now i'm doing something active that i like, and it's also making a great difference. tom has turned his life around. and on fleetwood's westview estate, local volunteers are trying to make similar changes across an entire community. a lot of people in fleetwood, they've become isolated. from 15 upwards, there's nothing for that age. we live in fleetwood, we're proud of fleetwood, but there's a world out there and we've got to try and make the best of it. what happens in fleetwood matters because lifestyle choices, smoking, drinking, poor diet and not enough exercise, mean people are dying early, notjust here, but right across the uk. and yet over the past 18 months, we've seen lots of different projects that are all trying to break that cycle of ill—health that is claiming lives. and senior nhs figures say something has to change because otherwise the health service itself could be overwhelmed.
10:48 pm
the problem is if we don't make those changes, we'll be in the situation of saying, we just don't have enough money to look after as many people as we would choose to, as doctors would choose to, and could end up with the equivalent of bankrupting the nhs. this is a process that has only just begun. but the prize is that these young people grow up in a town that is healthier and happier. and time, everyone, ok, well done. dominic hughes, bbc news, fleetwood. you can see more on all of today's stories on the bbc news channel. that's all from me, stay with us on bbc one, it's time for the news where you are. sir david attenborough has been sharing his views on plastic, brexit and tv fakery. in an interview with the bbc‘s martha kearney to mark the re—opening of the world's largest victorian glasshouse, the temperate house at kew gardens, sir david said that plastic is a "major danger" to the planet. we can never go far enough, because we shall always be
10:49 pm
overwhelmed with plastic. but, at the moment, we are using plastic in a completely functionless way. i mean, it baffles me. people send me letters, and if they think they are important, they put them in a plastic envelope. and then put that in another envelope. why? i can't understand. i mean, it makes them look, i suppose, precious or something. but it's quite functionless. and we use plastic, or have done until now, with total abandon, without any care or concern about where it's going to go or what it might do. if we can pull ourselves together and recognise that, actually, it is a major danger, particularly in the sea, we are stepping in the right direction. an awful lot of people now are working on ways in which you can deal with plastic waste. one of the problems is, of course, is that plastic is notjust plastic, there are lots of different kinds of plastics, chemically.
10:50 pm
what works for one kind of plastic is not necessarily working for another. those are the problems they are wrestling with at the moment. was it a conscious decision in the programme to highlight the pollution of plastic? well, it was certainly in the mind of the producers that we would have a sequence. but i've been saying that, and we've been making programmes about that sort of thing, for decades. i mean, i've certainly talked about plastic many times before. and many, many other people have, too. why has it happened just now? that i can't tell. itjust struck a particular moment in the national mood when people were sensitive to that particular danger. why? i don't know. but it certainly has had a huge effect. and, finally, you recently made a television programme, you were in conversation with the queen, you talked to her about her legacy,
10:51 pm
the commonwealth canopy tree project. what would you like your own legacy to be? well, i don't think i deserve... i mean, i've been unbelievably lucky for the last, what, 60 years or something, to make natural history programmes. and with a lot of other people, too, cameramen, recordists, so on. we've all worked together in the natural history unit and produced a great corpus of stuff. i would like to think that there will not be any of it which you couldn't do again, perhaps better. but it could be that quite a lot of those things will become extinct in 50 to 100 years' time. in which case, that will be a legacy that future generations will treasure. think of what it would be like if you could see pterodactyls coming across and, actually, a brontosaurus come thundering through this newly planted palm trees. laughter
10:52 pm
sir david attenborough, many thanks indeed. let's go before the pterodactyls come! the sun has set on the warmest may bank holiday on record. quite understandable, with temperatures reaching nearly 29. it was not the same everywhere, though, this was in north cornwall where temperatures were only 10—11 at some point. the warm air has been pushed off into northern europe as atlantic winds start to dominate. out there at the moment, a pleasant enough night, dry and clear in central and eastern areas and misty in the western coastal hills, and temperatures dropping in some eastern areas down to around 6—7, but plenty of sunshine temperatures shooting up. a misty grey start in the west, turning wet in the afternoon,
10:53 pm
west of scotland and northern ireland and also north west wales, before the sunshine arrives back late in the day. temperatures, improvement for some, but with the highs of 20—27 in eastern england, that could be enough to set off a few heavy and thundery downpours and they will continue into the first part of the evening. overnight, drive the most into wednesday, but the ridge of high pressure will be there on thursday. the weather will be pushing its way in. the isle of man again, north west wales, slightly heavy rain, and more prolonged than what we will see tomorrow. the brightest conditions further east but temperatures dropping. outbreaks of rain spreading east through wednesday night, thursday is looking like a fine day with sunny spells for many,
10:54 pm
but much cooler for most. 13—17, very pleasant when you have the sunshine, and it should be for this time of year. we will do it again on friday, dry and bright to begin with, cloud increasing, turning wet in the west and temperatures where they should be for the time of year. we think that what you can do is be tougher on iran, address the concerns of the president, and not throw the baby out with the bath water. president trump says he will make an announcement about the deal tomorrow evening. the uk has its hottest early may bank holiday on record, hitting a high of 28.7 degrees celsius. make the most of it, it is an heard of, incredible
10:55 pm
weather this early in may. considering it was the beast from the east, now it is shorts and t—shirts, great.
10:56 pm
10:57 pm
10:58 pm
10:59 pm
11:00 pm

23 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on