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tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  May 21, 2018 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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3121 “ni tiff. “2m; “12.21 sea coast and temperatures further south up to 25 degrees. the threat of showers continuing in england and wales on thursday and friday. you're watching beyond one hundred days.. the white house sends an uncompromising message to europe on the issue of iran. here's our policy of tough american sanctions — and now, you're either with us or against us. the secretary of state lays out the us alternative to the iran nuclear deal and promises unprecedented financial pressure. we will hold those doing prohibited business in iran to account. south korea's president is on his way to washington and it's clear there a lot about the north korea summit that still needs to be sorted. also on the programme: it is within a president's powers to demand the justice department investigate the fbi. it's just not been done since watergate. so why now? and katty and i are still in the wedding mood. and just when we thought it was over now we have the photographs.
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get in touch with us using the hashtag... #beyond1000ays. hello and welcome — i'm katty kay in washington and christian fraser is in london. the white house made it very clear today that it will not budge from taking a tough line on iran and a tough line on european companies who want to keep trading with the islamic republic. in a not very diplomatic speech, america's top diplomat laid out what the white house calls its alternative to the iran nuclear deal. mike pompeo is promising to cruch iran with sanctions unless it changes its behaviour in the wider middle east. and he basically told european countries, we are happy to listen but don't for a moment think we're changing course. we will hold those doing prohibited business in iran to account. over the coming weeks, we will send teams
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of specialists to countries around the world to further explain administration policy to discuss the implications of sanctions reimposition, and to listen. i know, i spent a great deal of time with our allies in my first three weeks. i know that they may decide to try and keep their old nuclear deal going with iran, that is certainly their decision to make. they know where we stand. joining us now from washington is our state department correspondent barbara plett usher. as mike pompeo was saying, the europeans have been working very ha rd europeans have been working very hard in the last two weeks to keep this deal alive and they would like the message from the white house.” think it would be very discouraging. mike pompeo to be hardest line possible, not just sanctions, mike pompeo to be hardest line possible, notjust sanctions, but the strongest ones in history. not just countering it, but crushing
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them. we'll have to see how the allies go along with this approach. much of the world still supports the deal and the europeans are fighting ha rd deal and the europeans are fighting hard to try and save it, and mr pompeo gave them no wiggle room, at all. the other question is whether or not he wants to change iran's behavioural change the regime. it is clear that he offered a new deal if they met 12 conditions, very tough conditions that would weaken iran's military programme. mr pompeo was offering a new relationship with iran, but with an iran that changes completely. barbara plett usher, thank you very much. let's get the thoughts of the former hillary clinton advisor jake sullivan, who worked on the iran deal as part of the obama administration. hejoins me now. thank you very much for coming in. when you were crafting the iran deal, you basically made a bet that this nuclear deal would help bring
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iran more into the western fold. more in line with western allies. that it did not work out in terms of iran's activities in the region. is it not time to put more pressure on them to get them to behave better? the action needed not make that bad. you hoped it would happen. we after the deal to focus on the nuclear issue, but we reserve the right to be up to push back against iran for all of its behaviour. nothing any nuclear deal protruded the united states from doing exactly what they said they wanted to do. the problem, now, for the administration, is that instead of doing it for the rest of the world, having european partners with us, having the rest of the trading nations with us, they are all sided with iran against washington, and that, funny, is a big problem, because it will make the sanctions significantly less effective. i am guessing that the administrative or make a bet that
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those companies would side with the approach the administrative is taking. first, there is no reason tojump the nuclear deal in order there is no reason tojump the nuclear deal in or der to put more pressure in the region. kiddie. by walking away from it a right to do that outside the context of the new kiddie. by walking away from it, we have removed the constraints from iran. secondly. we had the whole world united with us, in a campaign to make sure that we had a united policy against iran. now, we have global division and they ran well exploit that. and that and perhaps most importantly, the people of iran we re most importantly, the people of iran were holding their own governance accountable when the nuclear removed
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the constraints from iran. secondly. we had the whole world united with us, ina we had the whole world united with us, in a campaign to make sure that we had a united policy against iran. now, we have global division and they ran well exploit that. and that and perhaps most importantly, the people of iran were holding their own governance accountable when the nuclear deal deal was in place. we saw protests last year against the government, because they said it is not the west‘s fault, it is yours. now, the onus shifts to donald trump. now the regime gets said their people, it is not our fault, it is trump's fault the iranians said that they would stick with the jcpoa as long as it is in their interest. do you think the europeans can make it work even in the face of the sanctions that mike pompeo has outlined? i think it is unlikely. the sanctions that mike pompeo has outlined? ithink it is unlikely. it is going to be very difficult for european banks and firms to sign stand up to american sanctions, but there is a big difference between complying unwillingly, which is basically what they will do, and complying enthusiastically, which is what europe did with the united states in the period anyone up to the iran nuclear deal. i think that we are going to see foot dragging and workarounds, and some business that will continue, but most it is
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going to be very difficult for european banks and firms to sign stand up to american sanctions, but there is a big difference between complying unwillingly, which is basically what they will do, and complying enthusiastically, which is what europe did with the united states in the period anyone up to the iran nuclear deal. i think that we are going to see foot dragging and workarounds, and some business that will continue, but most european companies and banks... my guess is that they will not just stand up and salute, because donald trump and mike pompeo say they have two. my guess is that they will not just stand up and salute, because donald trump and mike pompeo say they have jake sullivan, thank you very much for coming into the studio. among those who support president trump pulling out of the iran deal is republican congressman steve russell from oklahoma. hejoins us now from capitol hill. is the objective to bring the regime is the objective to bring the have a resume change, but i think it is much it is always the hope that we would have a resume change, but i think it is much more pragmatic than great unity among our allies, the european allies, and we saw great
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unity among our allies, the european allies, and specifically brought back specifically this notion that europeans and the united states cannot work together unless there is a deal is probably a naive narrative. what we will see is that with this deal, now, we are not going to continue and this notion that europeans and the united states cannot work together unless there is a deal is probably a naive narrative. what we will see is that with this deal, now, we are not going to continue iran be rewarded for bad behaviour. the united states has seen that that does not work, and we have seen it in another foreign policy initiatives, and is fiow foreign policy initiatives, and is now shifting back to iran.|j foreign policy initiatives, and is now shifting back to iran. i want to raise the point that jake sullivan was just talking about, the prospect that china and russia were karen trading with iran foreign policy initiatives, and is now shifting back to iran. i want to raise the point that jake sullivan was just talking about, the prospect that china and russia were karen trading with iran, importing iranians oil, this weekend, the french ambassador to washington treated exactly about this, saying that it is going to put pressure on the in this policy. you don't relate to be company to
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suspend its activities in iran, and that a chinese company will replace it. iam that a chinese company will replace it. i am sure that there is some logic in this policy. you don't relate that the chinese to stop occurring for decades iran, do you? nobody would expect that they would stop with or without the deal. the fa ct stop with or without the deal. the fact that you have got russia and china trading and dealing with iran has been occurring for decades. can icani has been occurring for decades. can ican ijust has been occurring for decades. can i can ijust turned to events are doubts at the moment about thisjune summit with kim jong—un. it seems to me, at the moment, that all sides are hedging. they don't want to call it off, but they seem pretty sure at the moment that north korea is not fully committed to denuclearise is on. well, i am a bit more optimistic than that. certainly, because we have got to this point, and you have to understand that dictators have too feel that they are the man in the room, that they are the main
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there are doubts at the moment about thisjune there are doubts at the moment about this june summit with there are doubts at the moment about thisjune summit with kim jong—un. it seems to me, at the moment, that all sides are hedging. they don't wa nt all sides are hedging. they don't want to call it off, but they seem pretty sure at the moment that north korea is not fully committed to denuclearise asian. well, i am a bit more optimistic than that. certainly, because we have got to this point, and you have to understand that dictators have two feel that they are the man in the room, that they are the main power to be contended with, regardless of who as they are negotiating with. i read this as a bit of posturing from kimi read this as a bit of posturing from kim i think it is instructive, but in terms of whether we move forward, lam more in terms of whether we move forward, i am more optimistic we have gotten in bringing the head of north korea and the head of the united states together. i don't think that kim jong—un wants to lose that opportunity, because of the legitimacy that it gives him, and i do think that we can have some real progress at the table, along with the is as far as we have gotten in bringing the head of north korea and the head of the united states together. i don't think that kim jong—un wants to lose that opportunity, because of the legitimacy that it gives him, and i do think that we can have some real progress at the table, along with the official end of the war. it is
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probably time. the flip side of that, that there is a cost to this. it is the nuclear programme, we are able to find those achilles' heel like things that would take that away, and that is what is to be discussed and that is what the president has war. it is probably time. the flip side of that, that there is a cost to this. it is the nuclear programme, we are able to find those achilles' heel like things that would take that away, and that is what is to be discussed and that is what is to be discussed and that is what is to be discussed and that is what the president has will stop 0k, steve russell, thank you mac forjoining will stop 0k, steve russell, thank you mac for joining us. will stop 0k, steve russell, thank you mac forjoining us. a lot the president's foreign is the fact that we what i am interested in is the fa ct we what i am interested in is the fact that we have also had white house saying that the trade war with china is off the table, at the same time that the pressure the white house saying that the trade war with china is off the table, at the same time that the pressure is on the table, and when i was travelling around the country during the election campaign, i heard a lot supporters saying that they wanted trade about iran, so i'm not sure how this foreign policy choices going to go down with his base at the moment. reaction from iran as we china, andi the moment. reaction from iran as we china, and i didn't hear much about iran, so i'm not sure how this foreign policy choices going to go down iranians foreign minister. are they
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going are they going to deal to keep the deal alive? some reaction already, tonight, that this is really a attack on the sovereignty of european countries, and it relies on some pressure. let's turn to another story, because of relatives of those killed in the grenfell tower fire here in london have been remembering their loved ones at the start of the public inquiry into the disaster. the first victim to be commemorated was logan gomes, who was stillborn in hospital shortly after his pregnant mother escaped from the blaze. 72 people died after flames engulfed the block of flats in west london lastjune. the bbc‘s edina campbell has been listening to their stories. remembering their loved ones. the 72 lives lost in last year's devastating fire at grenfell tower. today, bereaved families and survivors were taking part in commemoration hearings to mark
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the beginning of a public inquiry. chaired by retired high courtjudge sir martin moore—bick. welcome to the first hearing of the inquiry into the fire at grenfell tower injune last year. in terms of loss of life, the fire was the single greatest tragedy to befall this city since the end of the second world war. the sight of the building engulfed in flames is indelibly imprinted on the memories of those who experienced an event of unimaginable horror. then came the first emotional tribute by survivor marcio gomes. he and his family escaped from the burning building but his son logan was stillborn. he looked like he was just sleeping, as babies do. at that moment... ..we felt like our
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hearts had broken. but at least we were able to hold him and to be with him. painter and decorator denis murphy was a community volunteer who loved football. he also died in the fire. his sister told the hearing their family's lives have been changed for ever. there is a gaping hole in our hearts that can be never filled, and it hurts, it really hurts. we can't imagine a day when it won't hurt any less. the pain, loss and sorrow we feel is indescribable and has left us devastated. next to be remembered was
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mohamed amied neda, known as saber. he was a chauffeur and tried to help others escape. his brother made this statement through his solicitor. the bond we had was unbreakable. a bond like no other. we shared our times of trouble, of sickness and hardship. but most importantly, we shared our happiness. our kids grew up together and they are like brother and sister, a relationship that we had and i still am proud of. losing saber was like my world came crashing down. i had faced many blows in life, losing many family members, but this was the worst. this will be a long and complex inquiry, one of the biggest on record. but for now, the personal tributes could take up to two weeks, a fitting start dedicated to those
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at the heart of this inquiry. donald trump tweeted about the russia investigation eight times this weekend, culminating in an order to thejustice department to investigate whether his presidential campaign was spied on by the fbi. historians say the us hasn't seen this kind of behaviour since richard nixon during the watergate investigation. so how did we get here? on wednesday, the republican head of the senate intelligence committee said the kremlin did indeed try to help donald trump by meddling in the 2016 election. on friday, the washington post reported that an fbi informant met with three advisers to the trump campaign during the 2016 presidential election. by yesterday, mr trump was tweeting this: i hereby demand, and will do so officially tomorrow, that the department ofjustice look into whether or not the fbi/doj infiltrated or surveilled the trump campaign for political purposes — and if any such demands
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or requests were made by people within the obama administration. let's pick this up with our north america editorjon sopel. indians, the russians, the chinese to keep the deal alive? some reaction already, tonight, that this is really a attack on the sovereignty of european countries, and it relies on some pressure. let's turn to another story, because how unusual is this? very what donald trump what donald trump has done tweet is try to order the department... what is and take to me about his edict, if you like, and let's remember, it is an edict on twitter that has not yet turned into an edict in reality, but i did know whether this is to clear the airor know whether this is to clear the air or muddy the water of the... watters and data me about his edict, if you like, and let's remember, it is an edict on twitter that has not yet turned into an edict in reality, but i did know whether this is to clear the
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but i did know whether this is to clearthe airor but i did know whether this is to clear the air or muddy the water investigation by doing this, but what i can tell you, is that the attorney general and the head of the fbi, are going to the white house in the next 45 minutes or so to have a meeting with the president about this demand. be adjusting to see if both men are left standing at the end of it. i don't know if it is because i have attorney general and the head of the fbi, are going to the head of the fbi, are going to the white house in the next 45 minutes or so to have a meeting with the president about this demand. it will be adjusting to see if both men are will be adjusting to see if both men a re left will be adjusting to see if both men are left standing at the end of it. i don't know if it is because i come back from covering the royal wedding, language, i hereby demand, regal in its tone. we wonder if we are heading to a breaking point constitutionally, and i have heard people saying today that this mark that point, what you say? regal in its tone. we wonder if we are heading to a breaking point constitutionally, and i have heard people saying today that this mark that point, what you say? -- we keep on reporting, but where his power ends and is despotic leadership begins. if formalised, i think some people would say he is overstepping the mark. ithink people would say he is overstepping the mark. i think if he'd becomes
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formalised, i think some people would say he is overstepping the mark. i think if he tries in a grey area, but i do feel that over the past 18 months, what we have deemed to be acceptable has changed and has moved. what robert mueller, these are special counsel, that'll be seen as overstepping the mark. at the moment, we are in a grey area, but i do feel that over the past 18 months, what we have deemed to be a cce pta ble months, what we have deemed to be acceptable has changed and has moved. what his supporters would point to is that there was an here in london, pointing out that he was try to get close to two or three people in the campaign, and who would have signed that off? was at political? if it was political, to undermine the trump campaign, here in london, pointing out that he was try to get close to two or three people in the campaign, and he would have signed that off? was at political? if it was political, to undermine the trump campaign, unacceptable, of course. if it is investigated by the independent office that is meant to is to maintain the security and integrity of elections in the country that they serve, and they felt that they had evidence that there was russian interference, russian undermining of
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the election, and they didn't investigated, wouldn't that be an enormous story and an abdication of this, then that is appropriate, as well. you have got an agency whose job is to maintain the security and integrity of elections in the country that they serve, and they felt that they had evidence that there was russian interference, russian undermining of the election, and they didn't investigated, wouldn't that be an enormous story and an abdication of their responsibilities line, as well. it is the way that you frame it. if you say that the fbi were investigating to ensure that the elections were clean and honest, but if you are phoning it in the way that was framing it, whether trying to undermine the trump campaign, you get a very different answer and response i wanted, because i kind of like that supporters. if i started saying, i hereby demand, would you listen to me and do what i wanted, because i kind of like that language? fourteen countries in the americas have recalled their ambassadors from venezuela, protesting against president nicolas maduro's landslide victory in sunday's elections. the vote was marred by an opposition boycott and claims of vote—rigging. critics say voter turn—out was even lower than the reported forty—six percent. washington calls the election a sham and is threatening sanctions on the oil industry.
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experimental vaccines will be given out in the democratic republic of congo as authorities try to stop the spread of ebola. the vaccine was used in limited trials during the epidemic that hit west africa a few years ago. health workers in the drc will be among the first to get it. 26 people are believed to have died in this current outbreak. gina haspel has been sworn in as the new director of the cia, the first woman to hold the post. president trump spoke at the ceremony — saying she takes the helm at a "crucial moment" in american history. haspel‘s appointment and confirmation have been controversial, because of her role in the spy agency's post—9/11 interrogation programme. a spokesperson for the british prime minister says the uk's argument is with the russian government not the russian people. it follows visa renewal delays for the russian owner of the chelsea football club, roman abramovich. the billionaire didn't attend saturday's fa cup final in london, where chelsea beat manchester united. the uk government says it can't comment on why the owner of chelsea football club roman abramovich, is dealing with delays in having his visa renewed.
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the russian billionaire also did not attend saturday's fa cup final in london — where chelsea beat manchester united. nowjust when you thought there was nothing else to see or hear about the royal wedding, the palace has released three official photographs and now that we are such royal wedding experts, we can't resist showing them. the pictures include a group photograph with bridesmaids and close family. and amazingly, the photographer has pulled off the impossible feat of getting page boys and bridesmaids to look at the camera, all at the same time. here's our royal correspondent nicholas witchell. there were certainly no shortages of photographs taken on saturday, as the carriage made its way through windsor and up the long walk, it seemed as though everyone was holding up a mobile phone to take a snap. but it was after harry and meghan had reached the end of the procession and made their way into the comparative calm of windsor castle that the official
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wedding pictures were taken by photographer alexi lubomirski. the first of the three photographs released by kensington palace is a group shot of the couple, the close family and the bride's made and page boys. standing to the couple's left is meghan's mother, doria ragland, who made such a deep impression on the wedding with her poise and dignity. the queen and the duke of edinburgh are seated in front of prince charles and the duchess of cornwall. among the bridesmaids and page boys, prince george is smiling broadly, princess charlotte is sitting on her mother's lap. the second picture shows harry and meghan in a more relaxed pose with their young attendants. george has an even bigger smile, charlotte is sitting on the floor holding one of the bouquets. the third photo is a black and white portrait of the bride and groom relaxing and looking very happy on the east terrace of windsor castle. so, what do people make of the pictures? to see a bit of colour in the royal
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family which inherently has been white, that acceptance, it does mean a step forward. —— lemarto —— lemar to see a woman of —— lemar to see a woman of colour. that the commonwealth history, our history and a bit of history in the making. nice to see philip back, as well. for the queen, visiting the chelsea flower show this evening, the wedding and the positive reactions to its images of diversity will surely be a matter of relief. she knows that the family's younger generation is stepping forward now and it seems well—equipped for the future. nicholas witchell, bbc news. pulsed they are the dress, no superlatives does it photographs. the dress, no superlatives does it, line, nicely weighted. this picture, you see that, i have been doing my
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fashion homework since the weekend. i was fashion homework since the weekend. iwasa fashion homework since the weekend. i was a bit worried about line, nicely weighted. this picture, you see that, i have been doing my fashion homework since the weekend. i was fashion homework since the weekend. iwasa fashion homework since the weekend. i was a bit worried... anyway, this particular photo, i style of the wedding, was that her mother. i thought it was fantastic, her poise, her grace throughout the day. i liked the way that prince charles looked after her, particularly that —— start of the wedding, was doria ragland, her mother. i thought it was fantastic, her poise, her grace throughout the day. i liked the way that prince charles looked after her, particularly that he grabbed her, particularly that he grabbed her hand to reassure her.|j her, particularly that he grabbed her hand to reassure her. i like that photograph, because when you see the picture like that, of the two families merging, you really get the idea that this american and british family, this is an african american and a white family, and they are merging together an american and british family, this is an african—american and a white family, and they are merginglj an african—american and a white family, and they are merging ijust think they should have got the bishop in this. anyway. beyond the
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this is beyond 100 days from the bbc. coming up for viewers on the bbc news channel and bbc world news, another hazard for hawaiians, dealing with the fallout from a major volcanic eruption — on the bbc .how dealing with the fallout from a major volcanic eruption — we've more of these amazing pictures to share with you. whilst there will be some warm sunshine around, we still have the risk of some more storms. have this rain across northern ireland, across scotland, and it is thinning out at the moment. focus on the showers, though, and a whole host of thunderstorms flashing away there, particularly across central and southern england, up into the west midlands and up until manchester, as well. we will find that those down poison down —— downpours will migrate further west. one or two heavy showers returning to the south—east, the rain will turn out and scotland and most bases become
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dry. a lot of low cloud that will dribble its way down into the north—east of england. not a particular cold start today. most prices starting dry and sunny. much more cloud quite low cloud, grey gloomy start the north—east of england and still across eastern parts of scotland. not much rain by this stage, sunshine beginning to... quatrain that is will peter out, the rain breaking across scotland and northern ireland. always rather grey and misty, though, across eastern scotland, particularly. we can see a few more thundery downpours pushing their way into the west country and wales. large parts of england and wales. large parts of england and wales bill will dry and warm. we should have some sunshine at chelsea flower show, but still a small chance of catching a downpour on tuesday, and then again on thursday. the most of the time, it will be fine and dry. high—pressure shaping
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our weather. with the high—pressure continuing to build, breaking up the ca rd continuing to build, breaking up the card more and more in scotland and northern ireland, and it means it will be warmer, too. more sunshine on the way on wednesday fingered and wales. a smaller chance of a shower across south wales, whether you'd will build into wales, across northern ireland and scotland. it warmer days away from those north sea coast, and we will find temperatures for further south 2425 degrees. showers continue particular in england and wales on thursday and friday. this is beyond one hundred days, with me katty kay in washington — christian fraser's in london. our top stories: the us secretary of state is warning iran will face the strongest sanctions in history — in response president rouhani says america can no longer decide what the rest of the world does. bereaved families of the grenfell tower fire pay tribute to their relatives — as the public inquiry into the disaster starts here in london. coming up in the next half hour: the leaders of italy's two populist parties from opposite sides of the political spectrum request approval to form a new coalition government.
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a group of mps accuses the uk government of putting national security at risk, by failing to stop russian "dirty money" being laundered in britain. let us know your thoughts by using the hashtag 'beyond—one—hundred—days' after two months of political deadlock, italy's two biggest populist parties look set to form a new coalition government. the anti—establishment five star movement and the nationalist league have sent a programme for government to the president. if it's approved the new prime minister will be giuseppe conte, a 54—year—old law professor from the university of florence. the agreement poses a real threat to the established order in europe. both parties oppose the euro currency. they want to renegotiate some eu treaties — specifically, those that set spending limits. they have committed to repatriating up to half a million
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migrants who arrived in italy illegally. they are proposing a two—tiered income tax system, and a fixed basic income for poor families which alone would increase public spending by 2 billion euros. our bbc europe correspondent gavin lee is in rome for us. some of the financial figures have really spooked the markets? yes, they have. certainly wobbles around italy with investors wondering if they should make a move. ultimately we have two mavericks in charge of two populist parties. we have fire starr and we have a euro sceptic parliament and a hard right anti—migrant party. but remember, two and a half months ago, more than half the electorate voted for these
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two and here in the presidential palace, most leaders met with the president of italy and have asked for permission to form a government. rewind, some of the rhetoric they we re rewind, some of the rhetoric they were talk about was to remove italy from the euro and cancel 250 billion euros of italian debt. they have watered that down, but some worrying signs for eu leaders, calling on them to cancel sanctions against russia and says vladimir putin should be treated as a partner and trying to fast track the deportation of illegal migrants. that tone today was different, the harder rhetoric was different, the harder rhetoric was more, we can rule together. this was more, we can rule together. this was matteo salvini a short while ago. translation: we read with
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interest and sometimes with amazement the declarations from some european ministers that are worried. they have nothing to worry about. our government wants to bring back economic growth and bring back businesses who invest here and to make jobs more stable. you have the germans today saying that they are, the populists in italy are playing with fire over the country's finances. we have had decades of fragile italian coalition governments, to italians think this mix of populist left and right can actually govern together?” mix of populist left and right can actually govern together? i think the point is they're saying we have tried most other things, we have tried most other things, we have tried a leftist party and they have tried a leftist party and they have tried silvio berlusconi for many years, now you have unemployment at the heightest level for many years, a third of the population of young adults are unemployed and they're
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sick of debt and i saddled with 2.3 billion euros of debt. the parties say we will lower you, taxes from 40 to 20% and give everyone a universal basic income. that is unheard of in europe. the finns have been trying it, but dropped it. so they're changing the system. many people voted for them. and now, they're talking about, they have ruled each other out of the chance of prime minister. giuseppe conte could be the prime minister. he has no political experience. tomorrow when the decision is made by the president, he could be the new prime minister of italy. thank you. big promises now they have to redeliver.
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thank you. hawaiians dealing with a major volcanic eruption are facing a new threat. the lava pouring into the pacific has created toxic clouds, which contains dangerous acid and tiny particles of glass. the lava from mount kilauea has also blocked part of a coastal road, cutting off a key escape route for residents. from hawaii, chris buckler reports. after erupting from deep within the ground lava has reached the ocean. molten rock stands more than 20 feet high where it has claimed the land. still burning and still dangerous. you can see how roads have become cut off. this is a huge amount of lava that has made is is way down from the cracks in the ground and
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the lava has fountained out. the smoke and fumes are toxic. but that is not the only worry. sections of the scorched surface are still being split apart. .ing there is the danger of additional fissures of lava that may be travelling under the surface and could spring up elsewhere. yet, some living close to where the lava is continuing to jet out at a ferocious rate haven't left their homes. kilauea has long been their homes. kilauea has long been their neighbour a volcano that erupted to create this land. but it is now destroying what is on it and many have ta ken is now destroying what is on it and many have taken the decision to abandon their houses. for many days, i was sitting thinking i didn't have to leave. then the activity increased enormously. even to get into the evacuation area, we had to
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be escorted by the national guard. and all who live near kilauea know they can't ignore volcano. you could hear the fissures and the explosions all night and all day. we have had about 100 earthquakes a day. the biggest was 6.9. this is a spectacular landscape, but beneath the craters it is continuing to be shaped and with kilauea still erupting, no one can be sure the many prayers to the gods will be answered. i was watching that and it took me back to a volcano i covered many yea rs back to a volcano i covered many years ago, the rivers lava, i remember the high street disappeared under a riv of lava and you have
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across a street a giant mound of rubble that you can never get rid of. it is incredible, the power of it is extraordinary. and notjust the hot lava, but the gases too. great pictures there. the former mayor of london, ken livingstone, has announced he is resigning from the uk labour party. he had been suspended in a row over allegations of anti—semitism and was waiting for fresh disciplinary proceedings to start this week. his continued membership of the party had been seen by many as an obstacle to restoring confidence in thejewish community and many had called for his resignation. mr livingstone denies he was jumping before being pushed. well, i've decided that rather than this drag on for another two years, it is better for the labour party if ijust resign. it is better for the labour party if i just resign. can it is better for the labour party if ijust resign. can i go back to campaigning on issues like the environment and supporting jeremy's economic plans, but if i was to stay in and fight this, my lawyers say it
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could take two years more. are you accepting it would lose and jumping before you are pushed? i'm pip i was tipped off of the right—wingers would raise this and it is a distraction. the husband of a british—iranian woman being detained in iran says she is now facing a new charge. richard ratcliffe says his wife nazanin denies the new allegation of spreading propaganda. she is already serving a five—year sentence after being convicted of spying. she denies all charges. the british prime minister's spokesman said the government was urgently seeking more information from iranian authorities. across the state of texas, people stood for a moment of silence today in a ritual that is becoming painfully familiar. they were remembering the 10 people shot dead in a school in the small town of santa fe on friday. some texas schools also boosted their own security measures today but the prospects of more gun controls in one of the most gun
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friendly states in the union seem slim to nothing. so sad seeing these pictures again from america and american schools. here is a radical proposal being put forewa h here is a radical proposal being put forewah that parents should pull their children out of school in the new year and september until there are sensible gun controls. one of the people proposing that idea is the people proposing that idea is the former education secretary arnie duncan. he has said he would support the measure and it would get a lot of attention and he would support it with his kids if they could do it on some kind of scale. we will have him on the programme tomorrow and we will ask him about that. it will ta ke will ask him about that. it will take something like that. on one side you have those who would only vote on second amendment rights and the other side you have those who wa nt the other side you have those who want change, but won't go to the polls to force it. until something
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gives, you won't get a change, will you? yes, 50 million school parents could have a big impact. tomorrow marks one year since 22 people were killed by a suicide bomber, at an ariana grande concert at manchester arena. eight—year—old saffie roussos was the youngest victim of the attack. as the anniversary of her death approaches, her father has told the bbc that he wants her life to be remembered with a special concert. judith moritz has been hearing from andrew roussos — as well as from others affected by the tragedy — about how they are coping one year on. losing your eight—year—old child is changed life forever. it will never be ok again. at night, i couldn't sleep — like crowds, loud noises, just hated. this experience has brought us all together. it's the psychological part that's been the hardest, i think. devastation caused in seconds has changed lives forever. children traumatised.
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survivors recovering. families broken. like that of little saffie roussos, the youngest child to die. her parents are still reeling. how has this year been? dreadful. you know, having a child that young and losing her in such a way, it will never be ok. it is not something that time passes and you can pick up the pieces and move on. you start forgetting bits and i dread that — i dread not feeling saffie's touch, not feeling saffie's presence. i want to celebrate me daughter. she loved music. andrew wants the music industry to help him stage a benefit concert at old trafford, because there's no specific state—funding for terror victims. this concert‘s not for us. i want to be there to support victims of future attacks. we're all really shocked on the lack of support from our government. so there's no government support?
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nothing. your turning to charity? yes. when it happened, it wasjust a really scary experience. 11—year—old ava wasn't directly caught in the blast, but still struggled emotionally afterwards. she is one of hundreds of traumatised children to be supported by the warrington peace centre. we have been talking about different coping techniques. it's like all these good experiences coming here. it's helped a lot? yeah. ava and her mum have also found solace in music. the manchester survivors' choir is giving them strength — everyone singing here survived the bomb. singing together with other people who understand what you're going through, it's a positive message, instead of seeing the negative in the world. it's notjust about the choir — the people here
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know how it felt. so that makes a big difference. the choir have agreed to perform in the city centre for tomorrow's anniversary — although they know that will be difficult. that is a common theme, we're struggling to go into crowds and busy places. with each other, hopefully we'll all do it and that would be just remarkable. 12 months on, the memories are fresh, the pain still raw. but manchester is healing. judith moritz bbc news. this is beyond one hundred days. still to come — beautiful blooms abound. we get a preview of london's most famous flower show. here, a leading scientist believes that coming into contact with too few microbes
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early in life can leave a child vulnerable to a type of leukaemia — the most common cancer in children. james gallagher reports. hugo has a cancerous immune system. he was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia when he was two and the disease means he has difficulty walking. he's now in his third year of chemotherapy. it's all he's ever known, but yes, certainly the early part of his treatment was really gruelling. all the side effects you'd expect, vomiting, hair loss, tiredness, lack of appetite. hugo's type of leukaemia is more common in affluent societies, but the reason why has been hotly debated. now scientists think they have the answer. it starts with a genetic mutation in the womb and then in the first year of life, a lack of exposure to microbes fails to train the immune system correctly. so if there is an infection in childhood, the immune system malfunctions and it can lead to leukaemia. part of the problem is how sterile
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and germfree our lives have become. but the researchers say using bacteria may prevent the disease. if all of our conclusions are correct, it should be preventable by exposing young infants to benign bacteria which primes the immune system adequately. coming into contact with beneficial bacteria is complicated, playing with other children, having older siblings, going to nursery and being breast—fed all play a major role. it's notjust about embracing dirt. i think you have to let the toy which drops on the ground go and just sort of say, well, that's that and not get too caught up on it. failing to train the immune system has been linked to diseases like type one diabetes, to allergies and now leukaemia. but this is absolutely not about blaming parents. it's an acknowledgement that the progress we are making as a society and in medicine comes at a price. james gallagher, bbc news. you're watching
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beyond one hundred days. a group of mps in the uk has issued a striking rebuke of the government — saying it is turning a blind eye to dirty russian money that is being laundered through the city of london. in its new report, the foreign affairs committee says for all the tough government rhetoric after the nerve agent attack in salisbury england, president vladimir putin and his allies continue to use britain's financial centre to hide and move their money. a short time ago we talked to the chair of the committee tom tugendhat. he raised his concerns. just after we expelled russian diplomats, the major gas firm, gazprom, was able to sell 750 million euros worth of bonds in the uk. so there is a series of areas where we could go further. that is what we are talk
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ing about. there is not also debt sales, there is property in the uk and other forms of financial movement that could be tightened up. when you question the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, he said he didn't think there was any role for government in this process. yes, we disagree. we think that the government does have a role in this process and we think that the foreign office in particular has a role. because it would be un reasonable to accept regulator or the police to have an intimate knowledge of every country around the world, so the foreign office can assist regulators and make sure we don't become a vehicle for dirty money, but clean up the city as most people want. you're sounding mild—mannered about this. but the report is striking, because it is so tough. you're accusing the government of inaction. i'm assuming
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that you're making such aggressive claims, because you think that this isa claims, because you think that this is a matter notjust of finance, but of national security? that is right. the key to this is that a while ago what the government was doing was fine in the sense they were tightening up things slowly and ratcheting up the pressure on financial crime. that is not ok any more. the reason is not because the crime has changed, but the effect of the crime has changed. it was a form of tax evasion from different authorities around the world and that was serious enough. but now this money is being used notjust to hide ill—gotten gains, but to actually undermine our allies, our friends and our interests overseas. that is where it comes into national security element. that is why we we re security element. that is why we were looking at it. you want to close the gaps in the sanctions
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regime and get the government to do more to hit the people close the president putin. won't that hurt the british economy and isn't that i why the government isn't doing anything. although there is a lot of money from russia, the reality in percentage terms it is small. it is less than 1% of uk business. the city sells itself on integrity and the city of london has demonstrated it is the right place for international clients to do business, because it is a place where your money can be trusted and checked and everyone can be confident in it. some strong words from mike pompeo, threatening european companies that continue to trade with iran. your thoughts on that? this wasn't a great deal, but the idea we should split ourselves
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when countries that sha values i don't agree. what we should be doing is working together to make sure this regime that has exported terror is properly constrained and other areas where we work together we share the values that unite us and bind us as one force. thank you. it's the highlight of the yearfor gardeners, showcasing some of the most creative designs from around the world. today is press day at the chelsea flower show. the theme of this year's event is health and well—being, they will be exploring how plants and green spaces can improve our mental well being. the bbc‘s helena lee is there. this the world's most prestigious flower show. designers get to show case their work and everything is in full bloom. one show piece aims to
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show the benefits of green spaces on mental health. this garden aims to high light the importance of gardening to families who have been displaced by war. and this exhibit highlighting the issue of plastic waste ending up in our oceans. these tell the story. that is the stomach contents from an albatross chick. the parents pick up food and they are instead picking up plastic. today some well known faces shared their love of gardening. today some well known faces shared their love of gardeninglj today some well known faces shared their love of gardening. i sit in it and enjoy it. trying to think of the names of the flowers i have, i tried to learn them. alliums. names of the flowers i have, i tried to learn them. alliumslj names of the flowers i have, i tried to learn them. alliums. i love old—fashioned geraniums. because it i was brought up in suffolk. some final finishing i was brought up in suffolk. some finalfinishing touches i was brought up in suffolk. some final finishing touches before the show opens to the public tomorrow.
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tens of thousands of people are expected to enjoy the very best of what the gardening world has to offer. yeah. get yourself there on saturday. they start handing the flowers away. does your garden look like that? sometimes i send my wife there to pick up the cheap plants on a saturday and my garden does look that. i just shove them a saturday and my garden does look that. ijust shove them in and claim all the credit. every year the students at yale have a graduation events at which they are encouraged to wear silly hats. and this year their key note speaker, was one hillary clinton who brought her own hat. take a look. isigh i sigh looking out at you —— see looking out at you, that you're following the tradition of over the top hats. so i brought a hat too! a
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russian hat! but i mean if you can't beat 'em, join 'em! she went to say that she wasn't over the loss in the election. i think give it up actually. i think give it up. you lost, move on. move on. do what the obamas are doing. did you see what they're doing. they have a new deal with netflix. here is a statement: we should do that. can't we get a deal? it doesn't say how much money. you can be president of united states and then all these opportunities come your way. unless you lose and then it'saway. -- it's
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yale. there is some sympathy for hillary clinton. but a lot of people are starting to think between the book, the publicity tour, this yale speech, she had a sense of humour, but this is still eating her up. that election loss. we need to see that. did you know something else? go on. spot something else. mr fashion guru? i don't know. nothing right? she didn't put the hat on her head, because she didn't want to mess up her hair. she didn't put it on. i wouldn't have put it on - my hair. you have such a good hair do. have you recovered from the wedding blues? it was great. i'm missing. i think that is my next career. you will to save up to go on another one
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with me. all in. we have seen temperatures into the low 20s. but we have had some heavy down pours in the south. we have had today a band of cloud and rain across western scotland and northern ireland. but here is the showers. you can see the lightning flashing away. particularly in central and southern england and the west country. those will fade away over the next few hours. maybe the odd shower returning to the south—east later on. further north the rain continues to peter out in northern ireland and becoming dry in scotland. not a particularly cold start to tuesday. warming up in the sunshine. there should be a fair bit of that in england and wales. maybe
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the odd shower in essex and kent. and a grey, dull misty saturday for the north—east of england. still across eastern scotland. brightening up across eastern scotland. brightening up in northern ireland and the north—west of scotland. very little rain left by this stage. what we have will tend to fade away in the morning cloud thinning and breaking in scotland and northern ireland. still cool and grey and misty around some of the eastern coasts of england and north—east england. sunny skies for dmrals. —— gales. some down pours in the south. and some in wales. the risk of a down pour at the chelsea flower show. more rain lightly on thursday. the weather front bringing the rain more rain lightly on thursday. the weatherfront bringing the rain in the north—west is petering out and high pressure is building in. further south, there is lower chance ofa further south, there is lower chance of a showers on wednesday. for most parts of england and wales it is dry with some sunshine and warm. with
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more sunshine arriving in scotland and northern ireland it will be warmer here. 20 degrees lightly through the skral belt and in northern ireland —— central belt and in northern ireland. cooler across the coasts. inland in england and wales up to 25 degrees. similar attem pts wales up to 25 degrees. similar attempts through thursday and friday. although there may be some down pours in england and wales on thursday. again largely dry with sunshine for scotland and northern ireland. this is bbc news. the headlines at eight. remembering the victims of the grenfell tower fire — emotional tributes are paid to six of the 72 people who died, as the public inquiry into the tragedy opens. i hate night time because it brings silence and that brings tears of sadness. there's a gaping hole in our hearts that can never be filled — and it hurts, it really hurts. we can't imagine a time when it will hurt any less. ken livingstone resigns from the labour party —
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the former london mayor was due to face a fresh hearing into allegations of anti—semitism. in the united states mike pompeo says his
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