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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 9, 2018 6:00am-8:30am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and steph mcgovern. international leaders fight to save the iran nuclear deal. president rouhani threatens to restart his country's uranium enrichment programme after donald trump pulls america out of the agreement. we cannot prevent an iranian nuclear bomb under the decaying and rotten structure of the current agreement. good morning, it is wednesday 9 may. also this morning: "failing a generation". mps say government plans risk leaving hundreds of thousands of children without the mental healthcare they need. ten years after their son was killed in an unprovoked attack, the parents of schoolboy jimmy mizen tells us why they are still campaigning to tackle youth violence. things haven't changed in the last
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ten years. if anything, now they are worse than they were ten years ago. so clearly the ways we are trying to treat this problem are not working and having an impact. forget your euros, dollars and sterling. there is now a lake district pound. but how does it work and who would use it? i will be finding out whether it is working. in sport: west brom are relegated from the premier league. despair for them, and swansea too, who look doomed. but delight for saints, as they take a huge step towards survival. and it will be the venue for next week's royal wedding, but before that, windsor castle is hosting its annual horse show. carol is there with the weather. good morning. it certainly is. it is the 75th anniversary of the royal winds are horse show, on the private grounds of winds are castle. about
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55,000 people are expected to attend between today and when it ends on 13 may. today's weather is a chilly start of many it is a fine, dry and sunny start of many it is a fine, dry and sunny one. start of many it is a fine, dry and sunny one. rains sweeping in from the west and wherever you are today, it will feel cooler than it did yesterday. good morning. first, our main story: intense diplomatic efforts are taking place to save the iran nuclear deal, after president trump announced he was withdrawing america from the agreement. the uk, france and germany have expressed regret and concern at the decision, while the iranian president has threatened to restart the country's uranium programme. our washington correspondent chris buckler reports. once hailed as historic, as far as the us is concerned, the iran nuclear deal is now history. president trump made a point of being seen to personally sign off on america abandoning the accord. it is clear to me that we cannot prevent an iranian nuclear bomb under the decaying and rotten
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structure of the current agreement. the iran deal is defective at its core. although the international agreement limited iran's nuclear programme, it didn't stop the country from developing missiles, and donald trump had many other concerns about inspections and time limits on the deal. european leaders are deeply worried about the impact of american leaving the agreement. but the series of 11th—hour dashes to the white house, and televised appeals, failed to persuade the president. now, they are left trying to hold what is left of the deal together, with tehran threatening to increase uranium enrichment. translation: from now on,
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the agreement is between iran and five other countries. and in these circumstances, we need to see how the other five countries will react. there will be an impact on trade, and potentially even the threat of us sanctions on european companies that continue to trade with iran. but, internationally, the immediate concern is of tensions once again increasing in the middle east. chris buckler, bbc news, washington. we will be speaking to middle east minister, alistair burt, at 7:10am this morning. quite a few questions to ask him about where we go now with regards to the iran deal. mps are warning that government plans to improve child mental health services lack ambition, and would leave hundreds of thousands of young people without the support they need. a joint report by the education and health social care committees said there needs to be more evidence the plans will lead to better services. our social affairs correspondent alison holt reports. with the exam season already under way, this is a time of extra
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pressure for many young people. for some, at least, anxiety and mental health issues. when 18—year—old chloe struggled with increasing stress, she found that, like many others, she faced a long wait for the services she needed.” others, she faced a long wait for the services she needed. i went to the services she needed. i went to the doctors in june the services she needed. i went to the doctors injune 2016, and then i think my wait for a referral was until october time, which is like... the start of october, i think it was, and then within that time i ended up in hospital after trying to ta ke ended up in hospital after trying to take my own life. so i think the wait for me was quite long. today's report describes the government's strategy to improve child and adolescent mental health services as lacking ambition. those plans include linking mental health teams to schools, and four—week waiting times to access services. but the mps say the current timetable will ta ke mps say the current timetable will take too long to roll out across the country, and most children won't benefit. the government reject the
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criticisms, and says its strategy, backed by extra staff and more money, will transform mental health services for young people. a secret scotland yard gang database is stigmatising and racially discriminating against young black men, according to a report by the human rights organisation amnesty international uk. it is called the gang violence matrix, and is under investigation by the information commissioner. the metropolitan police said the matrix was aimed at reducing violence and saving lives. our home affairs correspondent, june kelly, reports. it was that 2011 riots, which began in tottenham and spread across london, which spawned the gangs matrix. police began compiling intelligence on individuals said to be identified as being part of a gang, including those with no history of violence. today's report by amnesty international found that, of the 3,806 people whose details are held on the matrix,
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99% are male, 78% are black, and the youngest is just 12 years old. and at a news conference, among amnesty‘s many concerns is how the information is being shared. we hear stories of this following people through their lives, from the housing association to schools to job centres, where people are being treated differently. in response, the met police said... the matrix has been denounced as racist by campaigners who work with young black people. the truth is, the preoccupation with the gangs has meant that they have failed to design effective strategies for dealing with serious youth violence. the capital has seen a spate of violent crime involving young victims. today's report focuses on figures which found that the majority of knife crime wasn't
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regarded as gang—related. june kelly, bbc news. senior ministers are said to be at odds over plans for a new independent investigations unit to reopen unsolved killings from the northern ireland troubles. the defence secretary, gavin williamson, is understood to have raised concerns that the new system may end up with army veterans being taken to court. the government says it will carry out a thorough consultation on the proposals. a survey has found that cocaine can be delivered more quickly than a takeaway pizza in england and scotland. more than a third of the 1,000 cocaine users surveyed in england said they could get the class a drug delivered within half an hour. the authors of the report said dealers were competing to deliver quickest. scientists say they have found a potential cure for baldness. the most common type of hair loss is male pattern baldness. it starts in the late 20s or early 30s, and affects around half of all men by the time they are 50. scientists in manchester say they have found that a drug originally designed to treat brittle bone disease has a dramatic effect, by stimulating new hairs to grow.
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a0 men took part in the trial, and scientists say more research is now needed. someone has just pressed someone hasjust pressed reverse someone has just pressed reverse on that, haven't they? there will be loads of people posting about that. thankfully... it is tough for blokes when that happens. my mum would describe her own hair as like a thick doormat. you get your head genes from your mother... making stuff u p genes from your mother... making stuff up now. it is very thick and strong and steady and powerful, so i think i will be all right. although ican think i will be all right. although i can feel it falling out as you are looking. can ijust leap to
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i can feel it falling out as you are looking. can i just leap to the defence of bald men everywhere? i like a bald man. ithink defence of bald men everywhere? i like a bald man. i think if you are losing your hair, go with it. just gaveit losing your hair, go with it. just gave it all off? yes, it looks great! ijust think it looks great. i was trying to think, stanley tucci. on the list is quite long. we won't talk about that now. embrace it. some embracing going on amongst west brom fans last night, consoling, not happy embraces. what a fantastic club they are. a huge amount of history, a great community club, relegated from the premier league. if you look at the bottom half of the premier league table, at one point in the season it could have been absolutely anybody who went down. their future was sealed after relegation rivals southampton managed a 1—0 victory over swansea. huge celebrations for them, but swansea are now even deeper in trouble, while west brom
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are condemned to playing in the championship next season. a third wimbledon title for andy murray this year is looking all the more unlikely. his recovery from a hip injury has run into difficulty, and it now looks doubtful he will be able to make his comeback in loughborough this month. murray hasn't played competitively since wimbledon last year, and had a hip operation injanuary. kyle edmund is into the second round of the madrid open after a straight—sets win over daniil medvedev. edmund won eight games in a row to beat the russian in straight sets, and will play novak djokovic next. and chris froome lost more time at the giro d'italia. the fourth stage in sicily was won by the belgian, tim wellens. britain's simon yates has moved up to third overall, but froome is 57 seconds off the lead. quite a lot of time in cycling, that, isn't it? are you going to
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hang around for the papers in a minute? i will, and hang around for the papers in a minute? iwill, and more hang around for the papers in a minute? i will, and more all this chat. —— baldness chat. carol is at windsor castle for us this morning with the weather. carol is sort of loosening up, making sure everything is working. and grooming the horses! good morning. this is a beautiful horse, fred the horse. how old is he? he is 110w fred the horse. how old is he? he is now nine years old. and are you taking him fora now nine years old. and are you taking him for a wee stroll?|j now nine years old. and are you taking him for a wee stroll? i am, exercising him. is he a horse or raponi? he is a pony. here's a beautiful pony, and i will let you get cracking. the royal winds are horse show is in its 75th year. it sta rts horse show is in its 75th year. it starts today and goes on until 13 may, and about 55,000 people will come and watch this spectacle that is the royal windsor horse show in these next few days. weatherwise, will it hold up? that is the
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question. yes, it probably will for some of the time. it is a chilly start. yesterday we hit 26.7dc in gravesend, widely across central and eastern england it was low to mid—20s. today it will be something different. a chilly and fine start for many, but we have got some rain coming into the west and that rain is going to spread eastwards through the course of the day. so there is some patchy mist and fog around first thing this morning in the south—west of england, also dumfries & galloway, that were left. a lot of dry weather and sunshine. the cloud in the west producing some rain, that will cross northern ireland and get into western scotland as we go through the morning. the cloud a lwa ys through the morning. the cloud always building ahead of it and we get into western parts of england and also wales. so the further east
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that you are, the dry and brighter the weather will be. temperatures today at basta 20 or 21, for example. around the south—east, the london area. but generally we are looking at the mid—to—high teens. compared to what some of us have had that as a big drop. compared to yesterday in parts of the south—east it isa yesterday in parts of the south—east it is a good six degrees drop. as we move on to the evening and overnight, that band of rain continues to push from west to east, getting as far as eastern anglia, and the south—east by the end of the day. there will be some showers coming across north—west scotland and northern ireland. if you are under the clear skies it will be a chilly start to the day tomorrow. a temperature range overnight roughly about five to ten, ten where we have the rain. tomorrow morning we will lose the dregs of that weather front, the rain and also the cloud, from the south—east. it will brighten up the ridge of high pressure a cross brighten up the ridge of high pressure across us. there brighten up the ridge of high pressure across us. there will be some showers around, most of them in the north—west, and some of them will be heavy and thundery with hail. one or two popping up elsewhere. temperature—wise we are going down. temperatures lower, especially in the south—east. then for saturday we have a new weather
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front coming in, across the south—west. some heavy showers getting an across parts of wales and also northern ireland, but move away from that and it looks like it is going to be drier and brighter. still the timing of the showers a little bit uncertain. but i can tell you, dan and steph, it is mighty perky here this morning. you make it look lovely, it looks really lovely and sunny but i imagine there is a bit of a chill. thank you very much, we will see you in a bit. more horses as well. let's take a look at today's papers. let's have a look at the times. the daily express, lord's take wrecking ball to brexit, fury erupted last night as members of the lords were accused of taking a wrecking ball to brexit and they have donald trump's biggest gamble yet, ending the iran nuclear deal, which we will look at through the morning and the secret behind meghan‘s smile, there's meghan markle on the front page of the times is. is it her mouth, is that the secret? —— front page of
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the express. the times this morning has the lead story about trump and ditching that deal with a run around nuclear weapons. the story that we we re nuclear weapons. the story that we were just nuclear weapons. the story that we werejust alluding to, nuclear weapons. the story that we were just alluding to, one which caught my eye this morning, paying for petrol at the pump can help you stop getting fat. this is research that's been done by leading obesity experts, they say if you go into the petrol station to pay you end up buying a bag of crisps or some other snacks. chocolate is mine. but if you snacks. chocolate is mine. but if y°u pay snacks. chocolate is mine. but if you pay at the pump you don't get temptation ali as you walk into pay for your petrol. alley. i was tempted by a freddo, 58p, other droplets are available, i wasn't having that! i was so appalled i put it straight back down! front page of
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the guardian, meghan markle on the front page, their story, fears of new gulf crisis as trump pulls the us out of iran nuclear deal. you can see cate blanchett in the middle, a number of famous actresses at the cannes film festival, this is on the front page because cate blanchett has defended the number of female directors this year, arguing change will come but not overnight. the daily telegraph has the lead story there about donald trump and the deal with iran that is now not on with america. we will talk about that later. we talked about alex ferguson over the last few days, this is alex ferguson's first words to his family after brain surgery because his son's side lost 1—0 against wigan. this exclusive on the front page of the sun. what have you got? if there's anyone that can recover from brain surgery in a
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couple of days it is that man, he can pretty much do anything, he has the right mindset. the papers, lots of stories about relegation from last night, i want to show you this picture, down, can we get down here with the camera ? picture, down, can we get down here with the camera? this is darren moore, the west brom caretaker boss, receiving his manager of the month award yesterday. lots of people said the manager of the month award is cursed but i don't know if anyone has ever won it on the day the club has ever won it on the day the club has been relegated. the curse! thoroughly deserved from him. the sad thing for west brom fans in a way is they had a bit of hope, at one point in the season it looks like it wouldn't happen, all doom and gloom, then a bit of hope and it didn't work in the end. on the back page of the mail, wayne rooney potentially going to play in america for washington, dc perhaps next season and this is a big story we will talk about through the morning. andy murray, there's a suggestion he
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might not be fit for wimbledon according to the times and mail this morning. he had back surgery in january and hasn't played since last yea r‘s january and hasn't played since last year's wimbledon, he was due to play a warmup tournament shortly and he's not ready so lots of people are speculating that means he doesn't have enough of a run—up to be ready for wimbledon. he's had a big operation, it's been toojo very tough. do you want rats or rubbish? —— it's been very tough. tough. do you want rats or rubbish? -- it's been very tough. sounds terrible! this is rats on south georgia island just off south america, they got rid of rats that have been there for hundreds of yea rs, have been there for hundreds of years, this is because lots of people posted pictures on social media of bang, they rubbish that's been building up in various places. an entire spread in the daily mirror
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—— lots of rubbish. an entire spread in the daily mirror -- lots of rubbish. take it home if the bin is full! it looks awful, doesn't it? think of other people. it gets on my wick, that. it gets online as well! i'm glad you chose rubbish, thanks, sally! 10 years ago today, jimmy mizen was celebrating his 16th birthday. but the next day he was killed in a savage, unprovoked attack near his south london home. since then, his family has campaigned tirelessly injimmy‘s name trying to bring an end to the violence that's blighting the lives of so many young people and their families. much of their work is aimed at primary schools, hoping to catch children before it's too late. john maguire reports he wasjust a he was just a beautiful boy with a heart of gold, always smiling, just a gift to us and sadly we miss him very much. jimmy mizen was murdered in an unprovoked attack near his home. he
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was just unprovoked attack near his home. he wasjust 16. unprovoked attack near his home. he wasjust16. we're becoming a country of anger, of selfishness and of the. and you know, it doesn't have to be like this and let's together try and stop it. thank you. ten yea rs together try and stop it. thank you. ten years on and his family are still campaigning. through the charity set up injimmy‘s memory, his parents now spend most of their time talking to young people about the consequences of violence. today they're at a the consequences of violence. today they‘ re at a safety conference the consequences of violence. today they're at a safety conference at a south london school where local primary children are sharing concerns they have about their neighbourhood. this is what we did, we think they can make it more safe by putting in some cctv cameras. on the estates people take drugs, they smoke, they take drugs and they spill the drugs on the floor for us to slip on so we have to be careful. the children are able to talk to the police, the local council and community leaders. my belief is if
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we can go into schools and talk to you, dearfour, year 5, we can go into schools and talk to you, dearfour, year5, year 6, it's a hard you, dearfour, year5, year 6, it's a ha rd story you, dearfour, year5, year 6, it's a hard story for them to listen to but if you share it in the right way it doesn't frighten them and i believe from there they will take it to their secondary schools. this whole message of change is a message of peace. but they accept that despite their best efforts violence on the streets is a major problem. things have been changing over the last ten years, if anything it's worse than that, the ways we are treating this aren't working or having an impact. if we can change the thinking ever harsher punishment won't change what's going on here, i think the idea of lecturing young people about their behaviour won't work either. this is about trying to bring other people along with us but also the community itself. betrayer tea is also pioneering the safe havens in shops and businesses were people feeling threatened on the street can seek refuge and help —— the charity is. the shopkeeper can
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call the parents or the police and they shut the doors. it's like building community, our communities are falling apart so we're rebuilding community and making safe places for our young people in trouble. terry corn, who seems to have everything in his store, offers one extremely valuable service. there were two young goals, about 15 or17, there were two young goals, about 15 or 17, there was a strange man on the streets and then he stood outside for half an hour and i had to call the police because he wouldn't leave the shop until they came out and then the police dealt with it. this girl has used one. someone behind us was creeping up on us so we someone behind us was creeping up on us so we went into a shop with a safe haven sticker on it and after we felt safe, we went out of the shop and we went home. the families two family's hope is to roll out these safe havens across the uk in jimmy‘s name so his death will not have been in vain —— the family's hope. we will be talking to the family
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later in the programme. ben's in the lake district for us this morning talking money. 0f of all places to do come to discuss money! but there's a reason. here they have launched a new currency last week, this is its first week of operation, the lake district pound and you might wonder whether they need one. the idea is to promote local business. they encourage the 18.5 million visitors who come here every year to swap their sterling for the lake district pound and they can use that in about 300 shops around the area and they can pay for things as they normally would, but there's an added benefit. all the proceeds of using those pounds go towards supporting local charities and local organisations that maintain some of the peaks and the walks in this part of the country but also local organisations that
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help local people, because, remember, of course, after the storms there was a lot of damage to this part of the world particularly here on water so this part of the world particularly here on water so some this part of the world particularly here on water so some of that money used for community projects. later we will talk to some of the businesses that stand to benefit —— on ullswater. we will speak to the man behind it about why they have come up with the idea. it's not new, it is used in some cities, bristol, brixton in london has one, what the benefit of a local currency is and how they've come up with some of the designs because they will change every year. they look like banknotes so we every year. they look like banknotes so we will show them to you later. from here on tolls water, we will discuss that. before that, let's get the news, travel and weather were you're watching breakfast this morning. —— ullswater. see you soon. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. a woman was left screaming in pain after she was sprayed in the mouth with a noxious substance while on a bus in south london. the 20—year—old victim
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was treated yesterday close to brixton tube station. police believe the attack was targeted and inquiries are now underway to trace the male suspect involved. her injuries are not thought to be life—changing or life—threatening. a new report suggests overall spending by london councils has dropped by 19% over the past seven years. planning, cultural and transport budgets bore the brunt of fear cuts according to the independent think tank, centre for london. newham was hardest hit, where spending per person has fallen by 33% since 2011. a designer label making handbags and belts has saved almost 170 tons of old fire hoses from being sent to landfill. elvis and kresse sells its products for hundreds of pounds to the rich and famous but since they started a decade ago, none of london's old fire hoses have had to be dumped. instead they've been recycled and half of fear profits
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from the sale of fear range goes to the firefighters charity. last year that was around £30,000. and the reason they go to landfill is because fire hoses is a double wall nitrile rubber jacket surrounding this woven nylon core, and that means you can't shred it, melt it and make new hoses, it's a composite so it's going to landfill. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tube this morning. onto the trains and cqc buses are replacing services between upminster and pitsea due to overhead power cable problems near langdon. on southeastern services, some are delayed via gillingham following a faulty train. onto the roads and northbound traffic at the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover a nd is slow from the woolwich road flyover and the a13 is building westbound from dagenham into barking. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. today feeling just a
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bit fresher than it has for the last few days. the temperature is going to drop today but it's not a bad day, still some sunshine, still dry but we will notice that change in temperature. we've got a lovely bright start this morning. we've got a little bit of patchy cloud, that will start to develop through the day but staying dry and temperatures, although not as warm as the last few days, still managing to reach the low 20s, around 21 in central london. overnight tonight, clear for this central london. overnight tonight, clearfor this evening central london. overnight tonight, clear for this evening but then this cloud will sweep through overnight and with it some outbreaks of rain. just coming and going through to dawn tomorrow morning, the minimum temperature between 7—10. for tomorrow, great start for many of us, still some outbreaks of rain at first but it will clear fairly quickly to a drier, brighter afternoon. temperatures in the sunny spells, 17 celsius. similar conditions for friday then, a rather u nsettled conditions for friday then, a rather unsettled weekend and temperatures getting a little bit cooler.
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i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to dan and steph. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and steph mcgovern. it is 6:30am. we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: when 16—year—old jimmy mizen was killed ten years ago in an unprovoked attack, his parents‘ lives changed forever. but they were determined that he wouldn't have died in vain, and this morning they are here to tell us howjimmy‘s name is helping to create safe havens for young people. thousands of children are not getting the mental health support they need in school, according to a group of mps. we will speak to one former student about how he struggled through without any help. she is currently on tour with ed sheeran. pop star anne—marie will be popping in to tell us why she went back in time for her new single. good morning.
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here is a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: the government is taking part in intense diplomatic efforts to save the iran nuclear deal. president trump announced he was withdrawing the us from the agreement, calling it decaying and rotten. the iranian president has threatened to restart the country's uranium programme. there had been reports that president trump would withdraw the us from the agreement, and international reaction was almost immediate.
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his predecessor, barack obama, tweeted that it was a serious mistake. he said there were few issues more important to the security of the us than iran. he also suggested there was an increased risk of war in the middle east. israeli president benjamin netanyahu thanked donald trump on twitter, and said he was preventing iran from ever getting nuclear weapons. the iranian minister of foreign affairs tweeted that he would spearhead a diplomatic effort with the other countries that are part of the deal, including the uk. mps are warning that young people could be at risk of not getting the mental health support they need, because government plans to improve services are not good enough. a report by the education and health and social care committees says more research needs to be done into exam pressures, and social media education should be compulsory in schools. the government rejects the criticisms, and says its strategy will transform mental health services for young people. a secret scotland yard gang database is stigmatising and racially discriminating against young black men, according to a report by the human rights organisation amnesty international uk. it is called the gang violence matrix, and gives an automated violence ranking to individuals. it is under investigation by the data watchdog, the information commissioner.
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the metropolitan police said the system was aimed at reducing violence and saving lives. senior ministers are said to be at odds over plans for a new independent investigations unit to reopen unsolved killings from the northern ireland troubles. the defence secretary, gavin williamson, is understood to have raised concerns that the new system may end up with army veterans being taken to court. the government says it will carry out a thorough consultation on the proposals. a survey has found that cocaine can be delivered more quickly than a takeaway pizza in england and scotland. more than a third of the 1,000 cocaine users surveyed in england said they could get the class a drug delivered within half an hour. the authors of the report said dealers were competing to deliver quickest. patients are finding it increasingly difficult to see their own gp on a regular basis, according to a new study from the university of leicester. seeing the same doctor has been linked to fewer hospital admissions and better health, but the report
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says people are finding it harder to see their family doctor compared with five years ago. the department of health says the latest statistics show more than half the population is currently benefitting from more flexible appointments. plans to reform and modernise the justice system are behind schedule, and face a funding shortfall of between £60—170 million. that is the warning from a new report by the national audit office. it follows a raft of measures introduced in 2016 to digitalise records and increase virtual and online court hearings, which it is hoped could save the taxpayer over £260 million a year. the ministry ofjustice says it is confident the programme is on track. we're already seeing our courts tribunal system creaking at the seams, and justice delayed is justice denied, so we've got to make sure this new system is delivering
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what it sets out to, that is clear about its scope, and a dozen results and escalating costs to the taxpayers and ultimately putting in bigger bills. so what we need is a good, well—run court and tribunal system and these new proposals from the department have two helped deliver that. have to help. with ten days to go until the royal wedding, meghan markle's face is a sight we are used to seeing in the papers, magazines, and on tv. but now, it has been immortalised in wax. madame tussauds in london has unveiled its first model of meghan today, standing along a restyled figure of her fiance, prince harry. as you can see, his waxwork now has facial hair. he has sellotape keeping his hand inside his suitjacket, hasn't he? and lots of people will go and see it and have their photo taken. and in ten days' time you will be able to see that wedding, on fa cup final day, and carol is at windsor, and
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she has an invite to the royal wedding, hasn't she? she is royal. she is one of them. we have shown you our top story, about west brom being relegated last night. some shenanigans going on last night, which i will tell you about in a second. west bromwich albion have been relegated from the premier league. their fate was sealed after southampton secured a 1—0 victory over fellow strugglers swansea. in a tight and tense match, the only goal of the game came from substitute manolo gabbiadini in the second half. the result means saints are almost safe, whilst swansea are plunged deeper into trouble. west brom will now play in the championship next season, and swansea now need results elsewhere to go there way if they are to avoid joining them. we must wait for the score tomorrow, and after, in the last game, we must do our part to win the game, and
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wait for something to happen to stay in the premier league. but we don't like it, because we don't depend on ourselves in this moment. well, it has emerged the day before the match, southampton were turned away from the hotel they had booked. the saints claim the booking was cancelled at the last minute. the hotel says it cancelled large bookings after some guests became ill. so southampton, instead, spent monday night at the vale of glamorgan hotel near cardiff. we suspected that maybe there were some of the dark arts at work, but we didn't let it affect us. in fact, we didn't let it affect us. in fact, we used it as a motivating factor, andi we used it as a motivating factor, and i think thatjust helped our focus. the hotel said very clearly they have two, under european law, let big groups know if there has been illness in the hotel, and that is all they were doing. although approaching the match last night,
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the southampton boss had to stop and walk into the ground. the thing is, they still managed to win. they still managed to win, yes. they are trying everything to stop them from doing it, and they said let's prove them wrong. in the scottish premiership, the bottom three all lost. but near the top of the table, aberdeen drew 1—1 with rangers. the dons went ahead through a kenny mclean penalty, before ross mccrorie headed rangers level in the second half. the draw meas aberdeen stay second, a point ahead of rangers, going into the final weekend. women's super league leaders manchester city missed the chance to move clear of chelsea after losing 1—0 to liverpool. beth england scored the goal with less than ten minutes gone in chester. chelsea will repalace city at the top of the table if they beat birmingham tonight. andy murray's long—awaited return to tennis has again run into difficulty. the two—time wimbledon champion has been stuggling with a hip injury that has kept him from playing competitively since last summer. there are now serious concerns he may miss the start of the grass—court season, which was his target.
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better news for kyle edmund. he has moved into the second round of the madrid open with a straight—sets win over daniil medvedev, dropping only four games. next up for the british number one — novak djokovic. meanwhile, johanna konta's tough start to 2018 continues. she has gone out in madrid after being beaten in straight sets by qualifier bernarda pera. konta has won just nine matches this year. chris froome lost more time in the giro d'italia. the race left israel with the fourth stage in sicily, won by the belgian tim wellens. britain's simon yates has moved up to third overall, but reigning tour de france and vuelta a espana champion froome is nearly a minute off the lead, which is held by the australian rohan dennis. world and commonwealth champion tom daley has said he will take a break from competition for the rest of the year. daley won gold with partner dan goodfellow at the commonwealth games last month, but pulled out of the 10m individual event with injury.
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he and husband dustin lance black are expecting a baby later this year. understandably he is clearing his diary, he will have other things to do. donald trump called it rotten and an embarrassment. borisjohnson said it helped avoid a possible catastrophe. the iran nuclear dealfrom 2015 might now be at risk, after the us president said he would be withdrawing from it. but what exactly did it entail? well, it took six countries 20 months of talks to reach the agreement. iran said it would stop production of enriched uranium. that is used for fuel and nuclear weapons. it also allowed international inspectors in to check it was complying with the rules. in return, the west and russia agreed to lift economic sanctions. that meant iran could sell its oil abroad for petrol, buy products like planes and cars from international companies, including ones based in the uk, and could export products like fruits and nuts
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around the world. we can speak to lina khatib, head of the middle east and north africa programme at chatham house, now. she jois us from our london newsroom. good morning to you. thank you for joining us. first of all, what is your reaction to all of this, then? well, the deal is still there, it is just that the us has withdrawn, which means sadly that we are beginning to see the unravelling of the deal in the long run. so why do you think this has happened now? well, president trump did pledge, when he was running for election, that he would cancel the deal. he said the deal is not competent enough because it does not include activities such as ballistic missile development in iran, or iran's involvement in conflicts around the middle east. we have started to get some reaction, obviously, from a different countries who were part of this deal. what do you think is
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going to happen next? well, when it comes to the sanctions issue, it is going to be quite difficult for the us to implement secondary sanctions, because a lot of the companies that iran is still dealing with our companies based in the uk and france, while the us says that it penalise any company that deals with iran. how will the us deal with its allies in the eu, and also russia and china, remains an open question. but at the same time, a lot of people are concerned about iranian retaliation in the form of perhaps confrontation with israel in the middle east. i don't think this is actually likely. and you mentioned thereabout the economic sanctions, which were obviously waved and will be reimposed. there is some talk that actually these economic sanctions were that tough anyway, so therefore we didn't see them waived that much anyway. what impact do you
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think it will have? actually, the economic sanctions that were supposed to be lifted were never entirely lifted as a result of the jcpoa. so for example you couldn't have an international bank transfer to an iranian bank and iran was complaining about this, because it limited the extent of its economic recovery. so really, in effect, even with the jcpoa recovery. so really, in effect, even with thejcpoa being in place, the iranian economy did not benefit as much as it was expected to. and the iranians were not very happy about that. so now, with the us withdrawing, the net effect on iran on the ground is actually not going to be that rate. do you think, therefore, then, that there is any truth in what donald trump said about the deal, in his words, cannot prevent an iranian nuclear bomb under the decaying and rotten structure of the agreement? is there any truth in that? well, he is basically using the kind of
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presentation, i suppose, basically using the kind of presentation, isuppose, given basically using the kind of presentation, i suppose, given by benjamin netanyahu of israel a few days ago, that iran basically did not stick to the terms of the agreement, in order tojustify not stick to the terms of the agreement, in order to justify the withdrawal. what we all know that he was intending to withdraw anyway, andi was intending to withdraw anyway, and i think the way he sees the deal is that it was never enough because it did not deal with iran's activities at large. on the contrary, he says the deal actually facilitated iranian involvement in conflicts like syria and yemen and meddling in iraq. but the problem is, if you read remove this deal, you cannot expect iran to agree to a larger deal in the future. i think thatis larger deal in the future. i think that is it. when it comes to us iranian trust, unfortunately this has now ended. so you don't think there will be any kind of war from this, but what do you think iran will do in retaliation? well, iran has already issued contradictory statements. on the one hand it has
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said it would still be part of the deal with the remaining five countries that had signed thejcpoa, but at the same time the foreign minister of iran said that iran will enrich uranium now. so this to me as a sign of iranian nervousness, but at the same time i don't think iran will retaliate by launching an all—out war in the middle east, because this is not in its interest. thank you very much for your time. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: diplomatic efforts are taking place to try to save the iran nuclear deal a day after president trump announced america was withdrawing from the agreement. mps have criticised the government's plan to transform child mental health services, saying many young people won't get the help they need. carol's in windsor for us this morning with the weather. hello, carol.
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good morning. i'm at the royal windsor horse show and currently i'm in the castle arena, a bit nippy i must say! showjumping will be taking place here, we won't be standing here, but you can see the grandstand all around and where we have the velvet drapes over there, that's where her majesty the queen will be sitting should she come down. she has some ponies competing later but not in this arena. if we move back you can see how ornate the jumps are, look at the flowers and there's masks and we also have big ben on the other side of the camera, but it's very pretty. a chilly start, yesterday we hit 27.6 in gravesend and temperatures will be lower than that today. for most we are taking a drop, six degrees in the south—east. a chilly start, a fine start for
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most but we will see some rain later and that rain coming into western parts of northern ireland and it will fringe into western scotland. patchy mist and fog in dumfries and galloway, eastern england, that will clear and galloway, eastern england, that will clearand in galloway, eastern england, that will clear and in central and eastern areas, lots of sunshine and dry weather but through the day the cloud and rain will come in from the west. it will still be pleasant in parts of central and eastern england, up to 21, but generally we're looking at temperatures from the low to mid teens. here and there we will see high teens. through the evening and overnight the band of rain edges over to east anglia and the south—east, where it will rest by the end of the night. behind it, clear skies, a few showers in north—west scotland and northern ireland, temperatures overnight 5—8, ten where we have the rain and we start tomorrow with the cloud and the dregs of the rain in east anglia and the south—east and they will move away, leaving tomorrow with a day of sunshine and showers. most of
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the showers will be in the north, the showers will be in the north, the heaviest with hail and thunder will be in north—west scotland but the temperatures sliding. by friday, a dry start for many, sunshine around but another weather front from the west will introduce thicker cloud and rain and that rain is following the same track as the rain we had this week. moving from the west to the east. it will clear by the time we get to saturday. on saturday you will find a lot of dry weather, however, we're looking at showers coming in, showers in south—west england, getting into wales and northern ireland and some of those could be heavy. temperature wise, well, we're roughly where we should be at this stage in may, perhaps a couple of degrees below. that's how it's looking, dan and steph, glorious here. chilly in the shade, as you would expect, but in the sun the temperature is warming up the sun the temperature is warming up nicely. another nice day thanks,
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carol! no horses this time. if you had a horse every half an hour you would... run out of horses? you would... run out of horses? you would lose the magic of the force! that's true. -- horse. since the beginning of the month some businesses in the lake district have been able to use their own currency. it's designed to encourage tourists to spend more cash in the region especially in independent businesses. ben is there for us this morning. good morning, ben. i can also say the word currency! welcome on—board the word currency! welcome on—board the lady of lake, one of the stea mers the lady of lake, one of the steamers on ullswater. 1a! years old, it has been ferrying passengers around the likes for that length of time, but it could be getting busier because they've launched the lake district pound —— lakes. it's designed to bring more people to the area but support local businesses, like this one, so people can see the
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best of the lake and support community projects. let me show you the view of ullswater from the camera on the roof this morning, a bit misty and murky, but that's why people come here, they come for the nature and the walks. the currency launched this time last week, it has been up and running for a week. we went to meet some shoppers who been using the new currency to find out what they make of it. i think it puts us on the map really rather than we are windermere with a lake, i think it makes us a bit more accessible to people. ibegin accessible to people. i begin would be better perhaps if they got a discount for using coupons rather than it just they got a discount for using coupons rather than itjust being 121. other than that, coupons rather than itjust being 121. otherthan that, it'sjust coupons rather than itjust being 121. other than that, it'sjust an expensive souvenir. it's a good idea for people to come here if they want to have the money they can keep it. and it is nice for the restaurants and shops. very nice idea. probably
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will be very successful in the future. some of the people using the new currency that launched just last week. with me is the man behind this whole project, ken, good morning, and anthony is here as well from visit britain. ken, you have the notes, how do they work? they are swapped pound for pound with sterling, there is no exchange rate, why would you want one? they are paper currency, one, five, ten and 20 domination is and we have people on the other side representing iconic figures of the lake district. the landscape on this side, full security. it is here to celebrate everything in the local culture and everything in the local culture and everything that is great around the area. you spend them in local shops and so the idea is to get all the visitors, 18.5 million global visitors? we expect more this year because of the global world heritage
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status we have achieved and we expect they are here to enjoy themselves, here for some fun and entertainment and we have made the project something that can be really engaging to get the visitors to come here to engage with the local currency, to find local businesses and enjoy the local culture and have and enjoy the local culture and have a great experience and make it really fun. anthony, you're from visit britain, what difference will this make for the people coming here, to have a local currency to swa p here, to have a local currency to swap their foreign currency into sterling and by their lake district pounds? this is a great initiative, thinking about tourism across the country, especially in cumbria, it isa country, especially in cumbria, it is a sector made up of small and medium—sized businesses so do have a currency medium—sized businesses so do have a currency like this which is fun and different for visitors is a great initiative and hopefully it will get domestic and international visitors into the small shops. it's not the first one that has launched, there are very successful ones around the
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country, bristol and brixton have them, why are they of benefit, what do they bring that regular money can't? it makes people think about the impact of their spending. in cumbria you have something like {2.7 billion a year spent in the economy by our visitors and i think having this currencyjust by our visitors and i think having this currency just demonstrates further the impact in terms ofjobs, in terms of expanding the product andl in terms of expanding the product and i think that's why this is important. apart from anything else, it's a really fun souvenir. ten, when you came up with this, clearly lots of effort has gone into the design because actually you want some people not to spend them and ta ke some people not to spend them and take them away, that would be of benefit to you —— ken. take them away, that would be of benefit to you -- ken. have fun spending it is the message but if you want to take them home as a memento or collector's peace, take them home, they are valid for a year, every year we will have a new one, every pound you take away is a pound donated towards the local
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charities we support, that's the message, the cumbria community foundation and the lake district foundation and the lake district foundation that support the local communities and area and the landscape we love. if every visitor took away £1 and they didn't spend that, that's £18.5 million in charity money every year, it's a of money? potentially it could make a great deal of money and the proceeds from the whole project would firstly be to fund the marketing of the scheme to drive people to local businesses and support them, and everything else is divided 50—50 between the two charities. it could between the two charities. it could be really significant. anthony, when we talk about tourism in this part of the world, a lot of damage was done with the big storms recently, so done with the big storms recently, so getting people back into this region will be really vital to rebuild? that's right, tourism across the uk, especially in cumbria, isa across the uk, especially in cumbria, is a really resilient sector and we cumbria, is a really resilient sector and we seen
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cumbria, is a really resilient sector and we seen that since 2015. i was talking to the guys here at ullswater steam and they've proven you can recover quickly and the visitors are critical to that recovery. we want to do everything we can at visit britain and visit england to get more people here not only to support the existing businesses but get more businesses here in the future. good to see you and thanks very much. we will talk to you later. i want to leave you with some of the glorious views, will take you back to that shop our camera up high. it started out a little misty and murky this morning. you can see the low hanging cloud on some of the peaks around here, but a glorious start to the day on ullswater. we'll show you around a bit more later, see you soon. ben, looks fabulous. what is the temperature there do you think? freezing, i don't think it is the official temperature but it is cold. i have checked, it is 10 degrees. my
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producer, ed, is saying it is nine degrees. ed, thank you. that is what great producers are for when you struggle to find the words! that souls water, i havejust looked, the second—largest like in the lakes district —— that's ullswater —— lake district. carol is at the poor show at royal windsor horse show in ten days there will be the royal wedding as well. about 10 degrees there according to our carol. that's westminster. everywhere looks gorgeous with the sunlight and a bit of missed. as carol said, warm in the sunshine but chilly if you are outside it. —— mist. it is 11 in central london and outside our studios in salford, not the same amount of sunshine, that is our view from the bbc studios across the manchester ship canal. you can see old trafford behind the goal building. that's if you are a
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football fan! it is eight degrees outside. let's get the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. why not! good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. a woman was left screaming in pain after she was sprayed in the mouth with a noxious substance while on a bus in south london. the 20—year—old victim was treated yesterday, close to brixton tube station. police believe the attack was targeted, and inquiries are now underway to trace the male suspect involved. her injuries are not thought to be life—changing or life—threatening. a new report suggests overall spending by london councils has dropped by 19% over the past seven years. planning, cultural and transport budgets bore the brunt of the cuts, according to the independent think tank centre for london. newham was ha rdest—hit, where spending per person has fallen by 33% since 2011. a designer label making handbags and belts has saved almost 170 tons of old fire hoses from being sent to landfill.
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elvis & kresse sells its products for hundreds of pounds to the rich and famous. but since they started a decade ago, none of london's old firehoses have had to be dumped. instead, they've been recycled, and half of the profits from the sale of the range goes to the fire fighters charity. last year, that was around £30,000. and the reason they go to landfill is because fire hoses is a double wall nitrile rubber jacket surrounding this woven nylon core, and that means you can't shred it, melt it and make new hoses, it's a composite so it's going to landfill. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. and c2c buses are replacing services between upminster and pitsea, that's due to overhead power cable problems near lanedon. thameslink services are disrupted londonbound.
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that's following a broken train at sutton. onto the roads, traffic on the a13 is building westbound from dagenham into barking. and northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. today feeling just a bit fresher than it has for the last few days. the temperature is going to drop today but it's not a bad day, still some sunshine, still dry but we will notice that change in temperature. we've got a lovely bright start this morning. we've got a little bit of patchy cloud, that will start to develop through the day, but staying dry and temperatures, although not as warm as the last few days, still managing to reach the low 20s, around 21 in central london. overnight tonight, clear for this evening but then this cloud will sweep through overnight, and with it, some outbreaks of rain. just coming and going through to dawn tomorrow morning, the minimum temperature, between 7—10. for tomorrow, great start for many of us, still some outbreaks of rain at first but it
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will clear fairly quickly to a drier, brighter afternoon. temperatures in the sunny spells at 17 celsius. similar conditions for friday then, a rather unsettled weekend and temperatures getting a little bit cooler. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it is back to dan and steph. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and steph mcgovern. international leaders fight to save the iran nuclear deal. president rouhani threatens to restart his country's uranium enrichment programme, after donald trump pulls america out of the agreement. we cannot prevent an iranian nuclear bomb under the decaying and rotten structure of the current agreement. good morning, it is wednesday 9 may.
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also this morning: "failing a generation". mps say government plans risk leaving hundreds of thousands of children without the mental healthcare they need. ten years after their son was killed in an unprovoked attack, the parents of schoolboy jimmy mizen tells us why they are still campaigning to tackle youth violence. things haven't changed in the last ten years. if anything, now they're worse than they were ten years ago, so clearly the ways we're trying to treat this are not working and having an impact. so we can change the thinking, if harsher punishment is not going to change what is going on here. there is now a lake district pound, but what is it and how does it work? iam in but what is it and how does it work? i am in the lakes district to find
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out. in sport: west brom are relegated from the premier league. despair for them, and swansea too, who look doomed. but delight for saints, as they take a huge step towards survival. and carol is in windsor for us this morning. good morning, carol. good morning from the royal windsor horse show. you wanted horses? here they are in the warmup arena warming up for the showjumping event taking place at 7:15a.m., and showjumping event taking place at 7:15 a.m., and the sun is out for many central and eastern areas. it will be a dry and sunny day. in the west we have cloud building ahead of some rain coming in. wherever you are, it will feel a little bit cooler today than it did yesterday. more details on 15 minutes. carol, you never let us down. we asked for horses and we got them. good morning. first, our main story: intense diplomatic efforts are taking place to save the iran nuclear deal, after president trump announced he was withdrawing america from the agreement. the uk, france and germany have expressed regret and concern at the decision, while the iranian president has threatened to restart
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the country's uranium programme. our washington correspondent chris buckler reports. once hailed as an historic agreement, as far as the us is concerned, the iran nuclear deal is now history. president trump made a point of being seen to personally sign off on america abandoning the accord. it is clear to me that we cannot prevent an iranian nuclear bomb under the decaying and rotten structure of the current agreement. the iran deal is defective at its core. although the international agreement limited iran's nuclear programme, it didn't stop the country from developing missiles, and donald trump had many other concerns about inspections and time limits on the deal. european leaders are deeply worried about the impact of america leaving the agreement. but their series of 11th—hour
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dashes to the white house, and televised appeals, failed to persuade the president. now, they are left trying to hold what is left of the deal together, with tehran threatening to increase uranium enrichment. translation: from this moment on, the nuclear agreement is between iran and five other countries, and in these circumstances, we have to wait to see how the other five countries will react. there will be an impact on trade, and potentially even the threat of us sanctions for european companies that continue to trade with iran. but, internationally, the immediate concern is of tensions once again increasing in the middle east. chris buckler, bbc news, washington. we will be speaking to middle east minister alistair burt in around ten minutes' time. mps are warning that young people could be at risk of not getting the mental health support they need,
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because government plans to improve services are not good enough. a report by the education and health and social care committees says more research needs to be done into exam pressures, and social media education should be compulsory in schools. the government rejects the criticisms, and says its strategy will transform mental health services for young people. a secret scotland yard gang database is stigmatising and racially discriminating against young black men, according to a report by the human rights organisation amnesty international uk. it is called the gang violence matrix, and is under investigation by the information commissioner. the metropolitan police said the matrix was aimed at reducing violence and saving lives. our home affairs correspondent june kelly reports. it was that 2011 riots, which began in tottenham and spread across london, which spawned the gangs matrix. police began compiling intelligence on individuals said to be identified as being part of a gang,
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including those with no history of violence. today's report by amnesty international found that, of the 3,806 people whose details are held on the matrix, 99% are male, 78% are black, and the youngest is just 12 years old. and, at a news conference, among amnesty‘s many concerns is the way the information is being shared. we hear stories of this following people through their lives, so from housing association to schools to job centres, where people are being treated differently. in response, the met police said... the matrix has been denounced as racist by campaigners who work with young black people. the truth is, the preoccupation with the gangs has meant that they have failed to design effective strategies for dealing with serious youth violence.
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the capital has seen a spate of violent crime involving young victims. today's report focuses on figures which found that the majority of knife crime wasn't regarded as gang—related. june kelly, bbc news. senior ministers are said to be at odds over plans for a new independent investigations unit to reopen unsolved killings from the northern ireland troubles. the defence secretary, gavin williamson, is understood to have raised concerns that the new system may end up with army veterans being taken to court. the government says it will carry out a thorough consultation on the proposals. a survey has found that cocaine can be delivered more quickly than a takeaway pizza in england and scotland. more than a third of the 1,000 cocaine users surveyed in england said they could get the class a drug delivered within half an hour. the authors of the report said dealers were competing to deliver quickest. now, baldness is something you have
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not had to worry about, is it? not yet. scientists say they have found a potential cure for baldness. we have this lovely graphic to explain how baldness takes place. the most common type of hair loss is male pattern baldness. it starts in the late 20s or early 30s, and affects around half of all men by the time they are 50. scientists in manchester say they have found that a drug originally designed to treat brittle bone disease has a dramatic effect, by stimulating new hairs to grow. a0 men took part in the trial, and scientists say more research is now needed. there will be a lot of people happy about that news. but the idea, and sally was making this point earlier, the idea that you need a cure for baldness, when some people embrace it and look really good without any have. maybe cure is the wrong word.
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one viewer says that i do not embrace all this, it embraces me. another says if you gave me a pill to get it all back, where do i sign 7 to get it all back, where do i sign up? another viewer says i started shaking my head when i had hair, and i love my number zero cut. let us know what you think, as we say with most of our stories. global reaction to donald trump's decision to withdraw the us from the iran nuclear deal shows just how significant an impact it could have on both the peace of the middle east and the world as a whole. the united nations secretary general said he was deeply concerned. our middle east correspondent tom bateman is injerusalem for us. what has the reaction been in the region, tom? well, as far as the middle east is concerned, i mean, rememberthere are very
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concerned, i mean, rememberthere are very few countries that actually support what president trump has donein support what president trump has done in withdrawing america from the deal, but two countries that do support that move are saudi arabia and israel. and we had the israeli prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, last night shortly after president trump spoke saying that he regarded this as a historic move, he thanked him for doing this, he has always regarded the nuclear deal as being something that emboldened iran while in the long—term not dealing with the nuclear issue at all. now, the europeans, russia and china are vehemently opposed to that view. they think it did make the world a safer place, and the question for the israelis is what happens next. because while the iranians have said they will stick with the deal for they will stick with the deal for the next few weeks, regional tensions remained high here. thank you very much. donald trump's decision to withdraw from the agreement came despite a last—minute plea from borisjohnson for the us president not to throw the baby out with the bathwater.
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that is what mrjohnson said in america. middle east minister alistair burt joins us from westminster now. good morning to you. thank you very much for coming on and talking to us about this today. we heard president trump described this deal as rotten. were you describe that he took —— we re were you describe that he took —— were you surprised he took the decision? i think disappointed, were you surprised he took the decision? ithink disappointed, but at the end of the day not surprised. the president had made his views about the agreement clear. we disagree and we rather regret the decision. we believe the iranian deal did thejob it was decision. we believe the iranian deal did the job it was designed to do. it drastically reduce the number of centrifuges, and the iranian stockpile, and we believe it was doing that particularjob. we would rather it has been kept in place and also tackle the things which
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concerned our partners. all the assessment seemed to say that this will have a destabilising impact in the middle east. do you agree with that, and how concerned are you buy that? i think we are all concerned by activities in the middle east almost every day. it is a place where there is an awful lot of tension. there is conflict, there are confrontations, and anything that potentially disrupt that is a matter of worry and concern. so we took the view that it was best to keep the jcpoa took the view that it was best to keep thejcpoa in place, and at least that issue, in terms of the nuclear ambitions of iran, which have rightly been identified and had to be curbed, was dealt with. but what diplomacy has to do now is make sure this does not become a destabilising factor, and we must used every opportunity we can to seek the escalating conflict in the region, but the rest of the parties of the agreement, we want to keep the agreement in place and will be working very hard to make we do —— de—escalating. working very hard to make we do —— de-escalating. we mentioned mr johnson being over in america, and
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there was a direct appeal to the us president not to do this, and essentially that was ignored. what does that say about uk diplomacy and about the special relationship? well, remember boris followed on from president macron and angela merkel, so it was a concerted effort from european partners over a lengthy period of time to seek to persuade the united states that we should all stay in the agreement. so asi should all stay in the agreement. so as i say, it is disappointing, but the united states is clearly our closest partner in many is, in relation to security and defence matters, and when we have disagreements we do it openly and straightforwardly, as people have seen. straightforwardly, as people have seen. but you can't agree on everything all the time. what is happening behind the scenes? can you ta ke happening behind the scenes? can you take us inside the war room, if you like? what can be done to try and save this deal without the us involved? are you confident that can happen? at pheasant, i think! am. partly because of what i said at the
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beginning about this not being a surprise. people have been working on the possibility of this for some time. the european partners have been working on things that concern the united states, iran's ballistic missile programme, its disruption, the so—called sunset clause and what happens when thejcpoa comes to an end. we have been working on that amongst ourselves and with the other signatories to the agreement, the chinese and the russians as well as iran. so we are all aware that this could happen. the rest of us see the benefits of keeping the agreement in place, so i hope it will be possible to keep that agreement in place, to ensure that the change to the united states sanctions don't fully prevent other parties from working with iran and trading with iran, because this was part of a broader deal designed to curb behaviour by iran which is disruptive and dangerous in the area, but also seek to persuade it that there is another way forward, which will add to the stability of the region, which at the moment is clearly in a very parlous state.
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you mentioned and stability, what happens if they start enriching uranium now? that would be an issue, they have been successful at limiting that, and that would be a big factor but president rouhani yesterday didn't say they would jump to that, but iran is signatory to the non—proliferation treaty, the other main nuclear guarding treaty and we would expect iran to hold to that. clearly this is the day after the us decision so there's a lot of things still to do but we believe with our partners that the agreement can stay in place and we'll be working to do that as well as address the concerns others do have, and which we share in relation to iran. one more question about your boss, the foreign secretary, in the last few days he described the possible customs partnership as crazy. do you agree with him on that? i'm here to talk about jcp oa and if you'll forgive me, trying to
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place me between one bus, the foreign secretary, and the prime minister, is a line i'm not going to follow —— boss. minister, is a line i'm not going to follow -- boss. i understand that position but what does it say about the relationship between the foreign secretary and prime minister that he keeps finding himself at odds with her? it clearly indicates there's lots of discussions going on in the cabinet in relation to our arrangements after we leave the eu and it will be handled in the cabinet in the usual way. thanks for yourtime, cabinet in the usual way. thanks for your time, alistair burt, cabinet in the usual way. thanks for yourtime, alistair burt, on cabinet in the usual way. thanks for your time, alistair burt, on our top story this morning about president trump. if you've just turned on and you missed the news last night, donald trump has pulled the us out of the iranian nuclear deal. lots of reaction to that this morning. carol is in windsor for us this morning with the weather. earlier we said we wanted to see more horses, you have delivered them, nextstep, are you on a horse? fortu nately them, nextstep, are you on a horse? fortunately no horse is big enough for that little escapade, steph, fortunately no horse is big enough forthat little escapade, steph, but
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still some horses around, we are still some horses around, we are still in the warmup arena and the showjumping is about to start in the castle arena and interestingly the queen, prince philip and princess anne have all competed at the royal sir horse show. prince philip has been a fencejudge sir horse show. prince philip has been a fence judge standing by the fence checking carriage drivers have cleared the obstacles cleanly —— royal windsor horse show. lots going on today. tomorrow if you're bringing your children you might be interested in the shetland pony grand national, a miniature grand nationalfor grand national, a miniature grand national for children between eight and 1a, that sounds like lots of fun! the horses are magnificent, the weather is magnificent and today after a chilly start, dry in many central and eastern areas. rain coming into the west, that will move steadily east through the day, but it won't get everywhere in daylight hours. you can see where we have the dry conditions first thing, patchy mist and fog in dumfries and
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galloway, south—east england, lifting regularly and then we have the cloud building in the west, this isa the cloud building in the west, this is a cold front coming in and across northern ireland initially bringing in rain, that will get into western scotland, western england and wales and the south—west through the day and the south—west through the day and all the while the cloud will build ahead of it. sunny weather the further east where you travel and the highest temperatures will be there, 21 in the south—east and yesterday we got to 27.6, generally today the temperatures coming down. through the evening and overnight the weather front drifts eastwards, resting in east anglia and the south—east by the end of the night and behind it, showers coming in to northern and western scotland and northern ireland but lots of dry weather with temperatures between five and ten, ten where we have the rain. tomorrow we start with that cloud and rain in the south—east and east anglia, that will move away, and all of us will have a dry day with sunny spells but showers in the
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north, heavy with hail and thunder in north—west scotland. again, temperatures slipping down by another couple of degrees. by the time we get to friday we repeat all of this, lots of dry weather to start, bits of pieces cloud but the cloud building in from the west ahead of another weather front and that will bring rain as it moves from the west to the east. temperatures by now around where they should be, for some, a couple of degrees below average. on saturday, we have some showers, this time coming in across south—west england, wales and into northern ireland through the day and some of those could be heavy. move away from those could be heavy. move away from those showers, you won't all get one, back into dry conditions with variable amounts of cloud and sunny spells. compared to last weekend, quite different temperatures, much lower than some got used to. today, a glorious day to be enjoyed for many central and eastern areas but don't forget the rain coming in from the west, steph and dan. there's many things i love about you
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but you deliver the weather with all the graphics without a prescription but with all that going on in the background! you are a legend! you just blank it out! but thanks, steph, you should be my agent!” think i am! make sure you don't get anotherjob. we quite like her around here! we will never lose carol. she is a televisual star! let's move onto one of the stories we are talking about today's. —— today. 10 years ago today, jimmy mizen was celebrating his 16th birthday, but the next day he was killed in a savage, unprovoked attack near his south london home. since then, his family has campaigned tirelessly injimmy‘s name, trying to bring an end to the violence that's blighting the lives of so many young people and their families. much of their work is aimed at primary schools, hoping to catch children before it's too late. john maguire reports he was just a beautiful boy with a heart of gold, always smiling. just a gift to us and sadly we miss him very much. jimmy mizen was murdered in an unprovoked attack
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near his home. he wasjust16. we're becoming a country of anger, of selfishness and of fear. and you know, it doesn't have to be like this, and let's together try and stop it. thank you. ten years on and his family are still campaigning. through the charity set up in jimmy‘s memory, his parents now spend most of their time talking to young people about the consequences of violence. today they're at a safety conference at a south london school, where local primary children are sharing concerns they have about their neighbourhood. this is where we thought, "i'm safe," and they did it up, they put some blue lights in there, but we think they could make it more safe by putting in some cctv cameras. on the estates people take drugs, they smoke there, they take drugs and they spill the drugs on the floor for us to slip on, so we have to be careful. the children are able to talk to the police, to the local council and to community leaders. my belief that if we can go into schools and talk to year 4,
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year5, year 6, it's a hard story for them to listen to but if you share it in the right way it doesn't frighten them and i believe from there they will take it on to their secondary schools. this whole message of change, this whole message of peace. but they accept despite their best efforts, violence on the streets is a major problem. things have been changing in the last ten years, if anything now they're worse than they were ten years ago. so clearly the ways we're treating this aren't working and having an impact. if we can change the thinking, ever—harsher punishment will not change what's going on here, threaten all you like, it won't change it. i think the idea of lecturing young people about their behaviour will not work either. this is about trying to bring younger people along with us, but also the community itself. the charity's also pioneering these safe havens in shops and businesses, where people feeling threatened on the street can seek refuge and help. the shopkeeper promises to phone the parents or the police and they close the doors. itjust means...
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it's like building community, our communities are falling apart so we're rebuilding community and making safe places for our young people in trouble. and terry corne, who seems to sell everything in his store, offers one extremely valuable service. there were two young goals, i suppose about 15 or 17, there was a strange man on the streets that kept harrassing them, and then he stood outside for about half an hour and i had to call the police because he wouldn't leave the shop until they come out and then the police dealt with it. apiniya has used one. someone behind us was, like, creeping up on us so we went into a shop with a safe haven sticker on it and after we felt safe, we went out of the shop and we went home. the family's hope is to roll out these safe havens across the uk injimmy‘s name so his death will not have been in vain. john maguire, bbc news, south london. we shall be speaking to margaret and
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barry mizen on the sofa at 8:10am about how they want to carry on their son's legacy. ben's in the lake district for us this morning talking money. a bit chilly but looking gorgeous, you're talking about a new currency? ben, can you hear us? coming, ben! —— come in. oh, dear! that's where ben is. this is what happens! we will let him speak at some point. that's ullswater. it looked lovely. if you're waking up, carol is at windsor, she tells us it is nice out there, nice in the sunshine but chile out of the sunshine. shall we go back to ben or not? may be more later. let's go and find out the
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news, weather and travel where you are. “ news, weather and travel where you are. -- maybe. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. a woman was left screaming in pain after she was sprayed in the mouth with a noxious substance while on a bus in south london. the—20—year old victim was treated yesterday close to brixton tube station. police believe the attack was targeted and inquiries are now under way to trace the male suspect involved. her injuries are not thought to be life—changing or life—threatening. students at university college london flats are going on a rent strike for the third time in three years. it follows victories that have won millions of pounds in rent cuts and compensation. ucl say they welcome the opportunity to discuss the issues with the students and are committed to providing them with affordable accommodation of a good standard. a designer label making handbags and belts has saved almost 170 tons of old fire hoses from
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being sent to landfill. elvis & kresse sells its products for hundreds of pounds to the rich and famous but since they started a decade ago, none of london's old fire hoses have had to be dumped. instead, they've been recycled, and half of the profits from the sale of the range goes to the firefighters charity. last year, that was around £30,000. and the reason they go to landfill is because fire hoses is a double wall nitrile rubber jacket surrounding this woven nylon core, and that means you can't shred it, melt it and make new hoses, it's a composite so it was going to landfill. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tube this morning. onto the trains, and c2c buses are replacing services between upminster and pitsea due to overhead power cable problems near lanedon. and thameslink services are disrupted london—bound, that's following a broken train at sutton. in finchley, the aa06 north circular
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is slow westbound towards the gasworks just past the a1 at henly‘s corner. delays are back to east end road. traffic on the highway is slow through whopping towards tower hill. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. today feeling just a bit fresher than it has for the last few days. the temperature is going to drop today but it's not a bad day, still some sunshine, still dry but we will notice that change in temperature. we've got a lovely bright start this morning. we've got a little bit of patchy cloud, that will start to develop through the day, but staying dry and temperatures, although not as warm as the last few days, still managing to reach the low 20s, around 21 in central london. overnight tonight, clear for this evening but then this cloud will sweep through overnight, and with it, some outbreaks of rain. just coming and going through to dawn tomorrow morning, the minimum temperature,
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between 7—10 celsius. for tomorrow, grey start for many of us, still some outbreaks of rain at first but it will clear fairly quickly to a drier, brighter afternoon. temperatures in the sunny spells at 17 celsius. similar conditions for friday then, a rather unsettled weekend and temperatures getting a little bit cooler. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to dan and steph. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and steph mcgovern. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. the government is taking part in intense diplomatic efforts to save the iran nuclear deal. president trump announced he was withdrawing the us from the agreement, calling it decaying and rotten. the iranian president has threatened to restart the country's uranium programme. what diplomacy must do now is make
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sure that this does not become a destabilising factor and we must used every opportunity we can to seek the de—escalate confrontations in the region, and we will work with the united states on the spot for the united states on the spot for the rest of the parties to the agreement, we want to keep the agreement, we want to keep the agreement in place and we will be working very hard to make sure that we do. there had been reports that president trump would withdraw the us from the agreement, and international reaction was almost immediate. his predecessor, barack obama, tweeted that it was a serious mistake. he said there were few issues more important to the security of the us than iran. he also suggested there was an increased risk of war in the middle east. israeli president benjamin netanyahu thanked donald trump on twitter, and said he was preventing iran from ever getting nuclear weapons. the iranian minister of foreign affairs tweeted that he would spearhead a diplomatic effort with the other countries that are part of the deal, including the uk. mps are warning that young people
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could be at risk of not getting the mental health support they need, because government plans to improve services are not good enough. a report by the education and health and social care committees says more research needs to be done into exam pressures. it also says social media education should be compulsory in schools. the government rejects the criticisms, and says its strategy will transform mental health services for young people. hundreds of residents of a major care home company are to receive a share of £2 million in compensation following an investigation into compulsory upfront fees. the competitons watchdog said sunrise senior living will pay back an average of £3,000 to each resident or their families, who paid the additional charges dating back to 2015. the company says it will scrap unfront fees. a secret scotland yard gang database is stigmatising and racially
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discriminating against young black men, according to a report by the human rights organisation amnesty international uk. it is called the gang violence matrix, and gives an automated violence ranking to individuals. the metropolitan police said the system was aimed at reducing violence and saving lives. senior ministers are said to be at odds over plans for a new independent investigations unit to reopen unsolved killings from the northern ireland troubles. the defence secretary, gavin williamson, is understood to have raised concerns that the new system may end up with army veterans being taken to court. the government says it will carry out a thorough consultation on the proposals. patients are finding it increasingly difficult to see their own gp on a regular basis, according to a new study from the university of leicester. seeing the same doctor has been linked to fewer hospital admissions and better health, but the report says people are finding it harder
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to see their family doctor compared with five years ago. the department of health says the latest statistics show more than half the population is currently benefitting from more flexible appointments. can you imagine yourself as a waxwork? no, not really. with ten days to go until the royal wedding, meghan markle's face is a sight we're used to seeing in the papers, magazines, and on tv. but now, it has been immortalised in wax. madame tussauds in london has unveiled its first model of meghan today, standing along a restyled figure of her fiance, prince harry. as you can see, his waxwork now has facial hair. they have got it right up to date. let us know what you think about that. we're in that world where, whatever you do, whether it is a statue, waxwork, and we fell into this trap a little bit, we are highly critical. a lot of work has
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gone into that. it is better than some i have seen. i have not seen her in that colour dress. you have not been watching closely enough. the hand in the suit intrigues me as well. but that is what he did, isn't it? he isjust keeping an eye out his wallet. don't touch the wallet, hands off the wallet. coming up on the programme, carol will have the weather. she is at the venue for the royal wedding at windsor. and sally has the sport. i feel like i was a bit mean about the waxwork.” the sport. i feel like i was a bit mean about the waxwork. i was trying to row back from that position. and it is her engagement addressed. detail! that is why you are here, sally. i have often wondered why, but that is why. west brom fans have make commiseration. west brom have been relegated
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from the premier league. their fate was sealed after southampton secured a 1—0 victory over fellow strugglers swansea. in a tight and tense match, the only goal of the game came from manolo gabbiadini in the second half. the result means saints are almost safe, whilst swansea are plunged deeper into trouble. west brom will now play in the championship next season, and swansea now need results elsewhere to go there way if they are to avoid joining them. we must wait for the score tomorrow, and after, in the last game, we must do our part to win the game, and wait for something to happen to stay in the premier league. but we don't like it, because we don't depend on ourselves in this moment. well, it has emerged, the day before the match, southampton were turned away from the hotel they had booked. the saints claim the booking was cancelled at the last minute. the hotel says it cancelled large bookings after some guests became ill. so southampton, instead, spent monday night at the vale of glamorgan hotel near cardiff.
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didn't a media organisation ring the hotel with a large booking? didn't a media organisation ring the hotelwith a large booking? yes, and they had 30 rooms available, bizarrely. instead, they went to a nice hotel near cardiff. we suspected that maybe there were some of the dark arts at work, but we didn't let it affect us. in fact, we used it as a motivating factor, and i think thatjust helped our focus. in the scottish premiership, the bottom three all lost. but, near the top of the table, aberdeen drew 1—1 with rangers. the dons went ahead through a kenny mclean penalty, before ross mccrorie headed rangers level in the second half. the draw means aberdeen stay second, a point ahead of rangers, going into the final weekend. women's super league leaders, manchester city, missed the chance
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to move clear of chelsea after losing 1—0 to liverpool. beth england scored the goal with less than ten minutes gone in chester. chelsea will replace city at the top of the table if they beat birmingham tonight. toure intends to keep playing for at least to make more seasons. he has won three league titles, an fa cup and three league cups with the club, and three league cups with the club, and has paid tribute to the supporters. i feel good, and i feel... the difficult part is the fans. the fans have been so good with me, so superb with me, and that makes me feel happy, and it makes me feel like... it isjust makes me feel happy, and it makes me feel like... it is just about happiness, it is just about feeling great to serve this football club, and make these fans happy, you know? andy murray's long—awaited
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return to tennis has again run into difficulty. the two—time wimbledon champion has been stuggling with a hip injury that has kept him from playing competitively since last summer. there are now serious concerns he may miss the start of the grass—court season, which was his target. better news for kyle edmund. he has moved into the second round of the madrid open with a straight—sets win over daniil medvedev, dropping only four games. next up for the british number one — novak djokovic. meanwhile, johanna konta's tough start to 2018 continues. she has gone out in madrid after being beaten in straight sets by qualifier bernarda pera. konta has won just nine matches this year. chris froome has lost more time at the giro d'italia. the race left israel with the fourth stage in sicily won by the belgian tim wellens. britain's simon yates has moved up to third overall, but reigning tour de france and vuelta a espana champion froome is nearly a minute off the lead. and world and commonwealth diving champion tom daley is to take
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a break from competition for the rest of the year. daley won gold with partner dan goodfellow at the commonwealth games last month, but pulled out of the 10—metre individual event with injury. he and husband dustin lance black are to become parents later this year. he will be busy doing other stuff. he will be busy doing other stuff. he will be hard at work, i imagine. around one in ten children and young people in the uk experience mental health problems at some point. this can include things like depression, anxiety and self—harm. but a group of mps says not enough is being done to help them, and government plans to improve the situation aren't sufficient. with us now grace barrett, who gives talks in schools about these issues, and george hodgson, who has previously struggled with his mental health. also child psychiatrist tamsin ford, who gave evidence for the report. good morning to all of you. thank
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you very much for coming on the programme. grace, you are part of the self—esteem team. how does that work? essentially we travel all over the uk and work with students, pa rents the uk and work with students, parents and teachers talking about mental health, body image, self—esteem, and everything which relates to all of those things. trying to educate young people on how their brains work, how the world works, and how they can make to make things work together in harmony. at the moment that isn't happening, all too often. and george, this is something you have struggled with. tell us about that. i struggled quite seriously with anxiety and ocd for a few years, washing my hands 50 times a day, and the anxiety can me. i was confined to my bedroom for about three years until i sought help. a lot of what we talk about with regards to support focuses on social media. was that... when you are going through that particular problem, was that an issue for you,
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or was that something which happened on the side and added to it at the same time? i think it really contributed. i deleted all my social media accounts because friends were messaging me, saying we haven't seen you for a while, but i deleted it completely. i still get it now, messaging people, if they have read it, why haven't they replied in two hours? they might be the tube or something, and i think because everything is so instant now people get very worried about what people think of them, and how they are portrayed. and you say you have got help, how easy was that? so i went to cams and was told i would have to wait a0 weeks. i was really in a desperate condition, i was having suicidal thoughts, and we didn't know where to go. my parents were scared so we went back to the gp, and he recommended going privately. fortu nately and he recommended going privately. fortunately my parents could help me privately. so i saw a psychiatrist, and then a cbt therapist, trying to
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combat my ocd and get rid of the hand washing, and learning how to talk about it, which is the most important thing. it is quite hard to talk about, and it is great you are able to talk about it. kansan, you gave evidence for this report and the publication of it. how big a problem is it, the sort of thing is george is highlighting —— tamsin.” think the weights which young people face are awful. a old were you at the time? i was 16. and in the gcse year. so a0 weeks to wait for a condition keeping you in your bedroom during such an important time ina bedroom during such an important time in a young person's life. i think the response from health and education committee is to be welcomed, and they are saying the plans are simply not quick enough, there are lots of young people out there are lots of young people out there who need help now, and having this pushed across to a fifth or a quarter of the country by 2022 is
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simplyjust not good enough. so why are they not ambitious enough? what needs to be done to make this better? well, i think we welcome the joint working with schools and child and adolescent mental health services, but there are very vague funds attached, and george wasn't told he had to wait a0 weeks because psychiatrists and psychologists and nurses are sitting with their feet up, they are not. they are working extremely hard. we are simply swamped by the number of young people who need help. now, we don't know because our data is very old whether there are more people who are suffering with a mental health currently, or that more people are coming forward for help as it is more acceptable to seek help, and if thatis more acceptable to seek help, and if that is the case, that is a good thing, but we need to be able to help them. our children and young people are our future.” help them. our children and young people are our future. i imagine, grace, there are quite a few people watching this and their opinion will
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be why can't young people cope with the stresses that maybe they coped with in their generation? because exams will always be there, social media is broadly something which has more come into the equation in this generation than ever before, but are our young people less able to cope? is that part of an issue?” our young people less able to cope? is that part of an issue? i don't think so. i think, like i say, we work with parents and teachers as well as students, and the message we keep getting en repeat is i needed this when i was younger. i get that from parents and teachers all the time. this stuff has always been there. we have an educated anybody about mental health, about emotional literacy, for decades, and now we are seeing the repercussions of that 93p- are seeing the repercussions of that gap. it is an error, and we need to put it right by putting out the fires once the outback, but also working on the preventative stuff early on. so we are raising a generation of people that understand their brains and can pass that on to their brains and can pass that on to their children in later life. we have parents who can't help their children with these issues because they weren't educated on it before either. so i don't think it is a
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com pletely either. so i don't think it is a completely new thing. you are nodding along there.” completely new thing. you are nodding along there. i really agree with what grace is saying, it is about early intervention, and if we can stop it in schools then we won't see it later down the line. and introducing it to the curriculum. why are we teaching children about this stuff? at schools, people feel pressure if they are suffering and they don't want to talk about it. there is nothing to be ashamed of if you are suffering, and giving talks about it, i do thatjust to encourage students to open up.” just wanted to ask tamsin, would you agree with that as a recommendation? absolutely, i think pretty much every one goes to school, and they area every one goes to school, and they are a place where we learn about all kinds of things. and they are a really good forum. we talk to children about their diet, we talk to children about keeping themselves physically fit, why don't we talk to people about keeping themselves mentally fit? and we teach all
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children biology because it is important to understand your biology and the workings around you. we need to do the same when it comes to mental health. it is this crazy new topic and it will take a lot of learning and change and teaching to make it happen, but it is worthwhile. and i think putting it on the curriculum is a great idea, but how that looks, it was teachers would need an education themselves in how to teach that. it is the time in the curriculum as well, with teachers under pressure to teach so many different things. yes, absolutely, i think all of the ideas in the green paper sound great but it is about how we will actually make that happen, and so far we haven't heard an awful lot of that from the government. it is a really interesting discussion, thank you for having it with us this morning. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: diplomatic efforts are taking place to try to save the iran nuclear deal a day after president trump announced america was withdrawing from the agreement. mps have criticised the government's plan to transform child mental health services, saying many young people won't get the help they need.
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let's ta ke let's take you around the country to show you what the weather is like. ben is in the lake district, there's u llswate r, ben is in the lake district, there's ullswater, it was very sunny and hour ago. the mist has come down. still looks like a nice morning. we will be back with ben. this is westminster. that looks pretty warm. about 10 degrees it was this morning. and this is the scene outisde our studio. a bit more ullswater than westminster. temperature is not too dissimilar, though. carol is in windsor for us this morning with the weather. she'd picked the best one, didn't she, she knows what she's doing! —— she, she knows what she's doing! —— she picked. good morning, both, good morning to you too. beautiful this morning in windsor. we are at the royal windsor
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horse show and it starts today and ru ns horse show and it starts today and runs until the 13th of may and during that period over 3000 competitors will take part. the pinnacle of the showjumping will ta ke pinnacle of the showjumping will take place this sunday, the grand prix, and it's pretty special because five out of the ten top showjumpers in the world will be competing. one is our own gb olympians scott brush and the other thing that's happening on sunday is one of the queen's horses is retiring, barber shop. there's a special event for him, he is a supreme special event for him, he is a supreme champion. the horses are beautiful, we've been watching them all morning in the warmup arena in the sunshine and four central and eastern parts today we will have a dry, sunny and warm day. across the border it will be cooler than yesterday. a weather front coming in from the west. looking at the forecast, the weather front will produce more cloud and rain as it travels from the west to the east
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today. central and eastern areas getting off to a fine and dry start, patchy mist and fog lifting in dumfries and galloway and south—west england but the cloud is building in the west as a weather front comes m, the west as a weather front comes in, initially introducing rain to northern ireland, then western scotland, western england, then the south—west and wales. cloud will build ahead of it but still sunny spells and temperatures in the south—east, 19, 20, 21 but generally we're looking at the low to mid teens. through the evening and overnight the weather front will drift eastwards and finally by the end the night resting across east anglia and south—east england. behind it, clear skies but a packet of showers in north—west scotland and northern ireland with our overnight lows, 5—10, ten under the cloud and rain in the south—east. the cloud and rain will clear in the south—east quickly, a ridge of high pressure will build and a fair bit of sunshine. showers in the north, the heaviest in the north—west of scotland. some will have hail and
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thunder and lightning, many will miss them. temperatures slowly coming down by another degree or so. into friday, a repeat performance, a dry and bright note in central and eastern areas, cloud building in the west ahead of a weather front from the atlantic and that will introduce rain and it will be moving west to east. temperatures by then roughly where they should be at this stage in may, orfor some, where they should be at this stage in may, orforsome, a where they should be at this stage in may, orfor some, a little bit below. saturday, lots of dry weather around, variable amounts of cloud, sunny spells, and showers coming in across south—west england, wales and northern ireland. by then, again, quite a contrast compared to last week. last week we were basking in warm sunshine in many areas, certainly won't be doing the warm sunshine bit this week although there will be some warm sunshine this weekend. steph and darren, gorgeous here, we've had a lovely view of windsor castle. nice and quiet today, imagine what it's going
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to be like this time next week and into the weekend? for showing us the fantastic horses. it looks fabulous there. —— thank you for showing us. the fa cup final is next week, i've been asked to go ona is next week, i've been asked to go on a programme called i'm getting married in the morning. i think married in the morning. ithink i'm married in the morning. i think i'm there with the fa cup and then i will say see you tomorrow at wembley! sounds exciting! that's later in the month. since the beginning of the month some businesses in the lake district have been able to use their own currency. it's designed to encourage tourists to spend more cash in the region, especially in independent businesses. ben is there for us this morning. good morning to you. welcome to a bit of a misty start to the day on ullswater. if you were with us earlier, i was reliably informed it was nine degrees, i said it was a bit chilly but the guys here tell me that's pretty warm for this part of the world. we're here talking about
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the world. we're here talking about the launch of the local currency, the launch of the local currency, the lake district pound. you might wonder why somewhere like this needs its own currency, the idea is support local business and get more tourists coming here, the 18.5 million every year, to spend more money in local shops and support local businesses but also to support local businesses but also to support local organisations and charities. it launched this time last week and has been up and running for seven days. how is it going down with the people visiting here? we went to meet some of them. i think it puts us on the map really rather than we are windermere with a lake, i think it makes us a bit more accessible to people. i begin would be better perhaps if they got a discount for using coupons rather than it just being 1-2-1. other than that, it's just an expensive souvenir. it's a good idea for people to come here if they want to have the money they can keep it.
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and it is nice for the restaurants and shops. very nice idea. probably will be very successful in the future. that's some of the views from people using that currency. ken is with me, the man behind it, you have some of the man behind it, you have some of the notes, how do they work? visa five, ten, one and £20 lake district pound notes, and use what your sterling for lake district pound notes ——. then you can spend them with local businesses —— these are. £1 sterling will buy you one lake district pound, what is the benefit, why would people swap them? it costs nothing, you're right, why would people swap them ? nothing, you're right, why would people swap them? people love to engage the local culture to do something different why they are here but then they will also help local businesses and these can be only spent in local independent businesses and people want to do that. and it is fun, bit of fun when people are here on holiday. you're hoping people will take some of
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these away, not spend them all, why not? absolutely. they are designed, they are attractive, people will wa nt they are attractive, people will want them as a memento of the visit and they are collectors items. visa valued, valid for 2018, we will have new ones each year “— valued, valid for 2018, we will have new ones each year —— these are valid. we will have new designs. what we want people to understand is when they take this away, every pound they take away from the lake district, every lake district pound, is one that will contribute to a local charity. we support two charities, the cumbria community foundation, which does great work for local communities, and the lake district foundation, which helps the environment and helps the fells. district foundation, which helps the environment and helps the fallsm each visitor gets one lake district pound that would be £18.5 million for local. you run the steamers and you run a clothing shop around the
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corner. why is it important, lisa, what difference would it make for you to have the lake district pound? it will be a huge thing, it would be good to encourage locals to spend locally but also tourists and bring in families. i think it will be a big market for families. it's been going for a week, have people got to grips with it already? so far we have had £54 spent with us on tickets and souvenirs so so far so good. what difference does it make to you, some of your stuff is high end, big boots and raincoats, people are going to still use a credit card? for the big purchases people will still use cards but personally i still think it will be for families. people will come here up to the lakes on holidays and they will come and get their kids involved in the lake district pounds and it will be more exciting and memorable. then they can come into the shop. we have already sold some
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things but it's more the smaller things but it's more the smaller things like trekking poles, socks, some bits of clothing that have been bought with lake district pound is. it's fun and engaging with the customers and having fun. when it was presented to us and we were talking about it, the worst—case scenario is we raise money for charity and have fun with customers so charity and have fun with customers so why not? good luck with it and nice to see you both. that's how it will work. there are other schemes around the country, there's one in bristol and one in brixton but they've been successful in getting people to spend money in the local community, especially somewhere as glorious as this. one week in, things going pretty well. glorious as this. one week in, things going pretty wellm glorious as this. one week in, things going pretty well. it looks like good money as well! what a gorgeous view. pretty nice. they spent a lot of time and effort coming up with the designs because gee-lies. use with. the des‘z'ze'féffgzze’ " then want eereihe ee elith the eee‘e'ze'feeeeeee " then want people eereihe ee elith the eee‘e'ze'feeeeeee " then - want neenle to l so so it all, — preteen,” ,, ,. nice , to look
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