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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  May 9, 2018 9:00am-11:02am BST

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i'm victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme. what now for the iran nuclear deal? the us from the pact between tehran and six world powers? and we will work very hard to make sure we do. emily thornberry in a moment.. breaking those laws can mean life imprisonment — and it's british.
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and not know what to expect was daunting, yeah. it was not a nice feeling at all. it made me feel quite alone, really. i didn't know anybody who had had a termination before. and if they had, then no—one would ever speak about it. we have a full report from gibraltar just after half past nine. about the couple's love story. hello, welcome to the programme, we're live until 11:00 this morning. who slipped through the net of support, once you turned 18?
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to a group of mps from all parties. into adult services. co. victoria live. our top story today... america from the agreement. threatened to re—start the country's uranium programme. our washington correspondent chris buckler reports. is concerned, the iran nuclear deal is now history.
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on america the accord. under the decaying and rotten structure of the current agreement. the iran deal is defective at its core. developing missiles. and time limits on the deal. leaving the agreement. and televised appeals failed to persuade the president. enrichment in the country.
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agreement is between iran and five other countries. other countries will react. to trade with iran. increasing in the middle east. secretary, emily thornbery. good morning. donald trump to stick with this deal? deal? i think i would have had a different approach. different approach.
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donald trump i see a bully and i was taught to stand up to bullies. taught to stand up to bullies. government decided to try to appease him. him. holding his hand and inviting him to travel in the gold coach. travel in the gold coach. would your approach have succeeded ? would your approach have succeeded? approach have succeeded? hard for the peace in the rest of the world. the world. from the administration was something else. something else. and what he did was too little, too late. late. do you want the deal to survive without the americans? survive without the americans? of course i do. how can it work without them? them?
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world who continue to want to trade with iran. that is worrying. not doing so, they should not be trampling on our business. trampling on our business. europe and other nations are sticking with the deal? sticking with the deal? we have to do by way of negotiations. negotiations. have a nuclear deal with north korea, but why should that work? korea, but why should that work?
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back on your word in relation to the iranians nuclear deal? iranians nuclear deal? america would have stuck with the deal? deal? deal and they have not been developing nuclear weapons. developing nuclear weapons. sources have said they have stuck to that part of the deal. that part of the deal. sufficient in itself but it is a heck of a start. heck of a start. pointed at israel, let's talk about your behaviour in the region. your behaviour
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in the region. way in which they are doing proxy wars in syria. wars in syria. arab emirates, the russians and americans are all involved in syria. americans are all involved in syria. it could be part of wider negotiations. negotiations. the uranium nuclear deal is it brought iran in from the cold. brought iran in from the cold. and there are some very extreme tendencies. tendencies. trump's behaviour is giving succour to the extremists. to the extremists. donald trump when he comes to britain injuly? donald trump when he comes to britain in july? not that i am aware of. will you try? if one is offered we will
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see him. we will see him. idea if you want to be the next british government? british government? something that has crossed our radar. radar. will you be joining the marchers against him? i personally won't. do you know if jeremy corbyn well? i don't. thank you very much, emily thornbury. with a summary of the rest of the days news. racially discriminates against young black men. by the information commissioner to see if it's breached data laws. violence and save lives. who knows people on that database and a former senior police officer. that's injust a moment.
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killings from the troubles in northern ireland. through the courts unnecessarily. consultation on the proposals. the total number to 14. of the single market. when the bill returns to the commons. including being given sweets and chocolate. in feltham compared with a previous visit last year. at that time the facility in west london was judged to be unsafe.
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points earned for good behaviour for confectionary. without the help they need. committees says more research needs to be done into exam pressures. it also says social media education should be compulsory in schools. care will transform services. can cause cancer of the cervix, according to an independent review. than 73,000 girls and women. were found to be rare.
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explored more fully. in the south atlantic, is being hailed a complete success. who have been preying on the unique birdlife. bird populations. 30. suspected of being involved in gangs. gangs. will talk about it in the next few minutes.
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minutes. most useful document i had access to as an intelligence officer. as an intelligence officer. nothing to try and half the slaughter. slaughter. care more about these disadvantaged sections of society. sections of society. kids are killing each other over postcodes and bravado. postcodes and bravado. woodward they rather the police do? nothing? will be talking about it in a second. to get in touch. let's get some sport with holly hamilton. in action last night?
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swansea would mean spending next season in the championship. season in the championship. secured southampton‘s status for another season. another season. the fans when the final whistle was blown. blown. pretty composed, is as pumped as anyone. swansea were devastated. staying up, but for west brom it is all over.
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all over. and ending their eight—year stay in the top flight. , victoria? southampton's hotel and travel arrangements? arrangements? happy about a couple of things that happened just before the game. happened just before the game. cancelled due to sickness at the last minute. last minute. told they would have to wait on the bus until swansea got off first. bus until swansea got off first. mark hughes wasn't happy. us be affected, and we used it to motivators and it helped our focus. motivators and it helped our focus. taken his side pretty much to safety as he can get at this point. as he can get at this point.
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the final games of the season, which is highly unlikely. is highly unlikely. marching on in the premier league next season. next season. is andy murray going to be fit for wimbledon? be fit for wimbledon? at this stage it looks increasingly unlikely. it looks increasingly unlikely. be making his comeback as we might have expected. have expected. photo injanuary after his surgery when he was feeling really positive. when he was feeling really positive. well ahead of schedule, back on the court again, so what has happened? court again, so what has happened? we can get more from our tennis correspondent. correspondent. away, but what has gone
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wrong for andy murray? andy murray? of weeks and has had to pull out of a couple of corporate appearances. a couple of corporate appearances. we now wonder when he will be able to make his comeback. to make his comeback. challenge event, the level below the main men's tour. main men's tour. happening seem to have disappeared now. now. so will he be fit for the start of the grass court season? of the grass court season? that has to be in doubt. to be in doubt. possibility he would be at the all— england club. possibility he would be at the all-england club.
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all-england club. wimbledon, long—term, we have to be worried about his future. worried about his future. injury since the latter stages of may. may. maybe he thinks he can take that in his stride. his stride. would not rush back and he would try to return in australia injanuary. to return in australia injanuary. about being back when i am 100% fit is what he said. is what he said. russell, thank you for the moment. for the moment. so fingers crossed for andy murray.
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it will be one to watch. watch. it's hard to believe that wimbledon is just around the corner. wimbledon is just around the corner. i don't know about you. russell was saying, it does sound a bit unlikely. bit unlikely. more from her throughout the morning. is racially discriminating according to amnesty international. to see if it's breached data laws. in the aftermath of the 2011 london riots. were on the database or matrix. in any violent offence. which amnesty claims is racially disproportionate.
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of those listed are male. here now is 0lly feely sprague, from amnesty international uk. from tottenham who knows people who have been on the database. with the metropolitan police for 11 years. as part of a gang, may not yet have been drawn into gang violence. or them becoming a victim. to most people, that would sound really sensible, isn't it?
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this safeguarding function being a feature of the matrix. feature of the matrix. was more about the discriminatory outcomes. they only spoke to 30 people. people. that operate the database at boro level. level. they say about their day to day experience with the database. experience with the database. are local community route is and housing officers. -- community groups. groups. and potentially breaching human rights?
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rights? secretive document the police can say what they want about it. say what they want about it. who sees the matrix will note instantly that they cannot be right. instantly that they cannot be right. you say you have a copy of the matrix that covers haringey. matrix that covers haringey. how old is this? is this? the way that young people were being policed there. policed there. live, and they are red, amber or green. what does read mean? harm score with computer—generated
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algorithms. once glorious 25. involved in serious crimes —— one score of 25. score of 25. turkish boys, they do not feature on the haringey gang matrix. the haringey gang matrix. they wanted gunn, they go to the tottenham turkish boys. tottenham turkish boys. what is the point you are making? point you are making? understand i shouldn't be on the programme. their only black kids on here. here. there are only white people in that gang? that gang? and this is the problem with the matrix across london. matrix across london.
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europeans, they will tell you that they make up 316 people. they make up 316 people. tell you six chinese gangsters in london, it is tomfoolery. it is crazy. it has been taken out of context. context. intelligence database the police operate. operate. they operate a general police database. police database. so why has this been focused on? been focused on? been labelled gang crime and that label is not particularly helpful. label is not particularly helpful. that is predominantly done by young males in inner cities. males in inner cities. is redacted, and it says the harm score is zero. score is zero. have been involved in serious youth violence. violence.
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they are down is the same gang and they are just their peers. they are just their peers. they police them the same. police them the same. why are innocent people on the list? innocent people on the list? database is notjust a deal with people that have been convicted. people that have been convicted. no database ever is. database ever is. involved in crime, and they try to make sense of it. make sense of it. so it's all right to have innocent people in it? to have innocent people in it? these young people need to be diverted. diverted. but the police are telling them that's not really happening. them that's not really happening. might involve them becoming a victim. victim.
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completely different system than we are talking about here. are talking about here. techniques about how people get on it. it. district boro is about how it is used —— clarity. used —— clarity. ways that the local borrowers are in the database. ways that the local borrowers are in the data base. ways that the local borrowers are in the database. the database. officer involved and he sits on a number of gang panels across london. number of gang panels across london. there are two completely different ways that they are sharing. ways that they are sharing. advance of meetings to schools, housing officers, etc. housing officers, etc.
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and would only projected onto a screen and no copies were taken. screen and no copies were taken. five, ten, or more, this is why the data sharing is so important. data sharing is so important. perfect, so why is it useful to officers? officers? they can with the information they have got. have got. involved in that type of crime on the streets of london. the streets of london. their disproportionate black victims and suspects —— mortuaries. their disproportionate black victims and suspects -- mortuaries. and suspects -- mortuaries. that is not true. not true. level and they are not involved in the street level stuff. the street level stuff. police intelligence and it needs to be addressed. be addressed.
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aware of our operating at a higher level, not street crime levels. level, not street crime levels. other young black males in inner london and it needs to be addressed. london and it needs to be addressed. it's not the elephant in the room, that is what people talk about. that is what people talk about. police speak they don't provide statistics. statistics. statistics, young black kids are involved in 27. involved in 27. youth violence that takes place across london. but that isn't gang—related. but that isn't gang-related. there you go. so this is looking at one particular aspect. is looking at one particular aspect. found on the streets that have been killed on the streets today. killed on the streets today. they have had this database for ages. have had this database for ages. report on white or —— on white crime.
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crime. crime says black youths are responsible for 27. responsible for 27. give you an example and explain what happens. happens. identified as a gang member with the person in red. person in red. the person in red commits an offence, we are coming for you. offence, we are coming for you. that is a nonsense. don't call me a liar. it is utter nonsense. it is on the website, but it's hidden. website, but it's hidden. your researchers to see if they could find it. i've got in my laptop. don't call me a liar. you are totally misrepresenting. are totally misrepresenting. don't come on here and call me a liar. come on here and call me a liar. gentlemen, if you talk over each other, no one can hear. other, no one can hear. please let him respond. i'm finishing the point. point.
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violent offence, we will come to you. you've told us that. on parole, we will take away your parole. parole. committed a crime —— because they say their son is in a gang. say their son is in a gang. you did work at the met for 11 years. work at the met for 11 years. because the met will not come on. why won't they? a long period of problems definitively associated. definitively associated. it cannot be done without evidence. be done without evidence. not convicted, charged and the rest just because they know someone. just because they know someone.
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misunderstanding how the system works. works. but it is not as bad as it is being portrayed in the amnesty report. portrayed in the amnesty report. be scrapped or can you see some benefits? benefits? the floors, how it can continue in its current form. its current form. thank you all for coming on the programme. still to come. where breaking the law can mean life in prison. and it's british. in a moment, we'll bring you a special report on gibraltar. the price, in some cases by thousands of pounds. we'll speak to some fans shortly.
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time for the latest news, here's annita mcveigh. announced the united states was withdrawing from the agreement. on its nuclear programme. it is "not fit for purpose". matrix was "racially discriminatory" and breaches human rights law. young lives being lost". killings from the troubles in northern ireland.
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personnel being dragged through the courts unnecessarily. consultation on the proposals. bringing the total number to 1a. of the single market. when the bill returns to the commons. help to the majority of children who desperately need it. into exam pressures. it also says social media education should be compulsory in schools. care will transform
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services. in the south atlantic, is being hailed a complete success. on the unique birdlife. bird populations. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. conversation, the database which includes people who are in gangs. includes people who are in gangs. in finding a solution to see
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how it pans out. pans out. the police are dammed if they do, dammed if they don't. they do, dammed if they don't. the killings happening now, what percentage of them are white? percentage of them are white? hands behind their backs, we might as well abolish them all together. as well abolish them all together. let them do theirjob. this topic which shows what we all already know. already know. institutionally racist and the gang problem is not only a black problem. problem is not only a black problem. the black people who get shown in the media as the main culprits. the media as the main culprits. need to do better reporting if you want to tackle a problem. want to tackle a problem. for getting in touch and keep them coming in. here's some sport now with holly.
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west brom have been relegated from the premier league. the premier league. are almost safe while swansea are plunged deeper into trouble. plunged deeper into trouble. brom have had an eight—year stay in the top flight ended. the top flight ended. gives chelsea an advantage in the title race. title race. andy murray's return to tennis has run into difficulty. tennis has run into difficulty. has kept him from playing competitively since last summer. competitively since last summer. may miss the start of the grass court season. court season. meanwhile, johanna konta's to start to 2018 continues. konta's to start to 2018 continues. open, beaten in straight sets by a qualified. qualified. she has wonjust nine matches now this year. matches now this year. sport for now, more just after ten a:m.. strict abortion laws.
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but instead to a british overseas territory. john 0wen has more. i already had two children. i remember waking up one morning and feeling quite poorly. itjust reminded me of morning sickness. i took a pregnancy test and... i think i decided there and then that it wasn't something i could do. in the circumstances that i was in. through another pregnancy. it is the whole of europe, we need to be on par with them. it's ridiculous that we are not. found anywhere in europe.
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penalty for women who undertake an abortion, is life imprisonment. the same question is causing convulsions in gibraltar. we are a society that is still pandering to religious lobbies. thinking, then, there is nothing wrong with abortion. we are part of britain and have such a difference in that respect. once we leave the european union. to make a choice. gibraltar is a tiny peninsula poking out from the southern tip of spain. a matter of dispute between the uk and spain for
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almost as long. gibraltar is a british overseas territory. responsibility for areas like defence and foreign affairs. affinity with the uk. but in one respect, the uk and gibraltar are very different. anti—abortion laws. on the costa del sol. to cross into spain or fly to the uk. the urgency of the debate has 00:39:53,1000 --> 00:39:55,096 been gathering pace. every day, commuters cross this borderfrom gibraltar into spain.
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become more difficult. or even go ahead with a termination, that's cause for real concern. might fill the gap. there's been a powerful taboo against even discussion abortion. she's spoken anonymously about her experiences. but is now speaking publicly for the first time. to a clinic to have an abortion. it was quite daunting, really. the whole situation was. apart from the fact that i was going to go through this procedure. knowing that i was going to have to leave gib to go and do it. and go somewhere that
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i wasn't familiar with. i didn't know anybody there. so we kind of know the health service quite well. we know people there. what to expect was daunting. it was not a nice feeling at all. criminalised in gibraltar. place where you live? is itjust meant that i couldn't say anything to anybody. it made me feel quite alone, really. i didn't know anybody who had had a termination before. and if they had, then no one would ever speak about it. so, yeah, i felt quite lonely. it was quite a lonely experience. what was the clinic itself like? horrible. it was horrible. it was on the road.
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it was on the roadside. i walked in there. if it was clean or not or anything like that. it was full of women. and you get called in and you have to go in on your own. so, yeah, like i said, it was quite lonely. what would you like to see happen now? the first thing that needs to be done, needs to be decriminalised. a clinic here in gibraltar. to life in prison is scary, for a lot of women. which they feel they need to do. i was 16 years old. before i got pregnant. a termination aged just 16. i was on the pill for medical reasons. but even before i had that
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particular boyfriend,. which i was on antibiotics for. cancelled out my contraceptive pill. so, when i found out, it was a massive shock, really. it wasn't part of the plan. it wasn't supposed to happen. as far as i was concerned, i was protected. from unwanted pregnancy. so, yeah, it was a bit of a shock. i think it's... quite damaging. to both mother and baby or mother and foetus. to be put in situations where you don't have a choice.
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it must be awful. it must be... a really tough time. so, how likely is it that the law here might be changed? gibraltar‘s tiny parliament consists of just 17 mps. elected representative to be openly pro—choice. she wants to see an urgent change. outdated on the matter of abortion. especially considering that it is punishable with life imprisonment. it's not as if abortion is not happening. abortion is happening and our women are crossing over to spain.
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goes with it, the post—counselling. the right guidance. i think it is high time that we have a consultative referendum. of the catholic church in this area. gibraltar‘s catholic community is in the majority, here. of the catholic church in gibraltar, bishop carmelo zammit. to ask why he was opposed to a change in the law. the position of the church has always been the same. of a pregnancy, is wrong. because what you have there is human life. then there is nothing wrong with abortion. then both will
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die. what he church teaches is that then there is the intention that counts. or operate to kill a life? you know, it's a very hard decision. so you wouldn't like the law to be changed to accommodate... i wouldn't like in gibraltar, put it this way, to be changed. we know it has been changed in most places. at least they stuck to the principal. are going to get it. do you understand what i mean? to what we believe in. narrow circumstances.
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challenge the government's position might be viable. there's a strong legal basis. approved period of time, is it going to go away? and pills available. euros, are able to get a termination practised there. is that going to go away if we don't address it? we need to do something about it. in gibraltar‘s government, chief minister, fabian picardo. for those who might want to cross the border to terminate
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a pregnancy. from gibraltar into spain. frontier entirely maintained. i am fully confident of that. say to you that long. on the political agenda. the sensitivity of the situation that people can find themselves in. and the religious sensitivities that there may be in this community. the moral sensitivities there may be in this community.
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in the context of how we've dealt with other social issues. since i've been chief minister. and respect with religious beliefs that people may have. to deal with this issue, too. to changing the law. in modern times has actually faced this penalty. hostility from some sections of this community to reforming the law. the european mainstream. will be a catalyst for change remains to be seen.
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final, where liverpool will play real madrid. the price — in some cases by thousands of pounds. com to arrange their accommodation. their customer service team will step in. cup also starts next month. organised their accomodation in kiev back in august. for four people for £60.
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we are only talking to michael. we might get ian on the phone. com. michael, why did you book so early, first of all? first of all? because liverpool are the greatest team in europe. the greatest team in europe. hotel ready for the champions league final if we were to get there. weren't able to pay then although you wanted to. that's correct. that was fine as long as you can guarantee the booking. guarantee the booking. was guaranteed so i was more than happy to carry on.
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happy to carry on. my card and that is when my hotel was cancelled, back in march. was cancelled, back in march. there anything wrong with your credit card? was it in date? everything was fine. have my details and it was on the booking website. booking website. lost mike reservation because of that. that. megan, let me bring you in, what do you think is going on? what do you think is going on? com.
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their terms and conditions are not crystal clear for the circumstances. crystal clear for the circumstances. scenarios, one of which is invalid card details. card details. happened, i would be going back and asking what has happened. asking what has happened. look at what is going on, i'm not happy. happy. michael, so they cancelled the room. did you try to rebook it? yes, i called booking. said, ok, can you pay the difference and they said, not at this hotel. and they said, not at this hotel. was fine and they would reinstate the money. the money.
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60 and they would reinstate me £340 after i stayed there. after i stayed there. straightaway and i said to booking. booking. payment and i didn't know what it was. was. union and i said, ok, when can i do it? it? union store and they will help you out. this was sunday, six p:m. , so there was no store open. there was no store open. western union tomorrow and paid the £400, is that 0k? £400, is that 0k? then again my hotel was cancelled for nonpayment. 0k. is your suspicion because they were wanted to do what? were wanted to do what? second time did you think was going on? on?
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£400 was still really cheap in the end. the end. you think they wanted but the price of more. the price of more. ian, who booked two rooms through booking. com, and one was cancelled. hello, ian. what is the reason you had one room cancelled? had one room cancelled? claimed his credit card was not valid. was it? the e—mail saying you have two update in 48 hours. update in 48 hours. e—mail saying that the credit card details are invalid. details are invalid. what has happened then? happened then?
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afterwards, he complained to booking. complained to booking. because we have made those transactions since. transactions since. found our other hotel room which appears to be ok. appears to be ok. suspicious and when we get there, it might not be. might not be. how much is that costing you? costing you? it's costing us a bit more than it was. more than it was. quite lucky to find one that was cheap. cheap. when we get there it might not be actually our room. absolutely. might be sharing with 17 other liverpool fans. liverpool fans. the end of the world if you win the final. have a look at this.
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you can see various bookings and problems, just have a look at this. problems, just have a look at this. that is showing what the rooms have been charged now, over £3000. been charged now, over £3000. what do you think of that, megan? do you think of that, megan? putting the price up to £3000. the price up to £3000. that if you're making a complaint to booking. booking. com, you have to look if there is a pattern. there is a pattern. important they make the complaint so it can be dealt with and looked at. it can be dealt with and looked at. have you made an official complaint, michael and ian? yes, i have. yes, my brother has. and? they've offered me 25 euros compensation. oh, my goodness. what about you, ian? we didn't even get
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that. didn't even get that. although he hasn't undertaken it yet. we will see what happens. thank you, ian, michael and megan french. you, ian, michael and megan french. if you are a liverpool fan and it has happened to you, get in touch. big sporting events too, so if that's you, let us know. discriminatory, amongst other things. than they are about people being murdered on the streets. trying to tackle this but they are constantly criticised.
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it was a rather heated conversation earlier, as you can imagine. earlier, as you can imagine. and sport on the way, but now the weather, with simon. fresh conditions and temperatures down by a good six or 7 degrees. down by a good six or 7 degrees. area of low pressure moving in today with associated weather fronts. with associated weather fronts.
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brighter weather but much cooler and fresher here. fresher here. around 12 or 14 degrees, 14 or 16 degrees elsewhere. degrees elsewhere. particularly in the countryside with low single figures. low single figures. for many of on thursday, friday with sunny spells. sunny spells. england into scotland, but they are few and far between. few and far between. few degrees in the south—east to 17 celsius and 13 or 14 further north. celsius and 13 or 14 further
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north. poking through the cloud from time to time. to time. ireland on friday, further east, the highs of around 14 or 18 degrees. highs of around 14 or 18 degrees. weekend they will be the mid to high teens. teens. will be heavy showers towards the west and south—west. hello it's wednesday,
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it's 10 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. of the iran nuclear deal. of the iran nuclear deal. why on earth should that work? iranian nuclear deal. middle east editorjeremy bowen who's in the region. as long as we can establuish whether he's got wifi where he is.
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i didn't know anybody who had had a termination before. so, if they had no one would ever speak about it. i felt quite lonely, it was quite a lonely experience. what was the clinic itself like? it was horrible, horrible. it was on the road, it was on the roadside. to be a breakthrough, on curing baldness. to treat your hair loss — let me know. good morning. with a summary of todays news. announced the united states was withdrawing from the agreement. from sanctions in return for curbs on its nuclear programme. it is "not fit for purpose".
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it was "racially discriminatory" and breaches human rights law. figures from july 2016 showed 78% of the people listed were black. that was ill—defined when it started. about how people get on it. there is no clarity in the district boroughs about how the data is used. boroughs integrate this database with the wider community. killings from the troubles in northern ireland. personnel being dragged through the courts unnecessarily. consultation on the proposals. bringing the total number to 14.
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of the single market. when the bill returns to the commons. including being given sweets and chocolate. at the unit in feltham compared with a previous visit last year. at that time the facility in west london was judged to be unsafe. points earned for good behaviour for confectionary. help to the majority of children who desperately need it. research needs to be done into exam pressures. it also says social media education should be
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compulsory in schools. care will transform services. we are going to talk more about that in the next half now. in the next half now. granddaughter was discharged from cams. cams. and had to find a gp he would prescribe medication for her adhd. prescribe medication for her adhd. because she was in a good frame of mind at the time. mind at the time. which is next week, six months after her 18th birthday. her 18th birthday.
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and started to self harm and have panic attacks. panic attacks. emergency appointment, but was refused. refused. to a&e because panic attacks was not an emergency. an emergency. and i feel we are abandoned as a family. family. through the net when they turn 18, where is the support? where is the support? people should be taken up to the age of 25. of 25. let me know if you think it would be a more appropriate age? would be a more appropriate age? does it shift the threshold for people to slip through the net? people to slip through the net? let me know what you think. at the standard network rate. here's some sport now with holly.
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fans, there eight year stay in the premier league is over. premier league is over. relegation was sealed by southampton 1—0 victory over swansea last night. 1—0 victory over swansea last night. almost safe while swansea are plunged deeper into trouble. plunged deeper into trouble. elsewhere to go their way if they are to avoid joining them. are to avoid joining them. must win the game and wait to hope something happens to stay. something happens to stay. like it because we don't depend on ourselves at this moment. ourselves at this moment. three loss but aberdeen drew 1—1 with rangers. with rangers.
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the dons went ahead through a kenny mclean penalty. through a kenny mclean penalty. one point ahead of rangers going into the final weekend. into the final weekend. super league, chelsea lost to liverpool. liverpool. alex greenwood's cross on ten minutes was enough. ten minutes was enough. murray's long—awaited return to tennis has run into difficulty. tennis has run into difficulty. has kept him from playing competitively since last summer. competitively since last summer. miss the start of the grass court season. season. year at least that would be a concern for any player. concern for any player. as good as andy murray, maybe he thinks he can take it in his stride. thinks he can take it in his stride.
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made that mistake before, i wasn't ready. ready. being back when i am 100% fit and ready. ready. kyle edmund beat daniil medvedev in straight sets. medvedev in straight sets. likely enter the world top 20 should he beat novak djokovic later. he beat novak djokovic later. johanna konta's tough start to 2018 continues. continues. her australian open defeat as she crashed out of the madrid open. crashed out of the madrid open. straight sets and now mean she is just one in nine matches this year. just one in nine matches this year. will have more in the next half an hour, victoria. hour, victoria. thank you very much, welcome to the programme.
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to help them is failing too. health services to adult services at the age of 18. of psychiatrists says is a "particularly vulnerable time". until the age of 25? services be extended until the age of 25? of 25? it is a recommendation from this joint report today. let's speak to chloe shelton. she's 21 years old and has anorexia and anxiety. to adult mental health services. anorexia and depression.
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by camhs until he was 25. criticised the goverment badly today. welcome to all of you. chloe, let me start with you. start with you. about what happened to your support when you hit 18? when you hit 18? first in camhs when i was about 14 years old. years old. stable, i had a really, really great therapist. therapist.
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trying to find a therapist that worked and was understanding me. worked and was understanding me. was told, you are 18 now, so you are ready to move on. i wasn't ready. had about three years of not being... being... i wasn't as mature as i should have been at that age. should have been at that age. i wasn't mature enough to cope with the change. the change. three or four months of not having any care, help or anything. any care, help or anything. point, i was still very depressed and it was a complete mess. and it was a complete mess. needed help and i still wanted to help. help. try and understand you and know who you are.
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you are. cannot understand because they don't know you. know you. in therapy and again, didn't get on with them. with them. to slip through the net, even more so than i did at camhs. so than i did at camhs. age threshold should be raised to 25. 25. better before you are 18 because that is when things can go wrong? that is when things can go wrong? you, whatever your age and whatever your circumstances in life. your circumstances in life.
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more unwell before you get treatment, it rings a bell with me. treatment, it rings a bell with me. i had that experience of camhs saying he had better get better. saying he had better get better. was a scare tactic because it was if you don't get better, have nothing. you don't get better, have nothing. i needed a positive reason to get better, not a scary story. better, not a scary story. did keep me on a bit longer, until i was nearly 19. was nearly 19. discharged me and it was up to me if i wanted to go into adult services. i wanted to go into adult services. conversation about, do you need more support? support?
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your own and you have to make this decision for yourself. decision for yourself. still living at home going to university, didn't matter. through the net but it was so easy to do. understood. the recommendations today is that we move the threshold to the age of 25. move the threshold to the age of 25. you have an eating disorder or depression? depression? we know it is so challenging for people to get into services. people to get into services. in four children who need help get it. it.
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we have people repeating their stories to get through it. stories to get through it. have been these problems will have got them as a young person. got them as a young person. themselves but also for the nhs and the country as well. the country as well. university and suddenly all the was taken away. taken away. then i waited six years to get adult specialist help. i feel totally let
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down. down. these cases from matt, james and chloe or is it common? chloe or is it common? develop the mental aspects like we do. young people are at a vulnerable stage. stage. increased mental health risks in the last two years. last two years. the recommendation to move from 18 up to 25? up to 25?
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well served, but if you have the continuity to 25, that would help. continuity to 25, that would help. and mental health services in the future. future. we invited a minister and they weren't able to come. they weren't able to come. lack ambition and the changes we plan will transform services. plan will transform services. approach to make sure we get the approach correct. approach correct. people on the panel want to put to them. them. as we rightly set out will fail a generation at the moment. fail a generation at the moment. we don't make the claim lightly. don't make the claim lightly.
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that it will reach 25% of young people by 2023. people by 2023. of success as to when the money might or might not continue. might or might not continue. need to roll at the programme until 2030, so there is a massive gap. 2030, so there is a massive gap. plans to content with how we prevent mental ill—health for young people. mental ill—health for young people. have labour got plans to address that? most certainly. services which is about 10% of the budget. budget. minister, had a weak tackle
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inequalities? inequalities? this is a massive social justice issue. this is a massive socialjustice issue. socialjustice issue. —— how do we tackle inequalities? tackle inequalities? many young children are likely to suffer with this. suffer with this. system, excluded children, all of those missing in the plans. those missing in the plans. of 25% of people to be reached is so unambitious. unambitious. the costs are just too high, but we cannot tolerate that. high, but we cannot tolerate that. there is a failure to understand what investment means. what investment means. kinds of things and also for reducing human suffering. reducing human suffering. paying taxes and there is an economic argument that make sense. economic argument that make sense.
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to live healthy lives, it's worth paying for. paying for. university and lostjobs, friends and family potentially. and family potentially. lot younger and perhaps i would have been able to university. been able to university. brilliant, and my family, to support me when i am not well. me when i am not well.
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certain different aspects, they are not supporting anybody. not supporting anybody. going well for me, especially with eating disorders. it is shocking. —— who can put their hands up and say. who can put their hands up and say. thank you all for coming in. will read in the next half—hour of the programme. the programme. thank you for getting in touch. following america's decision to withdraw. threatened to re—start the country's uranium programme. iran nuclear deal? the bbc‘s barbara plett usher explains.
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from the iran nuclear deal. what happens now? the re—imposition of sanctions. us nuclear sanctions. that brought iran to the negotiating table in the first place. and add new ones. this disastrous deal gave this regime many billions of dollars. access to the us marketplace. to the us marketplace? could also be strongly sanctioned. to stop this decision.
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the deal survival. commendation of 12 years of negotiation. negotiation. has prevented iran from making nuclear weapons. nuclear weapons. enrichment on an industrial level without any limitations. without any limitations. from becoming a nuclear threat over the long run. the long run. to gain access to the most deadly weapons on. weapons on. but if that doesn't work, and many think it went, what then?
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think it went, what then? nuclear programme, increasing the risk of confrontation. risk of confrontation. is on his way to north korea in preparation for my upcoming meeting. preparation for my upcoming meeting. withdrawing from the iran accord was not the only big news. not the only big news. meeting scheduled and set and we are looking forward to a great success. looking forward to a great success. korea when the us president has reneges on this one. to do with other issues which faced iran and the region. specifically, what can you do now? is this deal now not dead in the water? we don't believe the deal is dead in the water.
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it stays in place because iran has said it wishes to keep it in place. states who are parties to it. would make it difficult to fulfil the terms of the agreement. that the uk should have taken a tougher stance with donald trump. brought up to stand up to bullies. to try to appease him. to meet the queen and travel in the gold coach. basically to play along with him. but would your approach have succeeded? for the world. about what donald trump was going to do with the nuclear deal.
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was something else. 0k. he was complacent and what he did was too little, too late. deal with north korea. but why on earth should that work? iranian nuclear deal? hazhir teimourian, he was born in iran and is a middle east analyst. your reaction, first of all? can it be saved, the deal? be saved, the deal?
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complaints to the joint commission and that will take time. and that will take time. i read it, the americans are very, very determined. very determined. dealings in iran are more important than dealing with the us. than dealing with the us. that is no choice at all. choice at all. prepare to unwind and dismantle all of their operations. of their operations. billion of cash was taken out of iran for safekeeping by iranians. iran for safekeeping by iranians. and the iranian economy is very vulnerable. vulnerable. iranian economy better than the british foreign office. british foreign office.
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chanting for the first time, down with islam itself. with islam itself. precarious position and we have got to talk. to talk. more dangerous place today as a result of pulling out? i'm not sure. this and they are usually very careful not to comment on iran. careful not to comment on iran. iran, the uae, and others, and israel was predictable. israel was predictable. but i think it will not come to war. it will not come to war. and i expect talks rather than hostility.
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thank you very much for taking to us. still to come. have you spent money trying to stop baldness in its tracks? for a receding hairline. in a children's book. time for the latest news — here's annita mcveigh. announced the united states was withdrawing from the agreement. from sanctions in return for curbs on its nuclear programme.
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database following accusations it is "not fit for purpose". it was "racially discriminatory" and breaches human rights law. figures from july 2016 showed 78% of the people listed were black. killings from the troubles in northern ireland. personnel being dragged through the courts unnecessarily. consultation on the proposals. bringing the total number to 14. of the single market. when the bill returns to the commons.
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that's a summary of the latest bbc news. thank you very much. adult support and whether you have slipped through the net. slipped through the net. have had an amazing care by my university doctor. university doctor. for over a week and was in hospital for several days, had terrible care. for several days, had terrible care. this wasn't helped when she left camhs. camhs. the care is too patchwork across the country. across the country. something must be done about this. be done about this. services for children and young adults is inadequate. adults is inadequate.
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my son, who is 21, was referred when he was 17. 21, was referred when he was 17. had several different councils, which messed him up. which messed him up. short—term contracts, so they moved on. on. when he reached 18, they washed their hands of him. their hands of him. other agencies which would have benefited my son at the time. benefited my son at the time. more pressure on a service which is already on its knees. already on its knees. services as a whole is already underfunded. underfunded. because part of the brain are not fully developed until years later. here's some sport now with holly. west brom have been relegated from the premier
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league. the premier league. sealed when southampton secured a 1—0 victory over swansea last night. 1—0 victory over swansea last night. the drop when they take on chelsea tonight. tonight. leaders, manchester city lost to liverpool. liverpool. the result gives chelsea an advantage in the title race. an advantage in the title race. tennis, andy murray's return has run into difficulty. into difficulty. playing competitively since last summer. summer. grass court season which starts soon. soon. and johanna konta's tough start to 2018 continues. start to 2018 continues. knocked out of the madrid open, beaten in straight sets. beaten in straight sets. she has won just nine matches this year so far. just nine matches this year so far. will have the latest on the bbc channel across the day.
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channel across the day. thank you very much. parents over background noise. but more than half don't. and is hosting a debate in parliament later. we can talk now to sophie anastasiou. but they moved local authorities and he got one when he was four. you can see yourself on television. it is very exciting.
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how does this work? you put them in and attach them to the hearing aid. and attach them to the hearing aid. that is a shoe and they are on each hearing aid. hearing aid. he has them already just beneath his hearing aid. just beneath his hearing aid. you just touch it. it is like a jigsaw puzzle. puzzle. person who is speaking, who he will be able to hear. be able to hear. would get through to him more easily, potentially? easily, potentially? able to hear who ever is speaking to him using the radio aids directly. him using the radio aids directly. he can clear them
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very clearly. so it is a microphone. it is a microphone. i am just sing this out as i am going. this out as i am going. feel like to have that behind your ear? what does it feel like? does it feel heavy? does it feel 0k? do you not notice it? is it all right? is it ok? good. why don't all deaf children receive one of these? children receive one of these? that is a good question. is a good question. money is probably an issue? probably an issue? moment they are provided in schools by local authorities. by local authorities. how much is one of these, sorry to interrupt. one of these, sorry to interrupt. around £1500. transmitter and two of those little things, receivers.
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things, receivers. they are around £500 each. so it is around £1500. authorities to get from council tax payers? payers? the local authorities and encourage them to use the money. them to use the money. tax, there is a separate fund available. available. which comes from taxpayers somewhere, presumably? taxpayers somewhere, presumably? best thing would be to research that with your local authority. with your local authority. equipment the money is in the pot for? for? essentially, yes will stop why would they not? would they not?
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develop without them, but with them, and massive improvement. and massive improvement. tell us the difference from your little boy? difference from your little boy? a little bit, it wouldn't be as clear. clear. then some of the words wouldn't be as clear as other words. as clear as other words. develops his language and understanding. big difference? huge difference. difference. on tv and it is a pleasurable experience, clearly. experience,
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clearly. what happens after the debate and hopefully things will move on. changes to the country's strict abortion laws. or malta, but instead to a british 0verseas territory. 0ur reporterjohn 0wen has more. anywhere in europe. southern tip of spain. imprisonment. forced to cross into spain or fly to the uk. but now, campaigners are calling for change. gathering pace. into spain.
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that crossing back and forth might suddenly become more difficult. to go ahead with a termination, that's cause for real concern. discussing abortion. she's spoken anonymously about her experiences. but is now speaking publicly for the first time. into spain to go to a clinic to have an abortion. it was quite daunting, really. the whole situation was. apart from the fact that i was going to go through this procedure. knowing that i was going to have to leave gib to go and do it. and go somewhere that i wasn't familiar with. and have such an invasive procedure and not know what to expect. it was daunting,
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yeah. it was not a nice feeling at all. what was the clinic itself like? horrible. it was horrible. it was on the road. it was on the roadside. might be changed? gibraltar‘s tiny parliament consists of just 17 mps. elected representative to be openly pro—choice. she wants to see an urgent change. it's not as if abortion isn't happening. abortion is happening and our women are crossing over to spain. goes with it, the post—counselling. the right guidance. of the catholic church in this area. gibraltar‘s catholic community is in the majority, here. the catholic church in gibraltar, bishop carmelo zammit. to ask why he was opposed to a change in the law. the position of the
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church has always been the same. of a pregnancy, is wrong. who want an abortion are going to get it. do you understand what i mean? just to say, let's stick to what we believe in. minister, fabian picardo. on the political agenda. the sensitivity of the situation that people can find themselves in. and the religious sensitivities that there may be in this community. intended to treat
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osteoporosis. is a side affect of a drug used to tackle brittle bones. available on the nhs. with losing her hair. it's almost like a hat that's measured to your head. it's got an elastic band. i wear this and it doesn't disturb my hairline at all. put it on, clip it on. it's really easy to put on but also easy to remove as well. so you can remove it. it looks bad, that's the word i'd use, it looks bad. my definition of bad is just patchy, so patchy and annoying. to a lot of people thatt doesn't look too bad? other days it's like, oh my goodness,
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this is so obvious. so this hairstyle has pretty much took away my hairline. you can see the extensions are quite thick and heavy. into a massive bun. like that, each time you move your head, the bun sways. because of the weight of it. i would never wear my hair upwards or in an afro without covering up. no—one sees this. one sees the like this. and scalp clinic at daniel galvin. he is with us in london. after he started losing his hair when he was just 21.
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side—effect for treating brittle bones encourages hair growth? bones encourages hair growth? it's exciting news, definitely. exciting news, definitely. about as a side—effect for taking them for something else. them for something else. be tested and trialled and how long that is going to take, who knows? that is going to take, who knows? out there and it is a hidden epidemic. epidemic. up daily and needing help for hair loss. loss. david, what is your reaction and how might it help? and how might it help? i think it's very exciting. very exciting.
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of medicine with hair loss, i think that's fantastic. that's fantastic. has the ability to ruin people's lives. lives. find you are suffering from hair loss. loss. to our viewers about how having alopecia has affected you? alopecia has affected you? induced by stress and it happens very suddenly. very suddenly. is happening and it's quite devastating. devastating. but i feel sometimes as women we feel almost defined by our hair. feel almost defined by our hair.
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for what ever reason, that is traumatic. traumatic. how do you react to this potential breakthrough then? potential breakthrough then? largely suffered by women and i read it was curing hair loss for men. it was curing hair loss for men. suffer from largely, does it not benefit women as well? benefit women as well? the answer to the question, so that is my first point. is my first point. both men and women, that's an amazing breakthrough. amazing breakthrough.
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any difference to either the thickness or quantity of your hair. i. thickness or quantity of your hair. if this drug does that, that's fantastic news. fantastic news. treatments, £40,000 on hair loss treatments. treatments. losing your hair, what you say to people who might think that? people who might think that? a bit of a misconception with regards to vanity. regards to vanity. journey wouldn't cost me that amount of money. of money.
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it was a yellow pages you would refer to. refer to. i tried a plethora of different products. different products. is a hidden epidemic and hair loss sufferers suffer in silence. sufferers suffer in silence. ladyjust mentioned, it's a traumatic experience. traumatic experience. much a harsh thing to say, it's kind of a cancer of the spirit. of a cancer of the spirit. it really affects you emotionally.
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affects you emotionally. somebody could be making a lot of money out of this in the future. money out of this in the future. it is a massive industry. is a massive industry. holy grail of parent beauty in some respect. respect. make billions of pounds worldwide because it isn't about vanity. because it isn't about vanity. in terms of how much money people can make out of this. can make out of this. it will be fantastic for users, everyone. fantastic for users, everyone. it will be great. will be great. and for 50 years i have been fighting my failing follicles. fighting my failing follicles.
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spent hundreds if not thousands on trying to restore my hair. trying to restore my hair. however, all has failed. all has failed. sarge, heat lamps, tablets which guaranteed to —— massage. guaranteed to —— massage. grandad is all there is a high chance you will be bald as well. chance you will be bald as well. head of hair who say that, not the ones with a comb over orate to pay. ones with a comb over orate to pay. we will see what happens with the research. research. thank you all for coming on the programme. reflected the diversity of london itself. couple in their twenties. as heroes in a children's fairytale. to schools in
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london. sofia bettiza travelled to venice to find out more. the jewel of italy, venice. are connected by tragedy. of the grenfell tower inferno last june. in this corner of italy. to travel to the uk. a move that would mean grenfell tower became home. by the loss of her only son. for the death of a son.
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because it's a pain you carry all the time. if there are 24 hours in a day, i sufferfor 25. about marco and gloria. that's how the knight and the princess came to life. to a high tower in a far—away land. translation: their flat was beautiful, warm and cosy. when their friends visited, they would never leave. they'd do everything together and they loved each other very much. marco's childhood friend, roberta, did all the drawings. translation: this gave me the strength to go on.
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it's not fair to keep quiet. who died for nothing. story a happy ending. kidnaps them and takes them away. and escapes with his princess. translated into english. and it will be given out to schools in london. blocks being safe in the future.
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and she has another hope. people can leave such a wonderful memory on the world. i hope they're happy, somewhere else. through the mental health support net. lianne says, my brother slipped through the net. depressed enough for treatment. a few years later, at 21, he took his own life. there doesn't seem to be help for families or young people.
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families or young people. this is from elizabeth. from elizabeth. mental health unit and was diagnosed with bipolar. transitioning my whole —— my daughter's life as collapse. daughter's life as collapse. that is very sad to hear. very sad to hear. we are back tomorrow at nine a:m.. have a good day. good morning.
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across eastern areas again today but it is fresher compared to yesterday. it is fresher compared to yesterday. fringes of england and wales seeing rain. rain. keep the sunshine but temperatures 20 around here. 20 around here. highs of about 12 to maybe 16 degrees further north. maybe 16 degrees further north. get down to low single figures particularly in the countryside. particularly in the countryside. northern england and across scotland. goodbye.
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stories developing at 11. france insists the deal is not dead. with some mps burning the american flag. we are disappointed that the usa has done this. done this. building block to dues and other regions in.
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for the second time in less than two months. and breaches human rights law. in northern ireland. prices at an auction in new york. dollars on its first day. bride—to—be meghan markle. at the london attraction.

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