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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  May 16, 2018 9:00am-11:00am BST

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hello it's wednesday, it's 9 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme our top story, is the much trumpeted summit between donald trump and kim jong—un going to be called off? north korea is threatening to cancel it if washington continues to insist it must give up its nuclear weapons programme. mps have published a scathing report on the collapse of the construction and services giant carillion, accusing the board of "stuffing their mouths with gold" instead of looking after their workers. the directors at carillion were running the company into the ground, more concerned about paying themselves lavish salaries, big bonuses and continuing to pay out dividends. ultimately, they were pulling the wool over the eyes of the investors, people saving for pensions and working there. we'll be talking to a carillion employee who's about to lose his job and one of the mps who's criticised the firm, the board, the regulators and the accountants who didn't notice the compnay was spiralling downwards
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the midwives watchdog has been heavily criticised for its investigation into the deaths of 11 babies and one mother at the maternity unit of a hospital in cumbria. i was devastated when my wife and son died. i needed to find out the truth. the nmc, no stage, offered any help, they never contacted me. there was certainly no empathy or compassion. they were just a disgrace, they were almost not human. and we still don't know if meghan markle‘s dad will be coming to her wedding in three days‘ time. this morning we'll be asking what kind of princess meghan will be and what people expect from her. i don't think that we should make her feel that she is i don't think that we should make herfeel that she is now i don't think that we should make her feel that she is now a representative for all black women and has to do an outstanding job and not do anything wrong. i think that isn't fair. hello. welcome to the programme, we're live until 11 this morning. later in the programme,
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we'll be talking about the collapsed construction and services giant carillion. two committees of mps have accused the board of "stuffing their mouths with gold" instead of looking after their workers. are you an employee of carillion? or maybe a small business who worked for them? how have you been affected by its collapse? what do you make of the searing criticism from this report? and are you one of the people preparing to head for windsorfor you one of the people preparing to head for windsor for the royal wedding? if you are packing your flask and sandwiches, let me know why you need to be as near to the couple as possible to be. do get in touch with all of the stories we're talking about. our top story today... north korea has threatened to cancel next month's summit between kim jong—un and president trump, if washington continues to push it to give up its nuclear weapons. earlier, pyongyang abruptly cancelled talks that were due to take place today with south korea, blaming planned joint military exercises by seoul and washington.
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the state news agency called the exercises a rehearsal for an invasion. andrew plant reports. since last month's korean summit, north korea has appeared to show a different, friendlierface to the world, pledging cooperation with the south and setting up a meeting next month with donald trump, denuclearisation firmly on the agenda. now, though, a statement appears to show the country is not as content with that as it seemed. its vice foreign minister saying... it came just hours after north korea pulled out of a planned meeting with the south, angered by the ongoing us—south korean military drills — codenamed max thunder. pyongyang said the exercise could evenjeopardise the meeting between donald trump and kim jong—un. the two were scheduled to meet in singapore on the 12th ofjune,
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and last night the white house said there was no change to that plan. we are operating under the idea and the notion that the president's meeting is going forward with chairman kim next month. since these last military drills, in 2017, north korea has become more open to the outside world. these latest comments, then, marking a significant setback in what had been unprecedented progress on the korean peninsula. our seoul correspondent laura bicker says north korea is unhappy with the way the trump administration have portrayed the upcoming meeting. think there is a bit of posturing. ifa think there is a bit of posturing. if a deal is not acceptable to north korea they will walk away, and they
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are making that clear by dangling the possibility of walking away from the possibility of walking away from the summit donald with trump. they mention in their release that they wa nt to mention in their release that they want to look at denuclearisation, that they have high hopes. but they are also perhaps feeling they are making all of the concessions here. they have released three detainees, they have stopped testing nuclear weapons and missiles. they have also signed up to an agreement with president moon in seoul. when it comes to the nuclear test site, they say they are going to dismantle it next week. they will maybe feel they are making all of the concessions and get nothing in return. the rhetoric coming from the united states, i have noticed over the last few weeks the state media releases have been growing rather irritated by the idea that president trump is boasting, and his administration are boasting, and his administration are boasting, that they have brought chairman kim to the table. they will feel that chairman kim is coming
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from a position of strength that they have built up nuclear weapons, and in no way are they the likes of libya or iraq, and they are willing to negotiate, but they are coming of their own free volition and own free will, not because of donald trump's maximum pressure strategy, not because of the sanctions. there is a huge gap in what north korea and the us believes at the moment. inafew in a few minutes we will bring you the film about meghan markle and what cannot —— kind of princess she will be. first, the news. the board of the failed construction giant carillion has been accused of presiding over a "rotten corporate culture" that was culpable for its collapse, that's the conclusion of two committees of mps. the work and pensions and business select committees say executives were too busy "stuffing their mouths with gold". members of carillion‘s board have rejected the findings. more details from our personal finance correspondent,
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simon gompertz. this is part of the fallout from the carillion collapse. the midland metropolitan hospital, a £350 million project now in limbo, delayed perhaps for years, likely to cost huge amounts more. blamed by mps today — richard howson, the chief executive of the strategy doomed to fail, finance director richard adam, architect of aggressive accounting policies, an accusation he rejects, and chairman philip green, called delusional, which he says is inaccurate. the directors of carillion were running the company into the ground, more concerned about paying themselves lavish salaries, big bonuses, then continuing to pay out dividends. and ultimately they were pulling the wool over the eyes of investors, the people saving for their pensions, and the people working there. the mps accuse carillion of using accounting methods which were intended to deceive, accounting for revenue,
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for instance, before the work had even been agreed. auditors, including kpmg, are criticised. it signed off the accounts, but claimed it acted appropriately. the danger that projects like this hospital have been put in has spurred mps into demanding action, and what they want is much tougher regulation of the auditors and of pension schemes, and possibly the breakup of the big four auditing firms — what mps call a cosy club. otherwise, they warn, the same thing could happen again. the organisation that regulates midwives has been strongly criticised for its investigation into a number of deaths at a maternity unit in cumbria. the professional standards authority says the nursing and midwifery council took too long to consider disciplinary cases and failed to take bereaved families seriously. the head of the nmc resigned on monday.
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here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. poor care at furness general hospital cost carl hendrickson the lives of his wife nittiya and newborn son chester. an independent inquiry described their deaths and the deaths of a further ten babies as the result of a lethal mix of failures in the maternity unit at furness general hospital between 2004 and 2013. but, when carl turned for help to the organisation that is meant to regulate midwives, the nursing and midwifery council, he was let down again. i was devastated when my wife and son died, so, you know, i had to find out the truth. and the nmc at no stage offered any help. they never contacted me. there was no empathy or compassion. they were just a disgrace, they were almost not human. today's report describes the handling of disciplinary cases by the nmc as frequently being incompetent. it took eight years from concerns first being raised to the completion of all cases.
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the organisation lost records and failed to investigate allegations, and the treatment of bereaved families, people like carl, was also seriously criticised. in terms of the way it engages with patients and families, the key thing for us is that they really need to take the relevant information given to them by patients and their families seriously, rather than discounting it. the nursing and midwifery council's chief executive has announced that she will resign, and says that since 2014, significant changes have been made to how the organisation works. but this review leaves open the question as to whether the organisation that oversees midwives is now fit for purpose. dominic hughes, bbc news. one of two british amateur rugby player who died in sri lanka last week had traces of an unidentified narcotic substance, according to a postmortem examination. 25—year—old thomas howard, and thomas baty who was 26, had been touring the country
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with durham—based clems pirates when they visited a club in colombo on saturday night. mr howard died after being admitted to hospital on sunday. mr baty‘s death was confirmed yesterday. bbc news has learned that more than 1600 it specialists and engineers offered jobs in the uk were denied visas between last december and march. they were refused visas because the number applying exceeded the monthly limit on those allowed to enter the country. the government says a white paper setting out its brexit position will be its "most significant publication on the eu" since the 2016 referendum. it's expected to include a plan on a customs relationship that avoids a hard irish border as well as details on aviation, fisheries and agriculture. labour said it was disturbing that ministers can't agree on fundamental issues. guernsey's parliament will debate whether to move towards legalising assisted dying later today. if deputies support the change, a working party would be set up to consider the details.
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supporters insist any change to the law would apply only to local residents, and wouldn't turn the island, a crown dependency, into a destination for euthanasia. a new study has found that a disrupted body clock puts people at increased risk of mood disorders. people who are active at night are up to 10% more likely to be diagnosed with diseases such as depression and bipolar disorder. fresh doubts have been cast on whether meghan markle‘s father will be able to attend her wedding to prince harry this weekend. thomas markle is reported to have told the us entertainment news website tmz that he will undergo a procedure on his heart later today and won't be able attend the ceremony. kensington palace has declined to comment. two new pages from anne frank's diary have been published, containing a handful of dirtyjokes and her thoughts on sex. thejewish teenager wrote her diary whilst in hiding from the nazis and was published after her death.
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the hidden pages had been covered with gummed brown paper — to hide her risque writing from herfamily. new imaging techniques have finally allowed researchers to read them. a rare blue diamond which has spent the last 300 years in some of europe's royal houses has been sold at an auction in geneva for £5 million. the auction house, sotheby‘s, says the farnese blue once formed part of a tiara owned by marie antoinette. the 6.1 carat diamond sold afterjust four minutes of bidding. the identity of the new owner has not been revealed. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30. district, i be attending the wedding, but walking from my house in slough, because road closures will not let you get anywhere near. this from fred, it is so
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unimportant, so irrelevant, nothing can display the disparity more than promoting this pampered lot. people are suffering. too many outside of the home counties, this is not significant. your views are welcome, particularly if you're going to windsor, let us know why you want to be as close as you can the couple. now the sport. a very big day for england's footballers. gareth southgate is going to name his squad. it looks like he has made some decisions already? he has. two of the more experienced players in recent tournaments for england are set to miss out. to be fair to both they have been fighting hard to make a claim for inclusion this season but in the end it's a little too late. late yesterday afternoon, newspapers began reporting that joe hart, the manchester city goalkeeper who spent this season on loan at west ham united would be left out.
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he's been in goal at england's last three tournaments but the torrid showing at world cup in brazil where england went out in the group stages and the exit to iceland at euro 2016 really cast doubts over how long he could stay as number one. hart of course came under intense scrutiny after that match and his form has since dropped so it won't be a huge shock. the newspapers are busy on this. today's back pages carry the story that arsenal midfielder jack wilshere will also miss out on the world cup. he has been plagued by injuries over the last couple of season but did go to england's last two major tournaments. and chelsea's gary cahill could miss out having been at england's last four tournaments stretching back to 2010 so some big calls for gareth southgate ahead of his first major tournament. what about the fringes of the squad
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and who will be waiting anxiously by the phone? there will be those calls, and is immense pride and massive heartbreak for some players. given the form of the next three players, burnley goalkeeper nick pope might be smiling, especially if joe hart is left out. he has had a fantastic season in goal that turf moor. a similar season forjonjo shelvey, and he could take the spot that jack will show was angling for and then there is trent alexander—arnold, who could be on the plane maturing well through what has been a breakthrough season at liverpool which saw them reach the champions league —— jack wilshere. harry maguire and tarkowski could be going to russia, so there will be a lot of debate going on about this squad. what do england supporters expect? you hear gary lineker say that they are obviously not going to win it, just use it for experience and concentrate on the next world cup. yes, i think there has been an
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approach from the fa to manage expectations from fans because we really do build things up going into a tournament. i would expect later you will see a mix of youth and experience in the squad, some familiar names, but with the england youth teams doing so well there is a focus in the fa that they want to build for the future. there might have been a left—field selection already because ryan sessegnon could bea already because ryan sessegnon could be a huge shock, 17 years old, born in 2000, nominated for pfa young player of the year after helping for them reach the championship play—off final, that would be a huge shock if he was included. but if you take everything we have said into consideration, frank lampard thinks this squad could be capable of reaching the quarterfinals.“ you're looking at the squad what we have got, you could say yes, maybe we would be happy to get that far. can we win it? this is a squad that is still developing for future
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tournaments, yes, to a degree and i understand and agree that the expectations should not be sky high, andl expectations should not be sky high, and i don't think they are, which is great that the team, so let's give them the freedom to play and see how well they do. we don't know the exact time of the squad announcement but we expect it will be in the early afternoon, so we will keep you posted. it's still not clear whether megan markle's dad is willing or well enough to attend his daughter's wedding to prince harry in windsor on saturday. the fuss over it is megan markle's first real public test in her new life as a member of the royal family. she is a royal bride of the time — ambitious, independent minded, media savvy, and with a global outlook. will that be enough to cope with the pressures of life inside the house of windsor? 0ur royal correspondent daniella relph has made this film, in which she explores how megan markle will get on as a royal. (vt next) it's meghan markle.
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meghan markle. sheer american. pretty. good. you've hit on me, we can get it out of the way that i am not interested. an actress. divorced. and mixed race. the 36—year—old from los angeles is about to join the most famous family in the world. well, of course daniela relph is also at windsor castle alongside... i'm one of the bbc‘s royal correspondents. they will get to see the queen. and have been reporting on the royal family for 10 years. the duke and duchess of cambridge and the new baby prince now leave hospital for life as a family of five at kensington palace. theirs is a life built round tradition and protocol. but the newest member of the family is far from your usual royal bride. meghan markle's marriage to prince harry is a significant moment for the modern royal family.
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but i want to find out what communities in britain, women of colour, and fellow aristocracy really think about the meghan effect. glossy and photogenic, for magazine editors meghan markle is irresistible. if harry had married a nice girl from the home counties, it wouldn't have had the same effect. she is completely different to anyone the royal family has ever welcomed before. so it's the week of the royal wedding, what coverage do we want, what are we all working on, what are our readers talking about? why does this wedding in particular feel so different with meghan, specifically, as the bride? obviously the meghan factor has come with every single person i've spoken to. the fact that she's biracial, the fact she's an older woman. it's notjust one thing, it's all of it. so good to meet you.
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i can see how it has generated these fever because she is so different to anything we've had in the firm before. you hear about the secret visits to grenfell tower and she seems to be really genuinely passionate about philanthropy and her charity work. i guess people naturally will then draw comparisons between her and diana and the fact they were both slightly against the grain of the traditional british royal family. i mean, meghan markle's the first woke princess that the royal family have ever had, but she had to delete her entire social media platform, how modern is that to delete your voice and get rid off your independence and sacrifice your very successful career for a bloke? clean water being here for everyone. it feels really nice. it seems odd to me to have women of such high profile that wouldn't be allowed to talk out about these important views, they have so much influence, why wouldn't you use your voice
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in a positive way? that is why everyone loves meghan. it remains to be seen as to whether we're going to get the same version of the meghan we had previously. yes. this marriage is a big readjustment for meghan markle. she's given up her career, her nationality and moved thousands of miles away here to kensington palace. it is a time of huge change for her, but what will be expected of meghan? after announcing their engaugement, one of their first public vents was here in brixton, at community radio station represent, set up and run by young people. i just got my show two months ago, after doing work experience and filling in some shows with djs. you're youngest one, right? yes, the youngest one. well done. six months on, we came back to brixton, and brought together a group ofjournalists and writers. to look at whether meghan markle's
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racial identity matters. we asked people while researching race in britain what did they think of meghan markle being the first mixed race person to join the royal family? the majority view, six out of ten, are like it doesn't matter, we're not noticing, and 20% of people saying it's an actively good thing. 10% of people saying i'm against it, i don't like it, shows you there's some resistance there. the interesting thing was among ethnic minority respondents, people were twice as likely to say it's a good thing. it's good for everyone not to notice, but actually i'm going to notice. so it does matter, so it's a mixture of not batting an eyelid and putting out the bunting. i think that, you know, meghan is a positive role model, and especially for me, as someone of mixed race, you know, i feel like i finally have someone to look up to. i feel like, you know, it's a big step, but as well it's a super—encouraging step, like maybe her being in the royal
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family will change something. we don't really know, but itjust gives me a lot of hope. when you start saying she's my role model, when i started... she is. i understand that, but she hasn't chosen that, that can be a burden in itself. no, i've seen her speeches i've seen her talk... so if she says is i don't want to be anyone's role model we have to respect that. the whole role model things sometimes troubles me because the expectation, the expectation is she will be the big one who can change. she can't make that... i think she knows what she's letting herself in for, so for me, i'm paying attention to meghan markle more than, and i think even though i'm not a royalist, she does kind of legitimise the royal family and modernise them a little bit, and it's a bit problematic if you're an abolitionist, because you don't want to see that happen, but just by the fact she's marrying into the royal family, her proximity to the royal family and the change that she could be making, is making young people sit up and say, ok, that could be something that is positive. could she make you not be
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an abolitionist, georgina? could she make you change that much? there is potential there because if she does the right kind of charitable work i will be supporting her and i will be thinking there is potential nor the royal family. on the wedding day itself there will be that formal family portrait that everybody has, and it will have prince charles, harry, meghan, and megan's mum will be there. when i've been talking to black women and women of mixed heritage, the person they are really interested in is meghan‘s mother. they cannot wait to see this black woman in this portrait with her dreads on the show. it might not be a big thing you, but lots of people it is a big thing. you talk about symbols, that isa thing. you talk about symbols, that is a big symbol. i think success for meghan and harry is to be happily married amongst all the expectations oi'i married amongst all the expectations on them to change our society. naomi anderson is one of the world's
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most successful models and has worked for victoria secrets and work with the likes of canny a west and rihanna. she has watched the rise of meghan with interest, curiosity and frustration. the one word used so much when it came to meghan was the word exotic and ifeel that much when it came to meghan was the word exotic and i feel that is slightly misogynistic and also slightly misogynistic and also slightly racist and i thought it was very sexist. the reason why is because i feel like they are using the term exotic to take away from her blackness and they try to make a more palatable to a wide audience who are coming with a lot of criticism towards her. number two, i think exotic as a sexual connotation. when you call a woman exotic you have a certain image in your mind, and that is not her race, she is not exotic, it is not a race.
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i don't think we should feel grateful that the royal family is finally accepting someone who is diverse or different from their own. i don't think we should feel grateful as black women. people say to me, it's amazing you are a black model who gets to do these covers and work for these amazing designers and work for these amazing designers and do amazing shows, but as a black woman, ifeel like and do amazing shows, but as a black woman, i feel like i and do amazing shows, but as a black woman, ifeel like i shouldn't and do amazing shows, but as a black woman, i feel like i shouldn't feel grateful for getting these things. these are things i've worked extremely hard for and it's the same for her. she can't help she has fallen in love with a prince. can't we all? but honestly speaking, i think we should make her feel she we all? but honestly speaking, i think we should make herfeel she is the representative of all black women and has to do an outstanding job and not get anything wrong. i don't think that is fair. meghan will perhaps draw in a new audience for the royalfamily, will perhaps draw in a new audience for the royal family, younger, will perhaps draw in a new audience for the royalfamily, younger, more diverse, a bit cooler but she still has to navigate the world of the aristocracy. which, in places, now
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looks very different. one more time, polio breath in. i am julia montague. —— pull your breath in. let your heels press into the mat. i was born in illinois and like meghan, i married into the british aristocracy. as an american and fitting into that british aristocracy, there are pros and coi'is. aristocracy, there are pros and cons. for me, luckily, i married into a cons. for me, luckily, i married intoa family cons. for me, luckily, i married into a family that totally accepted me. on the flip side, when i have had to go two occasions where there are other people in the aristocracy, i think the american accident, you either love it or hate it, and there are some people in the british aristocracy, the second they hear the american actions, they don't like it at all. so my advice for meghan is to keep our american accident and remember, rememberyour american roots. at the end of the day, you will have some people who
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don't like that, but overall the country will totally abrasive because i feel having this optimism —— will totally embrace you. i feel having this optimism and go getting attitude is what you guys kind of like about us. meghan markle will have do find her own way in her new world. the etiquette bible, they are experts in the dos and don'ts of dealing with the british aristocracy. we have been around for 250 yea rs aristocracy. we have been around for 250 years chronicling members of the aristocracy and royal family throughout that time. these are some of the questions we have been asked already. essentially, she will be a princess, because she will be marriage to prince henry of wales, but it's likely he will receive an additional title or title —— titles on the day itself that become his standard address. file she would be
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a princess by nature of being married to a prince. but if prince harry is made duke of somewhere, she will likely be styled the duchess of this place. generally, official, formal occasions, members of the public are expected to come in the case of women, to curtsy, two members of the royal family, case of women, to curtsy, two members of the royalfamily, and case of women, to curtsy, two members of the royal family, and for men to bow. when it comes to royal family members curtsying to each other it is more compensated and there is an order of precedence in place. on saturday, meghan markle will officially take on her new royal role. she walks a well trodden path of royal brides finding their place ina very of royal brides finding their place in a very british institution. ever since diana died, the mass media has been looking for a golden goose to
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lay a golden egg, and they think they have found one. there has been a lot of interest. diana made some historic changes, both with the royalfamily historic changes, both with the royal family and with modern britain. when she shook the hand of an aids victim, it was a real game changer around the world. megan has a great opportunity to be that change and time will tell whether she can harness their enthusiasm, his eloquence, into generating change and enthusiasm for the change. i guess we'll wait a couple of months and can hit the ground running. but until then i am pretty excited. it is not so much how she will get on with the royal family, it is how they will adapt to her. thank you for your messages. simon
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says on twitter, i wish harry all the best but fear that megan will a lwa ys the best but fear that megan will always be an act, because she has landed the biggest leading lady role. the press make a lot about her being mixed—race, they forget that prince phillip is greek and the queen has german ancestry. a text message, i have nothing against the royals but do we need to hype this wedding up? there are poor people suffering in the country, there are young babies with cancer. it is not the fault of the royals, i wish them well but let them get on with their life. if you want to get in touch, send a message on twitter. you can use our hashtag. you can send an e—mail, and we are particularly interested if you are getting set to go down to windsor, if you want to get as close as you can to the couple, let me know why. send me an e—mail. now the latest news. north korea has threatened to cancel next month's summit between kim jong—un and president trump,
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if washington continues to push it to give up its nuclear weapons. earlier, pyongyang abruptly cancelled talks that were due to take place today with south korea, blaming planned joint military exercises by seoul and washington. the state news agency called the exercises a rehearsal for an invasion. the board of the failed construction giant, carillion have been accused of presiding over a "rotten corporate culture" that was culpable for its collapse, that's the conclusion of two committees of mps. the work and pensions and business select committees say executives were too busy "stuffing their mouths with gold" to show concern for the welfare of their workers. members of carillion‘s board have rejected the findings. the organisation that regulates midwives has been criticised for its handling of a number of deaths at a maternity unit in cumbria, the professional standards authority has found. the nursing and midwifery council took too long to act on concerns about midwives and didn't listen to bereaved families. 11 babies and one mother died at furness general hospital between 2004 and 2013.
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one of two british amateur rugby player who died in sri lanka last week had traces of an unidentified narcotic substance, according to a postmortem examination. 25—year—old thomas howard, and thomas baty who was 26, had been touring the country with durham—based clems pirates when they visited a club in colombo on saturday night. mr howard died after being admitted to hospital on sunday. mr baty‘s death was confirmed yesterday. bbc news has learned that more than 1600 it specialists and engineers, offered jobs in the uk, were denied visas between last december and march. they were refused visas because the number applying exceeded the monthly limit on those allowed to enter the country. a new study has found that a disrupted body clock puts people at increased risk of mood disorders. people who are active at night are up to 10% more likely to be diagnosed with diseases such
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as depression and bipolar disorder. two new pages from anne frank's diary have been published, containing a handful of dirtyjokes and her thoughts on sex. thejewish teenager wrote her diary whilst in hiding from the nazis and was published after her death. the hidden pages had been covered with gummed brown paper — to hide her risque writing from herfamily. new imaging techniques have finally allowed researchers to read them. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. we are going to talk about carillion later, the company that ran so many contracts under half of the government, cleaning prisons, school dinners, hs2, so forth. it collapsed injanuary, and we are going to talk to one man who is about to lose his job because of the collapse of the
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company, as well as one of the mps that has really criticised pretty much every level in terms of the company, the board, the directors, the auditors, the regulators. it really is a scathing assessment of the failures. at this treat —— this tweet says the telling of marco of mps is eight joke, tweet says the telling of marco of mps is eightjoke, we need to see every boa rd mps is eightjoke, we need to see every board member injane doe, including taking off their assets like cars, bonds and shares, because greed and stupid management should not be paid. if you have lost your job or contract, do let me know, because we're going to talk about it after ten o'clock. england manager gareth southgate names his final 23—man squad for this summer's world cup in russia, later on. manchester city goalkeepr joe hart misses out after a season on loan at west ham in which he couldn't hold down a starting position. he had been england's number1
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at the last 3 major tournaments. despite a career plagued by injuries jack wilshere had made the last two tournaments... but won't be on the plane to russia.. the arsenal midfielder made 38 appearances this season. chelsea ladies have won the double — adding the wsl title to their fa cup win — with a 2—0 win over bristol city last night. their heavily pregnant manager emma hayes had to watch from home though. and britain's simon yates has stayed in the leader's pink jersey at the giro d'italia going into today's 11th stage. he now has a a1—second lead over the reigning champion tom dumoulin. that's all the sport for now. in an interview on last night's cbs evening news, the israeli prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, defended the actions of the israeli security forces who killed almost 60 palestinians on the border between gaza and israel on monday. looking back on yesterday, especially gaza, anything you would have done differently? well, i wish it wouldn't have happened at all. i mean, hamas is pushing people with a view of a massive infiltration into israel,
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openly declaring their goal is to destroy israel. they're paying these people, so it's not the peaceful demonstration that you think about. you say they're paying them to...? yes. ..to try to cross the border? hamas is paying these people who are coming there. they're pushing civilians, women, children, into the line of fire, with a view of getting casualties. we've tried to minimise casualties, they're trying to incur casualties in order to put pressure on israel, which is horrible. you say they wanted kids to die. yes. putting kids in the line of fire. yes. did your army go too far? i don't know of any army that would do anything differently if you had to protect your border against people who say, "we're going to destroy you and we're going to flood into your country." you try other means, you try all sorts of means, you try non—lethal means and they don't work, so you're left with bad choices.
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it's a bad deal, you know, you try and you go for below the knee and sometimes it doesn't work, and unfortunately these things are avoidable. if hamas had not pushed them there, then nothing would happen. do you see peace in your lifetime? i see it already now. we have peace with egypt, we have peace withjordan. peace with the palestinians? yes, i think it's possible. not with those palestinians, like hamas, who call for our destruction, but i see peace with any, any one of our neighbours who's willing to live in peace, i think, yes. i think it's possible. earlier, a minute's silence was held at a meeting of the united nations security council in memory of the dead. but there were sharp disagreements — the palestinian envoy condemned what he called the odious massacre by israel. the israeli envoy said the events on the border were notjust protests but violent riots. let's talk now to mohammed ammar
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who's oxfam's saving lives director in gaza. and in tel aviv in israel, we can talk to sari bashi thank you for talking to us. i would like you, if you could, to give some insight to the british audience about gaza and what it is like to live there. it is about 25 miles long and about six miles wide, up to 2 million people are cramped in there, trying to live there. yes, thank you very much. good morning. in gaza, specifically with the blockade, the latest protests and the response from the israeli side over the last few weeks and fridays, gaza contains more than 2 million individuals. as you know, the poverty rate is one of the highest in the world. more than a0%, and the
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unemployment rate is more than 45%. more than 60% between females as well. in gaza, specifically after the last conflict in 2014, we still have more than 23,000 internally displaced people, waiting for the reconstruction of their building. a lot of facts and figures related to food insecurity, which is more than 40% of the people are food insecure. we are worried about the cut in funding specifically after the us decision on funding. this is the situation in gaza. life is very, very ha rd situation in gaza. life is very, very hard for a lot of people there.
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what is the feeling and the mood after the killing of almost 62 palestinians on monday? yes, let me start with the feelings of people here in gaza, people are very sad and at the same time they are very angry. life has almost returned back to normal today, however we expect more protests in the coming few days. the organisers of the great martyr of return announced there are more protests in gaza at the border area. on the 5th ofjune there are more protests there. sorry to interrupt, why do the protests need to be at the border? as you know, israeli officials say on monday, at the border, people were trying to break down the border fence and were throwing explosives, molotov as rocks. really, we were not there,
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but our understanding, this is the message that the people and the organisers of the great march of return tried to communicate to the international community, being there at the border area with a flag, rather than being inside buildings. i wonder if you could share some stories of individual experience over the last few days? personally, with social media, local media in gaza, a lot of shock stories. for example, you can imagine these guys working without salaries for at least two months, or partly paid by the government authorities in gaza, he was working in one of the gaza
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hospitals and he was shocked when he saw his brother as one of the killed people yesterday. they were all shocked by the killing of this child in gaza, aged eight months. and eight—month—old child killed, you are saying? and a doctor working on one of the hospitals, his dead brother was brought in? yes, his brother was brought in? yes, his brother was brought in? yes, his brother was killed and he faced him in the hospital, while he was working. he continued his work in the hospital. thank you for your time, thank you very much. we were hoping to talk to a professor in tel aviv, but we could not establish the technical side of things. hopefully we will do that in the next hour of the programme. dozens of people walked out of a violent film, shown at the cannes film festival at the this week. the house that jack built tells the story of a serial killer, played by matt dillon, whose victims are primarily women and children.
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this is what people tweeted about it as they walked out. there they are. let's have a look. "never seen anything like this at a film festival." there were more as well. one more for now. and this is what people leaving the screening had to say. i was shocked.
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why? because the violence. i'm not very keen on violence. horrible movie. horrible. why? useless. i'm a bit overwhelmed right now. it was very, very multi—layered, interesting, and i thought that in this film he reads philosophical questions at a very high level. it's very good. it's very graphic, it's very violent, but it's good. well, i mean, i'm a massive lars von trierfan, and this is a wild movie. here's the film's official teaser trailer. the scene that prompted the walkout shows dillon's character shooting two young children with a shotgun. after this, people continued to leave the theatre, and reports suggest it was half empty by the end. critics are now questioning why cannes decided to screen such an graphic film. shouldn't film sometimes
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push boundaries though? we can speak now to jessica kiang who was at the screening on monday night. ellen wright is a senior lecturer in cinema and television history at de montfort university leicester. she has done extensive research on the treatment of women in film. and chris nials is the founder of the london horror society, which has more than 100 independent horrorfilm makers as members. jessica, how was it for you?” jessica, how was it for you? i think the reason i am here is that i wrote a scathing review of lars von trier‘s the house that jack built and it was a film i absolutely loathed and i think one of the issues that we are bringing up here issues that we are bringing up here is about the violence against women, but i think i should also say that i loathed the film from the bottom of my soul, not just loathed the film from the bottom of my soul, notjust because i am a woman andi my soul, notjust because i am a woman and i didn't like seeing those a cts woman and i didn't like seeing those acts of violence, but because i'm a
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film critic and it's a very bad film. did you walk out? i did not walk out. i'm a critic so i can't. you stayed till the end. as you saw people getting up to leave, did it shock you or not? it's unusual because i was at the gala premiere and it's unusual for people in that situation to walk out. in fact, at the very beginning of the film lars von trier had been given a very long and warm standing ovation. so the fa ct and warm standing ovation. so the fact that people who were invited guests, as one of them said, in their tuxedos and formal gear actually left during the gala premiere, that's an unusual occurrence. i should say that reports of the theatre being half empty at the end are wildly exaggerated. i just empty at the end are wildly exaggerated. ijust want empty at the end are wildly exaggerated. i just want to be clear, is it about the violence that you object to the film, or is it
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just rubbish film? it's a film, and asa just rubbish film? it's a film, and as a result its use of violence is com pletely as a result its use of violence is completely gratuitous. understood. ellen, high, and i could see you're reacting to whatjessica was saying and smiling at some of the things she was saying. what is the specific problem with the levels of violence in this film? i have to start by saying i haven't seen the film, obviously, so i'm at a disadvantage there. but this is typical lars von trier territory. he's always provocative and his films always are. so this doesn't surprise me in the slightest at all. does it offend you? you might not be surprised, but are you offended? i would reserve the right until i've seen it. just because a film is of ireland does not mean it doesn't have an interesting message —— a film is of ireland. that is —— a film is
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violent. if you think differently around a topic that can be a useful tool. violence does happen in society and it does happen towards women and children. jessica, was there a message or a point being made? i'm historically been a lars von trierfan, made? i'm historically been a lars von trier fan, one made? i'm historically been a lars von trierfan, one of his made? i'm historically been a lars von trier fan, one of his defenders and apologists sometimes because you find yourself in that position with such a provocative individual. so partly my loathing for this film came from an intense sense of disappointment because, as alan said, in the past, he has used provocation —— ellen said, in the past, he has used provocation for knotty debates and he has a finely honed intelligence which he seems to have abandoned in this film. let me bring in chris. in terms of the
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backlash of the screening of the film, what did you make of this? to echo what the ladyjust said, lars voi'i echo what the ladyjust said, lars von trier, his films, historically, have been designed to cause big emotion. his back catalogue is very hard—hitting and in terms of the reaction, it is an odd choice to play at a film festival that is multi—genre when it is a provocative film. i was not lucky enough to be withjessica and film. i was not lucky enough to be with jessica and see film. i was not lucky enough to be withjessica and see it in cannes. but if you can't show a provocative film that cannes, where can you shoveit? film that cannes, where can you shove it? you can show it genre specific festivals their point —— where can you show it. the people to get up and walk out of that says a lot for the festival and people's general reaction to the piece. it comes down to choice. whether violence of this excessive
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limit should be allowed in films is an argument that has raged for many an argument that has raged for many a yearandl an argument that has raged for many a year and i think the difference we have now is that with the rise of social media and the fact people can tweet or instagram instantly from these festivals it encourages debate which i think is a positive thing. it democrat eyes as it think —— it makes it more democratic, i think. is it just makes it more democratic, i think. is itjust a poorfilm, and that should be the end of it? obviously la rs should be the end of it? obviously lars von trier wants us to be debating it. with every single one of his films he wants to provoke. he has done it very successfully and intelligently in the past, however, i think, for me, and what i was writing in my review is that the best reform —— response is tojust not see it because it is not something that contribute anything to the debate we are talking about
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and all it is is an unpleasant two and all it is is an unpleasant two and all it is is an unpleasant two and a half hours in order to get to that level of being provoked enough to be disgusted. it doesn't actually have any central thesis to it. it does seem to be one of the most epic trolls on the part of lars von trier i have ever been privy to.|j trolls on the part of lars von trier i have ever been privy to. i can see ellen smiling. has it peaked or interest? will you see it? i'm not sure. i will have a bit more of a think about it. what about you, chris? yes, i will. think about it. what about you, chris? yes, iwill. i like think about it. what about you, chris? yes, i will. i like to be tested. when something is so divisive i have to see it for myself. make your own judgment. absolutely. it is a film of its time. it's doing potentially interesting stuff at a moment where we have this idea of violence against women and the broader context in terms of respect for women in the media and in broader
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society, so there might be some interesting stuff coming in there. all right. thank you for coming on the programme. i appreciate it. jessica was at the screening on monday night. next this morning, england fans heading to the world cup in russia are being warned by police not to display the flag of st george. that's because it risks being seen as "imperialistic" and "antagonistic". deputy chief constable mark roberts, who is working on preparations for the games, says the flags are the trophies of choice for hooligans from rival countries. the warning comes after more than 100 england fans were injured at the euro 2016 games. we've often said that we would not expect people to come here, get drunk and put their flag on the cenotaph, but you have to be aware that russia had significant losses
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during the warand that russia had significant losses during the war and there is a patriotic sense of that, so people need to be aware of that. putting a flag where you know it is an issue, that could cause great offence, and that could cause great offence, and thatis that could cause great offence, and that is something we can do without because it increases the threat to the individuals. we can speak now to professor clifford stott. he's an expert in football crowd management and policing. what do you make of this warning? well, i suppose there are some positives to it in terms of focusing on helping england fans to understand what the potential cultural sensitivities would be in russia, but at the end of the day, i don't think we should lose sight of the fact that we were russian allies in world war ii so i don't think it's necessarily going to be a problem displaying our flags. it's necessarily going to be a problem displaying ourflags. to some extent, it's a bit unrealistic to assume england fans will not export —— be showing their flags in the tournament, so it might be about where they could hang the flags and
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where they could hang the flags and where they could hang the flags and where they can't. that was not really the message from the police, and fairenough, really the message from the police, and fair enough, they are wanting to be cautious for the potential of trouble the russian altars and a minority of england supporters —— russian ultras. what do you think might happen there? we need to be careful about that and it's to be welcomed that the focus is on the vulnerability of england fans travelling to russia, where as in the past the message has been about the past the message has been about the threat england fans pose travelling abroad. let's recognise that as a positive development. but again, the issue here is about facilitation and what we need to ensure is that the policing around the tournament follows from the lessons learned in the past and that's not necessarilyjust about controlling negative behaviour, but focusing on the facilitation of positive behaviour among the fans when they travel abroad. give them
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places to go and hang their flags. give them places to celebrate their identity and england fans will gravitate towards those spaces and enjoy the tournament in a way that does not leave them exposed to vulnerabilities from any hostile groups that may or may not be in the vicinity. how many fans do you expect to travel? i think it's going to be difficult for fans to travel. the border controls will be quite strict and i understand there is a fan id system that will act as a visa, so you have do have a ticket and id to get even into the country, so and id to get even into the country, so the strict border controls should guarantee all of the england fans going there are going there with the intention of celebrating football. i'm sure we will see many thousands of england fans travel, but if the pastis of england fans travel, but if the past is anything to go by, there will be a certain amount but go through the group stages but if england go beyond that and qualify there will be an increasing amount
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of fa ns there will be an increasing amount of fans that want to go to those later games in the tournament, so it's difficult to call. certainly six or 7000 would not be an unrealistic number from my point of view. thank you for coming on the programme. thanks for your messages about the royal wedding. jan says she will be on the grounds of windsor castle and cannot wait to see the amazing gathering of wedding guests in the sun showcasing all thatis guests in the sun showcasing all that is brilliant about our country. we might talk to you in the next hour. this tweet says, i think it's great, as it brings the royalfamily into 2018. there will be some push back, but the most important thing is the royal family who set the standard and trends. steve quotes a tweet from an earlier reviewer. let the royals get on with their lives, sure, and let them put the bill. meghan has just landed the
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sure, and let them put the bill. meghan hasjust landed the biggest acting job anyone could land. still to come, police accuse karelian of board members shoving their mouth with gold instead of looking after their workers. —— carillion. also. . .. their workers. —— carillion. also.... the their workers. —— carillion. also. . .. the news their workers. —— carillion. also.... the news and sport at ten. before that, the weather. we have had some fine weather over the last few days and with the sunshine across england and wales yesterday it was pretty warm with temperatures up to 24, but today it is all change. we have had this weather front moving south through the night and behind it, look at the blue colours coming in across the uk. a fresher feel for many of us going into the afternoon. on the weather front we have cloud, and we have had rain affecting northern and western parts, but you will notice for scotland and northern ireland it has been a sparkling start to the david lots of sunshine and that will continue into the afternoon. for england and wales there be a few bright spells in the afternoon,
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especially down to the south—east. elsewhere, some spots of rain across south wales and south—west england and a fresher feel with maximum temperature is 14 up to 16 degrees. further north, 13 or 15 celsius, maybe 17 in the central belt. overnight the cloud will move away from the south and we have clear spells so it will turn quite chilly into thursday morning with temperatures down to low single figures but we start thursday with some sunshine. another fine, figures but we start thursday with some sunshine. anotherfine, dry figures but we start thursday with some sunshine. another fine, dry day for many of us and there will be some cloud moving across northern and eastern parts of england, scotla nd and eastern parts of england, scotland and northern ireland. sunny spells elsewhere and the temperature is roughly in the mead to high teens. this is friday's forecast, dry weather and sunshine again. there will be a weather front glancing the north west of scotland which could bring outbreaks of rain,
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and the sunshine will continue and temperatures getting up into the high teens, maybe 19 in the south—east or a bit warmer. there is the weather front i spoke about in the weather front i spoke about in the far north—west. that will be with us through the weekend, so for saturday, high pressure firmly in charge, lots of sunshine and a lovely start to the date, so that the royal wedding and street parties you might be having, a dry and bright day with temperatures in windsor getting up to 21 degrees in the afternoon. and across the board we have the sunshine, so whatever you are doing on saturday it looks fine, dry and always a bit more cloud towards the north—west and it will be warmer with those temperatures getting up to the low 20s across most parts of the uk, so after the next couple of days being rather cool, it gets warmer as we go to the weekend. hello it's wednesday, it's 10 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. north korea threatens to cancel the much anticipated meeting between donald trump and kim jong—un
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over demands to give up its nuclear weapons. the us is confident it'll go ahead. we are operating under the idea and the notions that the president's meeting is going forward with chairman ken next month. —— chairman kim. mps have published a scathing report on the collapse of the construction and services giant, carillion, accusing the board of "stuffing their mouths with gold" instead of looking after their workers. the midwives watchdog blasted over its investigation into the deaths of 11 babies and one mother at the maternity unit of a hospital in cumbria. when my wife and son died, i needed to find out the truth and the nmc at no stage offered any help, never contacted me. there was certainly no empathy or compassion, they were just a disgrace, they were almost not human. news just
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newsjust in news just in about the royal wedding. prince harry and meghan markle have invited prince william's children, george and charlotte, to be among the page boys and the bridesmaids at the wedding. george and charlotte, prince william and catherine's children will be among the page boys and bridesmaids at the wedding, iam the page boys and bridesmaids at the wedding, i am sure you will be delighted to know. i know you were on the edge of your seat, waiting for that new(!) i can confirm that they will be among the page boys and bridesmaids. here's annita mcveigh in the bbc newsroom with a summary of todays news. north korea has threatened to cancel next month's summit between kim jong—un and president trump — if washington continues to push it to give up its nuclear weapons. earlier, pyongyang abruptly cancelled talks that were due to take place today with south korea, blaming planned joint military exercises by seoul and washington. the state news agency
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called the exercises a rehearsal for an invasion. the board of the failed construction giant carillion have been accused of presiding over a "rotten corporate culture" that was culpable for its collapse, that's the conclusion of two committees of mps. the work and pensions and business select committees say executives were too busy "stuffing their mouths with gold" to show concern for the welfare of their workers. members of carillion‘s board have rejected the findings. the organisation that regulates midwives has been criticised for its handling of a number of deaths at a maternity unit in cumbria, the professional standards authority has found. the nursing and midwifery council took too long to act on concerns about midwives and didn't listen to bereaved families. 11 babies and one mother died at furness general hospital between 2004 and 2013. news one of two british amateur rugby players who died in sri lanka last week had traces of an unidentified narcotic substance, according to a postmortem examination.
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25—year old thomas howard, and thomas baty, who was 26, had been touring with durham—based clems pirates when they visited a club on saturday night. the as yet unidentified drug was detected during mr howard's postmortem examination. he died in hospital on sunday. mr baty‘s death was confirmed yesterday. news bbc news has learned that more than 1600 it specialists and engineers offered jobs in the uk were denied visas between last december and march. they were refused visas because the number applying exceeded the monthly limit on those allowed to enter the country. the government says a white paper setting out its brexit position will be its "most significant publication on the eu" since the 2016 referendum. it's expected to include a plan on a customs relationship that avoids a hard irish border as well as details on aviation, fisheries, and agriculture. labour said it was disturbing that ministers can't agree on fundamental issues. guernsey's parliament
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will debate whether to move towards legalising assisted dying later today. if deputies support the change, a working party would be set up to consider the details. supporters insist any change to the law would apply only to local residents — and wouldn't turn the island, a crown dependency, into a destination for euthanasia. a new study has found that a disrupted body clock puts people at increased risk of mood disorders. people who are active at night are up to 10% more likely to be diagnosed with diseases such as depression and bipolar disorder. two new pages from anne frank's diary have been published, containing a handful of dirtyjokes and her thoughts on sex. thejewish teenager wrote her diary whilst in hiding from the nazis and was published after her death. the hidden pages had been covered with gummed brown paper — to hide her risque writing from herfamily. new imaging techniques have finally allowed researchers to read them. a rare blue diamond which has spent the last 300 years
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in some of europe's royal houses has been sold at an auction in geneva for £5 million. the auction house, sotheby‘s, says the farnese blue once formed part of a tiara owned by marie antoinette. the 6.1 carat diamond sold afterjust four minutes of bidding. the identity of the new owner has not been revealed. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30. now the latest sport. everton have announced they have parted company with sam alla rdyce. announced they have parted company with sam allardyce. in a statement this morning they say he was brought in at this morning they say he was brought inata this morning they say he was brought in at a challenging time last season to provide some stability, and they say they are grateful to him for doing that, but we have made the decision as part of a longer—term plan we will be appointing a new manager this summer and we will commence this process immediately. the former england boss
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was only in charge at goodison park for 7 months. he took over with the club 13th, after a poor start to the premier league season and led them to an 8th placed finish.. however he drew criticism from some fans over the team's style of play. it's likely he'll be replaced by mardco silva, the former watford boss who everton initially approached last october, after dismissing ronald koeman. watford closed the door on the move, which led to allardyce's appointment. it's an important day for 23 players selected to go the world cup in russia this summer. gareth southgate has been making the all important calls over the last 24 hours and we have some picture of who hasn't made it. joe hart has been england's number one goalkeeper at their last 3 tournaments but the exit to iceland at euro 2016 was the beginning of a decline which has seen him miss out. arsenal midfielderjack wilshere will also miss out.
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he's been plagued by injuries over his career but did manage 38 appearances this season. former england midfielder frank lampard thinks a quarter—final place is possible. if you are looking at the squad and what we have got, you could say, yes, we are happy to get that far, yes, we are happy to get that far, yes, we are the boys, but can we win it with a squad that is still developing for the next future tournaments? yes, to a degree. i agree that expectations should not be sky high and i don't think they are, which is great for the team. give them freedom to go and play and see how well they can do. and frank will be happy this morning. chelsea ladies have clinched the wsl title and a domestic double after victory at bristol city last night. drew spence put chelsea in front before a late goal from jonna anderson wrapped up both the win and the title. chelsea remain unbeaten in the league, and add this to the fa cup they won earlier this month. assistant paul green took charge, with manager emma hayes advised not to travel at this late stage
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of her pregnancy british rider simon yates's good progress at the giro d'italia has continued as he extended his overall lead going into today's 11th stage. yates finished safely in the peloton as he bids to become the first british winner of the giro — he now has a 41—second lead over the reigning champion tom dumoulin. team sky's chris froome is two and half minutes down on the lead. that's all the sport for now. why did the outsourcing and construction giant carillion collapse at the start of this year putting 19,500 jobs at risk? according to a searing report from mps today it was because of a "rotten corporate culture" and the board was culpable for its "costly collapse". carillion worked on everything from the hs2 rail line to providing school dinners and cleaning services in prisons. it went bust owing £7 billion
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and is described by powerful parliamentary committees today as a giant and unsustainable time bomb. it's failure, one of the biggest in recent british history, exposed systemic flaws in corporate britain and its "toothless and feeble" regulators. the group of mps also demanded that the big four accountancy firms be referred to competition authorities for potential break—up — the four are described as a "cosy club incapable of providing the degree of independent challenge needed". let's speak to labour mp rachel reeves — who chairs the business, energy and industrial strategy committee and also david vaughan. he worked for carillion as a rehabilition manager — working in prisons to get veterans' lives back on track — he had previously been jailed for fraud. thank you for coming on the
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programme. david, when he left prison, you applied for over 40 jobs, something like that? just over 40 jobs that i applied for. i attended numerous interviews. u nfortu nately, attended numerous interviews. unfortunately, i never got any feedback from the interviews, i never had any returned correspondence to see why i had not been shortlisted, to give any feedback of what i could improve on. this went on for about 13 months. i took to social media, started on twitter, to tell my story about my hardships and the mistakes that i have made, but also how i have managed it in my life around. i then went on to linkedin to do the same. one of the directors at carillion saw my post and offered me to come down for a job interview. the first job interview went very well. i then went back to the second job
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interview, to the follow—up, and thatis interview, to the follow—up, and that is when they offered me a job asa that is when they offered me a job as a prison rehabilitation manager. carillion, the policy was not to have the box at the bottom of the application form that says if you have a criminal record or unspent convictions. they treated everybody fairly. and equally? and it was that job that really helped transform things for you? definitely. it com pletely things for you? definitely. it completely changed my life. at the time, iwas completely changed my life. at the time, i was still living with my mother. my wife and my daughter at the time were living in a separate house. for carillion to give me that stepping stone to develop myself into a career, it was absolutely life changing. when the news came about, in january, the life changing. when the news came about, injanuary, the hardest conversation i have had was to tell my wife that i could potentially lose myjob. i've been quite lucky to keep it up until now. but you have been given your notice?”
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to keep it up until now. but you have been given your notice? i have got another couple of weeks left of work. one of the carillion initiatives that we have lamented was the pre—apprenticeship programme that we had. because that was part of thejob that we had. because that was part of the job that is going to cease... how do you feel about that? it is hard? i never thought i would be in this position again. having to look for a job this position again. having to look forajob again? this position again. having to look for a job again? i applied forjobs in the last month or so. as an individual, i am just not getting any feedback. it is hard for me, because i don't know what i've been doing wrong. i've been quite lucky, i have made some friends within carillion that are helping me to find employment. hopefully i will be able to start working again. at the moment, i haven't got anything. it is concerning times for me and my family. let me bring in rachel reeves. this is the sort of human
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cost of what has happened with carillion, what do you make of david's story? it is a very sad story and i am sad for everything you're going through. we have people sitting and watching the former directors giving evidence. i think it was always at the front of our minds when were taking evidence from the directors or the auditors that this was about real people's lives, people that work there like david, the small businesses, subcontractors, many have gone out of business because they had unpaid bills, and people saving for their pensions at carillion that are now not going to get what they thought they were. what went wrong at carillion? everything, victorian. —— victoria. they made so many wrong decisions. it comes down to greed and putting themselves first. they we re and putting themselves first. they were responsible, really, 443,000 members of staff, subcontractors, pensions, communities in which they worked, and also for the public
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services they were running. but that doesn't seem to have been at the front of mind. it's interesting, because in 2016 it's interesting, because in 2016 it it's interesting, because in 2016 it had healthy accounts and signed off dividends of £28 million in 2016. yes, until the 11th hour, and beyond the 11th hour, this company claimed it was a successful company and doing well and paying out dividends. big bonuses and the pay of the directors was going up year on year and when they gave evidence to us it was like they had not realised what had happened and what they had presided over. they have walked away with their bonuses intact, with their pensions intact and their big paycheques and actually it's the people who work there and the small businesses who, through no fault of theirown, businesses who, through no fault of their own, have businesses who, through no fault of theirown, have in businesses who, through no fault of their own, have in some cases lost everything and they weren't responsible, but they are the ones paying the price and that is what is so paying the price and that is what is so horrendous about this case. even now the directors are saying about
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this report that they do not recognise it or agree with it. there is very little contrition.|j recognise it or agree with it. there is very little contrition. i have statements, and i will read some of those towards the end, but should they look in their bank accounts and give some of those bonuses back? what should they do? when they came to give evidence they started by saying how sorry they were and then we asked if you would do anything to put it right and none of them are willing to give back any of their bonuses. they made it harder for bonuses. they made it harder for bonuses to be clawed back in the event of failure, and it should be possible to claw them back, but they rigged the rules at carillion to make it harder to do. richard adam, their former finance director, when he left the company, he cashed in all of his shares because he knew which way the company was going. he is one of those who rejects the conclusions. what should happen to these former directors? should they be barred from running companies in the future? we have asked the
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insolvency service to look at that and for the government to look at whether these are fit and proper people to run companies in the future. the last thing you want is these guys to turn up at another business and do the same again. there are lessons that can be learned from this, and it doesn't affect david on the small businesses this time round, but let's not allow it to happen again. one of the worries i have is that carillion could happen again at another company because nothing has changed since january to stop this happen again and we desperately need to learn the lessons. one thing you have also called for is that the four big accountancy firms in this country should be referred to the competition authority and potentially broken up. why? first of all, the directors are culpable and responsible for what happened at the business but there are lots of checks and balances or they should be, and one of those is the audit companies. if you call in an auditor to look at your accounts or how you run your business, you expect them
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to be asking challenging questions and to look beneath the numbers put in front of them by the company, and kpmg, the 19 years, it doesn't seem that they ever put across through a numberora that they ever put across through a number or a question next to anything. red warning lights should have been flashing all over the place in terms of carillion. but as re ce ntly place in terms of carillion. but as recently as march of last year, when the company went bankrupt with nothing left, they signed off the accounts. i do think this cosy cartel of the big four audit companies, we need to look again whether they should be broken up and whether they should be broken up and whether they should be broken up and whether the consultancy work they do should be split up, because they charge big fees but it seems to me they don't ask the questions that need to be asked, but if they had have done, maybe carillion might not have done, maybe carillion might not have ended up in this place. so that is the directors and the auditors. you also describe the regulators as feeble and toothless. why? we are not generous to anybody in this
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report, because they are another check and balance that failed, so the financial reporting council who are meant to regulate the auditors and finance directors, in 2015, they queried a couple of numbers in the carillion annual report but did not come back the next year to see if they were doing anything differently. the accounting techniques that carillion were using we re techniques that carillion were using were signed off by kpmg and were incredibly aggressive. they ove rwrote incredibly aggressive. they overwrote their own peer review contracts to say they were profitable even though the others said they were not. the investors and shareholders are now saying that the accounting techniques used should never be used in a company like carillion. financial reporting council is, like the auditors, should have been signalling problems there. workers like david and small businesses who were doing work for them and pensioners saving for retirement had no idea there was a problem because none of those who should have been signalling there
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we re should have been signalling there were problems have put up their hands. as a labour politician are you against the business model of outsourcing generally or not? it did start under tony blair and the last labour government? we have to look again at the way we carve up public services and give them to the private sector. you have two hospitals, one in liverpool and the we st hospitals, one in liverpool and the west midlands that have been mothballed since january and no work has happened. taxpayers money, government money has gone to build those hospitals and they are not treating any patients. so do you as a labour politician take some responsibility that this kind of business model? i wasn't an mp until 2010, but i do think that all governments need to look in the mirrorand governments need to look in the mirror and say, did this model work? certainly in this case it did not. carillion are not necessarily the only company having these problems. other outsourcing companies also face financial difficulties with
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rights issues and profits warnings, so rights issues and profits warnings, so there is something wrong with this model of public services and i would like to see some of the services that carillion ran to be brought back in—house and run by local authorities, the nhs and public services. john mcdonnell, the labour shadow chancellor said that that would happen, that existing pfi contracts would be brought in if labour were to win the next general election. do you know how much that would cost? there are different ways you can do it. with carillion, these contracts now, there's a real opportunity to bring them in—house because carillion is no longer able to deliver them but the government don't have that philosophy and they are now parcelling them up and selling them on to other parts of the private sector and i think this isa the private sector and i think this is a perfect opportunity to try and do something different and put the public ethos and public service ethos back into the public services that corporations like carillion we re that corporations like carillion were running. what about the cost? i
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am not the shadow chancellor. that is not what we were looking at. if the company is failing to deliver, that's not providing valuable money for taxpayers. this is costing taxpayers a fortune in terms of winding up carillion. i don't think you can say that contracting out is providing value for money that some politicians claimed. the former chairman of carillion, philip green, not that one, the board sought to make decisions on the best available information and we always strive to act in the interest of the company and all stakeholders. the kpmg spokesman said it believed it had conducted its audits of carillion appropriately and sir tim young said it was disappointing that despite all it was disappointing that despite a ll efforts it was disappointing that despite all efforts the business was not rescued. deloitte said it was disappointing by the conclusions of that committee. the pwc defended its role as the official receiver and said the priority was to keep public services running across the country and saving jobs. doesn't it say it
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all? even now, when the company has collapsed, small businesses have gone under because of carillion and the actions of these big accountancy cos none of them will say sorry and none of them will hold up their hands. that is why we need reform. thank you very much. david, good luck and thanks for coming in. thank you. the first black person to become the head of a uk university says deep—seated prejudices and stereotypes are preventing ethnic minority staff from gaining senior positions in academia. baroness amos is speaking at the moment at a conference set up to shine a light on the issue. and there are also differences in how white and non—white students do at university. in a moment we'll talk about that with some students and professors. but first you might remember our reporter ashley john baptiste investigated the issue of racism on campus for us recently. here's a clip from his film. i was a victim of a racially aggravated assault. essentially 15 students beat me up because of my skin, the colour of my skin.
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and the next thing i know i was in an ambulance, being rushed to hospital, because i had received quite severe blows, muscular injuries, some ligament injuries as well to my head, my neck, my spine. let's talk to professor kalwant bhopal from the university of birmingham, who has studied the issues around race at universities. ayo kalil, the bme officer at university college london student's union. dr andrews, who set up the country's first black studies course at birmingham city university. and one of the students, sara bristol—abbott, who says that the way teachers reacted to her race earlier in life held her back. you might want to explain that, if you would. i would say definitely my
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earlier experiences in academia impacted my choices of attending university so late. give us some examples? in my primary school was quite a mixed area, so mainly white but there were a lot of mixes and my year group was but there were a lot of mixes and my year group was predominantly but there were a lot of mixes and my year group was predominantly black. there were a lot of issues with a troublesome year group as we had energy, there were threats of cancelling the prom and in the end we had to get a black male head of year just to have that we had to get a black male head of yearjust to have that person to sit down and understand us. it made a world of difference, it really did, had to be labelled as that troublesome individual because they don't understand where you are coming from. were you label that troublesome individual because of the colour of your skin? definitely. in school, for example, if you had a gripe with someone, to be able to have a discussion and work things
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out, it could never be left as that, it had to be the uproar of this and this and it was never really that intense, but everything had to be blown out of proportion. if a black child was having an issue, whether it be personal, in the friendship group, or with the teacher, it was blown up that much more. that is interesting. what do you think of that? you were nodding your head.“ you look at what happened in nottingham trent, student had to upload a video of white students outside her door intimidated her. we won't talk about that case because it is going through the legal process. it is, but that there are legal proceedings which we don't wa nt to legal proceedings which we don't want to prejudice. so we have examples, and we saw it in ashley's film. in terms of your experience, what would you say? in terms of my own campus, looking at ucl, it was
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in the news injanuary own campus, looking at ucl, it was in the news in january that they we re in the news in january that they were holding a conference on eugenics, and essentially it is the science around white supremacy and classes in, and it was eight white senior lecturer holding this, a doctoral professor, and there were no repercussions for this person. when i brought this up in an academic board meeting... sorry, was ita academic board meeting... sorry, was it a lecture? it was a series of conferences at ucl that happened over three years, hosting discussions on things like how do we solve the jewish question, refugees, the legitimisation of child rape.|j have to take your word for this.“ was all in the news. i was dealing with this on a day to day basis were a couple of months and i'm still dealing with it now. your point was
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that those should not have been happening? they should never have been happening. if it was a black person, a person of colour or a western muslim doing the same thing that this individual was doing we would have had counterterrorism police on our doorstep. because it was a white individual, when i was displaying these concerns too many academics at ucl, to the provost and the vice chancellor, i was told we had to protect freedom of speech. that is interesting. baroness amos is talking about a lack of senior academics from black and ethnic minority backgrounds. does that have a direct bearing on the student experience, as we just heard from sara? absolutely does. there's a huge amount of evidence to suggest that while there are positive advances in policy—making and an increase in the number of bme students attending university, the processes of exclusive and institutional racism continues to
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exist. black students have shown the most significant increase in the la st most significant increase in the last ten years, but if you are black you are less likely to leave university with a 2:1 or a first—class degree. why? because of institutional racism and structures of disadvantage which continue to perpetuate at universities. my new book talks about white privilege and examines the ways in which white dominance continues to exist in which universities recruit in their own image. my research has found that when i've spoken to students they say actually we don't want to become an academic because of the negative experiences and lack of representation. there are only eight black professors in the whole of the uk. and only 20 of those —— there are only 20 —— we need to understand the structural racism that continues to persist in our so—called liberal universities. can you give me an example of the
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kind of infrastructure that is stopping a black student from getting a 2:1, some people will think it isjust getting a 2:1, some people will think it is just down to how much revision you did? that is completely incorrect, there is a huge amount of evidence showing that black students continued to be disadvantaged. the independent published that black stu d e nts independent published that black students are 20 more times more likely to have their university applications investigated for negative implications. what interest —— infrastructure is preventing it? the way in which lecturers have stereotypical assumptions about particular students. stereotypical assumptions about particularstudents. indian stereotypical assumptions about particular students. indian and chinese students, there is lots of research to back this up, they are seen as very research to back this up, they are seen as very hard—working and very diligent in the way in which they approach their studies. muslim stu d e nts approach their studies. muslim students are seen as destructive. black students, as your guest has
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just seen, are seen to be very disruptive and don't want to work hard. the stereotypes are that they come from single families and there isa come from single families and there is a notion that we work in a meritocracy, if you work hard enough you will do well. that disregards the institutional racism that continues to persist in universities. would you agree with some or all of that question all of it. the curriculum itself alienate students. if you have a curriculum which is eurocentric, learning about the great white empires of europe, and you don't learn about black or asian scholars, it alienates students from the work, and i have that experience as a psychology undergraduate. that is why we started a black studies degree, giving students something that they can engage in. what difference do you think having that degree makes? we have students were the attitude
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is completely different, they are reading things they can relate to them, which they are enjoying. when you have to read book after book about white male authors, it does something to you, it puts you off the process of learning. why would you be surprised that students don't do as well when they are basically told they are stupid through their actual degree? we are saying, let's reverse that and make a curriculum which you can get involved in. thank you, good luck. thanks for coming on the programme. universities uk, which represent universities, says it's aiming to improve the representation, progression and success of minority ethnic staff and students in higher education. still to come: the midwifery watchdog has been criticised for its response
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to the deaths of 11 babies and a mother at furness general hospital in cumbria. we'll be speaking to the local mp in the next few minutes. and... with just three days to go until the royal wedding, we've learnt in the last half hour that prince george will be a page boy and princess charlotte will be a bridesmaid. but we still don't know if meghan's dad is coming. we'll have all the latest. time for the latest news — here's annita mcveigh. news north korea has threatened to cancel next month's summit between kim jong—un and president trump, if washington continues to push it to give up its nuclear weapons. earlier, pyongyang abruptly cancelled talks that were due to take place today with south korea, blaming planned joint military exercises by seoul and washington. the state news agency called the exercises a rehearsal for an invasion. the board of the failed construction giant carillion have been accused of presiding over a "rotten corporate culture" that was culpable for its collapse, that's the conclusion of two committees of mps. the work and pensions and business select committees say executives were too busy
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"stuffing their mouths with gold" to show concern for the welfare of their workers. members of carillion's board have rejected the findings. the organisation that regulates midwives has been criticised for its handling of a number of deaths at a maternity unit in cumbria, the professional standards authority has found. the nursing and midwifery council took too long to act on concerns about midwives and didn't listen to bereaved families. 11 babies and one mother died at furness general hospital between 2004 and 2013. bbc news has learned that more than 1600 it specialists and engineers offered jobs in the uk were denied visas between last december and march. they were refused visas because the number applying exceeded the monthly limit on those allowed to enter the country. princess charlotte will be among the bridesmaids at the wedding of prince harry and meghan markle, and her brother prince george will be a page boy, kensington palace has announced. the two are among ten children who will be members of the royal party.
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prince harry and miss markle get married on saturday at windsor castle. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. here's some sport now with hugh. former england manager sam allardyce has been sacked by premier league side everton. he only took over at the club in november after ronald koeman was sacked due to a poor start to the season. he took everton from 13th to an 8th placed finish and is likely to be replaced by former watford boss marco silva. manchester city goalkeeper joe hart will miss out when gareth southgate's england squad is announced later. he had spent the season on loan at west ham. arsenal midfielderjack wilshere also misses out. chelsea ladies have won the double — adding the wsl title to their fa cup win — with a 2—0 win over bristol city last night. their heavily pregnant manager emma hayes had
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to watch from home though. and britain's simon yates has stayed in the leader's pink jersey at the giro d'italia going into today's 11th stage. he now has a 41—second lead over the reigning champion tom dumoulin. that's all the sport for now. 11 babies and one mother died at a hospital in cumbria over a period of nine years, and a report published today says some of the deaths were avoidable. a review says the nursing and midwifery council took too long to act on concerns about midwives at furness general hospital in barrow. the report was sparked following the death ofjoshua titcombe from sepsis in 2008, he was just nine days old. liza brady's son alex was stillborn because of a shortage of oxygen in labour. an inquest found failings by the maternity services. carl hendrickson lost his wife nittaya and newborn son chester through a series of poor decisions by the hospital.
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i was devastated when my wife and son died. i needed help, i needed to find out the truth. the nmc, no stage, offered no help, they never contacted me and there was no empathy or compassion. they were a disgrace, they will almost not human. the body who carried out the report — the professional standards authority said the nurse and midwifery council need to be more transparent in how they treat families who have lost a child. these families have lost either babies, or in one case mother and baby. they were going through a terrible personal tragedy. they needed to be treated with compassion, but most importantly their evidence needed to be treated with respect. we didn't find that happened. the nmc, i have to say, have apologised now. they are taking significant steps to change the way they do things. but they need a cultural change inside the organisation to understand how significant these events are for the people who are involved in them.
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it's notjust a legal process. with me is our health correspondent, catherine burns. first, tell us will be nursing and midwifery council is? to the midwifery council is? to the midwifery body that essentially decides if midwives are fit to practice. you can understand why they were so key to this. this report has been highly critical. it says the handling of cases before 2014 was frequently incompetent. on the specifics, there were two really big issues. one was the length of time it took. eight years, from the first concerns being raised to the end result, which was three midwives being struck off and one being suspended. during those eight years they were still practising and other babies suffered avoidable harm. that was one issue. the other one was the way they dealt with the families. there were coming to them with
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concerns and they felt they were not being taken seriously enough. concerns and they felt they were not being taken seriously enoughm concerns and they felt they were not being taken seriously enough. in a way, even though they were the regulator of midwives, they were acting more like a union representing the midwives?“ acting more like a union representing the midwives? it feels like there was a certain defensiveness. cumbria police were investigating 22 cases. at one stage they went to them with the evidence and it seems like nothing's there is no evidence that the nmc acted on that. any more criticisms, and how have they responded? a lot of criticism. you saw carl hendrickson, one of the families that have spoken out against this. they put out a statement saying the report shows the truly shocking scale of the nmc's the truly shocking scale of the nmc‘s failure. the nmc themselves have said, yes, we have made massive changes. the chief executive is going to stand down. they said, we have made significant changes since 2014 and put vulnerable witnesses and families at the heart of everything we do. this report says it is not good enough. it acknowledges changes they made, generally quite technical changes,
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but it says the culture needs to change and needs to be more open, more transparent and more respectful with families. the head of the nmc, as you said, is standing down and that was announced earlier this week for this report coming out. that is linked to the report, obviously. she did that in july, jacqui linked to the report, obviously. she did that injuly, jacqui smith has beenin did that injuly, jacqui smith has been in thejob did that injuly, jacqui smith has been in the job for six years, but she has announced she has stepped down. she said the approach to the deaths is unacceptable and i am truly sorry for this. the nmc themselves say, yes, we have made all of these changes, the final statement is that they know there is much more to do. thank you very much. let's speak now to the mp for barrow and furness, john woodcock who has supported a number of the families throughout their ordeal. it wasn't just losing a it wasn'tjust losing a child, all in one case a child, but then having to fight for years to get the truth about what happened to them? that's right. i have so much respect for
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the families in my constituency who had all of that tragedy, but then had all of that tragedy, but then had all of that tragedy, but then had a system set up against them. they had to fight for years to get an inquiry, to get a change within the local health trust. but the scale of the failings from the nursing and midwifery council, it was of similar magnitude. their attitude, as set out in the report, was simply to close ranks against people who needed support as human beings, but also had their cases showing vital ways in which the service and practices of midwifery needed to change and improve. there was very needed to change and improve. there was very little interest at the time, as has been shown by this report, a learning those lessons. in
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fa ct, report, a learning those lessons. in fact, the focus of the organisation was protecting its members at all costs. that is a travesty, given that this body is supposed to actually regulate what is a fabulous profession, a vital profession, but to regulated and a half of the public, to keep the public safe.“ that because, through the nhs, not just in midwifery circles, through the nhs, when errors are made, when people die when they shouldn't have, medical professionals have had a reputation for being defensive about that, rather than necessarily opening up, being transparent and showing people what went wrong so people can learn lessons? that is what the likes of james titcomb, lisa brady, carl hendrickson, have fought for years, while they were
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grieving the death and the loss of their loved ones, to try to break down that culture. they are as much, perhaps more than any individual, they should be credited for the changes in culture within the nhs, locally and nationally that we are seeing. it shows that the nursing and midwifery council are right up there in the worst of this culture. it is appalling, i have to say, that jacqui smith, until late last week, was not intending to go. that the scale of, the magnitude of these failings, has not, as far as i can see, the council has not properly addressed it. you tell me if it is
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different, but i don't think they have even put anybody forward to speak on this report today, which is frankly disgusting. they need to listen to this and change. there needs to be a total change in culture in this organisation. thank you. john woodcock, who is the mp for the area. let me read some messages to you about the lack of black academics at universities and the impact on black students and how well they do. i was the equal opportunities opposite in university than nine years and raised many issues about the impact on students. some of the experiences were horrendous. no matter how hard i challenged, the university hid behind academicjudgment challenged, the university hid behind academic judgment and challenged, the university hid behind academicjudgment and things not being the responsibility of the university. hassan e—mails that an individual with a black background has to be a few fold better
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qualified or work harder to obtain social mobility in all aspects of life to compete against a white counterpart. scott says i always wa nted counterpart. scott says i always wanted to go into academia but felt there were no topics about black issues and ideas. every day in the news there's something about the minutiae, the rows, the political divisions, the divisions in the cabinet, the technicalities, about brexit. but these are the basics. two years on from the referendum, ten months away from us leaving, the government is about to come up with a negotiating position to put before mps. and it's crucial, because there's another summit coming up with the eu negotiators getting impatient. there's more, there's labour demanding a binding vote on customs fact—finding, and there's the scottish parliament voting against having anything to do with it at all. and there is the scottish parliament voting against having anything to do with it at all. norman smith is here to explain. what is a white paper and why is the
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one coming so important? it's basically a government position paper whether government sets out its ideas and this one should be pretty important because it contains the nitty—gritty, the detail of what the nitty—gritty, the detail of what the government is trying to achieve in these negotiations so all of these negotiations, aviation, financial services, the government will list all the points they want to achieve. if you like, it is their wish list from the negotiations. to date we have had plenty of papers and speeches, but by and large it has been the big vision thing. this is the detail and that is why it matters so much because the eu have been drumming their fingers matters so much because the eu have been drumming theirfingers on matters so much because the eu have been drumming their fingers on the table to tell us what you want, and now we get it and have a listen to david liddington explaining what we can expect. what will be on it when
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we announce it to parliament and the country next month will be the most detailed account that we have given in government of how we see these negotiations with very ambitious and a special partnership but we want to not to, just on trade, though it is important, but in terms of the continued operation on police matters and against crime, and to put it in a diplomatic or operation ina put it in a diplomatic or operation in a world where many of the challenges from terrorism and an aggressive russia, so the other european countries need to face this as well. does this mean the government is closer to knowing what it wants to do? you would hope so, wouldn't you, but i'm afraid not necessarily because on this key issue of what our future customs relationship is going to be,
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ministers are deadlocked. when you say to the government that in the white paper there will presumably be a customs deal that the answer is they hope so and they expect so but then not absolutely committing to have everything in the white paper which flags up how deep the divisions are over this fundamental issue. i kind of feel a lot of it is about not pr, but trying to show the government has got an agenda and are not just waiting for government has got an agenda and are notjust waiting for brussels to tell them what they can expect. they're trying to get on the front foot to say they want this or that because there is a view that up to now it has basically been michel barnier calling the shots and the british government has had to respond, but now theresa may's team are trying to get on the front foot and say this is what we want even though it might not include that
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crucial detail about the customs deal. norman smith, thank you very much. my favourite label for a story underneath you, with a brexit? we need to use that a bit more. prince george and princess charlotte, harry's nephews and nieces will be among the page boys and bridesmaids. let's have a look again at the affectionate stories that have been emerging from meghan markle's growing up in los angeles. i remember meghan as a very... excellent student. ..caring young person. the consumate professional. good for her, good for her. go, meghan! she was a wonderful child. she was lovely. she was creative and kind and pleasant and memorable. she had a certain spark and a certain self confidence
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and willingness to engage in a very deep way. you don't remember every single child you ever taught, but meghan was memorable to me, so when i saw that name, i thought "oh my gosh, there can't be more than one meghan markle and good for her!" i think she made a beeline and made the move and just kind of laid one of my lips. it was generous and courageous on her part, and it took me by surprise. meghan was involved in a classroom project where the students were exposed to a number of commercials that were popular at the time, and meghan found things in a commercial that were absolutely sexist, and her reaction to that was to write an essay about the sexism in that commercial, and that essay ended up going to the company.
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if you see something that you don't like or are offended by on television, or any other place, write letters and send them to the right people and you can really make a difference. it's her eyes, it's the way she enters the room, it's kind of, 0k. there's character right away in her presence, her presence on stage. sometimes you only get one shot. i wouldn't say that she was warm and fuzzy to everybody in a sense where, you know, she wants to be everybody‘s best friend, it didn't feel like she had to. she was a complete professional, knew her lines, responded extremely well to direction. it's heart—warming to know
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that she is in a position where she's in love, she has a partner that has her same passion and same belief system, and i know that they will do wonderful things for this world. so three days to go — our royal correspondentjonny dymond is here with all the details. news about the page boys and bridesmaids this morning. yes, the top line is, five bridesmaids, six bridesmaids, increasing every second. and there will be four page boys. evenly split between bride and groom. top of the list are their royal highness is princess charlotte, aged three, and prince george, aged four. the son and daughter of the duke and duchess of cambridge, william and catherine.
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then you have friends of meghan markle's from la, remi and ryland lit and friends from canada. these are canadian aristocracy, if you have aristocrats in canada, the mother, jessica, i think she is the daughter of a former private mr —— prime minister. very close friends of meghan. many have old friends of harry on the other side and their gods and goddaughter.. harry on the other side and their gods and goddaughter. a huge day for those youngsters, actually. the world's cameras will be on them in their gorgeous outfits. the average ages five. that is something they will never forget and it will be a delight. they will be gorgeous. they will be decked out in sweet suits. what do we know about meghan's
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father? we understand he's going for heart surgery in a few hours' time. so he's not coming. it seems very unlikely he is coming to the wedding. he will get on a flight, meet the queen, give away his daughter, that is very unlikely. so the question is who will walk meghan down the aisle. the palace is saying nothing and it's a difficult time for them and meghan markle as well but they are not saying anything at the moment. my money would probably be her mother, who we know is going to ta ke be her mother, who we know is going to take over from the hotel to st george ‘s chapel and may make the final leg, which will be quite a moment as she walks down that astonishing place in st george ‘s chapel. 600 years of royal and british history, and with her daughter, that will be quite a moment. thank you. as you might
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expect, the audience is split between those really excited about this royal wedding and some people are saying enough already. andy says, some people say that the royal wedding is not important outside of london and i live in blackpool and think it's a wonderful event. let's speak now to jan lofthouse. she will be in the grounds of windsor castle for the wedding on saturday. is that right? i am and i can't wait, yes. i can tell by your voice how thrilled you are at the prospect. how did this happen? this happened because i was invited by a member of the royal household to be a guest about two weeks ago, so i was very a guest about two weeks ago, so i was very delighted and i've been looking forward to it ever since. what are you wearing? looking forward to it ever since. what are you wearing ?|j looking forward to it ever since. what are you wearing? i will probably wear a blue dress because i love blue and i think it's going to be really hot, so sunglasses. fair
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enough. what is it about this couple you particularly admire? well, i think they are so young and we don't know meghan very well, but they are already doing so much to raise the profile of their good causes and she is very confident young lady and i think they will go far together. are you taking your own food and drink, have you got that sorted? it's not sorted yet that i have the champagne ready and waiting. so, yes, we are taking food for the whole day because it's going to be a really long day there. and you are able to go into the chapel afterwards? is that right? yes, i believe we can walk around the grounds and go and see the flowers in the chapel. the chapel is amazing. i have managed to be there before and it is beautiful. we are very privileged, and i look
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forward to seeing all the guests as they arrive, as well as the bride and groom. have a wonderful day and thanks for talking to us. thank you. thank you. goodbye. thanks for your company today, we will be back at 9am tomorrow. have a good day. hello, good morning. not quite as warm as it was yesterday across england and wales. you will have noticed more cloud streaming in and this is the scene at the moment in cambridgeshire, there it is, with some cloudy skies, but further north and west across scotland and northern ireland we have sparkling sunshine which will continue into the evening but cloudy skies for england and wales. you noticed the cloud clearing and in the south—east it could break to give a few holes
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here and there but temperatures you noticed are lower than yesterday and around the mid teens. as we go through the evening and overnight, the cloud across the southern areas will move away and prolonged clear spells into thursday morning means it will be a chilly start to thursday but with clear skies overnight that will translate to sunshine in the morning, so tomorrow looks day with dry weather, lots of sunshine, and fairweather cloud developing here and there, particularly towards the north—east of england, scotland and northern ireland and temperatures in the mid and high teens. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11. mps say carillion bosses created a ‘rotten corporate
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culture' and were ‘too busy stuffing their mouths with gold' as the firm collapsed. labour says it would close the uk's two main two immigration detention centres, in the wake of the windrush scandal a starring role for princess charlotte and prince george as bridesmaid and page boy at the royal wedding this weekend. also, remembering the brave 75 years on. the anniversary of the dambusters raid against german forces in the second world war takes place today. and everton announce the sacking of manager sam alla rdyce, with the former england boss in charge for only six months.

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